Discussion:
Joyce: after his old mother keeping him
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Marius Hancu
2017-04-20 11:14:11 UTC
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Hello,

~~~
[Mr Henchy on King Edward and Queen Victoria.]

Now, here's the way I look at it. Here's this chap come to the throne
after his old mother keeping him out of it till the man was grey.

James Joyce, Dubliners (Ivy Day In The Committee Room)
~~~

"after his old mother keeping him": is this Standard English, or only
informal?

Thanks.
--
Marius Hancu
Peter T. Daniels
2017-04-20 11:52:09 UTC
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Post by Marius Hancu
Hello,
~~~
[Mr Henchy on King Edward and Queen Victoria.]
Now, here's the way I look at it. Here's this chap come to the throne
after his old mother keeping him out of it till the man was grey.
James Joyce, Dubliners (Ivy Day In The Committee Room)
~~~
"after his old mother keeping him": is this Standard English, or only
informal?
Such a use of "after" is specifically Irish and quite ordinary there.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-04-20 11:53:30 UTC
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On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 07:14:11 -0400, Marius Hancu
Post by Marius Hancu
Hello,
~~~
[Mr Henchy on King Edward and Queen Victoria.]
Now, here's the way I look at it. Here's this chap come to the throne
after his old mother keeping him out of it till the man was grey.
James Joyce, Dubliners (Ivy Day In The Committee Room)
~~~
"after his old mother keeping him": is this Standard English, or only
informal?
Thanks.
It isn't formal, but I'd say that it is a form of Standard English.

The relevant phrase is "after his old mother keeping him out of it",
where "it" is the throne.

The idea presented by "after his old mother keeping him out of it" is
the semi-jocular idea that she deliberately prevented him from becoming
King by choosing not to die. In fact she just lived a long time.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Richard Heathfield
2017-04-20 11:57:15 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 07:14:11 -0400, Marius Hancu
<snip>
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Marius Hancu
[Mr Henchy on King Edward and Queen Victoria.]
<snip>
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
The idea presented by "after his old mother keeping him out of it" is
the semi-jocular idea that she deliberately prevented him from becoming
King by choosing not to die. In fact she just lived a long time.
Nihil sub sole novum.
--
Richard Heathfield
Email: rjh at cpax dot org dot uk
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Sig line 4 vacant - apply within
Marius Hancu
2017-04-20 13:35:53 UTC
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Post by Richard Heathfield
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Marius Hancu
[Mr Henchy on King Edward and Queen Victoria.]
<snip>
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
The idea presented by "after his old mother keeping him out of it" is
the semi-jocular idea that she deliberately prevented him from becoming
King by choosing not to die. In fact she just lived a long time.
Nihil sub sole novum.
Indeed:-)

--
Marius Hancu
Marius Hancu
2017-04-20 13:37:00 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Marius Hancu
~~~
[Mr Henchy on King Edward and Queen Victoria.]
Now, here's the way I look at it. Here's this chap come to the throne
after his old mother keeping him out of it till the man was grey.
James Joyce, Dubliners (Ivy Day In The Committee Room)
~~~
"after his old mother keeping him": is this Standard English, or only
informal?
It isn't formal, but I'd say that it is a form of Standard English.
The relevant phrase is "after his old mother keeping him out of it",
where "it" is the throne.
The idea presented by "after his old mother keeping him out of it" is
the semi-jocular idea that she deliberately prevented him from becoming
King by choosing not to die. In fact she just lived a long time.
Thank you.
--
Marius Hancu

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