Discussion:
Trees, Woods, Forest
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Lewis
2017-08-04 22:20:52 UTC
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The words trees, woods, and forest all mean essentially the same thing,
more than one tree, but they have (at least to me) very different
meanings with trees being reserved for a smallish collection of trees, or
a large collection of impermanent trees (The home store has thousands
of tress for sale); woods means a relatively small and possibly bounded
area of trees (The Hundred Acre Wood); and forest can mean anything from
something larger than a wood to a vast expanse.

I can't think of any other examples where there are three words like
this unless they are weight/size units which really isn't the same
thing.
--
My mind is going. There is no question about it. I can feel it. I can
feel it. I can feel it. I'm... afraid.
Jack Campin
2017-08-04 23:14:55 UTC
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Post by Lewis
The words trees, woods, and forest all mean essentially the same thing,
more than one tree, but they have (at least to me) very different
meanings with trees being reserved for a smallish collection of trees, or
a large collection of impermanent trees (The home store has thousands
of tress for sale); woods means a relatively small and possibly bounded
area of trees (The Hundred Acre Wood); and forest can mean anything from
something larger than a wood to a vast expanse.
I can't think of any other examples where there are three words like
this unless they are weight/size units which really isn't the same
thing.
Puddle, pool, pond, lake
Track, path, road, highway

or am I mistaking what you're after?

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e m a i l : j a c k @ c a m p i n . m e . u k
Jack Campin, 11 Third Street, Newtongrange, Midlothian EH22 4PU, Scotland
mobile 07895 860 060 <http://www.campin.me.uk> Twitter: JackCampin
Hen Hanna
2017-08-05 00:08:16 UTC
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Post by Jack Campin
Post by Lewis
The words trees, woods, and forest all mean essentially the same thing,
more than one tree, but they have (at least to me) very different
meanings with trees being reserved for a smallish collection of trees, or
a large collection of impermanent trees (The home store has thousands
of tress for sale); woods means a relatively small and possibly bounded
area of trees (The Hundred Acre Wood); and forest can mean anything from
something larger than a wood to a vast expanse.
I can't think of any other examples where there are three words like
this unless they are weight/size units which really isn't the same
thing.
Puddle, pool, pond, lake
Track, path, road, highway
or am I mistaking what you're after?
Other than this:
Loading Image...

I too don't see anything special about tree-wood-forest

splinter stick twig branch ... tree-wood-forest
HH
Lewis
2017-08-05 05:11:47 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Jack Campin
Post by Lewis
The words trees, woods, and forest all mean essentially the same thing,
more than one tree, but they have (at least to me) very different
meanings with trees being reserved for a smallish collection of trees, or
a large collection of impermanent trees (The home store has thousands
of tress for sale); woods means a relatively small and possibly bounded
area of trees (The Hundred Acre Wood); and forest can mean anything from
something larger than a wood to a vast expanse.
I can't think of any other examples where there are three words like
this unless they are weight/size units which really isn't the same
thing.
Puddle, pool, pond, lake
That's good.
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Jack Campin
Track, path, road, highway
The first two imply walking and the last two vehicles, but I suppose.
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Jack Campin
or am I mistaking what you're after?
I was thinking about plurals.
Post by Hen Hanna
http://www.japanesejoy.com/wp-content/uploads/tree-wood-forest.jpg
I too don't see anything special about tree-wood-forest
splinter stick twig branch
Stick and twig are pretty much synonyms, there's no size progression
there; splinter is not a synonym for the others at all.
--
CURSIVE WRITING DOES NOT MEAN WHAT I THINK IT DOES Bart chalkboard Ep.
2F11
Cheryl
2017-08-05 09:13:35 UTC
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Post by Lewis
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Jack Campin
Post by Lewis
The words trees, woods, and forest all mean essentially the same thing,
more than one tree, but they have (at least to me) very different
meanings with trees being reserved for a smallish collection of trees, or
a large collection of impermanent trees (The home store has thousands
of tress for sale); woods means a relatively small and possibly bounded
area of trees (The Hundred Acre Wood); and forest can mean anything from
something larger than a wood to a vast expanse.
I can't think of any other examples where there are three words like
this unless they are weight/size units which really isn't the same
thing.
Puddle, pool, pond, lake
That's good.
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Jack Campin
Track, path, road, highway
The first two imply walking and the last two vehicles, but I suppose.
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Jack Campin
or am I mistaking what you're after?
I was thinking about plurals.
Post by Hen Hanna
http://www.japanesejoy.com/wp-content/uploads/tree-wood-forest.jpg
I too don't see anything special about tree-wood-forest
splinter stick twig branch
Stick and twig are pretty much synonyms, there's no size progression
there; splinter is not a synonym for the others at all.
I think sticks are bigger than twigs, and usually, like splinters,
aren't still attached to a tree. A twig and branch are usually, but not
necessarily, attached to a tree, and in any case still look like they
were recently attached to a tree.
--
Cheryl
RH Draney
2017-08-05 00:21:14 UTC
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Post by Jack Campin
Post by Lewis
The words trees, woods, and forest all mean essentially the same thing,
more than one tree, but they have (at least to me) very different
meanings with trees being reserved for a smallish collection of trees, or
a large collection of impermanent trees (The home store has thousands
of tress for sale); woods means a relatively small and possibly bounded
area of trees (The Hundred Acre Wood); and forest can mean anything from
something larger than a wood to a vast expanse.
I can't think of any other examples where there are three words like
this unless they are weight/size units which really isn't the same
thing.
Puddle, pool, pond, lake
Track, path, road, highway
or am I mistaking what you're after?
Pebble, stone, rock, boulder?...

In the case of the original triplet, are you familiar with the Chinese
characters for:

tree (mù - http://zhongwen.com/d/164/x236.htm),
woods (lín - http://zhongwen.com/d/170/x76.htm)
and forest (sên - http://zhongwen.com/d/180/x203.htm)

which consist of one, two and three iterations of the "tree" radical
respectively?...r
Lewis
2017-08-05 05:14:02 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by Jack Campin
Post by Lewis
The words trees, woods, and forest all mean essentially the same thing,
more than one tree, but they have (at least to me) very different
meanings with trees being reserved for a smallish collection of trees, or
a large collection of impermanent trees (The home store has thousands
of tress for sale); woods means a relatively small and possibly bounded
area of trees (The Hundred Acre Wood); and forest can mean anything from
something larger than a wood to a vast expanse.
I can't think of any other examples where there are three words like
this unless they are weight/size units which really isn't the same
thing.
Puddle, pool, pond, lake
Track, path, road, highway
or am I mistaking what you're after?
Pebble, stone, rock, boulder?...
Pebble, stone, and rock do not show a progression in size.
Post by RH Draney
In the case of the original triplet, are you familiar with the Chinese
tree (mù - http://zhongwen.com/d/164/x236.htm),
woods (lín - http://zhongwen.com/d/170/x76.htm)
and forest (sên - http://zhongwen.com/d/180/x203.htm)
which consist of one, two and three iterations of the "tree" radical
respectively?...r
Not until I saw it in this thread, no.
--
A man without religion is like a fish without a bicycle.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-08-05 06:25:28 UTC
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Post by Lewis
Post by RH Draney
Post by Jack Campin
Post by Lewis
The words trees, woods, and forest all mean essentially the same thing,
more than one tree, but they have (at least to me) very different
meanings with trees being reserved for a smallish collection of trees, or
a large collection of impermanent trees (The home store has thousands
of tress for sale); woods means a relatively small and possibly bounded
area of trees (The Hundred Acre Wood); and forest can mean anything from
something larger than a wood to a vast expanse.
I can't think of any other examples where there are three words like
this unless they are weight/size units which really isn't the same
thing.
Puddle, pool, pond, lake
Track, path, road, highway
or am I mistaking what you're after?
Pebble, stone, rock, boulder?...
Pebble, stone, and rock do not show a progression in size.
They do in British English, but you guys confuse the matter by using
"rocks" for what we call "stones".
Post by Lewis
Post by RH Draney
In the case of the original triplet, are you familiar with the Chinese
tree (mù - http://zhongwen.com/d/164/x236.htm),
woods (lín - http://zhongwen.com/d/170/x76.htm)
and forest (sên - http://zhongwen.com/d/180/x203.htm)
which consist of one, two and three iterations of the "tree" radical
respectively?...r
Not until I saw it in this thread, no.
--
athel
RH Draney
2017-08-05 12:09:15 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Lewis
Post by RH Draney
Pebble, stone, rock, boulder?...
Pebble, stone, and rock do not show a progression in size.
They do in British English, but you guys confuse the matter by using
"rocks" for what we call "stones".
We were distracted by the similar confusion over how to line up "a bit",
"quite" and "rather"....r
Horace LaBadie
2017-08-04 23:43:14 UTC
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Post by Lewis
The words trees, woods, and forest all mean essentially the same thing,
more than one tree, but they have (at least to me) very different
meanings with trees being reserved for a smallish collection of trees, or
a large collection of impermanent trees (The home store has thousands
of tress for sale); woods means a relatively small and possibly bounded
area of trees (The Hundred Acre Wood); and forest can mean anything from
something larger than a wood to a vast expanse.
I can't think of any other examples where there are three words like
this unless they are weight/size units which really isn't the same
thing.
Where does copse land?

people, group, crowd, mob
Hen Hanna
2017-08-05 01:00:14 UTC
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Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Lewis
The words trees, woods, and forest all mean essentially the same thing,
more than one tree, but they have (at least to me) very different
meanings with trees being reserved for a smallish collection of trees, or
a large collection of impermanent trees (The home store has thousands
of tress for sale); woods means a relatively small and possibly bounded
area of trees (The Hundred Acre Wood); and forest can mean anything from
something larger than a wood to a vast expanse.
I can't think of any other examples where there are three words like
this unless they are weight/size units which really isn't the same
thing.
Where does copse land?
people, group, crowd, mob
Where does woodland land?


brush, grove,

woods · wood · thicket · bush · stand · woodlot · coppice · orchard · plantation · hurst · holt

undergrowth · bushes · scrub · underwood · underbrush · brushland · brushwood · shrubs · chaparral · thicket · copse · boscage

timberland · trees · bush · plantation · jungle · rain forest · pinewood · greenwood · taiga · boreal forest · Carolinian forest · Acadian forest
Lewis
2017-08-05 05:16:10 UTC
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Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Lewis
The words trees, woods, and forest all mean essentially the same thing,
more than one tree, but they have (at least to me) very different
meanings with trees being reserved for a smallish collection of trees, or
a large collection of impermanent trees (The home store has thousands
of tress for sale); woods means a relatively small and possibly bounded
area of trees (The Hundred Acre Wood); and forest can mean anything from
something larger than a wood to a vast expanse.
I can't think of any other examples where there are three words like
this unless they are weight/size units which really isn't the same
thing.
Where does copse land?
No idea, it's a word I know but not that I use.
Post by Horace LaBadie
people, group, crowd, mob
Group doesn't mean a group of people, but people, crowd, mob are a good
example.
--
'Yes, but humans are more important than animals,' said Brutha. 'This
is a point of view often expressed by humans,' said Om. (Small Gods)
GordonD
2017-08-05 09:24:22 UTC
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Post by Lewis
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Lewis
The words trees, woods, and forest all mean essentially the same
thing, more than one tree, but they have (at least to me) very
different meanings with trees being reserved for a smallish
collection of trees, or a large collection of impermanent trees
(The home store has thousands of tress for sale); woods means a
relatively small and possibly bounded area of trees (The Hundred
Acre Wood); and forest can mean anything from something larger
than a wood to a vast expanse.
I can't think of any other examples where there are three words
like this unless they are weight/size units which really isn't
the same thing.
Where does copse land?
No idea, it's a word I know but not that I use.
Post by Horace LaBadie
people, group, crowd, mob
Group doesn't mean a group of people, but people, crowd, mob are a
good example.
I'd disagree with that. To me, a mob isn't just a large crowd; there are
implications of unruly behaviour and can be a group of as few as twenty
or thirty people. Whereas you can get a crowd of a hundred thousand at a
major sporting event.
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
Jerry Friedman
2017-08-05 12:10:50 UTC
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Post by Lewis
The words trees, woods, and forest all mean essentially the same thing,
more than one tree, but they have (at least to me) very different
meanings with trees being reserved for a smallish collection of trees, or
a large collection of impermanent trees (The home store has thousands
of tress for sale); woods means a relatively small and possibly bounded
area of trees (The Hundred Acre Wood); and forest can mean anything from
something larger than a wood to a vast expanse.
I can't think of any other examples where there are three words like
this unless they are weight/size units which really isn't the same
thing.
Clearing, meadow, prairie? (In Colorado, "park" might be in there
somewhere.)

Short story, novelette, novella, novel? (Mostly in SF.)

Knife, dagger, sword?

Boat, ship, ocean liner?
--
Jerry Friedman
Whiskers
2017-08-05 12:13:58 UTC
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Post by Lewis
The words trees, woods, and forest all mean essentially the same thing,
more than one tree, but they have (at least to me) very different
meanings with trees being reserved for a smallish collection of trees, or
a large collection of impermanent trees (The home store has thousands
of tress for sale); woods means a relatively small and possibly bounded
area of trees (The Hundred Acre Wood); and forest can mean anything from
something larger than a wood to a vast expanse.
I can't think of any other examples where there are three words like
this unless they are weight/size units which really isn't the same
thing.
In England, 'forest' doesn't imply or require the presence of any trees
(although colloquially it usually does). In Norman law, a forest was a
royal hunting preserve - hence 'The Forest of Dartmoor', 'The New
Forest', etc. Dartmoor is notable for its general lack of trees (apart
from some woods and commercial conifer plantations).

The phrase 'Black Forest' usually implies 'gateau', in the form of a
sticky chocolate cake.
--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
J. J. Lodder
2017-08-05 13:00:31 UTC
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Post by Whiskers
Post by Lewis
The words trees, woods, and forest all mean essentially the same thing,
more than one tree, but they have (at least to me) very different
meanings with trees being reserved for a smallish collection of trees, or
a large collection of impermanent trees (The home store has thousands
of tress for sale); woods means a relatively small and possibly bounded
area of trees (The Hundred Acre Wood); and forest can mean anything from
something larger than a wood to a vast expanse.
I can't think of any other examples where there are three words like
this unless they are weight/size units which really isn't the same
thing.
In England, 'forest' doesn't imply or require the presence of any trees
(although colloquially it usually does). In Norman law, a forest was a
royal hunting preserve - hence 'The Forest of Dartmoor', 'The New
Forest', etc. Dartmoor is notable for its general lack of trees (apart
from some woods and commercial conifer plantations).
The phrase 'Black Forest' usually implies 'gateau', in the form of a
sticky chocolate cake.
Ah, eine Schwarzwalder Kirschentorte.
(or Dutch, 'een Schwarzwalder Kersentaart')
Why go to French for something manifestly German?

Jan
Whiskers
2017-08-05 13:34:29 UTC
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Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Whiskers
Post by Lewis
The words trees, woods, and forest all mean essentially the same thing,
more than one tree, but they have (at least to me) very different
meanings with trees being reserved for a smallish collection of trees, or
a large collection of impermanent trees (The home store has thousands
of tress for sale); woods means a relatively small and possibly bounded
area of trees (The Hundred Acre Wood); and forest can mean anything from
something larger than a wood to a vast expanse.
I can't think of any other examples where there are three words like
this unless they are weight/size units which really isn't the same
thing.
In England, 'forest' doesn't imply or require the presence of any trees
(although colloquially it usually does). In Norman law, a forest was a
royal hunting preserve - hence 'The Forest of Dartmoor', 'The New
Forest', etc. Dartmoor is notable for its general lack of trees (apart
from some woods and commercial conifer plantations).
The phrase 'Black Forest' usually implies 'gateau', in the form of a
sticky chocolate cake.
Ah, eine Schwarzwalder Kirschentorte.
(or Dutch, 'een Schwarzwalder Kersentaart')
Why go to French for something manifestly German?
Jan
Because French is posh but German is merely foreign? All The Best Cooks
were French, at one time (or pretended to be). Brits have a strange
relationship with French. Probably a side-effect of the Norman
Conquest. I expect the first Black Forest gateau was introduced here by
a French chef, hence the silly Franglais name we have for it. It is
rather nice though, if you can tolerate all that chocolate etc.
--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
Peter T. Daniels
2017-08-05 13:48:40 UTC
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Post by Whiskers
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Whiskers
Post by Lewis
The words trees, woods, and forest all mean essentially the same thing,
more than one tree, but they have (at least to me) very different
meanings with trees being reserved for a smallish collection of trees, or
a large collection of impermanent trees (The home store has thousands
of tress for sale); woods means a relatively small and possibly bounded
area of trees (The Hundred Acre Wood); and forest can mean anything from
something larger than a wood to a vast expanse.
I can't think of any other examples where there are three words like
this unless they are weight/size units which really isn't the same
thing.
In England, 'forest' doesn't imply or require the presence of any trees
(although colloquially it usually does). In Norman law, a forest was a
royal hunting preserve - hence 'The Forest of Dartmoor', 'The New
Forest', etc. Dartmoor is notable for its general lack of trees (apart
from some woods and commercial conifer plantations).
The phrase 'Black Forest' usually implies 'gateau', in the form of a
sticky chocolate cake.
Ah, eine Schwarzwalder Kirschentorte.
(or Dutch, 'een Schwarzwalder Kersentaart')
Why go to French for something manifestly German?
Jan
Because French is posh but German is merely foreign? All The Best Cooks
were French, at one time (or pretended to be). Brits have a strange
relationship with French. Probably a side-effect of the Norman
Conquest. I expect the first Black Forest gateau was introduced here by
a French chef, hence the silly Franglais name we have for it. It is
rather nice though, if you can tolerate all that chocolate etc.
We have Black Forest cake. Do you use "gateau" for anything else?

It's regular chocolate cake, with a thick layer of mocha filling between two of
the layers, and some other sorts of filling in other layers, with white frosting,
decorated with shaved bitter chocolate, and cherries. Both on top and,
possibly, incorporated into the cake batter and filling layers.

Whiskers
2017-08-05 12:16:55 UTC
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Post by Lewis
The words trees, woods, and forest all mean essentially the same thing,
more than one tree, but they have (at least to me) very different
meanings with trees being reserved for a smallish collection of trees, or
a large collection of impermanent trees (The home store has thousands
of tress for sale); woods means a relatively small and possibly bounded
area of trees (The Hundred Acre Wood); and forest can mean anything from
something larger than a wood to a vast expanse.
I can't think of any other examples where there are three words like
this unless they are weight/size units which really isn't the same
thing.
Hamlet village town city metropolis conurbation?
--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
Janet
2017-08-05 12:26:31 UTC
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Post by Lewis
The words trees, woods, and forest all mean essentially the same thing,
more than one tree, but they have (at least to me) very different
meanings with trees being reserved for a smallish collection of trees, or
a large collection of impermanent trees (The home store has thousands
of tress for sale); woods means a relatively small and possibly bounded
area of trees (The Hundred Acre Wood); and forest can mean anything from
something larger than a wood to a vast expanse.
Or there's a Scottish "deer forest", thousands of treeless acres.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deer_forest
Post by Lewis
I can't think of any other examples where there are three words like
this unless they are weight/size units which really isn't the same
thing.
how about hair, bristle, beard, fur, pelt.

Janet.
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