Discussion:
Mother, mam, mum, mummy
Add Reply
Quinn C
2017-11-25 16:11:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
I know this isn't new, but I don't remember details ...

Ran across this tweet the other day:
<https://twitter.com/junethomas/status/781796223808311296>

It says

| The British class system is never more obvious than in a card store.

and then shows a photo of various greeting cards addressed to
mother, mam, mum, mummy, respectively.

Not obvious at all to a foreigner. I would have thought that
there's some regional and individual variation in this as well. Is
it really, to this day, strongly class-based?

German has as many widely used words - Mutter, Mutti, Mama, Mami
-, but they carry no indication of class to me. I would never
seriously address my mother as "Mutter" in speaking, but I may
find it most appropriate in writing now that I'm an adult.
--
The Eskimoes had fifty-two names for snow because it was
important to them, there ought to be as many for love.
-- Margaret Atwood, Surfacing (novel), p.106
Mack A. Damia
2017-11-25 16:25:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sat, 25 Nov 2017 11:11:07 -0500, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
I know this isn't new, but I don't remember details ...
<https://twitter.com/junethomas/status/781796223808311296>
It says
| The British class system is never more obvious than in a card store.
and then shows a photo of various greeting cards addressed to
mother, mam, mum, mummy, respectively.
Not obvious at all to a foreigner. I would have thought that
there's some regional and individual variation in this as well. Is
it really, to this day, strongly class-based?
German has as many widely used words - Mutter, Mutti, Mama, Mami
-, but they carry no indication of class to me. I would never
seriously address my mother as "Mutter" in speaking, but I may
find it most appropriate in writing now that I'm an adult.
Many years ago:

Me: I am going to a lecture today.

Friend: At the university?

Me: No, I am having lunch with mother.
GordonD
2017-11-25 16:28:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Quinn C
I know this isn't new, but I don't remember details ...
<https://twitter.com/junethomas/status/781796223808311296>
It says
| The British class system is never more obvious than in a card store.
and then shows a photo of various greeting cards addressed to mother,
mam, mum, mummy, respectively.
Not obvious at all to a foreigner. I would have thought that there's
some regional and individual variation in this as well. Is it really,
to this day, strongly class-based?
German has as many widely used words - Mutter, Mutti, Mama, Mami -,
but they carry no indication of class to me. I would never seriously
address my mother as "Mutter" in speaking, but I may find it most
appropriate in writing now that I'm an adult.
In general I would say that a fairly young child would use "Mummy" and
change to "Mum" as he grew older. (I did.) The age where this change
takes place varies on the individual - I believe Prince Charles hasn't
yet reached it! My dad and his brother always addressed my grandmother
as "Mother". And "Mam" is regional.
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-11-25 17:44:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by GordonD
Post by Quinn C
I know this isn't new, but I don't remember details ...
<https://twitter.com/junethomas/status/781796223808311296>
It says
| The British class system is never more obvious than in a card store.
and then shows a photo of various greeting cards addressed to mother,
mam, mum, mummy, respectively.
Not obvious at all to a foreigner. I would have thought that there's
some regional and individual variation in this as well. Is it really,
to this day, strongly class-based?
German has as many widely used words - Mutter, Mutti, Mama, Mami -,
but they carry no indication of class to me. I would never seriously
address my mother as "Mutter" in speaking, but I may find it most
appropriate in writing now that I'm an adult.
In general I would say that a fairly young child would use "Mummy" and
change to "Mum" as he grew older. (I did.) The age where this change
takes place varies on the individual - I believe Prince Charles hasn't
yet reached it! My dad and his brother always addressed my grandmother
as "Mother". And "Mam" is regional.
Something Prince Charles and I have in common. However, my mother was
Irish and his isn't, and in Ireland it remains common for adults to
address their mothers as Mummy.
--
athel
Colonel Edmund J. Burke
2017-11-25 20:34:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Something Prince Charles and I have in common. However, my mother was Irish and his isn't, and in Ireland it remains common for adults to address their mothers as Mummy.
John Wayne went over to Ireland once and kicked the shit outa them cousins of the buck teeth.
Discuss how he kicked the shit outa 'em....
Tony
2017-11-26 01:30:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Something Prince Charles and I have in common. However, my mother was
Irish and his isn't, and in Ireland it remains common for adults to
address their mothers as Mummy.
John Wayne went over to Ireland once and kicked the shit outa them
cousins of the buck teeth.
Discuss how he kicked the shit outa 'em....
My roots go back to Northern Ireland back to Kings and Queens on
Ancestry.com yup just like in the movie Tommy the Kings and Queens
pinball machine.
David Kleinecke
2017-11-26 02:22:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tony
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Something Prince Charles and I have in common. However, my mother was
Irish and his isn't, and in Ireland it remains common for adults to
address their mothers as Mummy.
John Wayne went over to Ireland once and kicked the shit outa them
cousins of the buck teeth.
Discuss how he kicked the shit outa 'em....
My roots go back to Northern Ireland back to Kings and Queens on
Ancestry.com yup just like in the movie Tommy the Kings and Queens
pinball machine.
Back in the 1920-30's my mother's mother did her best on my
mother's ancestors. She collected about a thousand named
ancestors. About ten of the ancestoral lines she found ended
with a lengthy genealogy of descent from one of the kings of
England (none more recent than Edward III).

Perhaps ancestory.com - or a competitor can do even better
(more named ancestors) today.
David
2017-11-29 10:44:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Something Prince Charles and I have in common. However, my mother was
Irish and his isn't, and in Ireland it remains common for adults to
address their mothers as Mummy.
John Wayne went over to Ireland once and kicked the shit outa them cousins
of the buck teeth.
Discuss how he kicked the shit outa 'em....

I have missing teeth that have been replaced.
Colonel Edmund J. Burke
2017-11-29 14:50:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by David
I have missing teeth that have been replaced.
Shame the doctors can't do that with missing brain cells.
dolf
2017-12-03 14:04:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
— Dense as Bushmeat —

“Softly softly
Catchy monkey.
Such tucker
As bushmeat.

Looky Looky.
On the money.
Witless wanker.
Seditious heat.

Lies ‘n porky.
Dense donkey.
Endless rancour.
Diseased treat.”

YOUTUBE: “Catchy Monkey (Kovak)”



- dolf

Initial Post: 3 December 2017
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Something Prince Charles and I have in common. However, my mother was
Irish and his isn't, and in Ireland it remains common for adults to
address their mothers as Mummy.
John Wayne went over to Ireland once and kicked the shit outa them
cousins of the buck teeth.
Discuss how he kicked the shit outa 'em....
--
SEE ALSO: *INVALIDATING* *THE* *ORTHODOX* *AND* *ROMAN* *CATHOLIC*
*CHURCH'S* *CLAIM* *TO* *JUBILEE2000* *AS* *BEING* *DELUSIONAL* *AND*
*FRAUDULENT*

Private Street on the edge of the Central Business District dated 16th
May, 2000 - This report is prepared in response to a TP00/55 as a Notice of
an Application for Planning Permit

- <http://www.grapple369.com/jubilee2000.html>

SEE ALSO: HYPOSTATIS as DAO OF NATURE (Chinese: ZIRAN) / COURSE (Greek:
TROCHOS) OF NATURE (Greek: GENESIS) [James 3:6]

Chinese HAN Dynasty (206 BCE - 220CE) Hexagon Trigrams to Tetragram
assignments proposed by Yang Hsiung (53BCE - 18CE) which by 4BCE
(translation published within English as first European language in 1993),
first appeared in draft form as a meta-thesis titled T'AI HSUAN CHING {ie.
Canon of Supreme Mystery} on Natural Divination associated with the theory
of number, annual seasonal chronology and astrology reliant upon the seven
visible planets as cosmological mother image and the zodiac.

It shows the ZIRAN as the DAO of NATURE / COURSE-trochos OF
NATURE-genesis [James 3:6] as HYPOSTATIS comprising #81 trinomial
tetragrammaton x 4.5 day = #364.5 day / year as HOMOIOS THEORY OF NUMBER
which is an amalgam of the 64 hexagrams as binomial trigrams / 81 as
trinomial tetragrammaton rather than its encapsulated contrived use as the
microcosm to redefine the macrocosm as the quintessence of the Pythagorean
[Babylonian] as binomial canon of transposition as HETEROS THEORY OF
NUMBER.

- <http://www.grapple369.com/nature.html>

The Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities No. 43 of Act 2006
defines a "PERSON MEANS A HUMAN BEING” and the question is, if it is
permissible to extend this definition to be a "PERSON MEANS A HUMAN BEING
AS A CONSCIOUS REALITY OF HOMO[iOS] SAPIEN[T] WHO IS INSTANTIATED WITHIN
THE TEMPORAL REALITY AS THEN THE CAUSE FOR REASONING AND RATIONALITY."

That my mathematical theoretical noumenon defines the meta-descriptor
prototypes which are prerequisite to the BEING of HOMO[iOS] SAPIEN[T] as
EXISTENCE.

- http://www.grapple369.com/Grapple.zip (Download resources)

After all the ENNEAD of THOTH and not the Roman Catholic Eucharist,
expresses an Anthropic Cosmological Principle which appears within its
geometric conception as being equivalent to the Pythagorean
TETRAD/TETRACTYS
David
2017-12-04 07:04:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
it isn't on any of my coffee mugs

"dolf" wrote in message news:tNKdnfvhA-QZmbnHnZ2dnUU7-***@giganews.com...

— Dense as Bushmeat —

“Softly softly
Catchy monkey.
Such tucker
As bushmeat.

Looky Looky.
On the money.
Witless wanker.
Seditious heat.

Lies ‘n porky.
Dense donkey.
Endless rancour.
Diseased treat.”

YOUTUBE: “Catchy Monkey (Kovak)”

http://youtu.be/9m1mBhqFZ5k

- dolf

Initial Post: 3 December 2017
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Something Prince Charles and I have in common. However, my mother was
Irish and his isn't, and in Ireland it remains common for adults to
address their mothers as Mummy.
John Wayne went over to Ireland once and kicked the shit outa them
cousins of the buck teeth.
Discuss how he kicked the shit outa 'em....
--
SEE ALSO: *INVALIDATING* *THE* *ORTHODOX* *AND* *ROMAN* *CATHOLIC*
*CHURCH'S* *CLAIM* *TO* *JUBILEE2000* *AS* *BEING* *DELUSIONAL* *AND*
*FRAUDULENT*

Private Street on the edge of the Central Business District dated 16th
May, 2000 - This report is prepared in response to a TP00/55 as a Notice of
an Application for Planning Permit

- <http://www.grapple369.com/jubilee2000.html>

SEE ALSO: HYPOSTATIS as DAO OF NATURE (Chinese: ZIRAN) / COURSE (Greek:
TROCHOS) OF NATURE (Greek: GENESIS) [James 3:6]

Chinese HAN Dynasty (206 BCE - 220CE) Hexagon Trigrams to Tetragram
assignments proposed by Yang Hsiung (53BCE - 18CE) which by 4BCE
(translation published within English as first European language in 1993),
first appeared in draft form as a meta-thesis titled T'AI HSUAN CHING {ie.
Canon of Supreme Mystery} on Natural Divination associated with the theory
of number, annual seasonal chronology and astrology reliant upon the seven
visible planets as cosmological mother image and the zodiac.

It shows the ZIRAN as the DAO of NATURE / COURSE-trochos OF
NATURE-genesis [James 3:6] as HYPOSTATIS comprising #81 trinomial
tetragrammaton x 4.5 day = #364.5 day / year as HOMOIOS THEORY OF NUMBER
which is an amalgam of the 64 hexagrams as binomial trigrams / 81 as
trinomial tetragrammaton rather than its encapsulated contrived use as the
microcosm to redefine the macrocosm as the quintessence of the Pythagorean
[Babylonian] as binomial canon of transposition as HETEROS THEORY OF
NUMBER.

- <http://www.grapple369.com/nature.html>

The Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities No. 43 of Act 2006
defines a "PERSON MEANS A HUMAN BEING” and the question is, if it is
permissible to extend this definition to be a "PERSON MEANS A HUMAN BEING
AS A CONSCIOUS REALITY OF HOMO[iOS] SAPIEN[T] WHO IS INSTANTIATED WITHIN
THE TEMPORAL REALITY AS THEN THE CAUSE FOR REASONING AND RATIONALITY."

That my mathematical theoretical noumenon defines the meta-descriptor
prototypes which are prerequisite to the BEING of HOMO[iOS] SAPIEN[T] as
EXISTENCE.

- http://www.grapple369.com/Grapple.zip (Download resources)

After all the ENNEAD of THOTH and not the Roman Catholic Eucharist,
expresses an Anthropic Cosmological Principle which appears within its
geometric conception as being equivalent to the Pythagorean
TETRAD/TETRACTYS
Cheryl
2017-11-25 23:51:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by GordonD
Post by Quinn C
I know this isn't new, but I don't remember details ...
<https://twitter.com/junethomas/status/781796223808311296>
It says
| The British class system is never more obvious than in a card store.
and then shows a photo of various greeting cards addressed to mother,
mam, mum, mummy, respectively.
Not obvious at all to a foreigner. I would have thought that there's
some regional and individual variation in this as well. Is it really,
to this day, strongly class-based?
German has as many widely used words - Mutter, Mutti, Mama, Mami -,
but they carry no indication of class to me. I would never seriously
address my mother as "Mutter" in speaking, but I may find it most
appropriate in writing now that I'm an adult.
In general I would say that a fairly young child would use "Mummy" and
change to "Mum" as he grew older. (I did.) The age where this change
takes place varies on the individual - I believe Prince Charles hasn't
yet reached it! My dad and his brother always addressed my grandmother
as "Mother". And "Mam" is regional.
Something Prince Charles and I have in common. However, my mother was
Irish and his isn't, and in Ireland it remains common for adults to
address their mothers as Mummy.
And me, although the practice is extremely uncommon here, and arose in
my family, because at around the time the switch from 'Mommy' to 'Mom'
would occur, we still lived in the same town as our grandparents, who
we'd always addressed as 'Mom' and 'Dad', and it would have been too
confusing to have two Moms and Dads. Most grandparents adopted
particular nicknames - 'Nanny' and 'Pop' were popular and traditional -
but my 'Nan' was my great-grandmother, even though she died before I was
born, she was often referred to by name as I grew up.

My cousins used to use "Mom LastName" for our grandmother to disinguish
Mom-our-grandmother from Mom-our-mother.

People outside the family were simply confused when they asked us about
our Mom or Dad and, unless we mentally corrected the reference - got an
answer about our grandparents.
--
Cheryl

---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
Quinn C
2017-11-25 18:23:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by GordonD
Post by Quinn C
I know this isn't new, but I don't remember details ...
<https://twitter.com/junethomas/status/781796223808311296>
It says
| The British class system is never more obvious than in a card store.
and then shows a photo of various greeting cards addressed to mother,
mam, mum, mummy, respectively.
Not obvious at all to a foreigner. I would have thought that there's
some regional and individual variation in this as well. Is it really,
to this day, strongly class-based?
German has as many widely used words - Mutter, Mutti, Mama, Mami -,
but they carry no indication of class to me. I would never seriously
address my mother as "Mutter" in speaking, but I may find it most
appropriate in writing now that I'm an adult.
In general I would say that a fairly young child would use "Mummy" and
change to "Mum" as he grew older. (I did.) The age where this change
takes place varies on the individual - I believe Prince Charles hasn't
yet reached it! My dad and his brother always addressed my grandmother
as "Mother".
Were they copying one of their parents? I believe that's one way
addresses for grandparents arise in families.

It's confusing for kids at first that people should have so many
different names depending on who's talking to them, or about them.
When I was small, it was still somewhat common to call unrelated
adults "uncle" or "aunt". Now we didn't have a lot of visitors at
home, but the two adult males who visited most frequently were my
mother's brother and my father's best friend, and they happened to
share the same first name. I had a hard time remembering for which
one I was supposed to add "uncle".
Post by GordonD
And "Mam" is regional.
So I suspected.
--
Press any key to continue or any other key to quit.
Cheryl
2017-11-25 23:53:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Quinn C
Post by GordonD
Post by Quinn C
I know this isn't new, but I don't remember details ...
<https://twitter.com/junethomas/status/781796223808311296>
It says
| The British class system is never more obvious than in a card store.
and then shows a photo of various greeting cards addressed to mother,
mam, mum, mummy, respectively.
Not obvious at all to a foreigner. I would have thought that there's
some regional and individual variation in this as well. Is it really,
to this day, strongly class-based?
German has as many widely used words - Mutter, Mutti, Mama, Mami -,
but they carry no indication of class to me. I would never seriously
address my mother as "Mutter" in speaking, but I may find it most
appropriate in writing now that I'm an adult.
In general I would say that a fairly young child would use "Mummy" and
change to "Mum" as he grew older. (I did.) The age where this change
takes place varies on the individual - I believe Prince Charles hasn't
yet reached it! My dad and his brother always addressed my grandmother
as "Mother".
Were they copying one of their parents? I believe that's one way
addresses for grandparents arise in families.
It's confusing for kids at first that people should have so many
different names depending on who's talking to them, or about them.
When I was small, it was still somewhat common to call unrelated
adults "uncle" or "aunt". Now we didn't have a lot of visitors at
home, but the two adult males who visited most frequently were my
mother's brother and my father's best friend, and they happened to
share the same first name. I had a hard time remembering for which
one I was supposed to add "uncle".
We called all our aunts and uncles (except for one or two very elderly
ones) and our parents' adult friends by their first names, which was
quite unusual back then. As I grew up, I realized that no one else
called adults by their first names, so I started to use "Mr." or "Mrs.",
but first names for aunts and uncles remained our norm.
--
Cheryl

---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
charles
2017-11-25 16:32:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Quinn C
I know this isn't new, but I don't remember details ...
<https://twitter.com/junethomas/status/781796223808311296>
It says
| The British class system is never more obvious than in a card store.
and then shows a photo of various greeting cards addressed to
mother, mam, mum, mummy, respectively.
Not obvious at all to a foreigner. I would have thought that
there's some regional and individual variation in this as well. Is
it really, to this day, strongly class-based?
German has as many widely used words - Mutter, Mutti, Mama, Mami
-, but they carry no indication of class to me. I would never
seriously address my mother as "Mutter" in speaking, but I may
find it most appropriate in writing now that I'm an adult.
at one point, when he was a teenager, my younger brother started calling
our mother "Mrs Hope" in public - so that he wouldn't be embarrased having
her as his mother.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
occam
2017-11-25 18:30:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Quinn C
I know this isn't new, but I don't remember details ...
<https://twitter.com/junethomas/status/781796223808311296>
It says
| The British class system is never more obvious than in a card store.
and then shows a photo of various greeting cards addressed to
mother, mam, mum, mummy, respectively.
Not obvious at all to a foreigner. I would have thought that
there's some regional and individual variation in this as well. Is
it really, to this day, strongly class-based?
Yes, although I see that the upper class card to 'mater' is missing. Do
the upper classes not send cards to mater or pater?
Quinn C
2017-11-25 18:56:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by occam
Post by Quinn C
I know this isn't new, but I don't remember details ...
<https://twitter.com/junethomas/status/781796223808311296>
It says
| The British class system is never more obvious than in a card store.
and then shows a photo of various greeting cards addressed to
mother, mam, mum, mummy, respectively.
Not obvious at all to a foreigner. I would have thought that
there's some regional and individual variation in this as well. Is
it really, to this day, strongly class-based?
Yes, although I see that the upper class card to 'mater' is missing. Do
the upper classes not send cards to mater or pater?
I thought those upper classes left around AD 400.

How about papá? (Specifically with second-syllable stress. Not AmE
poppa.) And does it even have a female counterpart?
--
"Bother", said the Borg, as they assimilated Pooh.
GordonD
2017-11-26 09:52:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Quinn C
Post by occam
Post by Quinn C
I know this isn't new, but I don't remember details ...
<https://twitter.com/junethomas/status/781796223808311296>
It says
| The British class system is never more obvious than in a card store.
and then shows a photo of various greeting cards addressed to
mother, mam, mum, mummy, respectively.
Not obvious at all to a foreigner. I would have thought that
there's some regional and individual variation in this as well.
Is it really, to this day, strongly class-based?
Yes, although I see that the upper class card to 'mater' is
missing. Do the upper classes not send cards to mater or pater?
I thought those upper classes left around AD 400.
How about papá? (Specifically with second-syllable stress. Not AmE
poppa.) And does it even have a female counterpart?
In the UK, saying "Papa" with the stress on the second syllable is
likely to get the response "Nicole!", from an advertising campaign for
the Renault Clio (which I'm shocked to learn from Wikipedia ended in 1998!).
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
Jerry Friedman
2017-11-27 04:23:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Quinn C
Post by occam
Post by Quinn C
I know this isn't new, but I don't remember details ...
<https://twitter.com/junethomas/status/781796223808311296>
It says
| The British class system is never more obvious than in a card store.
and then shows a photo of various greeting cards addressed to
mother, mam, mum, mummy, respectively.
Not obvious at all to a foreigner. I would have thought that
there's some regional and individual variation in this as well. Is
it really, to this day, strongly class-based?
Yes, although I see that the upper class card to 'mater' is missing. Do
the upper classes not send cards to mater or pater?
I thought those upper classes left around AD 400.
How about papá? (Specifically with second-syllable stress. Not AmE
poppa.) And does it even have a female counterpart?
Yes, "mamá". I have the feeling upper-class characters in British books
before World War II (or some time) say "mamma" that way, but I could be
totally wrong.
--
Jerry Friedman
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-11-27 11:52:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sun, 26 Nov 2017 21:23:24 -0700, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Quinn C
Post by occam
Post by Quinn C
I know this isn't new, but I don't remember details ...
<https://twitter.com/junethomas/status/781796223808311296>
It says
| The British class system is never more obvious than in a card store.
and then shows a photo of various greeting cards addressed to
mother, mam, mum, mummy, respectively.
Not obvious at all to a foreigner. I would have thought that
there's some regional and individual variation in this as well. Is
it really, to this day, strongly class-based?
Yes, although I see that the upper class card to 'mater' is missing. Do
the upper classes not send cards to mater or pater?
I thought those upper classes left around AD 400.
How about papá? (Specifically with second-syllable stress. Not AmE
poppa.) And does it even have a female counterpart?
Yes, "mamá". I have the feeling upper-class characters in British books
before World War II (or some time) say "mamma" that way, but I could be
totally wrong.
My direct experience is not necessarily typical. To me and my sisters
our parents were Mumma and Dadda. That continued well beyond early
childhood. Our parents were from Australia. I don't know whether that
usage was normal in Australia or whether it was specific to their own
families.

"Mammy" is used in Ireland in the same way that "Mum" and "Mummy" would
be used. It does not have the connotations that it would in the USA.

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/mammy

mammy
NOUN
informal

1 A child's word for their mother.
‘he was screaming for his mammy’

1.1 offensive (formerly in the southern United States) a black
nursemaid or nanny in charge of white children.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
charles
2017-11-25 20:23:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by occam
Post by Quinn C
I know this isn't new, but I don't remember details ...
<https://twitter.com/junethomas/status/781796223808311296>
It says
| The British class system is never more obvious than in a card store.
and then shows a photo of various greeting cards addressed to
mother, mam, mum, mummy, respectively.
Not obvious at all to a foreigner. I would have thought that
there's some regional and individual variation in this as well. Is
it really, to this day, strongly class-based?
Yes, although I see that the upper class card to 'mater' is missing. Do
the upper classes not send cards to mater or pater?
probably not enough Etonians to justify a special preint run,
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
Katy Jennison
2017-11-26 08:28:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by occam
Post by Quinn C
I know this isn't new, but I don't remember details ...
<https://twitter.com/junethomas/status/781796223808311296>
It says
| The British class system is never more obvious than in a card store.
and then shows a photo of various greeting cards addressed to
mother, mam, mum, mummy, respectively.
Not obvious at all to a foreigner. I would have thought that
there's some regional and individual variation in this as well. Is
it really, to this day, strongly class-based?
Yes, although I see that the upper class card to 'mater' is missing. Do
the upper classes not send cards to mater or pater?
probably not enough Etonians to justify a special print run,
Dash it, old chap, one doesn't buy a mass-produced card for one's
parent. Those are only for oiks.
--
Katy Jennison
RH Draney
2017-11-26 11:03:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Katy Jennison
Dash it, old chap, one doesn't buy a mass-produced card for one's
parent.  Those are only for oiks.
Help a foreigner out...is an oik above or below a chav?...r
Katy Jennison
2017-11-26 12:59:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by RH Draney
Post by Katy Jennison
Dash it, old chap, one doesn't buy a mass-produced card for one's
parent.  Those are only for oiks.
Help a foreigner out...is an oik above or below a chav?...r
Why would you expect me to care enough to know?
--
Katy Jennison
musika
2017-11-26 15:15:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by RH Draney
Post by Katy Jennison
Dash it, old chap, one doesn't buy a mass-produced card for one's
parent.  Those are only for oiks.
Help a foreigner out...is an oik above or below a chav?...r
The upper class look down on oiks.
Oiks look down on chavs.
--
Ray
UK
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-11-25 18:54:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sat, 25 Nov 2017 11:11:07 -0500, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
I know this isn't new, but I don't remember details ...
<https://twitter.com/junethomas/status/781796223808311296>
It says
| The British class system is never more obvious than in a card store.
The British class system becomes less and less obvious the more one
tries to define it.
Post by Quinn C
and then shows a photo of various greeting cards addressed to
mother, mam, mum, mummy, respectively.
Not obvious at all to a foreigner. I would have thought that
there's some regional and individual variation in this as well. Is
it really, to this day, strongly class-based?
German has as many widely used words - Mutter, Mutti, Mama, Mami
-, but they carry no indication of class to me. I would never
seriously address my mother as "Mutter" in speaking, but I may
find it most appropriate in writing now that I'm an adult.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Loading...