Discussion:
called into being
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Harrison Hill
2017-11-29 15:56:30 UTC
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“Surbiton used to be the butt of jokes, as a symbol of dowdy
suburbia. That was silly. To anyone with half an eye it was -
and still is - an interesting place, in which the original
plan and later accretions can be discerned, much as they can
in a medieval town like Boston or Carlisle. And Surbiton may
fairly claim its place in history: for it is the oldest suburb
in Europe, perhaps in the world, that was called into being
by a railway.”

<http://www.kingstonhistoryresearch.co.uk/canbury/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/POOLEY-PAPER-29-JUNE-2016.pdf>

As well as "called into being" - which I like, but don't ever
remember hearing before - "accretions": pluralised in the sense
of "growths".
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-11-29 16:44:07 UTC
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On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 07:56:30 -0800 (PST), Harrison Hill
Post by Harrison Hill
“Surbiton used to be the butt of jokes, as a symbol of dowdy
suburbia. That was silly. To anyone with half an eye it was -
and still is - an interesting place, in which the original
plan and later accretions can be discerned, much as they can
in a medieval town like Boston or Carlisle. And Surbiton may
fairly claim its place in history: for it is the oldest suburb
in Europe, perhaps in the world, that was called into being
by a railway.”
<http://www.kingstonhistoryresearch.co.uk/canbury/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/POOLEY-PAPER-29-JUNE-2016.pdf>
As well as "called into being" - which I like, but don't ever
remember hearing before - "accretions": pluralised in the sense
of "growths".
"called into being" was called into being some centuries ago. It is
relatively rare.

OED:

to call into being (also existence): to give life to; to cause to
exist; to create.

1668 J. Austin Devotions 126 When we, alas! lay buried in the
abyss of nothing; his own free goodnes first cal'd us into Being.
1734 J. Hunt Ess. Hist. & Revelations of Script. 18 A long train
of descendants springing from this first pair, by the manner of
their being called into existence, came under the strongest
obligations that can be conceived to maintain mutual affection.
1754 T. Sherlock Several Disc. preached at Temple Church I. ii. 76
To call Men from the Grave into Being.
1826 Liverpool Mercury 22 Dec. 194/1 I called the new world into
existence to redress the balance of the old.
1868 E. A. Freeman Hist. Norman Conquest II. x. 501 It was no
small work to call into being that mighty Abbey.
1873 F. M. Müller Sci. Relig. 29 By which a canon of sacred
books is called into existence.
1920 Mod. Med. Dec. 833/1 Children should..be told the truth in
a plain manner that will cause them to have a wholesome respect
for that which called them into being—the reproductive impulse.
1968 B. Mazlish Riddle of Hist. viii. 256 Man, in seeking to
realize his potentialities and purpose, calls into existence new
purposes.
1994 W. Shaw Spying in Guru Land (1995) p. x He still lives
locally in the small cottage which became the headquarters of the
mysterious millenarian cult he called into being.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
charles
2017-11-29 17:20:15 UTC
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”Surbiton used to be the butt of jokes, as a symbol of dowdy
suburbia. That was silly. To anyone with half an eye it was -
and still is - an interesting place, in which the original
plan and later accretions can be discerned, much as they can
in a medieval town like Boston or Carlisle. And Surbiton may
fairly claim its place in history: for it is the oldest suburb
in Europe, perhaps in the world, that was called into being
by a railway.•
<http://www.kingstonhistoryresearch.co.uk/canbury/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/POOLEY-PAPER-29-JUNE-2016.pdf>
As well as "called into being" - which I like, but don't ever
remember hearing before - "accretions": pluralised in the sense
of "growths".
before, I used the train which passes throught the place, I always thought
it was "Suburbiton". I was interseted to note that there is a nearby
community "Norbiton"
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
HVS
2017-11-29 18:16:46 UTC
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On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 17:20:15 +0000 (GMT), charles
<***@candehope.me.uk> wrote:

-snip -
Post by charles
before, I used the train which passes throught the place, I always thought
it was "Suburbiton". I was interseted to note that there is a
nearby
Post by charles
community "Norbiton"
It's reasonable to suspect that Surbiton refers to suburban, but
it's got pukka OE roots - the second element refers to an outlying
grange or farm.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-11-29 18:30:53 UTC
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[ ... ]
before, I used the train which passes throught the place, I always thought
it was "Suburbiton". I was interseted to note that there is a nearby
community "Norbiton"
I've never had the pleasure of visiting Surbiton, but have long thought
that its name very effectively captured the idea of what sort of place
it is.* Its Wikipedia entry is surprisingly interesting, and includes
the following passage;
The present-day town came into existence after a plan to build a
London-Southampton railway line through nearby Kingston was rejected by
Kingston Council, who feared that it would be detrimental to the
coaching trade. This resulted in the line being routed further south,
through a cutting in the hill south of Surbiton.
That reminded of the reason why Oxford station ended up in such an
inconvenient place and why Didcot came to prominence.

*When I was at Birmingham the guy who kept the bar in the Staff House
used to pin up postcards that people had sent. Once there was an
incredibly boring one that showed a car parked outside an uninteresting
house nowhere in particular. I commented on this so he told me to read
the message on the other side: it proved to be sent from Riyadh and
said "It isn't often that you can find a picture postcard that sums up
a place so accurately".
--
athel
charles
2017-11-29 19:05:49 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
[ ... ]
before, I used the train which passes throught the place, I always
thought it was "Suburbiton". I was interseted to note that there is a
nearby community "Norbiton"
I've never had the pleasure of visiting Surbiton, but have long thought
that its name very effectively captured the idea of what sort of place
it is.* Its Wikipedia entry is surprisingly interesting, and includes
the following passage;
The present-day town came into existence after a plan to build a
London-Southampton railway line through nearby Kingston was rejected by
Kingston Council, who feared that it would be detrimental to the
coaching trade. This resulted in the line being routed further south,
through a cutting in the hill south of Surbiton.
That reminded of the reason why Oxford station ended up in such an
inconvenient place and why Didcot came to prominence.
Actually, it's Cambridge that has the railway station a long way from the
town centre: "It's presence nearer the town woul not only incur the wrath
of the Vice-Chancelleor, but would be displeasing to Almighty God.". Sorry,
I don't know who said that.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-11-30 08:32:10 UTC
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Post by charles
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
[ ... ]
before, I used the train which passes throught the place, I always
thought it was "Suburbiton". I was interseted to note that there is a
nearby community "Norbiton"
I've never had the pleasure of visiting Surbiton, but have long thought
that its name very effectively captured the idea of what sort of place
it is.* Its Wikipedia entry is surprisingly interesting, and includes
the following passage;
The present-day town came into existence after a plan to build a
London-Southampton railway line through nearby Kingston was rejected by
Kingston Council, who feared that it would be detrimental to the
coaching trade. This resulted in the line being routed further south,
through a cutting in the hill south of Surbiton.
That reminded of the reason why Oxford station ended up in such an
inconvenient place and why Didcot came to prominence.
Actually, it's Cambridge
Actually it's both. Certainly, for me it was a long slog to Oxford
station with my luggage. I had an idea that the other place was the
same, but I wasn't sure.
Post by charles
that has the railway station a long way from the
town centre: "It's presence nearer the town woul not only incur the wrath
of the Vice-Chancelleor, but would be displeasing to Almighty God.". Sorry,
I don't know who said that.
--
athel
Mark Brader
2017-11-30 08:56:17 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by charles
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
That reminded of the reason why Oxford station ended up in such an
inconvenient place...
Actually, it's Cambridge that has the railway station a long way
from the town centre...
Actually it's both.
No, not really.

The spot that Google Maps marks when you search for Cambridge is
at the corner of Sidney, Hobson, and St. Andrew's Sts., which looks
about right to my eye, and is over a mile from the station.

For Oxford, it marks the corner of St. Aldate's, High, Queen, and
Cornmarket Sts., which again looks right to my eye, and is only
just over a half-mile from the station.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Certainly, for me it was a long slog to Oxford station with my luggage.
Well, maybe you were starting from the wrong place.
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "X-ray of girl shows bureaucratic mentality"
***@vex.net | --Globe & Mail, Toronto, January 18, 1988

My text in this article is in the public domain.
Katy Jennison
2017-11-30 13:03:15 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by charles
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
That reminded of the reason why Oxford station ended up in such an
inconvenient place...
Actually, it's Cambridge that has the railway station a long way
from the town centre...
Actually it's both.
No, not really.
The spot that Google Maps marks when you search for Cambridge is
at the corner of Sidney, Hobson, and St. Andrew's Sts., which looks
about right to my eye, and is over a mile from the station.
For Oxford, it marks the corner of St. Aldate's, High, Queen, and
Cornmarket Sts., which again looks right to my eye, and is only
just over a half-mile from the station.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by charles
Certainly, for me it was a long slog to Oxford station with my luggage.
Well, maybe you were starting from the wrong place.
I agree. Oxford station is much closer to the centre (and anyway, what
about buses?).

It's true that if you're starting up by Magdalen, it will seem like a
long trek along the High, although I still think the walk to Cambridge
station from anywhere in the centre of Cambridge will seem longer.
--
Katy Jennison
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-11-30 15:45:59 UTC
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Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by charles
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
That reminded of the reason why Oxford station ended up in such an
inconvenient place...
Actually, it's Cambridge that has the railway station a long way
from the town centre...
Actually it's both.
No, not really.
The spot that Google Maps marks when you search for Cambridge is
at the corner of Sidney, Hobson, and St. Andrew's Sts., which looks
about right to my eye, and is over a mile from the station.
For Oxford, it marks the corner of St. Aldate's, High, Queen, and
Cornmarket Sts., which again looks right to my eye, and is only
just over a half-mile from the station.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by charles
Certainly, for me it was a long slog to Oxford station with my luggage.
Well, maybe you were starting from the wrong place.
I agree. Oxford station is much closer to the centre (and anyway, what
about buses?).
It's true that if you're starting up by Magdalen, it will seem like a
long trek along the High, although I still think the walk to Cambridge
station from anywhere in the centre of Cambridge will seem longer.
Well, I was usually starting from Wadham: probably not as far as
Magdalen, but quite far enough.

What is Cambridge's answer to Didcot?
--
athel
Richard Heathfield
2017-11-30 15:53:45 UTC
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On 30/11/17 15:45, Athel Cornish-Bowden wrote:

<snip>
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
What is Cambridge's answer to Didcot?
Cambridge's answer to "Didcot?" is "Yes, Cot did."
--
Richard Heathfield
Email: rjh at cpax dot org dot uk
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Sig line 4 vacant - apply within
Lazar Beshkenadze
2017-11-30 16:15:54 UTC
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Post by Richard Heathfield
Cambridge's answer to "Didcot?" is "Yes, Cot di
Paul Wolff
2017-11-30 23:24:18 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by charles
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
That reminded of the reason why Oxford station ended up in such an
inconvenient place...
Actually, it's Cambridge that has the railway station a long way
from the town centre...
Actually it's both.
No, not really.
The spot that Google Maps marks when you search for Cambridge is
at the corner of Sidney, Hobson, and St. Andrew's Sts., which looks
about right to my eye, and is over a mile from the station.
For Oxford, it marks the corner of St. Aldate's, High, Queen, and
Cornmarket Sts., which again looks right to my eye, and is only
just over a half-mile from the station.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by charles
Certainly, for me it was a long slog to Oxford station with my luggage.
Well, maybe you were starting from the wrong place.
I agree. Oxford station is much closer to the centre (and anyway,
what about buses?).
It's true that if you're starting up by Magdalen, it will seem like
a long trek along the High, although I still think the walk to
Cambridge station from anywhere in the centre of Cambridge will seem
longer.
Well, I was usually starting from Wadham: probably not as far as
Magdalen, but quite far enough.
New Inn Hall St was manageable. Be thankful not to have begun at St
Hilda's, on the Wrong Side of the Cherwell.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
What is Cambridge's answer to Didcot?
I shouldn't give adversaries ammunition, but before God's Wonderful
Railway came, Didcot was Dudcot (per Ordnance Survey maps pre-1830). As
a chemist, I'd call that a good retort.
--
Paul
charles
2017-12-01 09:46:39 UTC
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Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by charles
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
That reminded of the reason why Oxford station ended up in such an
inconvenient place...
Actually, it's Cambridge that has the railway station a long way
from the town centre...
Actually it's both.
No, not really. The spot that Google Maps marks when you search for
Cambridge is at the corner of Sidney, Hobson, and St. Andrew's Sts.,
which looks about right to my eye, and is over a mile from the
station. For Oxford, it marks the corner of St. Aldate's, High,
Queen, and Cornmarket Sts., which again looks right to my eye, and is
only just over a half-mile from the station.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by charles
Certainly, for me it was a long slog to Oxford station with my luggage.
Well, maybe you were starting from the wrong place.
I agree. Oxford station is much closer to the centre (and anyway,
what about buses?). It's true that if you're starting up by Magdalen,
it will seem like a long trek along the High, although I still think
the walk to Cambridge station from anywhere in the centre of
Cambridge will seem longer.
Well, I was usually starting from Wadham: probably not as far as
Magdalen, but quite far enough.
New Inn Hall St was manageable. Be thankful not to have begun at St
Hilda's, on the Wrong Side of the Cherwell.
Ah! Oxford's answer to Girton.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
Richard Tobin
2017-12-01 11:13:26 UTC
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Post by charles
Post by Paul Wolff
New Inn Hall St was manageable. Be thankful not to have begun at St
Hilda's, on the Wrong Side of the Cherwell.
Ah! Oxford's answer to Girton.


-- Richard
charles
2017-12-01 11:33:51 UTC
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Post by Richard Tobin
Post by charles
Post by Paul Wolff
New Inn Hall St was manageable. Be thankful not to have begun at St
Hilda's, on the Wrong Side of the Cherwell.
Ah! Oxford's answer to Girton.
http://youtu.be/Z4QcrUQNr-k
Brilliant
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-12-01 12:19:49 UTC
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On Fri, 01 Dec 2017 11:33:51 +0000 (GMT), charles
Post by charles
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by charles
Post by Paul Wolff
New Inn Hall St was manageable. Be thankful not to have begun at St
Hilda's, on the Wrong Side of the Cherwell.
Ah! Oxford's answer to Girton.
http://youtu.be/Z4QcrUQNr-k
Brilliant
+1
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Tony Cooper
2017-12-01 14:49:03 UTC
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On Fri, 01 Dec 2017 11:33:51 +0000 (GMT), charles
Post by charles
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by charles
Post by Paul Wolff
New Inn Hall St was manageable. Be thankful not to have begun at St
Hilda's, on the Wrong Side of the Cherwell.
Ah! Oxford's answer to Girton.
http://youtu.be/Z4QcrUQNr-k
Brilliant
The use of "pooling" is new to me. "Pooling" to me, is when several
sources get together to do something or provide something. A group of
teens might pool their money - each contributing something - to buy
enough gasoline to fill the tank when they're out riding around.

What I seem to get from this clip is that university applicants are
assigned to particular unis even though they have not applied to that
uni. They apply to one school, but are accepted at a different school
that they have not applied to if the school they applied to does not
accept them.

Not a concept in practice here in the US. An applicant has to apply
to a university to be accepted. Typically a student will apply to
several universities and go the one that accepts him/her that is
highest in the student's preference.

Often the US student has a "safe" choice. The student applies to -
say - Harvard, Yale, and Princeton, but also to a state school with
lesser requirements. If the first three decline to accept the
student, he's assured of getting into the "safe" choice.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
charles
2017-12-01 15:09:02 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Fri, 01 Dec 2017 11:33:51 +0000 (GMT), charles
Post by charles
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by charles
Post by Paul Wolff
New Inn Hall St was manageable. Be thankful not to have begun at St
Hilda's, on the Wrong Side of the Cherwell.
Ah! Oxford's answer to Girton.
http://youtu.be/Z4QcrUQNr-k
Brilliant
The use of "pooling" is new to me. "Pooling" to me, is when several
sources get together to do something or provide something. A group of
teens might pool their money - each contributing something - to buy
enough gasoline to fill the tank when they're out riding around.
What I seem to get from this clip is that university applicants are
assigned to particular unis even though they have not applied to that
uni. They apply to one school, but are accepted at a different school
that they have not applied to if the school they applied to does not
accept them.
Not a concept in practice here in the US. An applicant has to apply
to a university to be accepted. Typically a student will apply to
several universities and go the one that accepts him/her that is
highest in the student's preference.
Often the US student has a "safe" choice. The student applies to -
say - Harvard, Yale, and Princeton, but also to a state school with
lesser requirements. If the first three decline to accept the
student, he's assured of getting into the "safe" choice.
Oxford & Cambridge universities are comprised of a number of separate (&
independent) colleges. You apply to a college for a place. If you fail to
make it to your college of choice, you will go into a pool of people who
might get allocated a place at a less popular college. Girton (College) is
still Cambridge, but a couple of mile out of town. Up hill too, at the
start of the journey ((Cambridgeshire is flat?) It was founded as a
women's college.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
Tony Cooper
2017-12-01 15:35:51 UTC
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On Fri, 01 Dec 2017 15:09:02 +0000 (GMT), charles
Post by charles
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Fri, 01 Dec 2017 11:33:51 +0000 (GMT), charles
Post by charles
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by charles
Post by Paul Wolff
New Inn Hall St was manageable. Be thankful not to have begun at St
Hilda's, on the Wrong Side of the Cherwell.
Ah! Oxford's answer to Girton.
http://youtu.be/Z4QcrUQNr-k
Brilliant
The use of "pooling" is new to me. "Pooling" to me, is when several
sources get together to do something or provide something. A group of
teens might pool their money - each contributing something - to buy
enough gasoline to fill the tank when they're out riding around.
What I seem to get from this clip is that university applicants are
assigned to particular unis even though they have not applied to that
uni. They apply to one school, but are accepted at a different school
that they have not applied to if the school they applied to does not
accept them.
Not a concept in practice here in the US. An applicant has to apply
to a university to be accepted. Typically a student will apply to
several universities and go the one that accepts him/her that is
highest in the student's preference.
Often the US student has a "safe" choice. The student applies to -
say - Harvard, Yale, and Princeton, but also to a state school with
lesser requirements. If the first three decline to accept the
student, he's assured of getting into the "safe" choice.
Oxford & Cambridge universities are comprised of a number of separate (&
independent) colleges. You apply to a college for a place. If you fail to
make it to your college of choice, you will go into a pool of people who
might get allocated a place at a less popular college. Girton (College) is
still Cambridge, but a couple of mile out of town. Up hill too, at the
start of the journey ((Cambridgeshire is flat?) It was founded as a
women's college.
As I said, that is not a practice here. US universities are made up
of several colleges, but we are admitted to the university, not the
college. That's why "pooling" is a new one on me in this context.

Our concept of "college" is the field of study within the university
and the staff and programs in that field. At Indiana University, I
was a student at Indiana University taking courses in the College of
Business. To complicate things, we often use "School of" instead of
"College of". At Northwestern, I was in the School of Business.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Richard Tobin
2017-12-01 15:38:10 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
Post by charles
Oxford & Cambridge universities are comprised of a number of separate (&
independent) colleges. You apply to a college for a place. If you fail to
make it to your college of choice, you will go into a pool of people who
might get allocated a place at a less popular college. Girton (College) is
still Cambridge, but a couple of mile out of town. Up hill too, at the
start of the journey ((Cambridgeshire is flat?) It was founded as a
women's college.
As I said, that is not a practice here. US universities are made up
of several colleges, but we are admitted to the university, not the
college. That's why "pooling" is a new one on me in this context.
Our concept of "college" is the field of study within the university
and the staff and programs in that field. At Indiana University, I
was a student at Indiana University taking courses in the College of
Business. To complicate things, we often use "School of" instead of
"College of". At Northwestern, I was in the School of Business.
Oxford and Cambridge are exceptional in this respect, as in several
others. Don't infer anything about other UK universities from it.

-- Richard
charles
2017-12-01 22:14:57 UTC
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Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by charles
Oxford & Cambridge universities are comprised of a number of separate (&
independent) colleges. You apply to a college for a place. If you fail to
make it to your college of choice, you will go into a pool of people who
might get allocated a place at a less popular college. Girton (College) is
still Cambridge, but a couple of mile out of town. Up hill too, at the
start of the journey ((Cambridgeshire is flat?) It was founded as a
women's college.
As I said, that is not a practice here. US universities are made up
of several colleges, but we are admitted to the university, not the
college. That's why "pooling" is a new one on me in this context.
Our concept of "college" is the field of study within the university
and the staff and programs in that field. At Indiana University, I
was a student at Indiana University taking courses in the College of
Business. To complicate things, we often use "School of" instead of
"College of". At Northwestern, I was in the School of Business.
Oxford and Cambridge are exceptional in this respect, as in several
others. Don't infer anything about other UK universities from it.
I thought that St Andrews (Scotland oldest university) had a similar
collegiate system
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
Richard Tobin
2017-12-02 01:19:17 UTC
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Post by charles
Post by Richard Tobin
Oxford and Cambridge are exceptional in this respect, as in several
others. Don't infer anything about other UK universities from it.
I thought that St Andrews (Scotland oldest university) had a similar
collegiate system
No. It has some things called colleges, but they are completely different:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_St_Andrews#Colleges

-- Richard
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-12-02 17:00:20 UTC
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Post by Richard Tobin
Post by charles
Post by Richard Tobin
Oxford and Cambridge are exceptional in this respect, as in several
others. Don't infer anything about other UK universities from it.
I thought that St Andrews (Scotland oldest university) had a similar
collegiate system
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_St_Andrews#Colleges
One of my sisters went to St Andrews. As far as I recall she applied to
and was admitted by the university. I don't remember her ever talking
about colleges.
--
athel
the Omrud
2017-12-01 15:54:38 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 01 Dec 2017 15:09:02 +0000 (GMT), charles
Post by charles
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Fri, 01 Dec 2017 11:33:51 +0000 (GMT), charles
Post by charles
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by charles
Post by Paul Wolff
New Inn Hall St was manageable. Be thankful not to have begun at St
Hilda's, on the Wrong Side of the Cherwell.
Ah! Oxford's answer to Girton.
http://youtu.be/Z4QcrUQNr-k
Brilliant
The use of "pooling" is new to me. "Pooling" to me, is when several
sources get together to do something or provide something. A group of
teens might pool their money - each contributing something - to buy
enough gasoline to fill the tank when they're out riding around.
What I seem to get from this clip is that university applicants are
assigned to particular unis even though they have not applied to that
uni. They apply to one school, but are accepted at a different school
that they have not applied to if the school they applied to does not
accept them.
Not a concept in practice here in the US. An applicant has to apply
to a university to be accepted. Typically a student will apply to
several universities and go the one that accepts him/her that is
highest in the student's preference.
Often the US student has a "safe" choice. The student applies to -
say - Harvard, Yale, and Princeton, but also to a state school with
lesser requirements. If the first three decline to accept the
student, he's assured of getting into the "safe" choice.
Oxford & Cambridge universities are comprised of a number of separate (&
independent) colleges. You apply to a college for a place. If you fail to
make it to your college of choice, you will go into a pool of people who
might get allocated a place at a less popular college. Girton (College) is
still Cambridge, but a couple of mile out of town. Up hill too, at the
start of the journey ((Cambridgeshire is flat?) It was founded as a
women's college.
As I said, that is not a practice here. US universities are made up
of several colleges, but we are admitted to the university, not the
college. That's why "pooling" is a new one on me in this context.
Our concept of "college" is the field of study within the university
and the staff and programs in that field. At Indiana University, I
was a student at Indiana University taking courses in the College of
Business. To complicate things, we often use "School of" instead of
"College of". At Northwestern, I was in the School of Business.
Oxford, Cambridge and Durham are the only universities in which the
college is the body which admits you and where you live (at least in the
first year). Teaching is done in Departments or Schools, and is
university-wide.

I'll repeat so there is no doubt - there are no other universities in
the UK which are organised in this manner.
--
David
Paul Wolff
2017-12-01 18:03:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by the Omrud
Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 01 Dec 2017 15:09:02 +0000 (GMT), charles
Post by charles
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Fri, 01 Dec 2017 11:33:51 +0000 (GMT), charles
Post by charles
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by charles
Post by Paul Wolff
New Inn Hall St was manageable. Be thankful not to have begun at St
Hilda's, on the Wrong Side of the Cherwell.
Ah! Oxford's answer to Girton.
http://youtu.be/Z4QcrUQNr-k
Brilliant
The use of "pooling" is new to me. "Pooling" to me, is when several
sources get together to do something or provide something. A group of
teens might pool their money - each contributing something - to buy
enough gasoline to fill the tank when they're out riding around.
What I seem to get from this clip is that university applicants are
assigned to particular unis even though they have not applied to that
uni. They apply to one school, but are accepted at a different school
that they have not applied to if the school they applied to does not
accept them.
Not a concept in practice here in the US. An applicant has to apply
to a university to be accepted. Typically a student will apply to
several universities and go the one that accepts him/her that is
highest in the student's preference.
Often the US student has a "safe" choice. The student applies to -
say - Harvard, Yale, and Princeton, but also to a state school with
lesser requirements. If the first three decline to accept the
student, he's assured of getting into the "safe" choice.
Oxford & Cambridge universities are comprised of a number of separate (&
independent) colleges. You apply to a college for a place. If you fail to
make it to your college of choice, you will go into a pool of people who
might get allocated a place at a less popular college. Girton (College) is
still Cambridge, but a couple of mile out of town. Up hill too, at the
start of the journey ((Cambridgeshire is flat?) It was founded as a
women's college.
As I said, that is not a practice here. US universities are made up
of several colleges, but we are admitted to the university, not the
college. That's why "pooling" is a new one on me in this context.
Our concept of "college" is the field of study within the university
and the staff and programs in that field. At Indiana University, I
was a student at Indiana University taking courses in the College of
Business. To complicate things, we often use "School of" instead of
"College of". At Northwestern, I was in the School of Business.
Oxford, Cambridge and Durham are the only universities in which the
college is the body which admits you and where you live (at least in
the first year). Teaching is done in Departments or Schools, and is
university-wide.
I'll repeat so there is no doubt - there are no other universities in
the UK which are organised in this manner.
London University seems to have a unique structure in which the separate
colleges are individually far more university-like than Oxbridge
colleges. But it remains a University, with its Senate House building,
and notably ULU, the University of London Union, a social and
recreational and probably political centre too, for the students.

Observers of language will have noticed how in recent years the London
University colleges have been appropriating the word 'University' into
their names. To offer just one example, I'm sure we have seen 'Queen
Mary College, University of London' drift into 'Queen Mary, University
of London' and somehow become very careless with that comma, losing it
all too often, and accidentally becoming Queen Mary University of
London, or Queen Mary University for short. Or maybe there has been a
legitimate name change, but it all leaves me confused as to what London
University actually is, and does, no matter how much it may have been
patiently explained to me.
--
Paul
the Omrud
2017-12-01 19:13:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by the Omrud
Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 01 Dec 2017 15:09:02 +0000 (GMT), charles
Post by charles
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Fri, 01 Dec 2017 11:33:51 +0000 (GMT), charles
Post by charles
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by charles
Post by Paul Wolff
New Inn Hall St was manageable. Be thankful not to have begun at St
Hilda's, on the Wrong Side of the Cherwell.
Ah! Oxford's answer to Girton.
http://youtu.be/Z4QcrUQNr-k
Brilliant
The use of "pooling" is new to me.  "Pooling" to me, is when several
sources get together to do something or provide something.  A group of
teens might pool their money - each contributing something - to buy
enough gasoline to fill the tank when they're out riding around.
What I seem to get from this clip is that university applicants are
assigned to particular unis even though they have not applied to that
uni.  They apply to one school, but are accepted at a different school
that they have not applied to if the school they applied to does not
accept them.
Not a concept in practice here in the US.  An applicant has to apply
to a university to be accepted.  Typically a student will apply to
several universities and go the one that accepts him/her that is
highest in the student's preference.
Often the US student has a "safe" choice.  The student applies to -
say - Harvard, Yale, and Princeton, but also to a state school with
lesser requirements.  If the first three decline to accept the
student, he's assured of getting into the "safe" choice.
Oxford & Cambridge universities are comprised of a number of separate (&
independent) colleges.  You apply to a college for a place. If you
fail to
make it to your college of choice, you will go into a pool of people who
might get allocated a place at a less popular college.  Girton
(College) is
still Cambridge, but a couple of mile out of town. Up hill too, at the
start of the journey ((Cambridgeshire is flat?)  It was founded as a
women's college.
 As I said, that is not a practice here.  US universities are made up
of several colleges, but we are admitted to the university, not the
college.  That's why "pooling" is a new one on me in this context.
 Our concept of "college" is the field of study within the university
and the staff and programs in that field.  At Indiana University, I
was a student at Indiana University taking courses in the College of
Business.  To complicate things, we often use "School of" instead of
"College of".  At Northwestern, I was in the School of Business.
Oxford, Cambridge and Durham are the only universities in which the
college is the body which admits you and where you live (at least in
the first year).  Teaching is done in Departments or Schools, and is
university-wide.
I'll repeat so there is no doubt - there are no other universities in
the UK which are organised in this manner.
London University seems to have a unique structure in which the separate
colleges are individually far more university-like than Oxbridge
colleges. But it remains a University, with its Senate House building,
and notably ULU, the University of London Union, a social and
recreational and probably political centre too, for the students.
Observers of language will have noticed how in recent years the London
University colleges have been appropriating the word 'University' into
their names. To offer just one example, I'm sure we have seen 'Queen
Mary College, University of London' drift into 'Queen Mary, University
of London' and somehow become very careless with that comma, losing it
all too often, and accidentally becoming Queen Mary University of
London, or Queen Mary University for short. Or maybe there has been a
legitimate name change, but it all leaves me confused as to what London
University actually is, and does, no matter how much it may have been
patiently explained to me.
The University of Wales was similar, I think. It's used to be a single
university but with multiple cities hosting campuses which separately
looked like universities. I see it's now described as a "confederal
university" and that many of the original colleges have split and become
independent universities.
--
David
Peter T. Daniels
2017-12-01 19:49:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Paul Wolff
London University seems to have a unique structure in which the separate
colleges are individually far more university-like than Oxbridge
colleges. But it remains a University, with its Senate House building,
and notably ULU, the University of London Union, a social and
recreational and probably political centre too, for the students.
Observers of language will have noticed how in recent years the London
University colleges have been appropriating the word 'University' into
their names. To offer just one example, I'm sure we have seen 'Queen
Mary College, University of London' drift into 'Queen Mary, University
of London' and somehow become very careless with that comma, losing it
all too often, and accidentally becoming Queen Mary University of
London, or Queen Mary University for short. Or maybe there has been a
legitimate name change, but it all leaves me confused as to what London
University actually is, and does, no matter how much it may have been
patiently explained to me.
SOAS is still SOAS. I hope ... and its journal the BSOAS.

The first few volumes were just the BSOS.
Paul Wolff
2017-12-02 00:10:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Paul Wolff
London University seems to have a unique structure in which the separate
colleges are individually far more university-like than Oxbridge
colleges. But it remains a University, with its Senate House building,
and notably ULU, the University of London Union, a social and
recreational and probably political centre too, for the students.
Observers of language will have noticed how in recent years the London
University colleges have been appropriating the word 'University' into
their names. To offer just one example, I'm sure we have seen 'Queen
Mary College, University of London' drift into 'Queen Mary, University
of London' and somehow become very careless with that comma, losing it
all too often, and accidentally becoming Queen Mary University of
London, or Queen Mary University for short. Or maybe there has been a
legitimate name change, but it all leaves me confused as to what London
University actually is, and does, no matter how much it may have been
patiently explained to me.
SOAS is still SOAS. I hope ... and its journal the BSOAS.
I recognise the important School of Oriental and African Studies - and
indeed such other institutions as the School of Pharmacy, the London
School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and the London School of
Economics - but that doesn't help resolve the relationships between the
Schools, Colleges, and (?) Universities inside the University of London.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The first few volumes were just the BSOS.
I feel sorry for Africa, having been the fons et origo of humanity, yet
disdained by so many foreigners today. Was Africa excluded from the
early journals?
--
Paul
Peter T. Daniels
2017-12-02 04:06:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Paul Wolff
London University seems to have a unique structure in which the separate
colleges are individually far more university-like than Oxbridge
colleges. But it remains a University, with its Senate House building,
and notably ULU, the University of London Union, a social and
recreational and probably political centre too, for the students.
Observers of language will have noticed how in recent years the London
University colleges have been appropriating the word 'University' into
their names. To offer just one example, I'm sure we have seen 'Queen
Mary College, University of London' drift into 'Queen Mary, University
of London' and somehow become very careless with that comma, losing it
all too often, and accidentally becoming Queen Mary University of
London, or Queen Mary University for short. Or maybe there has been a
legitimate name change, but it all leaves me confused as to what London
University actually is, and does, no matter how much it may have been
patiently explained to me.
SOAS is still SOAS. I hope ... and its journal the BSOAS.
I recognise the important School of Oriental and African Studies - and
indeed such other institutions as the School of Pharmacy, the London
School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and the London School of
Economics - but that doesn't help resolve the relationships between the
Schools, Colleges, and (?) Universities inside the University of London.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The first few volumes were just the BSOS.
I feel sorry for Africa, having been the fons et origo of humanity, yet
disdained by so many foreigners today. Was Africa excluded from the
early journals?
Probably more "not included" than "excluded." If they didn't have any faculty
specializing in African studies, their journal wouldn't have carried African
studies.

A few decades ago, the venerable International Congress of Orientalists
changed its name to International Congress of Asian and North African Studies.
charles
2017-12-01 22:07:04 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by the Omrud
Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 01 Dec 2017 15:09:02 +0000 (GMT), charles
Post by charles
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Fri, 01 Dec 2017 11:33:51 +0000 (GMT), charles
Post by charles
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by charles
Post by Paul Wolff
New Inn Hall St was manageable. Be thankful not to have begun at
St Hilda's, on the Wrong Side of the Cherwell.
Ah! Oxford's answer to Girton.
http://youtu.be/Z4QcrUQNr-k
Brilliant
The use of "pooling" is new to me. "Pooling" to me, is when several
sources get together to do something or provide something. A group
of teens might pool their money - each contributing something - to
buy enough gasoline to fill the tank when they're out riding around.
What I seem to get from this clip is that university applicants are
assigned to particular unis even though they have not applied to
that uni. They apply to one school, but are accepted at a different
school that they have not applied to if the school they applied to
does not accept them.
Not a concept in practice here in the US. An applicant has to apply
to a university to be accepted. Typically a student will apply to
several universities and go the one that accepts him/her that is
highest in the student's preference.
Often the US student has a "safe" choice. The student applies to -
say - Harvard, Yale, and Princeton, but also to a state school with
lesser requirements. If the first three decline to accept the
student, he's assured of getting into the "safe" choice.
Oxford & Cambridge universities are comprised of a number of separate
(& independent) colleges. You apply to a college for a place. If you
fail to make it to your college of choice, you will go into a pool of
people who might get allocated a place at a less popular college.
Girton (College) is still Cambridge, but a couple of mile out of
town. Up hill too, at the start of the journey ((Cambridgeshire is
flat?) It was founded as a women's college.
As I said, that is not a practice here. US universities are made up
of several colleges, but we are admitted to the university, not the
college. That's why "pooling" is a new one on me in this context. Our
concept of "college" is the field of study within the university and
the staff and programs in that field. At Indiana University, I was a
student at Indiana University taking courses in the College of
Business. To complicate things, we often use "School of" instead of
"College of". At Northwestern, I was in the School of Business.
Oxford, Cambridge and Durham are the only universities in which the
college is the body which admits you and where you live (at least in
the first year). Teaching is done in Departments or Schools, and is
university-wide.
I'll repeat so there is no doubt - there are no other universities in
the UK which are organised in this manner.
London University seems to have a unique structure in which the separate
colleges are individually far more university-like than Oxbridge
colleges. But it remains a University, with its Senate House building,
and notably ULU, the University of London Union, a social and
recreational and probably political centre too, for the students.
Observers of language will have noticed how in recent years the London
University colleges have been appropriating the word 'University' into
their names. To offer just one example, I'm sure we have seen 'Queen
Mary College, University of London' drift into 'Queen Mary, University
of London' and somehow become very careless with that comma, losing it
all too often, and accidentally becoming Queen Mary University of
London, or Queen Mary University for short. Or maybe there has been a
legitimate name change, but it all leaves me confused as to what London
University actually is, and does, no matter how much it may have been
patiently explained to me.
Imperial College, from which my wife graduated is now university in its own
right, too.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-12-01 18:52:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by the Omrud
Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 01 Dec 2017 15:09:02 +0000 (GMT), charles
Post by charles
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Fri, 01 Dec 2017 11:33:51 +0000 (GMT), charles
Post by charles
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by charles
Post by Paul Wolff
New Inn Hall St was manageable. Be thankful not to have begun at St
Hilda's, on the Wrong Side of the Cherwell.
Ah! Oxford's answer to Girton.
http://youtu.be/Z4QcrUQNr-k
Brilliant
The use of "pooling" is new to me. "Pooling" to me, is when several
sources get together to do something or provide something. A group of
teens might pool their money - each contributing something - to buy
enough gasoline to fill the tank when they're out riding around.
What I seem to get from this clip is that university applicants are
assigned to particular unis even though they have not applied to that
uni. They apply to one school, but are accepted at a different school
that they have not applied to if the school they applied to does not
accept them.
Not a concept in practice here in the US. An applicant has to apply
to a university to be accepted. Typically a student will apply to
several universities and go the one that accepts him/her that is
highest in the student's preference.
Often the US student has a "safe" choice. The student applies to -
say - Harvard, Yale, and Princeton, but also to a state school with
lesser requirements. If the first three decline to accept the
student, he's assured of getting into the "safe" choice.
Oxford & Cambridge universities are comprised of a number of separate (&
independent) colleges. You apply to a college for a place. If you fail to
make it to your college of choice, you will go into a pool of people who
might get allocated a place at a less popular college. Girton (College) is
still Cambridge, but a couple of mile out of town. Up hill too, at the
start of the journey ((Cambridgeshire is flat?) It was founded as a
women's college.
As I said, that is not a practice here. US universities are made up
of several colleges, but we are admitted to the university, not the
college. That's why "pooling" is a new one on me in this context.
Our concept of "college" is the field of study within the university
and the staff and programs in that field. At Indiana University, I
was a student at Indiana University taking courses in the College of
Business. To complicate things, we often use "School of" instead of
"College of". At Northwestern, I was in the School of Business.
Oxford, Cambridge and Durham are the only universities in which the
college is the body which admits you and where you live (at least in the
first year). Teaching is done in Departments or Schools, and is
university-wide.
I'll repeat so there is no doubt - there are no other universities in
the UK which are organised in this manner.
But beware London University. It looks superficially similar. It is
comprised of Colleges. Students apply to and are admitted to a College
of their choice. Unlike the colleges at Oxford and Cambridge each
college is to (almost) all intents and purposes a university in its own
right.

Half of the 18 colleges award their own degrees, students at the others
receive degree from the federal body, the University of London.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_London#Organisation_and_administration

For most practical purposes, ranging from admission of students to
negotiating funding from the government, the 18 constituent colleges
are treated as individual universities. Legally speaking they are
known as Recognised Bodies, with the authority to examine students
and award them degrees of the university. Some colleges have the
power to award their own degrees instead of those of the university;
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Peter T. Daniels
2017-12-01 19:47:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 01 Dec 2017 15:09:02 +0000 (GMT), charles
Post by charles
Post by Tony Cooper
The use of "pooling" is new to me. "Pooling" to me, is when several
sources get together to do something or provide something. A group of
teens might pool their money - each contributing something - to buy
enough gasoline to fill the tank when they're out riding around.
What I seem to get from this clip is that university applicants are
assigned to particular unis even though they have not applied to that
uni. They apply to one school, but are accepted at a different school
that they have not applied to if the school they applied to does not
accept them.
Not a concept in practice here in the US. An applicant has to apply
to a university to be accepted. Typically a student will apply to
several universities and go the one that accepts him/her that is
highest in the student's preference.
Often the US student has a "safe" choice. The student applies to -
say - Harvard, Yale, and Princeton, but also to a state school with
lesser requirements. If the first three decline to accept the
student, he's assured of getting into the "safe" choice.
Oxford & Cambridge universities are comprised of a number of separate (&
independent) colleges. You apply to a college for a place. If you fail to
make it to your college of choice, you will go into a pool of people who
might get allocated a place at a less popular college. Girton (College) is
still Cambridge, but a couple of mile out of town. Up hill too, at the
start of the journey ((Cambridgeshire is flat?) It was founded as a
women's college.
As I said, that is not a practice here. US universities are made up
of several colleges, but we are admitted to the university, not the
college. That's why "pooling" is a new one on me in this context.
Our concept of "college" is the field of study within the university
and the staff and programs in that field. At Indiana University, I
was a student at Indiana University taking courses in the College of
Business. To complicate things, we often use "School of" instead of
"College of". At Northwestern, I was in the School of Business.
It often happens that top-level academic divisions are called "college" and
top-level vocational divisions are called "school." The College of Arts and
Sciences, the Law School, the Journalism School.

At the University of Chicago, undergraduates enroll in the College; the far
more numerous graduate students are accommodated in four Divisions: Humanities,
Social Sciences, Biological Sciences, Physical Sciences. Those are besides the
Business School, the Div School, the Law School, the Med School.
Cheryl
2017-12-01 16:35:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Fri, 01 Dec 2017 11:33:51 +0000 (GMT), charles
Post by charles
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by charles
Post by Paul Wolff
New Inn Hall St was manageable. Be thankful not to have begun at St
Hilda's, on the Wrong Side of the Cherwell.
Ah! Oxford's answer to Girton.
http://youtu.be/Z4QcrUQNr-k
Brilliant
The use of "pooling" is new to me. "Pooling" to me, is when several
sources get together to do something or provide something. A group of
teens might pool their money - each contributing something - to buy
enough gasoline to fill the tank when they're out riding around.
What I seem to get from this clip is that university applicants are
assigned to particular unis even though they have not applied to that
uni. They apply to one school, but are accepted at a different school
that they have not applied to if the school they applied to does not
accept them.
Not a concept in practice here in the US. An applicant has to apply
to a university to be accepted. Typically a student will apply to
several universities and go the one that accepts him/her that is
highest in the student's preference.
Often the US student has a "safe" choice. The student applies to -
say - Harvard, Yale, and Princeton, but also to a state school with
lesser requirements. If the first three decline to accept the
student, he's assured of getting into the "safe" choice.
It might be something similar to the process people use to apply to
residency programs in Canada, and maybe in the US. There's a central
service handling all applications, so the medical graduate will apply to
a number of different institutions through the same system, and will of
course tailor his personal statement for each! The applicant and the
institutions rank each other - an applicant might put down the Internal
Medicine Progam at Internationally Famous University as his or her first
choice, but naturally IFU might rank other applicants more highly, and
not accept him. If there's really stiff competition, the applicant might
get down to his 4th or 5th choice before he matches with a place that
likes him well enough to let him in. As with what you describe, a smart
applicant will have, somewhere on the list of places he's applied for, a
choice that he hopes will be "safe" - Family Medicine at Small Regional
University, perhaps. Unlike your example, it's all done through a
central computer matching system.
--
Cheryl
Tony Cooper
2017-12-01 17:05:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Fri, 01 Dec 2017 11:33:51 +0000 (GMT), charles
Post by charles
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by charles
Post by Paul Wolff
New Inn Hall St was manageable. Be thankful not to have begun at St
Hilda's, on the Wrong Side of the Cherwell.
Ah! Oxford's answer to Girton.
http://youtu.be/Z4QcrUQNr-k
Brilliant
The use of "pooling" is new to me. "Pooling" to me, is when several
sources get together to do something or provide something. A group of
teens might pool their money - each contributing something - to buy
enough gasoline to fill the tank when they're out riding around.
What I seem to get from this clip is that university applicants are
assigned to particular unis even though they have not applied to that
uni. They apply to one school, but are accepted at a different school
that they have not applied to if the school they applied to does not
accept them.
Not a concept in practice here in the US. An applicant has to apply
to a university to be accepted. Typically a student will apply to
several universities and go the one that accepts him/her that is
highest in the student's preference.
Often the US student has a "safe" choice. The student applies to -
say - Harvard, Yale, and Princeton, but also to a state school with
lesser requirements. If the first three decline to accept the
student, he's assured of getting into the "safe" choice.
It might be something similar to the process people use to apply to
residency programs in Canada, and maybe in the US. There's a central
service handling all applications, so the medical graduate will apply to
a number of different institutions through the same system, and will of
course tailor his personal statement for each! The applicant and the
institutions rank each other - an applicant might put down the Internal
Medicine Progam at Internationally Famous University as his or her first
choice, but naturally IFU might rank other applicants more highly, and
not accept him. If there's really stiff competition, the applicant might
get down to his 4th or 5th choice before he matches with a place that
likes him well enough to let him in. As with what you describe, a smart
applicant will have, somewhere on the list of places he's applied for, a
choice that he hopes will be "safe" - Family Medicine at Small Regional
University, perhaps. Unlike your example, it's all done through a
central computer matching system.
When my son was in high school and took the SAT in his senior year,
the results were sent to a list of universities that he chose. Four,
I think. The school, or some agency of the school, sent them.

The process wasn't to apply for admission. It was a pre-screening
process. The universities replied with letters that the scores did or
did not indicate that an actual admission application would be
accepted based on those scores. Some schools have requirements of a
certain level of scores.

I can't remember if the responses were sent to my son or to the
school. I do remember that the University of Alabama - his first
choice - indicated that the scores were acceptable to them and that
they later sent him a full admission application package. And, that's
where he went.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Peter Moylan
2017-12-02 01:33:44 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Fri, 01 Dec 2017 11:33:51 +0000 (GMT), charles
Post by charles
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by charles
Post by Paul Wolff
New Inn Hall St was manageable. Be thankful not to have begun at St
Hilda's, on the Wrong Side of the Cherwell.
Ah! Oxford's answer to Girton.
http://youtu.be/Z4QcrUQNr-k
Brilliant
The use of "pooling" is new to me. "Pooling" to me, is when several
sources get together to do something or provide something. A group of
teens might pool their money - each contributing something - to buy
enough gasoline to fill the tank when they're out riding around.
What I seem to get from this clip is that university applicants are
assigned to particular unis even though they have not applied to that
uni. They apply to one school, but are accepted at a different school
that they have not applied to if the school they applied to does not
accept them.
Not a concept in practice here in the US. An applicant has to apply
to a university to be accepted. Typically a student will apply to
several universities and go the one that accepts him/her that is
highest in the student's preference.
Often the US student has a "safe" choice. The student applies to -
say - Harvard, Yale, and Princeton, but also to a state school with
lesser requirements. If the first three decline to accept the
student, he's assured of getting into the "safe" choice.
NSW has a central universities admissions body, covering all of the
universities in the state. Potential students apply to that centre, not
to the individual universities. They give an order of preference, of
course. Meanwhile, each university tells that centre how many students
it will accept in each degree course that it offers, together with
prerequisites if those happen to be required.

The advantage is that multiple applications are not needed, and each
applicant is automatically assigned to the highest-preference course
that will give an acceptance. Of course, it helps that the high school
examinations are state-wide, meaning that every university is judging by
the same criterion.

Interstate applications have to be done separately, but again that can
be in a form of an application to that state's admission centre. It gets
slightly more complicated (but not by much) when the applicant is not
coming straight from high school.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-12-02 18:44:49 UTC
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On Sat, 2 Dec 2017 12:33:44 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Fri, 01 Dec 2017 11:33:51 +0000 (GMT), charles
Post by charles
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by charles
Post by Paul Wolff
New Inn Hall St was manageable. Be thankful not to have begun at St
Hilda's, on the Wrong Side of the Cherwell.
Ah! Oxford's answer to Girton.
http://youtu.be/Z4QcrUQNr-k
Brilliant
The use of "pooling" is new to me. "Pooling" to me, is when several
sources get together to do something or provide something. A group of
teens might pool their money - each contributing something - to buy
enough gasoline to fill the tank when they're out riding around.
What I seem to get from this clip is that university applicants are
assigned to particular unis even though they have not applied to that
uni. They apply to one school, but are accepted at a different school
that they have not applied to if the school they applied to does not
accept them.
Not a concept in practice here in the US. An applicant has to apply
to a university to be accepted. Typically a student will apply to
several universities and go the one that accepts him/her that is
highest in the student's preference.
Often the US student has a "safe" choice. The student applies to -
say - Harvard, Yale, and Princeton, but also to a state school with
lesser requirements. If the first three decline to accept the
student, he's assured of getting into the "safe" choice.
NSW has a central universities admissions body, covering all of the
universities in the state. Potential students apply to that centre, not
to the individual universities. They give an order of preference, of
course. Meanwhile, each university tells that centre how many students
it will accept in each degree course that it offers, together with
prerequisites if those happen to be required.
The UK has UCAS which is used by the vast majority of UK universities
and higher education colleges.

Would-be students apply via UCAS.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UCAS

To apply to university, students must submit a single application
via UCAS' online Apply service. The application itself requires the
student to register to the service, giving a buzzword if applying
through a centre, fill in personal details, write a personal
statement and choose up to five courses to apply to, in no order of
preference. They must then pay an application fee and obtain a
reference before submitting their application online by the
appropriate deadline. The application is then forwarded by UCAS to
the universities and colleges that the students have applied to, who
then decide whether to make students an offer of a place.
Universities give students either an unconditional offer, where the
student will receive a place regardless, or a conditional offer,
where the student will receive a place subject to their grades being
met.

There is more detail in that Wikiparticle.
Post by Peter Moylan
The advantage is that multiple applications are not needed, and each
applicant is automatically assigned to the highest-preference course
that will give an acceptance. Of course, it helps that the high school
examinations are state-wide, meaning that every university is judging by
the same criterion.
Interstate applications have to be done separately, but again that can
be in a form of an application to that state's admission centre. It gets
slightly more complicated (but not by much) when the applicant is not
coming straight from high school.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Percival P. Cassidy
2017-12-02 19:20:55 UTC
Reply
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by charles
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by charles
Post by Paul Wolff
New Inn Hall St was manageable. Be thankful not to have begun at St
Hilda's, on the Wrong Side of the Cherwell.
Ah! Oxford's answer to Girton.
http://youtu.be/Z4QcrUQNr-k
Brilliant
The use of "pooling" is new to me.  "Pooling" to me, is when several
sources get together to do something or provide something.  A group of
teens might pool their money - each contributing something - to buy
enough gasoline to fill the tank when they're out riding around.
What I seem to get from this clip is that university applicants are
assigned to particular unis even though they have not applied to that
uni.  They apply to one school, but are accepted at a different school
that they have not applied to if the school they applied to does not
accept them.
Not a concept in practice here in the US.  An applicant has to apply
to a university to be accepted.  Typically a student will apply to
several universities and go the one that accepts him/her that is
highest in the student's preference.
Often the US student has a "safe" choice.  The student applies to -
say - Harvard, Yale, and Princeton, but also to a state school with
lesser requirements.  If the first three decline to accept the
student, he's assured of getting into the "safe" choice.
NSW has a central universities admissions body, covering all of the
universities in the state. Potential students apply to that centre, not
to the individual universities. They give an order of preference, of
course. Meanwhile, each university tells that centre how many students
it will accept in each degree course that it offers, together with
prerequisites if those happen to be required.
The advantage is that multiple applications are not needed, and each
applicant is automatically assigned to the highest-preference course
that will give an acceptance. Of course, it helps that the high school
examinations are state-wide, meaning that every university is judging by
the same criterion.
Interstate applications have to be done separately, but again that can
be in a form of an application to that state's admission centre. It gets
slightly more complicated (but not by much) when the applicant is not
coming straight from high school.
Is it still the case that Australian universities take only a limited
number of students from outside their own state? At least, when I was at
UQ in the '70s, they took only 10% from outside Qld.

Perce
Peter Moylan
2017-12-03 00:49:38 UTC
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Post by Percival P. Cassidy
Is it still the case that Australian universities take only a limited
number of students from outside their own state? At least, when I was at
UQ in the '70s, they took only 10% from outside Qld.
To the best of my knowledge there is no quota, although some
universities give a form of preferential treatment to applicants in what
they regard as their own catchment area.

(At least, that was true the last time I checked. These days there's a
lot of pressure to give preference to non-Australian students, because
they bring in more money.)

What is certainly true is that not many intending students apply outside
their own state. I don't know whether this is because they don't want to
travel far, or because they don't know much about reputation, etc., of
the more distant universities. Possibly it's just that they feel that
they already have a sufficiency of choice in their own state. For all of
those reasons, I'm surprised that UQ was attracting as many as 10% of
out-of-state students.

The Australian National University in Canberra is an exception to this,
partly because it isn't in any state and partly because it's probably
getting better funding than other universities.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Richard Bollard
2017-12-05 03:37:07 UTC
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On Sun, 3 Dec 2017 11:49:38 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Percival P. Cassidy
Is it still the case that Australian universities take only a limited
number of students from outside their own state? At least, when I was at
UQ in the '70s, they took only 10% from outside Qld.
To the best of my knowledge there is no quota, although some
universities give a form of preferential treatment to applicants in what
they regard as their own catchment area.
(At least, that was true the last time I checked. These days there's a
lot of pressure to give preference to non-Australian students, because
they bring in more money.)
What is certainly true is that not many intending students apply outside
their own state. I don't know whether this is because they don't want to
travel far, or because they don't know much about reputation, etc., of
the more distant universities. Possibly it's just that they feel that
they already have a sufficiency of choice in their own state. For all of
those reasons, I'm surprised that UQ was attracting as many as 10% of
out-of-state students.
The Australian National University in Canberra is an exception to this,
partly because it isn't in any state and partly because it's probably
getting better funding than other universities.
I can't think of any reason why ANU would get more funding than any
other uni.
--
Richard Bollard
Canberra Australia

To email, I'm at AMT not spAMT.
Harrison Hill
2017-11-29 19:23:18 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
[ ... ]
before, I used the train which passes throught the place, I always thought
it was "Suburbiton". I was interseted to note that there is a nearby
community "Norbiton"
I've never had the pleasure of visiting Surbiton, but have long thought
that its name very effectively captured the idea of what sort of place
it is.
I know "Middle England" exists all over Britain, but I'd be hard-pressed
to identify another in Greater London.

It is the sort of place you'd expect it to be. Comfortable. A place
where all races get on together.

Other races can't move in however, because the people who live there
stay put :)
Paul Wolff
2017-11-29 23:39:29 UTC
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Post by Harrison Hill
“Surbiton used to be the butt of jokes, as a symbol of dowdy
suburbia. That was silly. To anyone with half an eye it was -
and still is - an interesting place, in which the original
plan and later accretions can be discerned, much as they can
in a medieval town like Boston or Carlisle. And Surbiton may
fairly claim its place in history: for it is the oldest suburb
in Europe, perhaps in the world, that was called into being
by a railway.”
<http://www.kingstonhistoryresearch.co.uk/canbury/wp-content/uploads/201
6/07/POOLEY-PAPER-29-JUNE-2016.pdf>
As well as "called into being" - which I like, but don't ever
remember hearing before - "accretions": pluralised in the sense
of "growths".
Surbiton is distinguished by its being home to the croquet club with
more world champions among its members than any other, as well as having
the best-kept beer in its bar.

I've been thinking of joining for some time...
--
Paul
occam
2017-11-30 08:25:37 UTC
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Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Harrison Hill
“Surbiton used to be the butt of jokes, as a symbol of dowdy
suburbia. That was silly. To anyone with half an eye it was -
and still is - an interesting place, in which the original
plan and later accretions can be discerned, much as they can
in a medieval town like Boston or Carlisle. And Surbiton may
fairly claim its place in history: for it is the oldest suburb
in Europe, perhaps in the world, that was called into being
by a railway.”
<http://www.kingstonhistoryresearch.co.uk/canbury/wp-content/uploads/201
6/07/POOLEY-PAPER-29-JUNE-2016.pdf>
As well as "called into being" - which I like, but don't ever
remember hearing before - "accretions": pluralised in the sense
of "growths".
Surbiton is distinguished by its being home to the croquet club with
more world champions among its members than any other, as well as having
the best-kept beer in its bar.
I've been thinking of joining for some time...
For the croquet or the beer?
Paul Wolff
2017-11-30 11:17:30 UTC
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Post by occam
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Harrison Hill
“Surbiton used to be the butt of jokes, as a symbol of dowdy
suburbia. That was silly. To anyone with half an eye it was -
and still is - an interesting place, in which the original
plan and later accretions can be discerned, much as they can
in a medieval town like Boston or Carlisle. And Surbiton may
fairly claim its place in history: for it is the oldest suburb
in Europe, perhaps in the world, that was called into being
by a railway.”
Surbiton is distinguished by its being home to the croquet club with
more world champions among its members than any other, as well as having
the best-kept beer in its bar.
I've been thinking of joining for some time...
For the croquet or the beer?
Correct on both counts.
--
Paul
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