Discussion:
"stag party" -- A male turkey is a stag and a female is a hen.
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Hen Hanna
2018-01-12 00:51:51 UTC
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Turkey facts: A young turkey is called a poult. A male turkey is a stag and a female is a hen.


ok, but I still imagine a "stag party" to be
full of male deers (maybe with horns)


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deer
Deer (singular and plural) are the ruminant mammals forming the family Cervidae.
A male deer is called a buck, a stag, or a hart. Other males of the deer family including elk, moose and caribou, are called bulls.
______________________

stag (n.)

late 12c., probably from Old English stagga "a stag," from Proto-Germanic *stag-, from PIE root *stegh- "to stick, prick, sting." The Old Norse equivalent was used of male foxes, tomcats, and dragons; and the Germanic root word perhaps originally meant "male animal in its prime."


Adjectival meaning "pertaining to or composed of males only" (as in stag party) is American English slang from 1848. Compare bull-dance, slang for one performed by men only (1845); gander (n.) also was used in the same sense.

Stag film "pornographic movie" is attested from 1968. Stag beetle, so called for its" horns," is from 1680s.
Will Parsons
2018-01-12 01:25:45 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
Turkey facts: A young turkey is called a poult. A male turkey is a stag and a female is a hen.
ok, but I still imagine a "stag party" to be
full of male deers (maybe with horns)
I've never heard the term "stag" applied to male turkeys - the term
I'm familiar with is "tom-turkeys". And, like you, I imagine those
who go to "stag parties" are suitably adorned with cervine horns. (I
assume that having bigger and more elaborate horns gives one a higher
status.)
--
Will
Peter T. Daniels
2018-01-12 04:10:33 UTC
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Post by Will Parsons
Post by Hen Hanna
Turkey facts: A young turkey is called a poult. A male turkey is a stag and a female is a hen.
ok, but I still imagine a "stag party" to be
full of male deers (maybe with horns)
I've never heard the term "stag" applied to male turkeys - the term
I'm familiar with is "tom-turkeys". And, like you, I imagine those
who go to "stag parties" are suitably adorned with cervine horns. (I
assume that having bigger and more elaborate horns gives one a higher
status.)
Are there degrees of cuckoldry?
b***@gmail.com
2018-01-12 05:59:48 UTC
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Post by Will Parsons
Post by Hen Hanna
Turkey facts: A young turkey is called a poult. A male turkey is a stag and a female is a hen.
ok, but I still imagine a "stag party" to be
full of male deers (maybe with horns)
I've never heard the term "stag" applied to male turkeys - the term
I'm familiar with is "tom-turkeys". And, like you, I imagine those
who go to "stag parties" are suitably adorned with cervine horns. (I
assume that having bigger and more elaborate horns gives one a higher
status.)
--
Will
if there's "tom-turkeys", what about dick and harry's?
Lewis
2018-01-12 06:33:31 UTC
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Post by Will Parsons
Post by Hen Hanna
Turkey facts: A young turkey is called a poult. A male turkey is a stag and a female is a hen.
ok, but I still imagine a "stag party" to be
full of male deers (maybe with horns)
I've never heard the term "stag" applied to male turkeys
Same.
Post by Will Parsons
- the term I'm familiar with is "tom-turkeys".
Or just toms.
Post by Will Parsons
And, like you, I imagine those who go to "stag parties" are suitably
adorned with cervine horns. (I assume that having bigger and more
elaborate horns gives one a higher status.)
I always think of the stag party as a vestigial hold-over from the old
druidic traditions of pre-Christian Northern Europe.

Beltane, specifically.
--
sometimes ascii is the best use of bandwidth... Tonya Engst
Tak To
2018-01-12 17:12:12 UTC
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Post by Will Parsons
Post by Hen Hanna
Turkey facts: A young turkey is called a poult. A male turkey is a stag and a female is a hen.
ok, but I still imagine a "stag party" to be
full of male deers (maybe with horns)
I've never heard the term "stag" applied to male turkeys - the term
I'm familiar with is "tom-turkeys". And, like you, I imagine those
who go to "stag parties" are suitably adorned with cervine horns. (I
assume that having bigger and more elaborate horns gives one a higher
status.)
Cervine horns would be a great triumph in genetic engineering.
What's next? Bovine antlers?
--
Tak
----------------------------------------------------------------+-----
Tak To ***@alum.mit.eduxx
--------------------------------------------------------------------^^
[taode takto ~{LU5B~}] NB: trim the xx to get my real email addr
RH Draney
2018-01-12 21:12:21 UTC
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Post by Tak To
Cervine horns would be a great triumph in genetic engineering.
What's next? Bovine antlers?
The Cervine Horns were an unsuccessful attempt by Herb Alpert at
extending the franchise begun with the Tijuana Brass and the Baja
Marimba Band....r
Hen Hanna
2018-01-12 19:40:38 UTC
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Post by Will Parsons
Post by Hen Hanna
Turkey facts: A young turkey is called a poult. A male turkey is a stag and a female is a hen.
ok, but I still imagine a "stag party" to be
full of male deers (maybe with horns)
I've never heard the term "stag" applied to male turkeys - the term
I'm familiar with is "tom-turkeys". And, like you, I imagine those
who go to "stag parties" are suitably adorned with cervine horns. (I
assume that having bigger and more elaborate horns gives one a higher
status.)
--
Will
[link to the Gary Larson cartoon]


argument:
"stag parties" and "hen parties" are male-female counterparts
in human parties.
Therefore, stags and hens are (must be) male-female counterparts
of the same animal species.


The argument is not without merit, as
what's good for the goose is good for the gander


So I tried to come up with clever counter-analogies:

1. Donkey and Elephant
are (must be) counterparts
of the same animal species.

2. All nations have (or must have)
heads-of-state of comparable
dignity and decorum as the current POTUS.

HH
Lewis
2018-01-12 21:59:40 UTC
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Therefore, stags and hens are (must be) male-female counterparts of
the same animal species.
No. That doesn't follow *at all*.

NB: You seem to take a great deal of effort in formatting your writing
as badly as possible. I haven't been able to figure out what you are
trying to do, but what you are accomplishing is to make your posts
difficult to read and therefore easy to skip.

I fixed the formatting abomination that you posted for the portion I quoted.
--
And, btw, my face cannot go blue because I have no face, I am not like that...
--Dorayme, in a fit of nonsensical drivel
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