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Vulgar narcissist Daniels
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Reinhold {Rey} Aman
2017-12-01 01:18:15 UTC
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Vulgar narcissist Daniels
-------------------------
Checking the Equinox Publishing site for my amusement to see what the
six hairless British birds are up to, I've found more hilarious stuff
about PeteY's eventually published *doomed* book.

The first point of amusement is the shifting number of pages.

When I mentioned that PeteY's *doomed* book is *224* pages, as listed on
their site, he "corrected" me by claiming it's *xvi + 236* pages.

Checking their site a couple of days ago, I see that the birds changed
End Matter
Maps 189-196
Peter T. Daniels <=================== !!!
References 197-218 { 22 pp.! }
Peter T. Daniels <=================== !!!
Indexes 219-236 { 18 pp.! }
Peter T. Daniels <=================== !!!
The students and "general readers," at whom PeteY's *doomed* book is
aimed, will be thrilled when consulting the *40* pages of References and Indexes.

But now to the second point of amusement: PeteY's *vulgar narcissism*.

Books, scholarly and otherwise, show the name of a single author *3*
(three) times: on the front cover of the book, on the spine of the book,
and on the title page; occasionally also on the copyright page.

Vulgar narcissist PeteY, however, insists that his name,
"Peter T. Daniels", is shown *19* (nineteen) times!

* Front cover
* Spine
* Title page

* Introduction
Peter T. Daniels <============== !!!

* Chapter 1
Syllables and Syllabaries
Peter T. Daniels <============== !!!

* Chapter 2
Segments and Alphabets
Peter T. Daniels <============== !!!

* Chapter 3
Consonants and Abjads
Peter T. Daniels <============== !!!

* Chapter 4
Moras and Kana
Peter T. Daniels <============== !!!

* Chapter 5
Clusters and Abugidas
Peter T. Daniels <============== !!!

* Chapter 6
Morphemes and Morphograms
Peter T. Daniels <============== !!!

* Chapter 7
Words and Heterogams
Peter T. Daniels <============== !!!

* Chapter 8
Hybrids and Innovations
Peter T. Daniels <============== !!!

* Chapter 9
Recoveries and Decipherments
Peter T. Daniels <============== !!!

* Chapter 10
Pictograms and Mysteries
Peter T. Daniels <============== !!!

* Chapter 11
Origins and Characteristics
Peter T. Daniels <============== !!!

* Chapter 12
Graphonomy and Linguistics
Peter T. Daniels <============== !!!

* Maps
Peter T. Daniels <============== !!!

* References
Peter T. Daniels <============== !!!

* Indexes
Peter T. Daniels <============== !!!

Has *anyone* ever seen a single-author book boasting such
attention-whoring, shameless, vulgar narcissism by insisting that the
author's name be exhibited ostentatiously *19* times???

Scholars, who by chance may see PeteY's *doomed* book, will be aghast
seeing that ostentatious vulgarian's name *19* times and put it back
unread in the library's stacks.

And those poor British birds at Equinox, who apparently don't have
enough sense to delete the *16* extraneous namings of "Peter T. Daniels"
and who apparently can't afford a competent editor who would have
deleted PeteY's superfluous names, will regret to their dying days for
having their outfit ridiculed and besmirched by publishing that vulgar
and financially devastating *doomed* compilation.
--
~~~ Reinhold {Rey} Aman ~~~
Peter T. Daniels
2017-12-01 04:14:07 UTC
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Post by Reinhold {Rey} Aman
Daniels
-------------------------
Checking the Equinox Publishing site for my amusement to see what the
six hairless British birds are up to, I've found more hilarious stuff
about PeteY's eventually published *doomed* book.
The first point of amusement is the shifting number of pages.
When I mentioned that PeteY's *doomed* book is *224* pages, as listed on
their site, he "corrected" me by claiming it's *xvi + 236* pages.
Checking their site a couple of days ago, I see that the birds changed
End Matter
Maps 189-196
Peter T. Daniels <=================== !!!
References 197-218 { 22 pp.! }
Peter T. Daniels <=================== !!!
Indexes 219-236 { 18 pp.! }
Peter T. Daniels <=================== !!!
The students and "general readers," at whom PeteY's *doomed* book is
aimed, will be thrilled when consulting the *40* pages of References and Indexes.
But now to the second point of amusement: PeteY's *vulgar narcissism*.
Books, scholarly and otherwise, show the name of a single author *3*
(three) times: on the front cover of the book, on the spine of the book,
and on the title page; occasionally also on the copyright page.
Vulgar narcissist PeteY, however, insists that his name,
"Peter T. Daniels", is shown *19* (nineteen) times!
* Front cover
* Spine
* Title page
* Introduction
Peter T. Daniels <============== !!!
* Chapter 1
Syllables and Syllabaries
Peter T. Daniels <============== !!!
* Chapter 2
Segments and Alphabets
Peter T. Daniels <============== !!!
* Chapter 3
Consonants and Abjads
Peter T. Daniels <============== !!!
* Chapter 4
Moras and Kana
Peter T. Daniels <============== !!!
* Chapter 5
Clusters and Abugidas
Peter T. Daniels <============== !!!
* Chapter 6
Morphemes and Morphograms
Peter T. Daniels <============== !!!
* Chapter 7
Words and Heterogams
Peter T. Daniels <============== !!!
* Chapter 8
Hybrids and Innovations
Peter T. Daniels <============== !!!
* Chapter 9
Recoveries and Decipherments
Peter T. Daniels <============== !!!
* Chapter 10
Pictograms and Mysteries
Peter T. Daniels <============== !!!
* Chapter 11
Origins and Characteristics
Peter T. Daniels <============== !!!
* Chapter 12
Graphonomy and Linguistics
Peter T. Daniels <============== !!!
* Maps
Peter T. Daniels <============== !!!
* References
Peter T. Daniels <============== !!!
* Indexes
Peter T. Daniels <============== !!!
Has *anyone* ever seen a single-author book boasting such
attention-whoring, shameless, vulgar narcissism by insisting that the
author's name be exhibited ostentatiously *19* times???
Scholars, who by chance may see PeteY's *doomed* book, will be aghast
seeing that ostentatious vulgarian's name *19* times and put it back
unread in the library's stacks.
And those poor British birds at Equinox, who apparently don't have
enough sense to delete the *16* extraneous namings of "Peter T. Daniels"
and who apparently can't afford a competent editor who would have
deleted PeteY's superfluous names, will regret to their dying days for
having their outfit ridiculed and besmirched by publishing that vulgar
and financially devastating *doomed* compilation.
Turns out that sociopaths have never in their life looked at a publisher's page
for a book.

Authors have no say in web page design or content, beyond supplying summaries
of chapters that were not intended to be published in such a way.
Reinhold {Rey} Aman
2017-12-01 05:47:38 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Reinhold {Rey} Aman
Checking the Equinox Publishing site for my amusement to see what the
six hairless British birds are up to, I've found more hilarious stuff
about PeteY's eventually published *doomed* book.
(I snipped my detailed, accurate info about PeteY's *doomed* book.)
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Reinhold {Rey} Aman
Scholars, who by chance may see PeteY's *doomed* book, will be aghast
seeing that ostentatious vulgarian's name *19* times and put it back
unread in the library's stacks.
And those poor British birds at Equinox, who apparently don't have
enough sense to delete the *16* extraneous namings of "Peter T.
Daniels" and who apparently can't afford a competent editor who would
have deleted PeteY's superfluous names, will regret to their dying
days for having their outfit ridiculed and besmirched by publishing
that vulgar and financially devastating *doomed* compilation.
Turns out that sociopaths have never in their life looked
at a publisher's page for a book.
Cut the bullshit, bullshitting PeteY. I don't know what sociopaths
do, but I have been in the publishing business for 43 years and do
know what's going on. I also had books published in Germany, the USA,
and England and thus am familiar with other publishers' pages.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Authors have no say in web page design or content,
^^^^^^^
Bullshit! I also can't imagine that scholarly authors like
Athel and Laura had no say in the *content* of their works.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
beyond supplying summaries of chapters that were not
intended to be published in such a way.
Bullshit! Irrational and irrelevant. "Victim" PeteY lets six
British birds boss him around. What a wimpy loser!

See the victimized wimpy loser:
Loading Image...
--
~~~ Reinhold {Rey} Aman ~~~
Jenny Telia
2017-12-01 09:13:42 UTC
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On 01/12/2017 02:18, Reinhold {Rey} Aman wrote:

Reinhold, you are showing distinct tendencies of pathological stalking.

I wonder what the equivalent of a restraining order within a newsgroup
would be, if enforceable?

"You shall not post within 5 posts of Mr. Daniels, when in 'threaded
view'. Furthermore, you shall adhere to the golden rule of Usenet by not
including a person's name in the 'Subject' of a post."
Reinhold {Rey} Aman
2017-12-01 17:26:09 UTC
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Jenny Telia drooled something:
[snipped]
Fuck off, you anonymous coward.
--
~~~ Reinhold {Rey} Aman ~~~
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-12-01 17:46:16 UTC
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Post by Reinhold {Rey} Aman
[snipped]
Fuck off, you anonymous coward.
Funny you should say that. I was thinking only today that snidely
thinks that grown ups don't try to correct PTD's misstatements, but he
apparently does think that grown ups hide their names. I don't think
it's his case, but there are many anonymous cowards on Twitter etc. who
write things about others -- especially women -- that they wouldn't
dare to say openly.
--
athel
Peter T. Daniels
2017-12-01 20:00:36 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Reinhold {Rey} Aman
[snipped]
Fuck off, you anonymous coward.
Funny you should say that. I was thinking only today that snidely
thinks that grown ups don't try to correct PTD's misstatements, but he
He can't even understand what snidely writes.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
apparently does think that grown ups hide their names. I don't think
it's his case, but there are many anonymous cowards on Twitter etc. who
write things about others -- especially women -- that they wouldn't
dare to say openly.
He apparently doesn't grasp that "snidely" is a pseudonym.
J. J. Lodder
2017-12-01 20:59:22 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Reinhold {Rey} Aman
[snipped]
Fuck off, you anonymous coward.
Funny you should say that. I was thinking only today that snidely
thinks that grown ups don't try to correct PTD's misstatements, but he
He can't even understand what snidely writes.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
apparently does think that grown ups hide their names. I don't think
it's his case, but there are many anonymous cowards on Twitter etc. who
write things about others -- especially women -- that they wouldn't
dare to say openly.
He apparently doesn't grasp that "snidely" is a pseudonym.
There are no pseudonyms on usenet, only nyms,

Jan
Sam Plusnet
2017-12-02 01:57:26 UTC
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Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Reinhold {Rey} Aman
[snipped]
Fuck off, you anonymous coward.
Funny you should say that. I was thinking only today that snidely
thinks that grown ups don't try to correct PTD's misstatements, but he
He can't even understand what snidely writes.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
apparently does think that grown ups hide their names. I don't think
it's his case, but there are many anonymous cowards on Twitter etc. who
write things about others -- especially women -- that they wouldn't
dare to say openly.
He apparently doesn't grasp that "snidely" is a pseudonym.
There are no pseudonyms on usenet, only nyms,
The battle-nym of the repugnant?
--
Sam Plusnet
occam
2017-12-02 09:08:06 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by J. J. Lodder
On Friday, December 1, 2017 at 12:46:00 PM UTC-5, Athel
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Reinhold {Rey} Aman
[snipped]
Fuck off, you anonymous coward.
Funny you should say that. I was thinking only today that snidely
thinks that grown ups don't try to correct PTD's misstatements, but he
He can't even understand what snidely writes.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
apparently does think that grown ups hide their names. I don't think
it's his case, but there are many anonymous cowards on Twitter etc. who
write things about others -- especially women -- that they wouldn't
dare to say openly.
He apparently doesn't grasp that "snidely" is a pseudonym.
There are no pseudonyms on usenet, only nyms,
The battle-nym of the repugnant?
Is 'battle-nym' the same as 'nom de guerre'? I am not clear about the
difference between 'nom de guerre' and 'nom de plume' in French. The
former is not much used in English whereas the latter is more common.
b***@aol.com
2017-12-02 17:40:19 UTC
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Post by occam
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by J. J. Lodder
On Friday, December 1, 2017 at 12:46:00 PM UTC-5, Athel
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Reinhold {Rey} Aman
[snipped]
Fuck off, you anonymous coward.
Funny you should say that. I was thinking only today that snidely
thinks that grown ups don't try to correct PTD's misstatements, but he
He can't even understand what snidely writes.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
apparently does think that grown ups hide their names. I don't think
it's his case, but there are many anonymous cowards on Twitter etc. who
write things about others -- especially women -- that they wouldn't
dare to say openly.
He apparently doesn't grasp that "snidely" is a pseudonym.
There are no pseudonyms on usenet, only nyms,
The battle-nym of the repugnant?
Is 'battle-nym' the same as 'nom de guerre'? I am not clear about the
difference between 'nom de guerre' and 'nom de plume' in French. The
former is not much used in English whereas the latter is more common.
In French, a "nom de guerre" applies to all fields and may have not
been self-attributed by the person who receives it, whereas "nom de
plume" is limited to writing and refers to the name a writer deliberately
uses in their activity.

The same seems to hold true in English.
occam
2017-12-02 19:56:09 UTC
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Post by b***@aol.com
Post by occam
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by J. J. Lodder
On Friday, December 1, 2017 at 12:46:00 PM UTC-5, Athel
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Reinhold {Rey} Aman
[snipped]
Fuck off, you anonymous coward.
Funny you should say that. I was thinking only today that snidely
thinks that grown ups don't try to correct PTD's misstatements, but he
He can't even understand what snidely writes.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
apparently does think that grown ups hide their names. I don't think
it's his case, but there are many anonymous cowards on Twitter etc. who
write things about others -- especially women -- that they wouldn't
dare to say openly.
He apparently doesn't grasp that "snidely" is a pseudonym.
There are no pseudonyms on usenet, only nyms,
The battle-nym of the repugnant?
Is 'battle-nym' the same as 'nom de guerre'? I am not clear about the
difference between 'nom de guerre' and 'nom de plume' in French. The
former is not much used in English whereas the latter is more common.
In French, a "nom de guerre" applies to all fields and may have not
been self-attributed by the person who receives it, whereas "nom de
plume" is limited to writing and refers to the name a writer deliberately
uses in their activity.
The same seems to hold true in English.
So, the modern internet term 'nym' would be 'nom de plume' (or maybe
even 'nom de clavier' ;-)?
RH Draney
2017-12-02 20:13:53 UTC
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Post by occam
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by occam
Is 'battle-nym' the same as 'nom de guerre'? I am not clear about the
difference between 'nom de guerre' and 'nom de plume' in French. The
former is not much used in English whereas the latter is more common.
In French, a "nom de guerre" applies to all fields and may have not
been self-attributed by the person who receives it, whereas "nom de
plume" is limited to writing and refers to the name a writer deliberately
uses in their activity.
The same seems to hold true in English.
So, the modern internet term 'nym' would be 'nom de plume' (or maybe
even 'nom de clavier' ;-)?
Temper, temper!...r
Peter T. Daniels
2017-12-02 23:12:11 UTC
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Post by b***@aol.com
Post by occam
Is 'battle-nym' the same as 'nom de guerre'? I am not clear about the
difference between 'nom de guerre' and 'nom de plume' in French. The
former is not much used in English whereas the latter is more common.
In French, a "nom de guerre" applies to all fields and may have not
been self-attributed by the person who receives it, whereas "nom de
plume" is limited to writing and refers to the name a writer deliberately
uses in their activity.
The same seems to hold true in English.
Dang! That was this week's Sunday Puzzle on NPR. Think of a familiar French
phrase, three words, 3-2-5 letters. The first word, and the first word of the
English translation, sound like a world capital.

Send in the answer before 3:00 on Thursday and maybe you'll be selected to play
Puzzle on the air with Will Shortz.

Tune in to your local NPR station at 8:40 EST Sunday to find out how many
correct answers they received. I imagine this was one of the easiest, so
they'll have above 2000 correct answers.
Mack A. Damia
2017-12-02 23:58:35 UTC
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On Sat, 2 Dec 2017 15:12:11 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by occam
Is 'battle-nym' the same as 'nom de guerre'? I am not clear about the
difference between 'nom de guerre' and 'nom de plume' in French. The
former is not much used in English whereas the latter is more common.
In French, a "nom de guerre" applies to all fields and may have not
been self-attributed by the person who receives it, whereas "nom de
plume" is limited to writing and refers to the name a writer deliberately
uses in their activity.
The same seems to hold true in English.
Dang! That was this week's Sunday Puzzle on NPR. Think of a familiar French
phrase, three words, 3-2-5 letters. The first word, and the first word of the
English translation, sound like a world capital.
Phnom Penh.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Send in the answer before 3:00 on Thursday and maybe you'll be selected to play
Puzzle on the air with Will Shortz.
Tune in to your local NPR station at 8:40 EST Sunday to find out how many
correct answers they received. I imagine this was one of the easiest, so
they'll have above 2000 correct answers.
Peter T. Daniels
2017-12-03 00:08:24 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sat, 2 Dec 2017 15:12:11 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by occam
Is 'battle-nym' the same as 'nom de guerre'? I am not clear about the
difference between 'nom de guerre' and 'nom de plume' in French. The
former is not much used in English whereas the latter is more common.
In French, a "nom de guerre" applies to all fields and may have not
been self-attributed by the person who receives it, whereas "nom de
plume" is limited to writing and refers to the name a writer deliberately
uses in their activity.
The same seems to hold true in English.
Dang! That was this week's Sunday Puzzle on NPR. Think of a familiar French
phrase, three words, 3-2-5 letters. The first word, and the first word of the
English translation, sound like a world capital.
Phnom Penh.
Did you figure that out all by yourself?
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Send in the answer before 3:00 on Thursday and maybe you'll be selected to play
Puzzle on the air with Will Shortz.
Tune in to your local NPR station at 8:40 EST Sunday to find out how many
correct answers they received. I imagine this was one of the easiest, so
they'll have above 2000 correct answers.
Mack A. Damia
2017-12-03 00:13:26 UTC
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On Sat, 2 Dec 2017 16:08:24 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sat, 2 Dec 2017 15:12:11 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by occam
Is 'battle-nym' the same as 'nom de guerre'? I am not clear about the
difference between 'nom de guerre' and 'nom de plume' in French. The
former is not much used in English whereas the latter is more common.
In French, a "nom de guerre" applies to all fields and may have not
been self-attributed by the person who receives it, whereas "nom de
plume" is limited to writing and refers to the name a writer deliberately
uses in their activity.
The same seems to hold true in English.
Dang! That was this week's Sunday Puzzle on NPR. Think of a familiar French
phrase, three words, 3-2-5 letters. The first word, and the first word of the
English translation, sound like a world capital.
Phnom Penh.
Did you figure that out all by yourself?
Of course. Nom de Plume - Pen name

Easy-Peasy.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Send in the answer before 3:00 on Thursday and maybe you'll be selected to play
Puzzle on the air with Will Shortz.
Tune in to your local NPR station at 8:40 EST Sunday to find out how many
correct answers they received. I imagine this was one of the easiest, so
they'll have above 2000 correct answers.
Peter T. Daniels
2017-12-03 13:30:17 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sat, 2 Dec 2017 16:08:24 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sat, 2 Dec 2017 15:12:11 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
In French, a "nom de guerre" applies to all fields and may have not
been self-attributed by the person who receives it, whereas "nom de
plume" is limited to writing and refers to the name a writer deliberately
uses in their activity.
The same seems to hold true in English.
Dang! That was this week's Sunday Puzzle on NPR. Think of a familiar French
phrase, three words, 3-2-5 letters. The first word, and the first word of the
English translation, sound like a world capital.
Phnom Penh.
Did you figure that out all by yourself?
Of course. Nom de Plume - Pen name
Easy-Peasy.
Especially when the answer is given three lines above where the riddle started.
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Send in the answer before 3:00 on Thursday and maybe you'll be selected to play
Puzzle on the air with Will Shortz.
Tune in to your local NPR station at 8:40 EST Sunday to find out how many
correct answers they received. I imagine this was one of the easiest, so
they'll have above 2000 correct answers.
Peter T. Daniels
2017-12-03 14:13:44 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sat, 2 Dec 2017 16:08:24 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sat, 2 Dec 2017 15:12:11 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
In French, a "nom de guerre" applies to all fields and may have not
been self-attributed by the person who receives it, whereas "nom de
plume" is limited to writing and refers to the name a writer deliberately
uses in their activity.
The same seems to hold true in English.
Dang! That was this week's Sunday Puzzle on NPR. Think of a familiar French
phrase, three words, 3-2-5 letters. The first word, and the first word of the
English translation, sound like a world capital.
Phnom Penh.
Did you figure that out all by yourself?
Of course. Nom de Plume - Pen name
Easy-Peasy.
Especially when the answer is given three lines above where the riddle started.
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Send in the answer before 3:00 on Thursday and maybe you'll be selected to play
Puzzle on the air with Will Shortz.
Tune in to your local NPR station at 8:40 EST Sunday to find out how many
correct answers they received. I imagine this was one of the easiest, so
they'll have above 2000 correct answers.
Curiously, only "More than 1400" correct answers were submitted. The fellow who was picked at
random explained that he knew "nom de plume" from a song from *Aladdin*, and when he was saying
out loud, "nom, pen," his partner observed "I think that's a place in Asia somewhere." He then
"looked it up" and discovered Phnom Penh (though how he did that without knowing the spelling
isn't clear). The host then pointed out to Will Shortz that the official NPR pronunciation does
include the P, but she'd allow him poetic license this time.
Mack A. Damia
2017-12-03 16:18:39 UTC
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On Sun, 3 Dec 2017 05:30:17 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sat, 2 Dec 2017 16:08:24 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sat, 2 Dec 2017 15:12:11 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
In French, a "nom de guerre" applies to all fields and may have not
been self-attributed by the person who receives it, whereas "nom de
plume" is limited to writing and refers to the name a writer deliberately
uses in their activity.
The same seems to hold true in English.
Dang! That was this week's Sunday Puzzle on NPR. Think of a familiar French
phrase, three words, 3-2-5 letters. The first word, and the first word of the
English translation, sound like a world capital.
Phnom Penh.
Did you figure that out all by yourself?
Of course. Nom de Plume - Pen name
Easy-Peasy.
Especially when the answer is given three lines above where the riddle started.
You're just another lowly scumbag, Daniels.

You read what I posted last night. I did not see the earlier
conversation that mentioned Nom de Plume. I thought of the phrase
because I remembered a 1956 TV program by the same name.

God, fella, you lie so much you think everybody else does. You are
one sad son of a bitch.
Peter T. Daniels
2017-12-03 20:22:38 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 3 Dec 2017 05:30:17 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sat, 2 Dec 2017 16:08:24 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sat, 2 Dec 2017 15:12:11 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
In French, a "nom de guerre" applies to all fields and may have not
been self-attributed by the person who receives it, whereas "nom de
plume" is limited to writing and refers to the name a writer deliberately
uses in their activity.
The same seems to hold true in English.
Dang! That was this week's Sunday Puzzle on NPR. Think of a familiar French
phrase, three words, 3-2-5 letters. The first word, and the first word of the
English translation, sound like a world capital.
Phnom Penh.
Did you figure that out all by yourself?
Of course. Nom de Plume - Pen name
Easy-Peasy.
Especially when the answer is given three lines above where the riddle started.
You're just another lowly scumbag, Daniels.
You read what I posted last night.
I didn't read anything last night. I actually fell asleep during a "City
Cinematheque" presentation of *Little Lord Fauntleroy* (I can't imagine what
the 1930s audience saw in Freddie Bartholomew -- especially when he was cast
opposite the dynamic Mickey Rooney) and turned out the light without coming
back to the computer.
Post by Mack A. Damia
I did not see the earlier
conversation that mentioned Nom de Plume. I thought of the phrase
because I remembered a 1956 TV program by the same name.
God, fella, you lie so much you think everybody else does. You are
one sad son of a bitch.
You managed to read the riddle without reading the paragraph quoted immediately
above it. Someone's credibility is strained, and it ain't mine.
Mack A. Damia
2017-12-03 20:42:29 UTC
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On Sun, 3 Dec 2017 12:22:38 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 3 Dec 2017 05:30:17 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sat, 2 Dec 2017 16:08:24 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sat, 2 Dec 2017 15:12:11 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
In French, a "nom de guerre" applies to all fields and may have not
been self-attributed by the person who receives it, whereas "nom de
plume" is limited to writing and refers to the name a writer deliberately
uses in their activity.
The same seems to hold true in English.
Dang! That was this week's Sunday Puzzle on NPR. Think of a familiar French
phrase, three words, 3-2-5 letters. The first word, and the first word of the
English translation, sound like a world capital.
Phnom Penh.
Did you figure that out all by yourself?
Of course. Nom de Plume - Pen name
Easy-Peasy.
Especially when the answer is given three lines above where the riddle started.
You're just another lowly scumbag, Daniels.
You read what I posted last night.
I didn't read anything last night. I actually fell asleep during a "City
Cinematheque" presentation of *Little Lord Fauntleroy* (I can't imagine what
the 1930s audience saw in Freddie Bartholomew -- especially when he was cast
opposite the dynamic Mickey Rooney) and turned out the light without coming
back to the computer.
You lie through your teeth. Lying is so much a part of you, you don't
even realize it. Remember, Daniels, I am not the only one in here who
has pointed this out.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
I did not see the earlier
conversation that mentioned Nom de Plume. I thought of the phrase
because I remembered a 1956 TV program by the same name.
God, fella, you lie so much you think everybody else does. You are
one sad son of a bitch.
You managed to read the riddle without reading the paragraph quoted immediately
above it. Someone's credibility is strained, and it ain't mine.
There you go. You don't believe because you are a pathological liar.

I unsubscribed and then subscribed to the group again to clean up the
sheer volume of posts. I didn't yet put you into your dishonored
place in the Bozo Bin, and I accidentally opened your message and
immediately read the quiz problem. I didn't read anything else except
the problem as you stated it. If you don't believe that, then it only
reveals the depth of your personality disorder.

Your veracity is strained, bunkie, and that's engraved in the
tarnished holes of AUE.

Back into the Bozo Bin with you, loser.
Peter T. Daniels
2017-12-03 20:57:09 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 3 Dec 2017 12:22:38 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 3 Dec 2017 05:30:17 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sat, 2 Dec 2017 16:08:24 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sat, 2 Dec 2017 15:12:11 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
In French, a "nom de guerre" applies to all fields and may have not
been self-attributed by the person who receives it, whereas "nom de
plume" is limited to writing and refers to the name a writer deliberately
uses in their activity.
The same seems to hold true in English.
Dang! That was this week's Sunday Puzzle on NPR. Think of a familiar French
phrase, three words, 3-2-5 letters. The first word, and the first word of the
English translation, sound like a world capital.
Phnom Penh.
Did you figure that out all by yourself?
Of course. Nom de Plume - Pen name
Easy-Peasy.
Especially when the answer is given three lines above where the riddle started.
You're just another lowly scumbag, Daniels.
You read what I posted last night.
I didn't read anything last night. I actually fell asleep during a "City
Cinematheque" presentation of *Little Lord Fauntleroy* (I can't imagine what
the 1930s audience saw in Freddie Bartholomew -- especially when he was cast
opposite the dynamic Mickey Rooney) and turned out the light without coming
back to the computer.
You lie through your teeth. Lying is so much a part of you, you don't
even realize it. Remember, Daniels, I am not the only one in here who
has pointed this out.
Were you somehow spying on me at 10 pm last night?
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
I did not see the earlier
conversation that mentioned Nom de Plume. I thought of the phrase
because I remembered a 1956 TV program by the same name.
God, fella, you lie so much you think everybody else does. You are
one sad son of a bitch.
You managed to read the riddle without reading the paragraph quoted immediately
above it. Someone's credibility is strained, and it ain't mine.
There you go. You don't believe because you are a pathological liar.
I unsubscribed and then subscribed to the group again to clean up the
sheer volume of posts. I didn't yet put you into your dishonored
place in the Bozo Bin, and I accidentally opened your message and
immediately read the quiz problem. I didn't read anything else except
the problem as you stated it. If you don't believe that, then it only
reveals the depth of your personality disorder.
Your veracity is strained, bunkie, and that's engraved in the
tarnished holes of AUE.
Back into the Bozo Bin with you, loser.
I wish that meant you would stop responding to my messages, but experience
shows that it doesn't.
Peter Moylan
2017-12-03 04:14:44 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sat, 2 Dec 2017 15:12:11 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Dang! That was this week's Sunday Puzzle on NPR. Think of a familiar French
phrase, three words, 3-2-5 letters. The first word, and the first word of the
English translation, sound like a world capital.
Phnom Penh.
That wouldn't work in an Australian crossword puzzle, because we
pronounce the 'P' in 'Phnom'.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Mack A. Damia
2017-12-03 04:44:16 UTC
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On Sun, 3 Dec 2017 15:14:44 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sat, 2 Dec 2017 15:12:11 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Dang! That was this week's Sunday Puzzle on NPR. Think of a familiar French
phrase, three words, 3-2-5 letters. The first word, and the first word of the
English translation, sound like a world capital.
Phnom Penh.
That wouldn't work in an Australian crossword puzzle, because we
pronounce the 'P' in 'Phnom'.
It was easy - but harder because I did not read that the previous
discussion mentioned "nom de plume".

I thought of phrase because there used to be a TV program by that name
(1956 series) and it's one of the few French phrases I know.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt4795020/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1
Dr. HotSalt
2017-12-03 10:43:40 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sat, 2 Dec 2017 15:12:11 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Dang! That was this week's Sunday Puzzle on NPR. Think of a familiar French
phrase, three words, 3-2-5 letters. The first word, and the first word of the
English translation, sound like a world capital.
Phnom Penh.
That wouldn't work in an Australian crossword puzzle, because we
pronounce the 'P' in 'Phnom'.
Do you also pronounce the haitch?


Dr. Hot"wondering how that looks in IPA"Salt
Peter Moylan
2017-12-03 11:03:12 UTC
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Post by Dr. HotSalt
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sat, 2 Dec 2017 15:12:11 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Dang! That was this week's Sunday Puzzle on NPR. Think of a familiar French
phrase, three words, 3-2-5 letters. The first word, and the first word of the
English translation, sound like a world capital.
Phnom Penh.
That wouldn't work in an Australian crossword puzzle, because we
pronounce the 'P' in 'Phnom'.
Do you also pronounce the haitch?
Yes, in the sense that the aspiration of the 'P' produces a puff of air.
Still, I must admit that I don't pronounce the 'h' in 'Penh".
Post by Dr. HotSalt
Dr. Hot"wondering how that looks in IPA"Salt
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Quinn C
2017-12-05 22:50:59 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Dr. HotSalt
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sat, 2 Dec 2017 15:12:11 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Dang! That was this week's Sunday Puzzle on NPR. Think of a familiar French
phrase, three words, 3-2-5 letters. The first word, and the first word of the
English translation, sound like a world capital.
Phnom Penh.
That wouldn't work in an Australian crossword puzzle, because we
pronounce the 'P' in 'Phnom'.
I arrived at the answer myself, although I wasn't really sure of
it. I didn't think anyone would think the initial P should be
dropped, even if they did so themselves, but that the answer was
just "close enough" - as many riddles are when looked at from
other dialects of English. I have complained several times about
how finding rhyming words is more difficult when they don't rhyme
in your dialect (did I mention the choco taco?)
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Dr. HotSalt
Do you also pronounce the haitch?
Yes, in the sense that the aspiration of the 'P' produces a puff of air.
Then, to make it significant, you shouldn't do the same in "Penh".
That's actually what the spelling p/ph means in this case.
Post by Peter Moylan
Still, I must admit that I don't pronounce the 'h' in 'Penh".
Apparently it stands for a palatalization, similar to the sounds
in digne/gnocchi/niño. Now if you also read the o in Phnom as [u],
you get quite close to the local pronunciation.
--
- It's the title search for the Rachel property.
Guess who owns it?
- Tell me it's not that bastard Donald Trump.
-- Gilmore Girls, S02E08 (2001)
Jerry Friedman
2017-12-05 23:38:57 UTC
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Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sat, 2 Dec 2017 15:12:11 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Dang! That was this week's Sunday Puzzle on NPR. Think of a familiar French
phrase, three words, 3-2-5 letters. The first word, and the first word of the
English translation, sound like a world capital.
Phnom Penh.
That wouldn't work in an Australian crossword puzzle, because we
pronounce the 'P' in 'Phnom'.
I arrived at the answer myself, although I wasn't really sure of
it. I didn't think anyone would think the initial P should be
dropped, even if they did so themselves,
For many, maybe most Americans, it follows the same rule as
"pneumonia".
Post by Quinn C
but that the answer was
just "close enough" - as many riddles are when looked at from
other dialects of English.
...

Quite true.
--
Jerry Friedman
Wayne Brown
2017-12-06 01:07:00 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sat, 2 Dec 2017 15:12:11 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Dang! That was this week's Sunday Puzzle on NPR. Think of a familiar French
phrase, three words, 3-2-5 letters. The first word, and the first word of the
English translation, sound like a world capital.
Phnom Penh.
That wouldn't work in an Australian crossword puzzle, because we
pronounce the 'P' in 'Phnom'.
I arrived at the answer myself, although I wasn't really sure of
it. I didn't think anyone would think the initial P should be
dropped, even if they did so themselves,
For many, maybe most Americans, it follows the same rule as
"pneumonia".
I've always pronounced "Phnom" like a shorter, quicker version of
the first two syllables of "phenomenon" blended into a single syllable.
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Quinn C
but that the answer was
just "close enough" - as many riddles are when looked at from
other dialects of English.
...
Quite true.
--
F. Wayne Brown <***@bellsouth.net>

ur sag9-ga ur-tur-še3 ba-an-kur9
"A dog that is played with turns into a puppy." (Sumerian proverb)
Jerry Friedman
2017-12-06 17:16:21 UTC
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Post by Wayne Brown
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sat, 2 Dec 2017 15:12:11 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Dang! That was this week's Sunday Puzzle on NPR. Think of a familiar French
phrase, three words, 3-2-5 letters. The first word, and the first word of the
English translation, sound like a world capital.
Phnom Penh.
That wouldn't work in an Australian crossword puzzle, because we
pronounce the 'P' in 'Phnom'.
I arrived at the answer myself, although I wasn't really sure of
it. I didn't think anyone would think the initial P should be
dropped, even if they did so themselves,
For many, maybe most Americans, it follows the same rule as
"pneumonia".
I've always pronounced "Phnom" like a shorter, quicker version of
the first two syllables of "phenomenon" blended into a single syllable.
...

That one's new to me. (Sorry, wrong thread.)
--
Jerry Friedman
Dr. HotSalt
2017-12-09 00:21:45 UTC
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Post by Wayne Brown
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sat, 2 Dec 2017 15:12:11 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Dang! That was this week's Sunday Puzzle on NPR. Think of a
familiar French phrase, three words, 3-2-5 letters. The first
word, and the first word of the English translation, sound like a
world capital.
Phnom Penh.
That wouldn't work in an Australian crossword puzzle, because we
pronounce the 'P' in 'Phnom'.
I arrived at the answer myself, although I wasn't really sure of
it. I didn't think anyone would think the initial P should be
dropped, even if they did so themselves,
For many, maybe most Americans, it follows the same rule as
"pneumonia".
I've always pronounced "Phnom" like a shorter, quicker version of
the first two syllables of "phenomenon" blended into a single syllable.
That's how those of us old enough to have watched live coverage of the Vietnam War heard it pronounced by Walter Cronkite et. al.


Dr. HotSalt
Wayne Brown
2017-12-09 13:53:25 UTC
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Post by Dr. HotSalt
Post by Wayne Brown
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sat, 2 Dec 2017 15:12:11 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Dang! That was this week's Sunday Puzzle on NPR. Think of a
familiar French phrase, three words, 3-2-5 letters. The first
word, and the first word of the English translation, sound like a
world capital.
Phnom Penh.
That wouldn't work in an Australian crossword puzzle, because we
pronounce the 'P' in 'Phnom'.
I arrived at the answer myself, although I wasn't really sure of
it. I didn't think anyone would think the initial P should be
dropped, even if they did so themselves,
For many, maybe most Americans, it follows the same rule as
"pneumonia".
I've always pronounced "Phnom" like a shorter, quicker version of
the first two syllables of "phenomenon" blended into a single syllable.
That's how those of us old enough to have watched live coverage
of the Vietnam War heard it pronounced by Walter Cronkite et. al.
That's probably where I got it, from listening to Walter Cronkite
(or perhaps from Huntley & Brinkley).
--
F. Wayne Brown <***@bellsouth.net>

ur sag9-ga ur-tur-še3 ba-an-kur9
"A dog that is played with turns into a puppy." (Sumerian proverb)
Quinn C
2017-12-05 22:51:00 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Reinhold {Rey} Aman
[snipped]
Fuck off, you anonymous coward.
Funny you should say that. I was thinking only today that snidely
thinks that grown ups don't try to correct PTD's misstatements, but he
apparently does think that grown ups hide their names. I don't think
it's his case, but there are many anonymous cowards on Twitter etc. who
write things about others -- especially women -- that they wouldn't
dare to say openly.
I believe recent studies show no such difference between users of
real names and pseudonyms.
--
The Eskimoes had fifty-two names for snow because it was
important to them, there ought to be as many for love.
-- Margaret Atwood, Surfacing (novel), p.106
Wayne Brown
2017-12-01 18:55:42 UTC
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Post by Jenny Telia
Reinhold, you are showing distinct tendencies of pathological stalking.
I wonder what the equivalent of a restraining order within a newsgroup
would be, if enforceable?
"You shall not post within 5 posts of Mr. Daniels, when in 'threaded
view'. Furthermore, you shall adhere to the golden rule of Usenet by not
including a person's name in the 'Subject' of a post."
Back in 1999 a disagreement in the newsgroup rec.alpine.skiing
escalated to the point of death threats. A judge in Seattle banned
one of the participants, Scott Abraham, from posting in the newsgroup
for a year. It was the first (and so far as I know, only) case of
such a legal ruling being issued. It caused a bit of a controversy
at the time and was reported in a number of media outlets. Here are
links to a _Seattle Times_ story and a _Wired_ article about it:

http://community.seattletimes.nwsource.com/archive/?date=19991117&slug=2995869
https://www.wired.com/1999/11/usenet-ban-a-slippery-slope/

I never visited that newsgroup myself, but I was participating in the
newsgroup creation process in news.groups back around that time and
some of the r.a.s. regulars were trying to get a moderated version
of the newsgroup called rec.alpine.skiing.moderated created, mostly to
keep "Scotty" out. He showed up in the discussions and was, from what
I remember, quite unpleasant and seemed to me to be rather "eccentric"
(to put it mildly).
--
F. Wayne Brown <***@bellsouth.net>

ur sag9-ga ur-tur-še3 ba-an-kur9
"A dog that is played with turns into a puppy." (Sumerian proverb)
Wayne Brown
2017-12-01 19:01:02 UTC
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Post by Wayne Brown
Post by Jenny Telia
Reinhold, you are showing distinct tendencies of pathological stalking.
I wonder what the equivalent of a restraining order within a newsgroup
would be, if enforceable?
"You shall not post within 5 posts of Mr. Daniels, when in 'threaded
view'. Furthermore, you shall adhere to the golden rule of Usenet by not
including a person's name in the 'Subject' of a post."
Back in 1999 a disagreement in the newsgroup rec.alpine.skiing
escalated to the point of death threats. A judge in Seattle banned
one of the participants, Scott Abraham, from posting in the newsgroup
for a year. It was the first (and so far as I know, only) case of
such a legal ruling being issued. It caused a bit of a controversy
at the time and was reported in a number of media outlets. Here are
http://community.seattletimes.nwsource.com/archive/?date=19991117&slug=2995869
https://www.wired.com/1999/11/usenet-ban-a-slippery-slope/
I never visited that newsgroup myself, but I was participating in the
newsgroup creation process in news.groups back around that time and
some of the r.a.s. regulars were trying to get a moderated version
of the newsgroup called rec.alpine.skiing.moderated created, mostly to
keep "Scotty" out. He showed up in the discussions and was, from what
I remember, quite unpleasant and seemed to me to be rather "eccentric"
(to put it mildly).
Correction: The newsgroup is rec.skiing.alpine (I had the last two
elements of the name reversed). In my defense, it's been almost
twenty years since this happened and I was writing from memory until
I searched for those two links.
--
F. Wayne Brown <***@bellsouth.net>

ur sag9-ga ur-tur-še3 ba-an-kur9
"A dog that is played with turns into a puppy." (Sumerian proverb)
HVS
2017-12-01 19:25:26 UTC
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On Fri, 1 Dec 2017 19:01:02 -0000 (UTC), Wayne Brown
<***@bellsouth.net> wrote:

-snip -
Post by Wayne Brown
Correction: The newsgroup is rec.skiing.alpine (I had the last two
elements of the name reversed). In my defense, it's been almost
twenty years since this happened and I was writing from memory until
I searched for those two links.
In this current thread, the trigger for Aman is presumably the
accusation of stalking/harassment, which IIRC is a particularly
sensitive personal issue for him.
Reinhold {Rey} Aman
2017-12-02 01:00:54 UTC
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Post by HVS
In this current thread, the trigger for Aman is presumably the
accusation of stalking/harassment, which IIRC is a particularly
sensitive personal issue for him.
Arschitect Harvey Van Fuckle has been stalking me for more than 15
years, sniping at me from behind his safe killfile.

According to that cowardly asshole, stalking/harassment is a
"particularly sensitive personal issue" for me. What a crazy bastard!

Say, Shaky, IIRC, is your child-molestation conviction in Canada and
then fleeing from justice to England decades ago a particularly
sensitive personal issue for you?

(This is of course just a PeteY-type "joke.")
--
~~~ Reinhold {Rey} Aman ~~~
Dr. HotSalt
2017-12-03 10:47:30 UTC
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Post by HVS
On Fri, 1 Dec 2017 19:01:02 -0000 (UTC), Wayne Brown
-snip -
Post by Wayne Brown
Correction: The newsgroup is rec.skiing.alpine (I had the last two
elements of the name reversed). In my defense, it's been almost
twenty years since this happened and I was writing from memory until
I searched for those two links.
In this current thread, the trigger for Aman is presumably the
accusation of stalking/harassment, which IIRC is a particularly
sensitive personal issue for him.
I cannot imagine "sensitive" being used in the same sentence with the name of the person with delusions of royalty.


Dr. Hot"cue the claims of cowardice for using a nym"Salt
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