Discussion:
Do you distinguish "careen" from "career"?
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Harrison Hill
2018-01-11 17:22:59 UTC
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Asked of a Brit by PTD:

Do you even fail to distinguish "careen" from "career"?

Is "careen" in our BrE vocabulary at all? If it is
in what way is it distinguished from "career"?
Katy Jennison
2018-01-11 17:34:10 UTC
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Post by Harrison Hill
Do you even fail to distinguish "careen" from "career"?
Is "careen" in our BrE vocabulary at all? If it is
in what way is it distinguished from "career"?
Careen is what one does to boats. Career isn't boating unless you're a
sailor.
--
Katy Jennison
Harrison Hill
2018-01-11 17:50:49 UTC
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Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Harrison Hill
Do you even fail to distinguish "careen" from "career"?
Is "careen" in our BrE vocabulary at all? If it is
in what way is it distinguished from "career"?
Careen is what one does to boats. Career isn't boating unless you're a
sailor.
The two verbs are also synonyms Katy. "Careen" crossed the
Atlantic in this song, and led directly to two
Beatles hit titles:

1) Something [in the way she moves].
2) I Feel Fine.

This YouTube link is to James Taylor:
3) Something in the way she moves



"To me the words are nice the way they sound".

http://youtu.be/XAzgwSLiMUc
LFS
2018-01-11 18:29:03 UTC
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Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Harrison Hill
Do you even fail to distinguish "careen" from "career"?
Is "careen" in our BrE vocabulary at all? If it is
in what way is it distinguished from "career"?
Careen is what one does to boats. Career isn't boating unless you're a
sailor.
The two verbs are also synonyms Katy. "Careen" crossed the
Atlantic in this song, and led directly to two
1) Something [in the way she moves].
2) I Feel Fine.
3) Something in the way she moves
http://youtu.be/XAzgwSLiMUc
"To me the words are nice the way they sound".
http://youtu.be/XAzgwSLiMUc
Led directly? What on earth does that mean? The word careen does not
appear in either of those songs.

OED:

[Influenced by career v. 2] To rush headlong, to hurtle, esp. with an
unsteady motion. Chiefly U.S.

1923 E. R. Burroughs Chessmen of Mars vii. 70 The cruiser ‘Vanator’
careened through the tempest.
1925 T. Dreiser Amer. Trag. I. ii. xxiii. 312 There came a
contact..which set his thoughts careening in an entirely different
direction.
1928 F. Hurst President is Born xiii. 146 With terrible, terrifying,
careening strides, that zigzagged crazily.
1928 F. Hurst President is Born xxxi. 315 The tears jetted and
careened down to her lips.
1940 Amer. Speech 15 72 Careen of recent years has come to mean ‘to
rush headlong’, or ‘hurtle’, doubtless because of its resemblance to career.
1957 H. Roosenburg Walls came tumbling Down iv. 91 A lot of Russians
careening along the road on liberated bicycles.
1965 H. Gold Man who was not with It (1965) v. 46 A shrill cry
careened down the street.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Harrison Hill
2018-01-11 19:00:33 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Harrison Hill
Do you even fail to distinguish "careen" from "career"?
Is "careen" in our BrE vocabulary at all? If it is
in what way is it distinguished from "career"?
Careen is what one does to boats. Career isn't boating unless you're a
sailor.
The two verbs are also synonyms Katy. "Careen" crossed the
Atlantic in this song, and led directly to two
1) Something [in the way she moves].
2) I Feel Fine.
3) Something in the way she moves
http://youtu.be/XAzgwSLiMUc
"To me the words are nice the way they sound".
http://youtu.be/XAzgwSLiMUc
Led directly? What on earth does that mean? The word careen does not
appear in either of those songs.
What an annoying way of looking at the world.

"The Wright Brothers led directly to modern flight".
"No they didn't. The latest Boeings owe nothing to the
Wright Brothers".

A literal view of the world - text based - misses most
of it out :(
LFS
2018-01-11 19:20:33 UTC
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Post by Harrison Hill
Post by LFS
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Harrison Hill
Do you even fail to distinguish "careen" from "career"?
Is "careen" in our BrE vocabulary at all? If it is
in what way is it distinguished from "career"?
Careen is what one does to boats. Career isn't boating unless you're a
sailor.
The two verbs are also synonyms Katy. "Careen" crossed the
Atlantic in this song, and led directly to two
1) Something [in the way she moves].
2) I Feel Fine.
3) Something in the way she moves
http://youtu.be/XAzgwSLiMUc
"To me the words are nice the way they sound".
http://youtu.be/XAzgwSLiMUc
Led directly? What on earth does that mean? The word careen does not
appear in either of those songs.
What an annoying way of looking at the world.
"The Wright Brothers led directly to modern flight".
"No they didn't. The latest Boeings owe nothing to the
Wright Brothers".
A literal view of the world - text based - misses most
of it out :(
You wrote: ""Careen" crossed the Atlantic in this song". What song? What
plane, even?
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
"Django Cat" <>
2018-01-11 21:50:24 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by LFS
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Harrison Hill
Do you even fail to distinguish "careen" from "career"?
Is "careen" in our BrE vocabulary at all? If it is
in what way is it distinguished from "career"?
Careen is what one does to boats. Career isn't boating
unless you're a sailor.
The two verbs are also synonyms Katy. "Careen" crossed the
Atlantic in this song, and led directly to two
1) Something [in the way she moves].
2) I Feel Fine.
3) Something in the way she moves
http://youtu.be/XAzgwSLiMUc
"To me the words are nice the way they sound".
http://youtu.be/XAzgwSLiMUc
Led directly? What on earth does that mean? The word careen does
not appear in either of those songs.
What an annoying way of looking at the world.
"The Wright Brothers led directly to modern flight".
"No they didn't. The latest Boeings owe nothing to the
Wright Brothers".
A literal view of the world - text based - misses most
of it out :(
You wrote: ""Careen" crossed the Atlantic in this song". What song?
What plane, even?
A little Googling reveals on Wikipedia:

"Something in the Way She Moves" is a song written by James Taylor that
appeared on his 1968 debut album for Apple Records, James Taylor. It
has also been covered by other artists, including Tom Rush and Harry
Belafonte. The opening line inspired George Harrison to write the #1
Beatles' song "Something."

Well, if they say so. I don't know the James Taylor song, but a little
further Googling reveals the lyrics contain the word 'Carrening'. The
Beatles song doesn't. There we apparently have it (should we want it)...


DC, remembering why he gave up doing this stuff...

--
Peter T. Daniels
2018-01-11 21:46:18 UTC
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Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Harrison Hill
Do you even fail to distinguish "careen" from "career"?
Is "careen" in our BrE vocabulary at all? If it is
in what way is it distinguished from "career"?
Careen is what one does to boats. Career isn't boating unless you're a
sailor.
The two verbs are also synonyms
That's the point. They're not.
Post by Harrison Hill
Katy. "Careen" crossed the
Atlantic
The Atlantic is not between France and England.
Post by Harrison Hill
in this song, and led directly to two
1) Something [in the way she moves].
2) I Feel Fine.
3) Something in the way she moves
http://youtu.be/XAzgwSLiMUc
"To me the words are nice the way they sound".
http://youtu.be/XAzgwSLiMUc
Paul Wolff
2018-01-11 18:28:01 UTC
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Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Harrison Hill
Do you even fail to distinguish "careen" from "career"?
Is "careen" in our BrE vocabulary at all? If it is
in what way is it distinguished from "career"?
Careen is what one does to boats. Career isn't boating unless you're a
sailor.
Presumably he starts his career at the bottom of the ladder. To get to
the bottom of the boat, he careens it, so he can scrape it. And to
scrape the bottom of the barrel, I wrote this post.

Oxford says, as a fourth meaning of the verb careen:
"verb intrans. (Infl. by career verb.) Rush headlong, hurtle unsteadily.
N. Amer. E20."

Note the N. American origin, early 20th century, implying that it's
North Americans rather than Britons who fail to make the distinction.
Not that I see any points worth scoring there.
--
Paul
Snidely
2018-01-13 08:26:50 UTC
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Katy Jennison suggested that ...
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Harrison Hill
Do you even fail to distinguish "careen" from "career"?
Is "careen" in our BrE vocabulary at all? If it is
in what way is it distinguished from "career"?
Careen is what one does to boats. Career isn't boating unless you're a
sailor.
Shore leave?

/dps
--
"That's a good sort of hectic, innit?"

" Very much so, and I'd recommend the haggis wontons."
-njm
Don P
2018-01-12 18:28:55 UTC
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Post by Harrison Hill
Do you even fail to distinguish "careen" from "career"?
Is "careen" in our BrE vocabulary at all? If it is
in what way is it distinguished from "career"?
Careen is in the vocabulary of any Brit who ever read Treasure Island or
other romances about pirates, or historical novels about warship
captains like Horatio Hornblower or Jack Aubrey, or histories of
exploration in the age of sail, etc., and perhaps even observant
spectators of Hollywood adventure movies as well.

Careen is a standard word different from the word career by sound and by
one letter in spelling, not to mention context. They are as different
as the words hop and hot.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ontario, Canada)
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