Discussion:
The meaning of *simply*
Add Reply
Lazypierrot
2017-12-04 05:32:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Hi, I would like to know the meaning of *simply* in the following passage. I wonder if it means "only", or rather "really."


The cold viruses may appear to be nothing but mischief-makers at first glance and something that should be avoided at all cost. However, there is a case to be made that they are *simply* part of the human environment and possibly even good for it.


Cordially,

LP
Tony Cooper
2017-12-04 05:58:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sun, 3 Dec 2017 21:32:02 -0800 (PST), Lazypierrot
Post by Lazypierrot
Hi, I would like to know the meaning of *simply* in the following passage. I wonder if it means "only", or rather "really."
The cold viruses may appear to be nothing but mischief-makers at first glance and something that should be avoided at all cost. However, there is a case to be made that they are *simply* part of the human environment and possibly even good for it.
Cordially,
LP
The usage is the same as "no more than or no less than": "...there is
a case to be made that they are no more than or no less than part of
the human environment".
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Lazypierrot
2017-12-04 06:13:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Lazypierrot
Hi, I would like to know the meaning of *simply* in the following passage. I wonder if it means "only", or rather "really."
The cold viruses may appear to be nothing but mischief-makers at first glance and something that should be avoided at all cost. However, there is a case to be made that they are *simply* part of the human environment and possibly even good for it.
Cordially,
LP
The usage is the same as "no more than or no less than": "...there is
a case to be made that they are no more than or no less than part of
the human environment".
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
I think that "no more than" and "no less than" have the opposite meanings. I am afraind the expression "no more than or no less than" is sort of contradictory. Is there any other way to paraphrase it?

LP
Tony Cooper
2017-12-04 06:40:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sun, 3 Dec 2017 22:13:27 -0800 (PST), Lazypierrot
Post by Lazypierrot
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Lazypierrot
Hi, I would like to know the meaning of *simply* in the following passage. I wonder if it means "only", or rather "really."
The cold viruses may appear to be nothing but mischief-makers at first glance and something that should be avoided at all cost.
However, there is a case to be made that they are *simply* part of the
human environment and possibly even good for it.
Post by Lazypierrot
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Lazypierrot
Cordially,
LP
The usage is the same as "no more than or no less than": "...there is
a case to be made that they are no more than or no less than part of
the human environment".
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
I think that "no more than" and "no less than" have the opposite meanings. I am afraind the expression "no more than or no less than" is sort of contradictory. Is there any other way to paraphrase it?
LP
Yes, they are opposites, but they offset each other. That then means
the result is "exactly the same". In other words, cold viruses are
"no more than just a part of the human environment and no less than
just a part of the human environment".

It's a phrase that serves as emphasis when saying something is exactly
the same. That is what is attempted by adding "simply".

You could substitute "just", "merely", or "only" for "simply", but I'm
not sure you would understand those as substitutes if "simply" is not
clear.

Not "really", though. That implies that there is something that might
be misconstrued.

It would be appreciated if you would set your line length to about 70
characters or hit "enter" after about 70 characters. Not doing so
forces some of us to scroll across the page to read what you've
written.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Lazypierrot
2017-12-04 06:53:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
I appreciate your kind comments.
Post by Tony Cooper
You could substitute "just", "merely", or "only" for "simply", but I'm
not sure you would understand those as substitutes if "simply" is not
clear.
Do you mean "just", "merely", or "only" can be used instead of "simply" here?


I feel that the writer of the sentence intends that although the cold viruses
may appear to be something that should be avoided at all cost, in fact, it is
not such a big problem and the virus is *only* a part of the human environment.

LP
Tony Cooper
2017-12-04 14:50:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sun, 3 Dec 2017 22:53:31 -0800 (PST), Lazypierrot
Post by Lazypierrot
I appreciate your kind comments.
Post by Tony Cooper
You could substitute "just", "merely", or "only" for "simply", but I'm
not sure you would understand those as substitutes if "simply" is not
clear.
Do you mean "just", "merely", or "only" can be used instead of "simply" here?
Yes. I've added that if you don't understand why "simply" is unclear
you may not understand why the other words would be any better.
Post by Lazypierrot
I feel that the writer of the sentence intends that although the cold viruses
may appear to be something that should be avoided at all cost, in fact, it is
not such a big problem and the virus is *only* a part of the human environment.
The writer is saying that cold viruses are an unavoidable part of the
human environment. He's *not* saying they are not a problem. He's
saying they are a problem that are inherent to our environment.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Richard Yates
2017-12-04 13:41:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Mon, 04 Dec 2017 01:40:01 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
It would be appreciated if you would set your line length to about 70
characters or hit "enter" after about 70 characters. Not doing so
forces some of us to scroll across the page to read what you've
written.
Someone here pointed out to me a couple of weeks ago that setting
"Word wrap" in the View menu of Forté Agent (8.00) solves this for
those using that newreader.
Ken Blake
2017-12-04 18:13:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Mon, 04 Dec 2017 05:41:17 -0800, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
On Mon, 04 Dec 2017 01:40:01 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
It would be appreciated if you would set your line length to about 70
characters or hit "enter" after about 70 characters. Not doing so
forces some of us to scroll across the page to read what you've
written.
Someone here pointed out to me a couple of weeks ago that setting
"Word wrap" in the View menu of Forté Agent (8.00) solves this for
those using that newreader.
Yes, but not only in Agent 8.00--also in older versions
Tony Cooper
2017-12-04 19:29:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ken Blake
On Mon, 04 Dec 2017 05:41:17 -0800, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
On Mon, 04 Dec 2017 01:40:01 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
It would be appreciated if you would set your line length to about 70
characters or hit "enter" after about 70 characters. Not doing so
forces some of us to scroll across the page to read what you've
written.
Someone here pointed out to me a couple of weeks ago that setting
"Word wrap" in the View menu of Forté Agent (8.00) solves this for
those using that newreader.
Yes, but not only in Agent 8.00--also in older versions. I'm using
6.0, and word wrap works fine here.
I'm using Agent 7.0, and that setting does not wrap long lines.

I did say *some of us*. It shouldn't be an inconvenience to the
sender to observe this simple consideration.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Ken Blake
2017-12-04 21:46:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Mon, 04 Dec 2017 14:29:04 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Ken Blake
On Mon, 04 Dec 2017 05:41:17 -0800, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
On Mon, 04 Dec 2017 01:40:01 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
It would be appreciated if you would set your line length to about 70
characters or hit "enter" after about 70 characters. Not doing so
forces some of us to scroll across the page to read what you've
written.
Someone here pointed out to me a couple of weeks ago that setting
"Word wrap" in the View menu of Forté Agent (8.00) solves this for
those using that newreader.
Yes, but not only in Agent 8.00--also in older versions. I'm using
6.0, and word wrap works fine here.
I'm using Agent 7.0, and that setting does not wrap long lines.
How odd. It works in 6 and 8, but not 7?
Post by Tony Cooper
I did say *some of us*. It shouldn't be an inconvenience to the
sender to obser
Tony Cooper
2017-12-04 23:10:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ken Blake
On Mon, 04 Dec 2017 14:29:04 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Ken Blake
On Mon, 04 Dec 2017 05:41:17 -0800, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
On Mon, 04 Dec 2017 01:40:01 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
It would be appreciated if you would set your line length to about 70
characters or hit "enter" after about 70 characters. Not doing so
forces some of us to scroll across the page to read what you've
written.
Someone here pointed out to me a couple of weeks ago that setting
"Word wrap" in the View menu of Forté Agent (8.00) solves this for
those using that newreader.
Yes, but not only in Agent 8.00--also in older versions. I'm using
6.0, and word wrap works fine here.
I'm using Agent 7.0, and that setting does not wrap long lines.
How odd. It works in 6 and 8, but not 7?
You said "setting 'Word rap'". Agent 7 does have "Word Wrap" in View,
but it is not a setting. It is an action that wraps the lines in a
received post. And, it wraps them to the width of my screen. Since I
have a wide screen, it wraps to 156 character line.

You have to do that for every post with extended lines. It doesn't
seem to be any easier than just scrolling across.
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Tony Cooper
I did say *some of us*. It shouldn't be an inconvenience to the
sender to observe this simple consideration.
I completely agree.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Tony Cooper
2017-12-04 23:28:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Mon, 04 Dec 2017 18:10:26 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Ken Blake
On Mon, 04 Dec 2017 14:29:04 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Ken Blake
On Mon, 04 Dec 2017 05:41:17 -0800, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
On Mon, 04 Dec 2017 01:40:01 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
It would be appreciated if you would set your line length to about 70
characters or hit "enter" after about 70 characters. Not doing so
forces some of us to scroll across the page to read what you've
written.
Someone here pointed out to me a couple of weeks ago that setting
"Word wrap" in the View menu of Forté Agent (8.00) solves this for
those using that newreader.
Yes, but not only in Agent 8.00--also in older versions. I'm using
6.0, and word wrap works fine here.
I'm using Agent 7.0, and that setting does not wrap long lines.
How odd. It works in 6 and 8, but not 7?
You said "setting 'Word rap'".
That error was mine, not yours, Ken.
Post by Tony Cooper
Agent 7 does have "Word Wrap" in View,
but it is not a setting. It is an action that wraps the lines in a
received post. And, it wraps them to the width of my screen. Since I
have a wide screen, it wraps to 156 character line.
You have to do that for every post with extended lines. It doesn't
seem to be any easier than just scrolling across.
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Tony Cooper
I did say *some of us*. It shouldn't be an inconvenience to the
sender to observe this simple consideration.
I completely agree.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Ken Blake
2017-12-05 00:35:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Mon, 04 Dec 2017 18:10:26 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Ken Blake
On Mon, 04 Dec 2017 14:29:04 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Ken Blake
On Mon, 04 Dec 2017 05:41:17 -0800, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
On Mon, 04 Dec 2017 01:40:01 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
It would be appreciated if you would set your line length to about 70
characters or hit "enter" after about 70 characters. Not doing so
forces some of us to scroll across the page to read what you've
written.
Someone here pointed out to me a couple of weeks ago that setting
"Word wrap" in the View menu of Forté Agent (8.00) solves this for
those using that newreader.
Yes, but not only in Agent 8.00--also in older versions. I'm using
6.0, and word wrap works fine here.
I'm using Agent 7.0, and that setting does not wrap long lines.
How odd. It works in 6 and 8, but not 7?
You said "setting 'Word rap'".
No, I didn't. It was Richard Yates.
Post by Tony Cooper
Agent 7 does have "Word Wrap" in View,
but it is not a setting. It is an action that wraps the lines in a
received post. And, it wraps them to the width of my screen. Since I
have a wide screen, it wraps to 156 character line.
Ah! You run Agent full-screen. I don't. I don't r
Mark Brader
2017-12-04 09:58:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Lazypierrot
The usage is the same as "no more than or no less than"...
I think that "no more than" and "no less than" have the opposite
meanings.
The normal expression is "no more or less than". Which is just a
fancy way to say "the same as". If it's not more, and it's not less,
then it must be equal.
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "My ambition is to see a saying of mine attributed
***@vex.net | to Dorothy Parker or Mark Twain." -- Joe Fineman
Rich Ulrich
2017-12-04 20:17:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Lazypierrot
The usage is the same as "no more than or no less than"...
I think that "no more than" and "no less than" have the opposite
meanings.
The normal expression is "no more or less than". Which is just a
fancy way to say "the same as". If it's not more, and it's not less,
then it must be equal.
I agree that this seems to be the meaning. And it leaves /me/
trying to figure what would communicate better.

If I had the sentence pointed out to me in my writing, I would
re-write it.

What was intended, IMHO, might be, "Unfortuantely, cold viruses
are unavoidable. Fortunately, their effects (for good or for bad)
usually are small."
--
Rich Ulrich
b***@aol.com
2017-12-04 18:22:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Lazypierrot
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Lazypierrot
Hi, I would like to know the meaning of *simply* in the following passage. I wonder if it means "only", or rather "really."
The cold viruses may appear to be nothing but mischief-makers at first glance and something that should be avoided at all cost. However, there is a case to be made that they are *simply* part of the human environment and possibly even good for it.
Cordially,
LP
The usage is the same as "no more than or no less than": "...there is
a case to be made that they are no more than or no less than part of
the human environment".
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
I think that "no more than" and "no less than" have the opposite meanings. I am afraind the expression "no more than or no less than" is sort of contradictory. Is there any other way to paraphrase it?
Maybe "...are nothing but part of...".
Post by Lazypierrot
LP
Peter Moylan
2017-12-05 01:47:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On 04/12/17 17:13, Lazypierrot wrote:

[rewrapped so that I can see what I'm responding to]
Post by Lazypierrot
I think that "no more than" and "no less than" have the opposite
meanings. I am afraind the expression "no more than or no less than"
is sort of contradictory. Is there any other way to paraphrase it?
A dozen is no more than 12 and no less than 12. Is that a contradiction?
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
b***@shaw.ca
2017-12-05 03:20:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter Moylan
[rewrapped so that I can see what I'm responding to]
Post by Lazypierrot
I think that "no more than" and "no less than" have the opposite
meanings. I am afraind the expression "no more than or no less than"
is sort of contradictory. Is there any other way to paraphrase it?
A dozen is no more than 12 and no less than 12. Is that a contradiction?
Yes, if you're a baker.
Peter Moylan
2017-12-05 03:25:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Peter Moylan
[rewrapped so that I can see what I'm responding to]
Post by Lazypierrot
I think that "no more than" and "no less than" have the opposite
meanings. I am afraind the expression "no more than or no less than"
is sort of contradictory. Is there any other way to paraphrase it?
A dozen is no more than 12 and no less than 12. Is that a contradiction?
Yes, if you're a baker.
Touché.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Ken Blake
2017-12-05 17:51:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Peter Moylan
[rewrapped so that I can see what I'm responding to]
Post by Lazypierrot
I think that "no more than" and "no less than" have the opposite
meanings. I am afraind the expression "no more than or no less than"
is sort of contradictory. Is there any other way to paraphrase it?
A dozen is no more than 12 and no less than 12. Is that a contradiction?
Yes, if you're a baker.
Took the words out of my mouth (or in this c
Mack A. Damia
2017-12-05 18:02:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Peter Moylan
[rewrapped so that I can see what I'm responding to]
Post by Lazypierrot
I think that "no more than" and "no less than" have the opposite
meanings. I am afraind the expression "no more than or no less than"
is sort of contradictory. Is there any other way to paraphrase it?
A dozen is no more than 12 and no less than 12. Is that a contradiction?
Yes, if you're a baker.
Took the words out of my mouth (or in this case, off my fingers).
We don't sell cakes to finger lickers.
occam
2017-12-04 10:12:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Lazypierrot
Hi, I would like to know the meaning of *simply* in the following passage. I wonder if it means "only", or rather "really."
The cold viruses may appear to be nothing but mischief-makers at first glance and something that should be avoided at all cost. However, there is a case to be made that they are *simply* part of the human environment and possibly even good for it.
Try substituting 'essentially' for 'simply'.
s***@my-deja.com
2017-12-04 11:37:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Hi,I would like to know the meaning of *simply* in the following passage.
I wonder if it means "only", or rather "really."
The cold viruses may appear to be nothing but mischief-makers
at first glance and something that should be avoided at all cost.
However, there is a case to be made that they are *simply* part of
the human environment and possibly even good for it.
Cordially,
LP
Delete the word "simply" from the sentence and the meaning is clearer.
Peter T. Daniels
2017-12-04 12:34:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Lazypierrot
Hi, I would like to know the meaning of *simply* in the following passage. I wonder if it means "only", or rather "really."
The cold viruses may appear to be nothing but mischief-makers at first glance and something that should be avoided at all cost. However, there is a case to be made that they are *simply* part of the human environment and possibly even good for it.
Yes.

Your two queries this morning suggest that you're good at spotting indeterminacy
-- but not so good at interpreting it!
Colonel Edmund J. Burke
2017-12-05 13:13:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Lazypierrot
Hi, I would like to know the meaning of *simply* in the following passage. I wonder if it means "only", or rather "really."
The cold viruses may appear to be nothing but mischief-makers at first glance and something that should be avoided at all cost. However, there is a case to be made that they are *simply* part of the human environment and possibly even good for it.
How much *simpler* could it be?
Limey twit!
q***@yahoo.com
2017-12-06 19:43:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sun, 3 Dec 2017 21:32:02 -0800 (PST), Lazypierrot
Post by Lazypierrot
Hi, I would like to know the meaning of *simply* in the following passage. I wonder if it means "only", or rather "really."
The cold viruses may appear to be nothing but mischief-makers at first glance and something that should be avoided at all cost. However, there is a case to be made that they are *simply* part of the human environment and possibly even good for it.
Here it means "unarguably" and "inevitably".

Why? Any argument would complicate the matter, and make it not simple.
--
John
Loading...