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did tell him
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a***@gmail.com
2018-08-05 05:22:39 UTC
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1) I did tell him no lies.

Is that sentence grammatically correct?
Is it idiomatic?

If yes, in what situation would it be used?

I don't think it breaks any grammar rules, but it doesn't seem to work.
The 'did' doesn't seem to work in a negative sentence. The sentence seems
to be emphasizing two different things at the same time.

That's my take on it, but I am not sure at all, or else I wouldn't have asked.
Maybe there is a context where it will work.

Gratefully,
Navi
David Kleinecke
2018-08-05 06:26:08 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
1) I did tell him no lies.
Is that sentence grammatically correct?
Is it idiomatic?
If yes, in what situation would it be used?
I don't think it breaks any grammar rules, but it doesn't seem to work.
The 'did' doesn't seem to work in a negative sentence. The sentence seems
to be emphasizing two different things at the same time.
That's my take on it, but I am not sure at all, or else I wouldn't have asked.
Maybe there is a context where it will work.
Standard would be "I didn't tell him (any) lies."

I think "I told him no lies" might not be considered a
negative sentence in every grammar. A grammar might
restrict "negative" to cases where the verb was negated.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-08-05 06:37:49 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
1) I did tell him no lies.
Is that sentence grammatically correct?
More or less. Noting grossly wrong with it.
Post by a***@gmail.com
Is it idiomatic?
No
Post by a***@gmail.com
If yes, in what situation would it be used?
Never normally by a native speaker.
Post by a***@gmail.com
I don't think it breaks any grammar rules, but it doesn't seem to work.
The 'did' doesn't seem to work in a negative sentence.
Yes
Post by a***@gmail.com
The sentence seems
to be emphasizing two different things at the same time.
Yes
Post by a***@gmail.com
That's my take on it, but I am not sure at all, or else I wouldn't have asked.
Maybe there is a context where it will work.
Gratefully,
Navi
--
athel
Mark Brader
2018-08-05 08:54:10 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) I did tell him no lies.
...in what situation would it be used?
Never normally by a native speaker.
"I told you, 'tell him no lies.'"
"I did tell him no lies."
--
Mark Brader | "Fortunately, we have anti-terrorist laws
Toronto | to prevent people having privacy."
***@vex.net | --Robert Bannister
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-08-05 09:31:34 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) I did tell him no lies.
...in what situation would it be used?
Never normally by a native speaker.
"I told you, 'tell him no lies.'"
"I did tell him no lies."
OK. I tried to think of a plausible context, but yours is much better
than anything I thought of.
--
athel
CDB
2018-08-05 12:12:48 UTC
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1) I did tell him no lies.
Is that sentence grammatically correct? Is it idiomatic?
If yes, in what situation would it be used?
I don't think it breaks any grammar rules, but it doesn't seem to
work. The 'did' doesn't seem to work in a negative sentence. The
sentence seems to be emphasizing two different things at the same
time.
That's my take on it, but I am not sure at all, or else I wouldn't
have asked. Maybe there is a context where it will work.
It works! He asked me no questions, and I did tell him no lies.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-08-05 12:43:30 UTC
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Post by CDB
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) I did tell him no lies.
Is that sentence grammatically correct? Is it idiomatic?
If yes, in what situation would it be used?
I don't think it breaks any grammar rules, but it doesn't seem to
work. The 'did' doesn't seem to work in a negative sentence. The
sentence seems to be emphasizing two different things at the same
time.
That's my take on it, but I am not sure at all, or else I wouldn't
have asked. Maybe there is a context where it will work.
It works! He asked me no questions, and I did tell him no lies.
That doesn't work, but Brader's version does.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-08-05 13:27:18 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by CDB
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) I did tell him no lies.
Is that sentence grammatically correct? Is it idiomatic?
If yes, in what situation would it be used?
I don't think it breaks any grammar rules, but it doesn't seem to
work. The 'did' doesn't seem to work in a negative sentence. The
sentence seems to be emphasizing two different things at the same
time.
That's my take on it, but I am not sure at all, or else I wouldn't
have asked. Maybe there is a context where it will work.
It works! He asked me no questions, and I did tell him no lies.
That doesn't work, but Brader's version does.
+1
--
athel
CDB
2018-08-06 14:16:14 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by CDB
1) I did tell him no lies. Is that sentence grammatically
correct? Is it idiomatic? If yes, in what situation would it
be used? I don't think it breaks any grammar rules, but it
doesn't seem to work. The 'did' doesn't seem to work in a
negative sentence. The sentence seems to be emphasizing two
different things at the same time. That's my take on it, but I
am not sure at all, or else I wouldn't have asked. Maybe there
is a context where it will work.
It works! He asked me no questions, and I did tell him no lies.
That doesn't work, but Brader's version does.
+1
This is becoming interesting. Either of you gents care to articulate a
reason?

In case anybody missed it: the "it" that "works" is the well-known
baseball conditional and popular song "Ask me no questions and I'll tell
you no lies".


Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-08-06 15:26:01 UTC
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Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by CDB
1) I did tell him no lies. Is that sentence grammatically
correct? Is it idiomatic? If yes, in what situation would it
be used? I don't think it breaks any grammar rules, but it
doesn't seem to work. The 'did' doesn't seem to work in a
negative sentence. The sentence seems to be emphasizing two
different things at the same time. That's my take on it, but I
am not sure at all, or else I wouldn't have asked. Maybe there
is a context where it will work.
It works! He asked me no questions, and I did tell him no lies.
That doesn't work, but Brader's version does.
+1
This is becoming interesting. Either of you gents care to articulate a
reason?
In case anybody missed it: the "it" that "works" is the well-known
baseball conditional and popular song "Ask me no questions and I'll tell
you no lies".
http://youtu.be/z17TZLU2xUc
They've all gone barking mad as far as I'm concerned. If we accept
that 'did tell' and 'told' are synonymous then there are no situations
in which one 'works' but not the other. One might be considered
slightly less elegant than the other, though there are certainly BrE
dialects which would heartily disagree as they customarily employ
'did' in past constructions. " 'E did thank I for the drink. I did thank
'im not to be so daft!"
Peter T. Daniels
2018-08-06 16:10:40 UTC
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Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by CDB
1) I did tell him no lies. Is that sentence grammatically
correct? Is it idiomatic? If yes, in what situation would it
be used? I don't think it breaks any grammar rules, but it
doesn't seem to work. The 'did' doesn't seem to work in a
negative sentence. The sentence seems to be emphasizing two
different things at the same time. That's my take on it, but I
am not sure at all, or else I wouldn't have asked. Maybe there
is a context where it will work.
It works! He asked me no questions, and I did tell him no lies.
That doesn't work, but Brader's version does.
+1
This is becoming interesting. Either of you gents care to articulate a
reason?
In case anybody missed it: the "it" that "works" is the well-known
baseball conditional and popular song "Ask me no questions and I'll tell
you no lies".
http://youtu.be/z17TZLU2xUc
Despite Maddie's lack of imagination, the auxiliary "do" is used for
emphasis, to make a contrast with the previous utterance.

"You never told me I couldn't have cookies before supper." "I did tell
you. Many times." (The "did" is stressed ["accented"].)
Jerry Friedman
2018-08-06 16:21:12 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
1) I did tell him no lies. Is that sentence grammatically correct?
Is it idiomatic? If yes, in what situation would it
be used? I don't think it breaks any grammar rules, but it
doesn't seem to work. The 'did' doesn't seem to work in a
negative sentence. The sentence seems to be emphasizing two
different things at the same time. That's my take on it, but I
am not sure at all, or else I wouldn't have asked. Maybe there
is a context where it will work.
It works!  He asked me no questions, and I did tell him no lies.
That doesn't work, but Brader's version does.
+1
This is becoming interesting.  Either of you gents care to articulate a
reason?
In case anybody missed it: the "it" that "works" is the well-known
baseball conditional and popular song "Ask me no questions and I'll tell
you no lies".
http://youtu.be/z17TZLU2xUc
I could imagine this.

"You and he should have followed the rule, 'Ask me no questions and I'll
tell you no lies.'"

"He did ask me no questions, and I did tell him no lies!"

There needs to be some statement or implication that the "did"
contradicts (except in the dialects that Mad mentioned). I find it hard
to come up with one for your suggestion.
--
Jerry Friedman
CDB
2018-08-07 15:39:02 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by CDB
1) I did tell him no lies. Is that sentence grammatically
correct? Is it idiomatic? If yes, in what situation would
it be used? I don't think it breaks any grammar rules, but
it doesn't seem to work. The 'did' doesn't seem to work in
a negative sentence. The sentence seems to be emphasizing
two different things at the same time. That's my take on
it, but I am not sure at all, or else I wouldn't have
asked. Maybe there is a context where it will work.
It works! He asked me no questions, and I did tell him no
lies.
That doesn't work, but Brader's version does.
+1
This is becoming interesting. Either of you gents care to
articulate a reason?
In case anybody missed it: the "it" that "works" is the well-known
baseball conditional and popular song "Ask me no questions and I'll
tell you no lies".
http://youtu.be/z17TZLU2xUc
I could imagine this.
"You and he should have followed the rule, 'Ask me no questions and
I'll tell you no lies.'"
"He did ask me no questions, and I did tell him no lies!"
There needs to be some statement or implication that the "did"
contradicts (except in the dialects that Mad mentioned). I find it
hard to come up with one for your suggestion.
My use of an otherwise unidentified "it" for that saying seems to me to
imply a previous mention in the imagined text. I assumed that the next
sentence would recall the saying to the reader's mind.

You are right, I think, in saying that the first term of the conditional
would be clearer with its own "did" (I thought the same thing, too
late), but I think the second "did" is the only indispensable one. It
emphasises the proof of the adage, which is in the second term.

Janet
2018-08-05 14:09:51 UTC
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1) I did tell him no lies.
Is that sentence grammatically correct?
Is it idiomatic?
If yes, in what situation would it be used?
It's certainly idiomatic; " did " emphasises the verb following it.
" I did tell him" is often a reminder of previous advice or instruction
that was ignored or over-ruled.

"Mummy mummy, I burned my finger"
"I did tell you not to play with matches.".

"You did warn me he's a compulsive liar, I should have listened".

Janet.
Post by a***@gmail.com
I don't think it breaks any grammar rules, but it doesn't seem to work.
The 'did' doesn't seem to work in a negative sentence. The sentence seems
to be emphasizing two different things at the same time.
That's my take on it, but I am not sure at all, or else I wouldn't have asked.
Maybe there is a context where it will work.
Gratefully,
Navi
a***@gmail.com
2018-08-06 08:24:37 UTC
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Post by Janet
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) I did tell him no lies.
Is that sentence grammatically correct?
Is it idiomatic?
If yes, in what situation would it be used?
It's certainly idiomatic; " did " emphasises the verb following it.
" I did tell him" is often a reminder of previous advice or instruction
that was ignored or over-ruled.
"Mummy mummy, I burned my finger"
"I did tell you not to play with matches.".
"You did warn me he's a compulsive liar, I should have listened".
Janet.
Post by a***@gmail.com
I don't think it breaks any grammar rules, but it doesn't seem to work.
The 'did' doesn't seem to work in a negative sentence. The sentence seems
to be emphasizing two different things at the same time.
That's my take on it, but I am not sure at all, or else I wouldn't have asked.
Maybe there is a context where it will work.
Gratefully,
Navi
Thank you all very much,

Mark, to me what you did looks like a magic trick!

Respectfully,
Navi
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