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The art of insult by politicians
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occam
2018-09-13 19:22:00 UTC
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Here is an article from The Telegraph:

"From Churchill to Corbyn: the 40 most brutal British political insults"
(link lower down)

These are not insults involving cussing and effing (sorry Rey), rather a
much more subtle form of exchange between British politicians .

And the winner is....Winston Churchill. Some highlights:

Said about Lloyd George:
"He would make a drum out of the skin of his own mother in order to
sound his own praises."

Said of PM Clement Attlee:
"A sheep in sheep's clothing" and

"He is a modest man with much to be modest about"


Other notable mentions:

"Being attacked by Geoffrey Howe was like being savaged by a dead sheep."
(said by Denis Healey)

"Neil Kinnock is a [Welsh] windbag whose incoherent speeches spring from
an incoherent mind." (said by Norman Tebbit)


"I often say to my children 'No need to go to the Natural History Museum
to see a dinosaur, come to the House of Commons at about half past
twelve'." (David Cameron)

And the description of Nigel Farage by Russell Brand (comedian)
"A pound shop Enoch Powell" (ouch!)

For the full set see:
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/books/authors/the-best-british-political-insults-rows-and-putdowns/
David Kleinecke
2018-09-13 20:24:17 UTC
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On Thursday, September 13, 2018 at 12:22:04 PM UTC-7, occam wrote:
> Here is an article from The Telegraph:
>
> "From Churchill to Corbyn: the 40 most brutal British political insults"
> (link lower down)
>
> These are not insults involving cussing and effing (sorry Rey), rather a
> much more subtle form of exchange between British politicians .
>
> And the winner is....Winston Churchill. Some highlights:
>
> Said about Lloyd George:
> "He would make a drum out of the skin of his own mother in order to
> sound his own praises."
>
> Said of PM Clement Attlee:
> "A sheep in sheep's clothing" and
>
> "He is a modest man with much to be modest about"
>
>
> Other notable mentions:
>
> "Being attacked by Geoffrey Howe was like being savaged by a dead sheep."
> (said by Denis Healey)
>
> "Neil Kinnock is a [Welsh] windbag whose incoherent speeches spring from
> an incoherent mind." (said by Norman Tebbit)
>
>
> "I often say to my children 'No need to go to the Natural History Museum
> to see a dinosaur, come to the House of Commons at about half past
> twelve'." (David Cameron)
>
> And the description of Nigel Farage by Russell Brand (comedian)
> "A pound shop Enoch Powell" (ouch!)
>
> For the full set see:
> https://www.telegraph.co.uk/books/authors/the-best-british-political-insults-rows-and-putdowns/

One printable US comparable:
Like a rotten mackerel in the moonlight he stinks and
shines.
David Kleinecke
2018-09-13 23:30:27 UTC
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On Thursday, September 13, 2018 at 1:44:25 PM UTC-7, occam wrote:
> On 13/09/2018 22:24, David Kleinecke wrote:
> > Like a rotten mackerel in the moonlight he stinks and
> > shines.
>
> In trying to trace teh source of the insult, I discovered this page of
> insults.
>
> http://www.mactheknife.org/Quotations/Political.html
>
> It is surprising how many of the US insults have been inspired by Gerald
> Ford.

John Randolph of Roanoke. Per Wikipedia:

(In reference to Henry Clay ). "He is a man of splendid
abilities but utterly corrupt. He shines and stinks, like
a rotten mackerel by moonlight."[27] According to Randolph's
biographer, he was actually referring to Edward Livingston,
not Clay.

Quite a character John Randolph of Roanoke.
Tony Cooper
2018-09-14 02:22:14 UTC
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On Thu, 13 Sep 2018 22:44:22 +0200, occam <***@invalid.nix> wrote:

>On 13/09/2018 22:24, David Kleinecke wrote:
>> Like a rotten mackerel in the moonlight he stinks and
>> shines.
>
>In trying to trace teh source of the insult, I discovered this page of
>insults.
>
>http://www.mactheknife.org/Quotations/Political.html
>
>It is surprising how many of the US insults have been inspired by Gerald
>Ford.

Trump inspires the more pithy insult. "Fucking moron!" - Rex
Tillerson, former Secretary of State under Trump

--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
occam
2018-09-14 07:58:06 UTC
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On 14/09/2018 04:22, Tony Cooper wrote:
> On Thu, 13 Sep 2018 22:44:22 +0200, occam <***@invalid.nix> wrote:
>
>> On 13/09/2018 22:24, David Kleinecke wrote:
>>> Like a rotten mackerel in the moonlight he stinks and
>>> shines.
>>
>> In trying to trace teh source of the insult, I discovered this page of
>> insults.
>>
>> http://www.mactheknife.org/Quotations/Political.html
>>
>> It is surprising how many of the US insults have been inspired by Gerald
>> Ford.
>
> Trump inspires the more pithy insult. "Fucking moron!" - Rex
> Tillerson, former Secretary of State under Trump
>

If you look at the original list of 40 (UK) insults, you'll notice that
the more recent they are, the less pithy (or witty) they become. I think
this is a sign of our times.
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-09-14 11:41:07 UTC
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On Friday, 14 September 2018 08:58:10 UTC+1, occam wrote:
> On 14/09/2018 04:22, Tony Cooper wrote:
> > On Thu, 13 Sep 2018 22:44:22 +0200, occam <***@invalid.nix> wrote:
> >
> >> On 13/09/2018 22:24, David Kleinecke wrote:
> >>> Like a rotten mackerel in the moonlight he stinks and
> >>> shines.
> >>
> >> In trying to trace teh source of the insult, I discovered this page of
> >> insults.
> >>
> >> http://www.mactheknife.org/Quotations/Political.html
> >>
> >> It is surprising how many of the US insults have been inspired by Gerald
> >> Ford.
> >
> > Trump inspires the more pithy insult. "Fucking moron!" - Rex
> > Tillerson, former Secretary of State under Trump
> >
>
> If you look at the original list of 40 (UK) insults, you'll notice that
> the more recent they are, the less pithy (or witty) they become. I think
> this is a sign of our times.

I'm not so sure about that. You have to remember that the less pithy/witty
insults of the past don't make it into books of quotations and the like. Future
versions will have "Mutton headed old mugwump", "The water was so cold
it turned Farage from a Great Briton to a Little Englander", "Baldemort",
"a Poundshop Enoch Powell" and many others to consider from the last
five years of British politics alone to add to slightly older gems like "being
savaged by a dead sheep", "a semi house trained polecat" and "a shiver
looking for a spine to run up".
RHDraney
2018-09-14 13:27:57 UTC
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On 9/14/2018 4:41 AM, Madrigal Gurneyhalt wrote:
> On Friday, 14 September 2018 08:58:10 UTC+1, occam wrote:
>> On 14/09/2018 04:22, Tony Cooper wrote:
>>> On Thu, 13 Sep 2018 22:44:22 +0200, occam <***@invalid.nix> wrote:
>>>
>>>> On 13/09/2018 22:24, David Kleinecke wrote:
>>>>> Like a rotten mackerel in the moonlight he stinks and
>>>>> shines.
>>>>
>>>> In trying to trace teh source of the insult, I discovered this page of
>>>> insults.
>>>>
>>>> http://www.mactheknife.org/Quotations/Political.html
>>>>
>>>> It is surprising how many of the US insults have been inspired by Gerald
>>>> Ford.
>>>
>>> Trump inspires the more pithy insult. "Fucking moron!" - Rex
>>> Tillerson, former Secretary of State under Trump
>>>
>>
>> If you look at the original list of 40 (UK) insults, you'll notice that
>> the more recent they are, the less pithy (or witty) they become. I think
>> this is a sign of our times.
>
> I'm not so sure about that. You have to remember that the less pithy/witty
> insults of the past don't make it into books of quotations and the like. Future
> versions will have "Mutton headed old mugwump", "The water was so cold
> it turned Farage from a Great Briton to a Little Englander", "Baldemort",
> "a Poundshop Enoch Powell" and many others to consider from the last
> five years of British politics alone to add to slightly older gems like "being
> savaged by a dead sheep", "a semi house trained polecat" and "a shiver
> looking for a spine to run up".

It's a shame that "suffers from delusions of adequacy" wasn't originally
said of a politician....

I still keep my eyes open for opportunities to use my own creation:
"you've obviously given this a great deal of whatever the opposite of
thought is"....r
occam
2018-09-14 14:17:07 UTC
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On 14/09/2018 13:41, Madrigal Gurneyhalt wrote:
> On Friday, 14 September 2018 08:58:10 UTC+1, occam wrote:
>> On 14/09/2018 04:22, Tony Cooper wrote:
>>> On Thu, 13 Sep 2018 22:44:22 +0200, occam <***@invalid.nix> wrote:
>>>
>>>> On 13/09/2018 22:24, David Kleinecke wrote:
>>>>> Like a rotten mackerel in the moonlight he stinks and
>>>>> shines.
>>>>
>>>> In trying to trace teh source of the insult, I discovered this page of
>>>> insults.
>>>>
>>>> http://www.mactheknife.org/Quotations/Political.html
>>>>
>>>> It is surprising how many of the US insults have been inspired by Gerald
>>>> Ford.
>>>
>>> Trump inspires the more pithy insult. "Fucking moron!" - Rex
>>> Tillerson, former Secretary of State under Trump
>>>
>>
>> If you look at the original list of 40 (UK) insults, you'll notice that
>> the more recent they are, the less pithy (or witty) they become. I think
>> this is a sign of our times.


>
> I'm not so sure about that. You have to remember that the less pithy/witty
> insults of the past don't make it into books of quotations and the like. Future
> versions will have "Mutton headed old mugwump",

Boris Johnson later apologised to "mugwumps everywhere" for the comparison.


"The water was so cold
> it turned Farage from a Great Briton to a Little Englander", "Baldemort",
> "a Poundshop Enoch Powell" and many others to consider from the last
> five years of British politics alone to add to slightly older gems like "being
> savaged by a dead sheep",


"a semi house trained polecat"

Norman Tebbit owned that insult and adopted it in his coat-of-arms when
he was made a Lord.


and "a shiver
> looking for a spine to run up".
>

I'm sorry I left that out of my list. Brilliant.
Tak To
2018-09-14 15:23:03 UTC
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On 9/14/2018 7:41 AM, Madrigal Gurneyhalt wrote:
> On Friday, 14 September 2018 08:58:10 UTC+1, occam wrote:
>> On 14/09/2018 04:22, Tony Cooper wrote:
>>> On Thu, 13 Sep 2018 22:44:22 +0200, occam <***@invalid.nix> wrote:
>>>
>>>> On 13/09/2018 22:24, David Kleinecke wrote:
>>>>> Like a rotten mackerel in the moonlight he stinks and
>>>>> shines.
>>>>
>>>> In trying to trace teh source of the insult, I discovered this page of
>>>> insults.
>>>>
>>>> http://www.mactheknife.org/Quotations/Political.html
>>>>
>>>> It is surprising how many of the US insults have been inspired by Gerald
>>>> Ford.
>>>
>>> Trump inspires the more pithy insult. "Fucking moron!" - Rex
>>> Tillerson, former Secretary of State under Trump
>>
>> If you look at the original list of 40 (UK) insults, you'll notice that
>> the more recent they are, the less pithy (or witty) they become. I think
>> this is a sign of our times.
>
> I'm not so sure about that. You have to remember that the less pithy/witty
> insults of the past don't make it into books of quotations and the like. Future
> versions will have "Mutton headed old mugwump", "The water was so cold
> it turned Farage from a Great Briton to a Little Englander", "Baldemort",
> "a Poundshop Enoch Powell" and many others to consider from the last
> five years of British politics alone to add to slightly older gems like "being
> savaged by a dead sheep", "a semi house trained polecat" and "a shiver
> looking for a spine to run up".

Personally, I want a politician who can parse a sentence
with two kinds of quotes rather than one who can insult
colorfully. I want mots juste, not bon mots.

I remember hearing Mel Brooks (on TV) saying that humor
was a political weapon, and thinking how blunt that weapon
was. I prefer John Oliver to, say, Steve Colbert.

--
Tak
----------------------------------------------------------------+-----
Tak To ***@alum.mit.eduxx
--------------------------------------------------------------------^^
[taode takto ~{LU5B~}] NB: trim the xx to get my real email addr
Peter T. Daniels
2018-09-14 18:04:49 UTC
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On Friday, September 14, 2018 at 11:23:09 AM UTC-4, Tak To wrote:

> I remember hearing Mel Brooks (on TV) saying that humor
> was a political weapon, and thinking how blunt that weapon
> was. I prefer John Oliver to, say, Steve Colbert.

You mean Jack Oliver? (There isn't any "Steve" Colbert.)

I am told that Jon Stewart on his own show was nothing like the ass he
appears as when he visits Colbert.
Tak To
2018-09-14 19:21:05 UTC
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On 9/14/2018 2:04 PM, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
> On Friday, September 14, 2018 at 11:23:09 AM UTC-4, Tak To wrote:
>
>> I remember hearing Mel Brooks (on TV) saying that humor
>> was a political weapon, and thinking how blunt that weapon
>> was. I prefer John Oliver to, say, Steve Colbert.
>
> You mean Jack Oliver? (There isn't any "Steve" Colbert.)

No: John Oliver. Yes: Steven Colbert.

> I am told that Jon Stewart on his own show was nothing like the ass he
> appears as when he visits Colbert.

--
Tak
----------------------------------------------------------------+-----
Tak To ***@alum.mit.eduxx
--------------------------------------------------------------------^^
[taode takto ~{LU5B~}] NB: trim the xx to get my real email addr
Peter T. Daniels
2018-09-15 12:27:19 UTC
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On Friday, September 14, 2018 at 3:21:10 PM UTC-4, Tak To wrote:
> On 9/14/2018 2:04 PM, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
> > On Friday, September 14, 2018 at 11:23:09 AM UTC-4, Tak To wrote:

> >> I remember hearing Mel Brooks (on TV) saying that humor
> >> was a political weapon, and thinking how blunt that weapon
> >> was. I prefer John Oliver to, say, Steve Colbert.
> > You mean Jack Oliver? (There isn't any "Steve" Colbert.)
>
> No: John Oliver. Yes: Steven Colbert.

Still wrong. It's Stephen Colbert, and he seems to be rather prickly about it.

> > I am told that Jon Stewart on his own show was nothing like the ass he
> > appears as when he visits Colbert.
Tony Cooper
2018-09-14 19:00:30 UTC
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On Fri, 14 Sep 2018 11:23:03 -0400, Tak To <***@alum.mit.eduxx>
wrote:


>I remember hearing Mel Brooks (on TV) saying that humor
>was a political weapon, and thinking how blunt that weapon
>was. I prefer John Oliver to, say, Steve Colbert.

I watch both "Last Week Tonight" with John Oliver and "The Late Show
with Stephen Colbert". I enjoy them equally.

Oliver, being on cable, has much more latitude of expression. He does
sort of a monologue covering various points before he goes into his
primary subject of the week, but his primary subject is covered with
more depth and seriousness than you would normally expect from someone
noted for being a comedian. It's a "60 Minutes" segment interspersed
with jokes and a great deal of profanity.

Colbert does a longer monologue, but doesn't cover serious points the
way Oliver does. It's unusual for him to devote a whole
post-monologue show to one guest as he did the other night with Bob
Woodward. Not unknown, but not usual.

Colbert is often dependant on the guest(s) to be interesting for the
whole show. Some guests (like Robert De Niro, in my opinion) are
segment-killers. Oliver doesn't depend on guests, so he's more in
control.

I see the two shows as different and not really directly comparable.


--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Tak To
2018-09-14 22:36:35 UTC
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On 9/14/2018 3:00 PM, Tony Cooper wrote:
> On Fri, 14 Sep 2018 11:23:03 -0400, Tak To <***@alum.mit.eduxx>
> wrote:
>
>> I remember hearing Mel Brooks (on TV) saying that humor
>> was a political weapon, and thinking how blunt that weapon
>> was. I prefer John Oliver to, say, Steve Colbert.
>
> I watch both "Last Week Tonight" with John Oliver and "The Late Show
> with Stephen Colbert". I enjoy them equally.
>
> Oliver, being on cable, has much more latitude of expression. He does
> sort of a monologue covering various points before he goes into his
> primary subject of the week, but his primary subject is covered with
> more depth and seriousness than you would normally expect from someone
> noted for being a comedian. It's a "60 Minutes" segment interspersed
> with jokes and a great deal of profanity.
>
> Colbert does a longer monologue, but doesn't cover serious points the
> way Oliver does. It's unusual for him to devote a whole
> post-monologue show to one guest as he did the other night with Bob
> Woodward. Not unknown, but not usual.
>
> Colbert is often dependant on the guest(s) to be interesting for the
> whole show. Some guests (like Robert De Niro, in my opinion) are
> segment-killers. Oliver doesn't depend on guests, so he's more in
> control.
>
> I see the two shows as different and not really directly comparable.

Very nicely summarized, even though I was thinking more
of the Colbert Report days.

Yes, they are like apples and oranges, but apples and
oranges can still be compared in some way, like how
easy it is to get juice out of it.

And I was saying that I prefer oranges because <...>.
YMMV.

--
Tak
----------------------------------------------------------------+-----
Tak To ***@alum.mit.eduxx
--------------------------------------------------------------------^^
[taode takto ~{LU5B~}] NB: trim the xx to get my real email addr
Peter T. Daniels
2018-09-14 18:03:15 UTC
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On Friday, September 14, 2018 at 7:41:10 AM UTC-4, Madrigal Gurneyhalt wrote:
> On Friday, 14 September 2018 08:58:10 UTC+1, occam wrote:

> > If you look at the original list of 40 (UK) insults, you'll notice that
> > the more recent they are, the less pithy (or witty) they become. I think
> > this is a sign of our times.
>
> I'm not so sure about that. You have to remember that the less pithy/witty
> insults of the past don't make it into books of quotations and the like. Future
> versions will have "Mutton headed old mugwump", "The water was so cold

?? When did a Brit use an obsolete (mid-19th-century) Americanism? A
mugwump was someone who refused to make up their mind -- their mug [face]
on one side of the fence, their wump [rump] on the other; presumably
referring to the big question of the age, slavery; allegedly related
to an Algonquian word.

(A later use, that seems to have made its way into Brit politics, referring
to those who "bolt the party":
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mugwumps )


> it turned Farage from a Great Briton to a Little Englander", "Baldemort",
> "a Poundshop Enoch Powell" and many others to consider from the last
> five years of British politics alone to add to slightly older gems like "being
> savaged by a dead sheep", "a semi house trained polecat" and "a shiver
> looking for a spine to run up".
Katy Jennison
2018-09-16 12:33:54 UTC
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On 14/09/2018 19:03, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
> On Friday, September 14, 2018 at 7:41:10 AM UTC-4, Madrigal Gurneyhalt wrote:
>> On Friday, 14 September 2018 08:58:10 UTC+1, occam wrote:
>
>>> If you look at the original list of 40 (UK) insults, you'll notice that
>>> the more recent they are, the less pithy (or witty) they become. I think
>>> this is a sign of our times.
>>
>> I'm not so sure about that. You have to remember that the less pithy/witty
>> insults of the past don't make it into books of quotations and the like. Future
>> versions will have "Mutton headed old mugwump", "The water was so cold
>
> ?? When did a Brit use an obsolete (mid-19th-century) Americanism? A
> mugwump was someone who refused to make up their mind -- their mug [face]
> on one side of the fence, their wump [rump] on the other; presumably
> referring to the big question of the age, slavery; allegedly related
> to an Algonquian word.
>

In the innocent days of my childhood it was just another synonym for
fool, clot, idiot, etc. I conjecture that to us it was simply 'mug' with
'wump' attached to make it sound more interesting. It had a slightly
affectionate nuance. We knew nothing of American politics.

--
Katy Jennison
Peter T. Daniels
2018-09-16 13:38:38 UTC
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On Sunday, September 16, 2018 at 8:33:56 AM UTC-4, Katy Jennison wrote:
> On 14/09/2018 19:03, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
> > On Friday, September 14, 2018 at 7:41:10 AM UTC-4, Madrigal Gurneyhalt wrote:

> >> I'm not so sure about that. You have to remember that the less pithy/witty
> >> insults of the past don't make it into books of quotations and the like. Future
> >> versions will have "Mutton headed old mugwump", "The water was so cold
> > ?? When did a Brit use an obsolete (mid-19th-century) Americanism? A
> > mugwump was someone who refused to make up their mind -- their mug [face]
> > on one side of the fence, their wump [rump] on the other; presumably
> > referring to the big question of the age, slavery; allegedly related
> > to an Algonquian word.
>
> In the innocent days of my childhood it was just another synonym for
> fool, clot, idiot, etc. I conjecture that to us it was simply 'mug' with
> 'wump' attached to make it sound more interesting. It had a slightly
> affectionate nuance. We knew nothing of American politics.

The Wikiparticle has a Punch cartoon dating from the President Cleveland
era, which is when it says the 'bolts the party' sense came into use.
Don P
2018-09-13 20:31:17 UTC
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On 13/09/2018 3:22 PM, occam wrote:

> These are not insults involving cussing and effing (sorry Rey), rather a
> much more subtle form of exchange between British politicians .
> . . .
> And the description of Nigel Farage by Russell Brand (comedian)
> "A pound shop Enoch Powell" (ouch!)

This confirms how universal is monetary inflation. We in the dollar
zone used to take about "dime stores" (which I think Mr. Woolworth
invented in the 19th century;) they are now "dollar stores."

--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
John Varela
2018-09-15 01:22:23 UTC
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On Thu, 13 Sep 2018 20:31:17 UTC, Don P <***@ncf.ca> wrote:

> On 13/09/2018 3:22 PM, occam wrote:
>
> > These are not insults involving cussing and effing (sorry Rey), rather a
> > much more subtle form of exchange between British politicians .
> > . . .
> > And the description of Nigel Farage by Russell Brand (comedian)
> > "A pound shop Enoch Powell" (ouch!)
>
> This confirms how universal is monetary inflation. We in the dollar
> zone used to take about "dime stores" (which I think Mr. Woolworth
> invented in the 19th century;) they are now "dollar stores."

WIWAL they were "five and dimes". What used to be "penny candy" now
costs 25 cents. What ever happened to the "dime novel"? When was
the last time you heard someone say something is "sound as a
dollar"?

--
John Varela
RHDraney
2018-09-15 02:34:40 UTC
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On 9/14/2018 6:22 PM, John Varela wrote:
> On Thu, 13 Sep 2018 20:31:17 UTC, Don P <***@ncf.ca> wrote:
>>
>> This confirms how universal is monetary inflation. We in the dollar
>> zone used to take about "dime stores" (which I think Mr. Woolworth
>> invented in the 19th century;) they are now "dollar stores."
>
> WIWAL they were "five and dimes". What used to be "penny candy" now
> costs 25 cents. What ever happened to the "dime novel"? When was
> the last time you heard someone say something is "sound as a
> dollar"?

The dime novel evolved from the earlier penny dreadful....

A joke at the foot of the page in an old Readers Digest (which means it
must have appeared elsewhere first) mentioned an old lady seeing a
7-Eleven for the first time and exclaiming "land sakes! inflation has
even hit the five-and-ten!"...r
bill van
2018-09-15 06:13:51 UTC
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On 2018-09-15 01:22:23 +0000, John Varela said:

> On Thu, 13 Sep 2018 20:31:17 UTC, Don P <***@ncf.ca> wrote:
>
>> On 13/09/2018 3:22 PM, occam wrote:
>>
>>> These are not insults involving cussing and effing (sorry Rey), rather a
>>> much more subtle form of exchange between British politicians .
>>> . . .
>>> And the description of Nigel Farage by Russell Brand (comedian)
>>> "A pound shop Enoch Powell" (ouch!)
>>
>> This confirms how universal is monetary inflation. We in the dollar
>> zone used to take about "dime stores" (which I think Mr. Woolworth
>> invented in the 19th century;) they are now "dollar stores."
>
> WIWAL they were "five and dimes". What used to be "penny candy" now
> costs 25 cents. What ever happened to the "dime novel"? When was
> the last time you heard someone say something is "sound as a
> dollar"?

There's no stopping progress. I have a Dollarama the size of a supermarket
in my neighbourhood.

bill
Arindam Banerjee
2018-09-14 09:16:23 UTC
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On Friday, 14 September 2018 05:22:04 UTC+10, occam wrote:
> Here is an article from The Telegraph:
>
> "From Churchill to Corbyn: the 40 most brutal British political insults"
> (link lower down)
>
> These are not insults involving cussing and effing (sorry Rey), rather a
> much more subtle form of exchange between British politicians .
>
> And the winner is....Winston Churchill. Some highlights:
>
> Said about Lloyd George:
> "He would make a drum out of the skin of his own mother in order to
> sound his own praises."
>
> Said of PM Clement Attlee:
> "A sheep in sheep's clothing" and
>
> "He is a modest man with much to be modest about"
>
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=2376057982421985&set=pcb.2376066082421175&type=3&theater

This WC near Tallinn reminded me of our tour guide in Athens. He said, pointing, there is a Winston Churchill over there.
occam
2018-09-14 11:56:32 UTC
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On 14/09/2018 11:16, Arindam Banerjee wrote:

>>


>
> This WC near Tallinn reminded me of our tour guide in Athens. He said, pointing, there is a Winston Churchill over there.
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That's about the limit of wit you can expect of a Greek tour guide. By
all accounts Winston was aware and played on the 'W.C.' initials. In the
film 'Darkest Hour' (2017) the director of the film makes a passing
visual reference to it.
Arindam Banerjee
2018-09-14 13:08:21 UTC
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He was born there.
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