Discussion:
Repeat introductions
(too old to reply)
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-16 17:27:54 UTC
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Why do people introduce people twice? For example:

"Mr Smith, Mr Jones. Mr Jones, Mr Smith."

You only need to say each name ONCE.
--
"Get as far away from the nuclear explosion as possible" - Rodney McKay, Stargate Atlantis.
The Peeler
2017-04-16 18:17:55 UTC
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On Sun, 16 Apr 2017 18:27:54 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
"Mr Smith, Mr Jones. Mr Jones, Mr Smith."
You only need to say each name ONCE.
Prick! <tsk>
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sociopathic "wisdom":
"Anyone with ginger hair is inferior, they cannot handle the natural
phenomenon called the sun. They deserve to catch fire!"
MID: <***@red.lan>
GordonD
2017-04-16 19:32:28 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
"Mr Smith, Mr Jones. Mr Jones, Mr Smith."
You only need to say each name ONCE.
Because if you only say the name once, Mr Jones will feel slighted
because he feels that Mr Smith has been told who he is, but *he* hasn't
been told who Mr Smith is and this makes him feel inferior. Assuming of
course that he has an inflated sense of his own self-importance; normal
people wouldn't care, but it's safest to assume otherwise.
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-16 19:34:23 UTC
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Post by GordonD
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
"Mr Smith, Mr Jones. Mr Jones, Mr Smith."
You only need to say each name ONCE.
Because if you only say the name once, Mr Jones will feel slighted
because he feels that Mr Smith has been told who he is, but *he* hasn't
been told who Mr Smith is and this makes him feel inferior. Assuming of
course that he has an inflated sense of his own self-importance; normal
people wouldn't care, but it's safest to assume otherwise.
You're speaking to both of them at once. They can both hear you. You list the names of everyone in the room you know. Doing so again in reverse order achieves nothing.
--
What's the best thing to get for a woman who has everything?
A man to show her how to work it.
The Peeler
2017-04-16 20:03:34 UTC
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On Sun, 16 Apr 2017 20:34:23 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by GordonD
Because if you only say the name once, Mr Jones will feel slighted
because he feels that Mr Smith has been told who he is, but *he* hasn't
been told who Mr Smith is and this makes him feel inferior. Assuming of
course that he has an inflated sense of his own self-importance; normal
people wouldn't care, but it's safest to assume otherwise.
You're speaking to both of them at once. They can both hear you. You
list the names of everyone in the room you know. Doing so again in
reverse order achieves nothing.
Darn, do those poor simpletons in a.u.e. REALLY still have to be educated
about what kind of an idiot they are dealing with? <tsk>
--
More details from Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) strange
sociopathic world:
"I like driving fast and scaring people".
"If the guy behind me has his lights on too bright. I let him past
then tailgate him with my full beam on until he switches his off".
(Courtesy of Mr Pounder)
GordonD
2017-04-16 21:31:03 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by GordonD
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
"Mr Smith, Mr Jones. Mr Jones, Mr Smith."
You only need to say each name ONCE.
Because if you only say the name once, Mr Jones will feel slighted
because he feels that Mr Smith has been told who he is, but *he* hasn't
been told who Mr Smith is and this makes him feel inferior. Assuming of
course that he has an inflated sense of his own self-importance; normal
people wouldn't care, but it's safest to assume otherwise.
You're speaking to both of them at once. They can both hear you. You
list the names of everyone in the room you know. Doing so again in
reverse order achieves nothing.
I'm not disputing that. But that kind of person needs to feel he's
important.
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-16 22:11:02 UTC
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Post by GordonD
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by GordonD
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
"Mr Smith, Mr Jones. Mr Jones, Mr Smith."
You only need to say each name ONCE.
Because if you only say the name once, Mr Jones will feel slighted
because he feels that Mr Smith has been told who he is, but *he* hasn't
been told who Mr Smith is and this makes him feel inferior. Assuming of
course that he has an inflated sense of his own self-importance; normal
people wouldn't care, but it's safest to assume otherwise.
You're speaking to both of them at once. They can both hear you. You
list the names of everyone in the room you know. Doing so again in
reverse order achieves nothing.
I'm not disputing that. But that kind of person needs to feel he's
important.
That's his problem. I've told everyone their names.
--
Yorkshire man takes his cat to the vet.
Yorkshireman: "Ayup, lad, I need to talk to thee about me cat."
Vet: "Is it a tom?"
Yorkshireman: "Nay, I've browt it wi' us."
JoeyDee
2017-04-16 22:47:39 UTC
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Post by GordonD
Post by GordonD
"Mr Smith, Mr Jones. Mr Jones, Mr Smith."
You only need to say each name ONCE.
Because if you only say the name once, Mr Jones will feel slighted
because he feels that Mr Smith has been told who he is, but *he* hasn't
been told who Mr Smith is and this makes him feel inferior. Assuming of
course that he has an inflated sense of his own self-importance; normal
people wouldn't care, but it's safest to assume otherwise.
You're speaking to both of them at once. They can both hear you. You
list the names of everyone in the room you know. Doing so again in
reverse order achieves nothing.
I'm not disputing that. But that kind of person needs to feel he's
important.
That's his problem. I've told everyone their names.
Hey, here's an idea: You do what you want and the rest of the world will do
what they want. Simples.
--
Joey Dee
Remember: It is To Laugh
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-17 00:41:27 UTC
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Post by JoeyDee
Post by GordonD
Post by GordonD
"Mr Smith, Mr Jones. Mr Jones, Mr Smith."
You only need to say each name ONCE.
Because if you only say the name once, Mr Jones will feel slighted
because he feels that Mr Smith has been told who he is, but *he* hasn't
been told who Mr Smith is and this makes him feel inferior. Assuming of
course that he has an inflated sense of his own self-importance; normal
people wouldn't care, but it's safest to assume otherwise.
You're speaking to both of them at once. They can both hear you. You
list the names of everyone in the room you know. Doing so again in
reverse order achieves nothing.
I'm not disputing that. But that kind of person needs to feel he's
important.
That's his problem. I've told everyone their names.
Hey, here's an idea: You do what you want and the rest of the world will do
what they want. Simples.
My way is more sensible.
--
If Christians want us to believe in a Redeemer, let them act redeemed. -- Voltaire
The Peeler
2017-04-17 10:36:26 UTC
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On Mon, 17 Apr 2017 01:41:27 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by JoeyDee
Hey, here's an idea: You do what you want and the rest of the world will do
what they want. Simples.
My way is more sensible.
Psychotic idiot!
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) "deep thinking":
"If there as many molestations as the media makes us believe, are they not
now in the majority? Soon it will be illegal not to molest."
MID: <***@red.lan>
Peter Moylan
2017-04-17 02:57:36 UTC
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Post by JoeyDee
Hey, here's an idea: You do what you want and the rest of the world will do
what they want. Simples.
You might be able to clear up something that's been puzzling me. There's
a TV ad here where a meerkat ends his spiel by saying "simples". I
thought he was saying that his audience was made up of simples, i.e.
people who aren't very bright. (Think of Simple Simon.) But it looks as
if you're using it in a different way.

Is this existing slang that I've managed to overlook?
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
GordonD
2017-04-17 08:12:52 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by JoeyDee
Hey, here's an idea: You do what you want and the rest of the world
will do what they want. Simples.
You might be able to clear up something that's been puzzling me.
There's a TV ad here where a meerkat ends his spiel by saying
"simples". I thought he was saying that his audience was made up of
simples, i.e. people who aren't very bright. (Think of Simple Simon.)
But it looks as if you're using it in a different way.
Is this existing slang that I've managed to overlook?
The meerkat is supposed to be Russian, and his English is less than
perfect. He's saying that taking out a policy with them is simple. (It's
an insurance company, for the benefit of those unfamiliar with the ad.)
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
Peter Young
2017-04-17 08:33:59 UTC
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Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by JoeyDee
Hey, here's an idea: You do what you want and the rest of the world
will do what they want. Simples.
You might be able to clear up something that's been puzzling me.
There's a TV ad here where a meerkat ends his spiel by saying
"simples". I thought he was saying that his audience was made up of
simples, i.e. people who aren't very bright. (Think of Simple Simon.)
But it looks as if you're using it in a different way.
Is this existing slang that I've managed to overlook?
The meerkat is supposed to be Russian, and his English is less than
perfect. He's saying that taking out a policy with them is simple. (It's
an insurance company, for the benefit of those unfamiliar with the ad.)
"Simples" is current kid-speak, innit?

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Ir)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-04-17 09:53:04 UTC
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Post by Peter Young
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by JoeyDee
Hey, here's an idea: You do what you want and the rest of the world
will do what they want. Simples.
You might be able to clear up something that's been puzzling me.
There's a TV ad here where a meerkat ends his spiel by saying
"simples". I thought he was saying that his audience was made up of
simples, i.e. people who aren't very bright. (Think of Simple Simon.)
But it looks as if you're using it in a different way.
Is this existing slang that I've managed to overlook?
The meerkat is supposed to be Russian, and his English is less than
perfect. He's saying that taking out a policy with them is simple. (It's
an insurance company, for the benefit of those unfamiliar with the ad.)
"Simples" is current kid-speak, innit?
I don't know how much kids use it. It very possibly came from the TV ad.

It is not only kids who use it.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Richard Heathfield
2017-04-17 09:35:58 UTC
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Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by JoeyDee
Hey, here's an idea: You do what you want and the rest of the world
will do what they want. Simples.
You might be able to clear up something that's been puzzling me.
There's a TV ad here where a meerkat ends his spiel by saying
"simples". I thought he was saying that his audience was made up of
simples, i.e. people who aren't very bright. (Think of Simple Simon.)
But it looks as if you're using it in a different way.
Is this existing slang that I've managed to overlook?
The meerkat is supposed to be Russian, and his English is less than
perfect.
I can't help noticing that even British meerkats aren't that great at
English. There is, for example, a colony of meerkats in Chester, and I
am given to understand from a friend who has visited them that they
don't speak any English at all!
--
Richard Heathfield
Email: rjh at cpax dot org dot uk
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Sig line 4 vacant - apply within
Katy Jennison
2017-04-17 10:26:12 UTC
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Post by Richard Heathfield
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by JoeyDee
Hey, here's an idea: You do what you want and the rest of the world
will do what they want. Simples.
You might be able to clear up something that's been puzzling me.
There's a TV ad here where a meerkat ends his spiel by saying
"simples". I thought he was saying that his audience was made up of
simples, i.e. people who aren't very bright. (Think of Simple Simon.)
But it looks as if you're using it in a different way.
Is this existing slang that I've managed to overlook?
The meerkat is supposed to be Russian, and his English is less than
perfect.
I can't help noticing that even British meerkats aren't that great at
English. There is, for example, a colony of meerkats in Chester, and I
am given to understand from a friend who has visited them that they
don't speak any English at all!
I noticed a similar thing at the Cotswold Wildlife Park. But it
occurred to me later that they might simply not have wanted to converse
with the park's visitors. After all, if strange people gawp at you over
your garden wall, you don't necessarily engage them in discussion in
perfect English. You reserve that for your friends, in private.
--
Katy Jennison
Sam Plusnet
2017-04-17 19:27:33 UTC
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Post by Richard Heathfield
I can't help noticing that even British meerkats aren't that great at
English. There is, for example, a colony of meerkats in Chester, and I
am given to understand from a friend who has visited them that they
don't speak any English at all!
Once we've left the EU there'll be no need to put up with these alien
colonies in our ancient market towns!
--
Sam Plusnet
Janet
2017-04-17 12:22:39 UTC
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In article <***@mid.individual.net>, ***@btinternet.com
says...
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by JoeyDee
Hey, here's an idea: You do what you want and the rest of the world
will do what they want. Simples.
You might be able to clear up something that's been puzzling me.
There's a TV ad here where a meerkat ends his spiel by saying
"simples". I thought he was saying that his audience was made up of
simples, i.e. people who aren't very bright. (Think of Simple Simon.)
But it looks as if you're using it in a different way.
To mean " so obvious it's easy to understand; no problem".
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Moylan
Is this existing slang that I've managed to overlook?
The meerkat is supposed to be Russian, and his English is less than
perfect. He's saying that taking out a policy with them is simple. (It's
an insurance company, for the benefit of those unfamiliar with the ad.)
Those meerkat adverts became so well known in UK that his use of the
word "simples" was adopted into the nation's slang vocabulary, and is
widespread now.

Janet
Peter Moylan
2017-04-17 14:01:53 UTC
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Post by Janet
says...
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by JoeyDee
Hey, here's an idea: You do what you want and the rest of the world
will do what they want. Simples.
You might be able to clear up something that's been puzzling me.
There's a TV ad here where a meerkat ends his spiel by saying
"simples". I thought he was saying that his audience was made up of
simples, i.e. people who aren't very bright. (Think of Simple Simon.)
But it looks as if you're using it in a different way.
To mean " so obvious it's easy to understand; no problem".
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Moylan
Is this existing slang that I've managed to overlook?
The meerkat is supposed to be Russian, and his English is less than
perfect. He's saying that taking out a policy with them is simple. (It's
an insurance company, for the benefit of those unfamiliar with the ad.)
Those meerkat adverts became so well known in UK that his use of the
word "simples" was adopted into the nation's slang vocabulary, and is
widespread now.
I'm at least slightly surprised that the same ad is airing in the UK and
in Australia. I don't think that happens very often.

I didn't realise that he was Russian, but then I don't look very closely
at TV ads. Normally I watch only non-commercial TV (and not very much of
that), so when I do watch commercial TV I treat the ads as toilet breaks
or coffee time, or time to read the book I usually have to occupy my
mind while watching TV.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Tony Cooper
2017-04-17 14:28:33 UTC
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On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 00:01:53 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Janet
says...
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by JoeyDee
Hey, here's an idea: You do what you want and the rest of the world
will do what they want. Simples.
You might be able to clear up something that's been puzzling me.
There's a TV ad here where a meerkat ends his spiel by saying
"simples". I thought he was saying that his audience was made up of
simples, i.e. people who aren't very bright. (Think of Simple Simon.)
But it looks as if you're using it in a different way.
To mean " so obvious it's easy to understand; no problem".
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Moylan
Is this existing slang that I've managed to overlook?
The meerkat is supposed to be Russian, and his English is less than
perfect. He's saying that taking out a policy with them is simple. (It's
an insurance company, for the benefit of those unfamiliar with the ad.)
Those meerkat adverts became so well known in UK that his use of the
word "simples" was adopted into the nation's slang vocabulary, and is
widespread now.
I'm at least slightly surprised that the same ad is airing in the UK and
in Australia. I don't think that happens very often.
I didn't realise that he was Russian, but then I don't look very closely
at TV ads. Normally I watch only non-commercial TV (and not very much of
that), so when I do watch commercial TV I treat the ads as toilet breaks
or coffee time, or time to read the book I usually have to occupy my
mind while watching TV.
We record all TV shows (except football) and fast-forward through the
commercials. Usually.

Some, like Geico's and Farmer's Mutual, are more entertaining than the
show we're watching.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
CDB
2017-04-17 18:54:13 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Janet
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by JoeyDee
Hey, here's an idea: You do what you want and the rest of the world
will do what they want. Simples.
You might be able to clear up something that's been puzzling me.
There's a TV ad here where a meerkat ends his spiel by saying
"simples". I thought he was saying that his audience was made up of
simples, i.e. people who aren't very bright. (Think of Simple Simon.)
But it looks as if you're using it in a different way.
To mean " so obvious it's easy to understand; no problem".
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Moylan
Is this existing slang that I've managed to overlook?
The meerkat is supposed to be Russian, and his English is less than
perfect. He's saying that taking out a policy with them is simple. (It's
an insurance company, for the benefit of those unfamiliar with the ad.)
Those meerkat adverts became so well known in UK that his use of the
word "simples" was adopted into the nation's slang vocabulary, and is
widespread now.
I'm at least slightly surprised that the same ad is airing in the UK and
in Australia. I don't think that happens very often.
I didn't realise that he was Russian, but then I don't look very closely
at TV ads. Normally I watch only non-commercial TV (and not very much of
that), so when I do watch commercial TV I treat the ads as toilet breaks
or coffee time, or time to read the book I usually have to occupy my
mind while watching TV.
We record all TV shows (except football) and fast-forward through the
commercials. Usually.
Some, like Geico's and Farmer's Mutual, are more entertaining than the
show we're watching.
Subaru. The story of parents rousing reluctant sleepy children to drive
them to where they can see the heavens at night, and the story of the
runt in a pack of farm dogs. He can't keep up with the rest, but he
already knows what to do (if you can't handle a problem, ask a human for
help), and he ends up being first in line at the cafeteria for once. I
never speed through that one.



While fetching the clip, I saw that Subaru has many commercials
featuring dogs. Smart move.
Charles Bishop
2017-04-18 00:45:46 UTC
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[snip]
Post by CDB
Post by Tony Cooper
We record all TV shows (except football) and fast-forward through the
commercials. Usually.
Some, like Geico's and Farmer's Mutual, are more entertaining than the
show we're watching.
Subaru. The story of parents rousing reluctant sleepy children to drive
them to where they can see the heavens at night, and the story of the
runt in a pack of farm dogs. He can't keep up with the rest, but he
already knows what to do (if you can't handle a problem, ask a human for
help), and he ends up being first in line at the cafeteria for once. I
never speed through that one.
http://youtu.be/Qm3IYgH0Bq0
While fetching the clip, I saw that Subaru has many commercials
featuring dogs. Smart move.
Liked that one, and a couple of the others that followed. I wonder if
there's a Subaru commercial that shows the Pleiades as part of the
commercial.
--
charles
CDB
2017-04-18 19:53:17 UTC
Permalink
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Post by Charles Bishop
[snip]
Post by CDB
Post by Tony Cooper
We record all TV shows (except football) and fast-forward through the
commercials. Usually.
Some, like Geico's and Farmer's Mutual, are more entertaining than the
show we're watching.
Subaru. The story of parents rousing reluctant sleepy children to drive
them to where they can see the heavens at night, and the story of the
runt in a pack of farm dogs. He can't keep up with the rest, but he
already knows what to do (if you can't handle a problem, ask a human for
help), and he ends up being first in line at the cafeteria for once. I
never speed through that one.
http://youtu.be/Qm3IYgH0Bq0
While fetching the clip, I saw that Subaru has many commercials
featuring dogs. Smart move.
Liked that one, and a couple of the others that followed. I wonder if
there's a Subaru commercial that shows the Pleiades as part of the
commercial.
Thank you for making me look that up; I didn't know.

'In Japan, the constellation is mentioned under the name Mutsuraboshi
("six stars") in the 8th century Kojiki and Manyosyu documents.[citation
needed] The constellation is now known in Japan as Subaru ("to unite").
It was chosen as the brand name of Subaru automobiles to reflect the
origins of the firm as the joining of five companies, and is depicted in
the firm's six-star logo.'

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pleiades

Only six sisters. I heard one of them was shy.
Peter Moylan
2017-04-19 03:42:00 UTC
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Post by CDB
Post by Charles Bishop
Liked that one, and a couple of the others that followed. I wonder if
there's a Subaru commercial that shows the Pleiades as part of the
commercial.
Thank you for making me look that up; I didn't know.
'In Japan, the constellation is mentioned under the name Mutsuraboshi
("six stars") in the 8th century Kojiki and Manyosyu documents.[citation
needed] The constellation is now known in Japan as Subaru ("to unite").
It was chosen as the brand name of Subaru automobiles to reflect the
origins of the firm as the joining of five companies, and is depicted in
the firm's six-star logo.'
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pleiades
Only six sisters. I heard one of them was shy.
I've often tried to count them, which is difficult because of the
twinkling. (From here they're usually low in the sky.) I don't think
I've ever managed to count more than six.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Charles Bishop
2017-04-19 14:03:49 UTC
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Post by CDB
Post by Charles Bishop
[snip]
Post by CDB
Post by Tony Cooper
We record all TV shows (except football) and fast-forward through the
commercials. Usually.
Some, like Geico's and Farmer's Mutual, are more entertaining than the
show we're watching.
Subaru. The story of parents rousing reluctant sleepy children to drive
them to where they can see the heavens at night, and the story of the
runt in a pack of farm dogs. He can't keep up with the rest, but he
already knows what to do (if you can't handle a problem, ask a human for
help), and he ends up being first in line at the cafeteria for once. I
never speed through that one.
http://youtu.be/Qm3IYgH0Bq0
While fetching the clip, I saw that Subaru has many commercials
featuring dogs. Smart move.
Liked that one, and a couple of the others that followed. I wonder if
there's a Subaru commercial that shows the Pleiades as part of the
commercial.
Thank you for making me look that up; I didn't know.
'In Japan, the constellation is mentioned under the name Mutsuraboshi
("six stars") in the 8th century Kojiki and Manyosyu documents.[citation
needed] The constellation is now known in Japan as Subaru ("to unite").
It was chosen as the brand name of Subaru automobiles to reflect the
origins of the firm as the joining of five companies, and is depicted in
the firm's six-star logo.'
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pleiades
Only six sisters. I heard one of them was shy.
I wonder why the Japanese only have 6 when Western Culture has 7 (The
Seven Sisters). I thought that I had heard that one was dimming, but
couldn't find reference to it in the WikiP article. It was, and is, one
of my favorite "objects" in the sky. Of course, it's not possible to see
in under the conditions that a LA sky provides. A trip out to the desert
at Joshua Tree is needed.

Additional Information at no additional cost(please ask for our brochure)

The local astronomy group holds a Messier Night every year - they set up
telescopes in the local mountains, and give attendees a chance to see as
many Messier objects as they are able to.

Does anyone here live where there are clear, bright skies at night such
that the Pleiades are visible (when they are up)?
--
charles, if so, I'm immensely jealous
CDB
2017-04-19 14:48:19 UTC
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[commercials you can watch]
Post by Charles Bishop
Post by CDB
Post by Charles Bishop
Post by CDB
While fetching the clip, I saw that Subaru has many commercials
featuring dogs. Smart move.
Liked that one, and a couple of the others that followed. I
wonder if there's a Subaru commercial that shows the Pleiades as
part of the commercial.
Thank you for making me look that up; I didn't know.
'In Japan, the constellation is mentioned under the name
Mutsuraboshi ("six stars") in the 8th century Kojiki and Manyosyu
documents.[citation needed] The constellation is now known in
Japan as Subaru ("to unite"). It was chosen as the brand name of
Subaru automobiles to reflect the origins of the firm as the
joining of five companies, and is depicted in the firm's six-star
logo.'
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pleiades
Only six sisters. I heard one of them was shy.
I wonder why the Japanese only have 6 when Western Culture has 7
(The Seven Sisters). I thought that I had heard that one was dimming,
but couldn't find reference to it in the WikiP article. It was, and
is, one of my favorite "objects" in the sky. Of course, it's not
possible to see in under the conditions that a LA sky provides. A
trip out to the desert at Joshua Tree is needed.
I have a memory like that too, of being told in childhood that one of
the stars the ancients saw had dimmed since. It's too vague for further
detail, though.
Post by Charles Bishop
Additional Information at no additional cost(please ask for our brochure)
The local astronomy group holds a Messier Night every year - they
set up telescopes in the local mountains, and give attendees a chance
to see as many Messier objects as they are able to.
Does anyone here live where there are clear, bright skies at night
such that the Pleiades are visible (when they are up)?
Clear night skies were one of the reasons I used to go canoe-camping --
only a three-hour drive from Ottawa, where lakes give the same kind of
clearance for viewing as deserts, if not the same dry clarity. We
usually tried to plan one trip for the Perseid shower.

Some brochures, with one shot of stars (but the fire is far too big):

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_V%C3%A9rendrye_Wildlife_Reserve

http://www.canot-camping.ca/photo-album.html

For shorter treats, the woods around Mud Lake, a mile or two from where
I live and within the old city limits, are all right if there's no cloud
around to reflect the sky-glow.
Katy Jennison
2017-04-19 16:28:37 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Charles Bishop
Post by CDB
Post by Charles Bishop
[snip]
Post by CDB
Post by Tony Cooper
We record all TV shows (except football) and fast-forward through the
commercials. Usually.
Some, like Geico's and Farmer's Mutual, are more entertaining than the
show we're watching.
Subaru. The story of parents rousing reluctant sleepy children to drive
them to where they can see the heavens at night, and the story of the
runt in a pack of farm dogs. He can't keep up with the rest, but he
already knows what to do (if you can't handle a problem, ask a human for
help), and he ends up being first in line at the cafeteria for once. I
never speed through that one.
http://youtu.be/Qm3IYgH0Bq0
While fetching the clip, I saw that Subaru has many commercials
featuring dogs. Smart move.
Liked that one, and a couple of the others that followed. I wonder if
there's a Subaru commercial that shows the Pleiades as part of the
commercial.
Thank you for making me look that up; I didn't know.
'In Japan, the constellation is mentioned under the name Mutsuraboshi
("six stars") in the 8th century Kojiki and Manyosyu documents.[citation
needed] The constellation is now known in Japan as Subaru ("to unite").
It was chosen as the brand name of Subaru automobiles to reflect the
origins of the firm as the joining of five companies, and is depicted in
the firm's six-star logo.'
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pleiades
Only six sisters. I heard one of them was shy.
I wonder why the Japanese only have 6 when Western Culture has 7 (The
Seven Sisters). I thought that I had heard that one was dimming, but
couldn't find reference to it in the WikiP article. It was, and is, one
of my favorite "objects" in the sky. Of course, it's not possible to see
in under the conditions that a LA sky provides. A trip out to the desert
at Joshua Tree is needed.
Additional Information at no additional cost(please ask for our brochure)
The local astronomy group holds a Messier Night every year - they set up
telescopes in the local mountains, and give attendees a chance to see as
many Messier objects as they are able to.
Does anyone here live where there are clear, bright skies at night such
that the Pleiades are visible (when they are up)?
Quite visible in the UK at the right time of year (winter), certainly
from the outskirts of the town where we live, and I'd have thought from
most places outside the centres of very big cities.
--
Katy Jennison
Quinn C
2017-04-19 22:01:05 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
[talking of Subaru]
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Charles Bishop
Post by CDB
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pleiades
Only six sisters. I heard one of them was shy.
I wonder why the Japanese only have 6 when Western Culture has 7 (The
Seven Sisters). I thought that I had heard that one was dimming, but
couldn't find reference to it in the WikiP article. It was, and is, one
of my favorite "objects" in the sky. Of course, it's not possible to see
in under the conditions that a LA sky provides. A trip out to the desert
at Joshua Tree is needed.
Additional Information at no additional cost(please ask for our brochure)
The local astronomy group holds a Messier Night every year - they set up
telescopes in the local mountains, and give attendees a chance to see as
many Messier objects as they are able to.
Does anyone here live where there are clear, bright skies at night such
that the Pleiades are visible (when they are up)?
Quite visible in the UK at the right time of year (winter), certainly
from the outskirts of the town where we live, and I'd have thought from
most places outside the centres of very big cities.
I remember seeing them from my window as a teenager, in a
suburbian area. I couldn't distinguish even 6 of them, though,
just 4 or 5.

But residential streets in Germany were never lit as brightly as
here in Canada.
--
Was den Juengeren fehlt, sind keine Botschaften, es ist der Sinn
fuer Zusammenhaenge. [Young people aren't short of messages, but
of a sense for interconnections.]
-- Helen Feng im Zeit-Interview
Charles Bishop
2017-04-19 22:28:29 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Charles Bishop
Post by CDB
Post by Charles Bishop
[snip]
Post by CDB
Post by Tony Cooper
We record all TV shows (except football) and fast-forward through the
commercials. Usually.
Some, like Geico's and Farmer's Mutual, are more entertaining than the
show we're watching.
Subaru. The story of parents rousing reluctant sleepy children to drive
them to where they can see the heavens at night, and the story of the
runt in a pack of farm dogs. He can't keep up with the rest, but he
already knows what to do (if you can't handle a problem, ask a human for
help), and he ends up being first in line at the cafeteria for once. I
never speed through that one.
http://youtu.be/Qm3IYgH0Bq0
While fetching the clip, I saw that Subaru has many commercials
featuring dogs. Smart move.
Liked that one, and a couple of the others that followed. I wonder if
there's a Subaru commercial that shows the Pleiades as part of the
commercial.
Thank you for making me look that up; I didn't know.
'In Japan, the constellation is mentioned under the name Mutsuraboshi
("six stars") in the 8th century Kojiki and Manyosyu documents.[citation
needed] The constellation is now known in Japan as Subaru ("to unite").
It was chosen as the brand name of Subaru automobiles to reflect the
origins of the firm as the joining of five companies, and is depicted in
the firm's six-star logo.'
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pleiades
Only six sisters. I heard one of them was shy.
I wonder why the Japanese only have 6 when Western Culture has 7 (The
Seven Sisters). I thought that I had heard that one was dimming, but
couldn't find reference to it in the WikiP article. It was, and is, one
of my favorite "objects" in the sky. Of course, it's not possible to see
in under the conditions that a LA sky provides. A trip out to the desert
at Joshua Tree is needed.
Additional Information at no additional cost(please ask for our brochure)
The local astronomy group holds a Messier Night every year - they set up
telescopes in the local mountains, and give attendees a chance to see as
many Messier objects as they are able to.
Does anyone here live where there are clear, bright skies at night such
that the Pleiades are visible (when they are up)?
Quite visible in the UK at the right time of year (winter), certainly
from the outskirts of the town where we live, and I'd have thought from
most places outside the centres of very big cities.
There's the rub, here. Although a 45 minute trip or one of a couple of
hours will give a better sky, I miss being able to see more than 10
stars (not counting planets) just by going out in the yard (garden).

I also miss fireflies, but none have hitched a ride across the Rockies
yet.
--
charles
Janet
2017-04-20 21:40:15 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Charles Bishop
Does anyone here live where there are clear, bright skies at night such
that the Pleiades are visible (when they are up)?
Yes.

Janet.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-04-17 21:56:55 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 00:01:53 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Janet
says...
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by JoeyDee
Hey, here's an idea: You do what you want and the rest of the world
will do what they want. Simples.
You might be able to clear up something that's been puzzling me.
There's a TV ad here where a meerkat ends his spiel by saying
"simples". I thought he was saying that his audience was made up of
simples, i.e. people who aren't very bright. (Think of Simple Simon.)
But it looks as if you're using it in a different way.
To mean " so obvious it's easy to understand; no problem".
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Moylan
Is this existing slang that I've managed to overlook?
The meerkat is supposed to be Russian, and his English is less than
perfect. He's saying that taking out a policy with them is simple. (It's
an insurance company, for the benefit of those unfamiliar with the ad.)
Those meerkat adverts became so well known in UK that his use of the
word "simples" was adopted into the nation's slang vocabulary, and is
widespread now.
I'm at least slightly surprised that the same ad is airing in the UK and
in Australia. I don't think that happens very often.
The ads are not the same in the UK and Australia.
There are separate companies in the UK and Australia which uses the same
Meerkat characters in their separate TV ads.

This is an Australian ad:


The websites mentioned in the ads are
in the UK
https://www.comparethemarket.com/
the company is BISL Limited which uses "comparethemarket.com" as a
trading name.

And in Australia
https://www.comparethemarket.com.au/
the company is Compare The Market Pty Ltd
Post by Peter Moylan
I didn't realise that he was Russian, but then I don't look very closely
at TV ads. Normally I watch only non-commercial TV (and not very much of
that), so when I do watch commercial TV I treat the ads as toilet breaks
or coffee time, or time to read the book I usually have to occupy my
mind while watching TV.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Charles Bishop
2017-04-18 00:38:58 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tony Cooper
On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 00:01:53 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Janet
says...
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by JoeyDee
Hey, here's an idea: You do what you want and the rest of the world
will do what they want. Simples.
You might be able to clear up something that's been puzzling me.
There's a TV ad here where a meerkat ends his spiel by saying
"simples". I thought he was saying that his audience was made up of
simples, i.e. people who aren't very bright. (Think of Simple Simon.)
But it looks as if you're using it in a different way.
To mean " so obvious it's easy to understand; no problem".
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Moylan
Is this existing slang that I've managed to overlook?
The meerkat is supposed to be Russian, and his English is less than
perfect. He's saying that taking out a policy with them is simple. (It's
an insurance company, for the benefit of those unfamiliar with the ad.)
Those meerkat adverts became so well known in UK that his use of the
word "simples" was adopted into the nation's slang vocabulary, and is
widespread now.
I'm at least slightly surprised that the same ad is airing in the UK and
in Australia. I don't think that happens very often.
The ads are not the same in the UK and Australia.
There are separate companies in the UK and Australia which uses the same
Meerkat characters in their separate TV ads.
http://youtu.be/vff6FhLwTds
I saw no meerkats
Post by Tony Cooper
The websites mentioned in the ads are
in the UK
https://www.comparethemarket.com/
the company is BISL Limited which uses "comparethemarket.com" as a
trading name.
I saw meerkats but no animated ones
Post by Tony Cooper
And in Australia
https://www.comparethemarket.com.au/
the company is Compare The Market Pty Ltd
Again meerkats but no speaking roles.
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Peter Moylan
I didn't realise that he was Russian, but then I don't look very closely
at TV ads. Normally I watch only non-commercial TV (and not very much of
that), so when I do watch commercial TV I treat the ads as toilet breaks
or coffee time, or time to read the book I usually have to occupy my
mind while watching TV.
Charles
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-04-18 11:45:42 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Mon, 17 Apr 2017 17:38:58 -0700, Charles Bishop
Post by Charles Bishop
Post by Tony Cooper
On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 00:01:53 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Janet
says...
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by JoeyDee
Hey, here's an idea: You do what you want and the rest of the world
will do what they want. Simples.
You might be able to clear up something that's been puzzling me.
There's a TV ad here where a meerkat ends his spiel by saying
"simples". I thought he was saying that his audience was made up of
simples, i.e. people who aren't very bright. (Think of Simple Simon.)
But it looks as if you're using it in a different way.
To mean " so obvious it's easy to understand; no problem".
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Moylan
Is this existing slang that I've managed to overlook?
The meerkat is supposed to be Russian, and his English is less than
perfect. He's saying that taking out a policy with them is simple. (It's
an insurance company, for the benefit of those unfamiliar with the ad.)
Those meerkat adverts became so well known in UK that his use of the
word "simples" was adopted into the nation's slang vocabulary, and is
widespread now.
I'm at least slightly surprised that the same ad is airing in the UK and
in Australia. I don't think that happens very often.
The ads are not the same in the UK and Australia.
There are separate companies in the UK and Australia which uses the same
Meerkat characters in their separate TV ads.
http://youtu.be/vff6FhLwTds
I saw no meerkats
Post by Tony Cooper
The websites mentioned in the ads are
in the UK
https://www.comparethemarket.com/
the company is BISL Limited which uses "comparethemarket.com" as a
trading name.
I saw meerkats but no animated ones
Post by Tony Cooper
And in Australia
https://www.comparethemarket.com.au/
the company is Compare The Market Pty Ltd
Again meerkats but no speaking roles.
Sorry about that!

Alexandr Orlov, a meerkat, addressing Australians:


British adverts with Alexandr and other meerkats:




The Wikip article about the "Compare the Meerkat" advertising campaign
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compare_the_Meerkat
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
CDB
2017-04-17 13:49:38 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by JoeyDee
Hey, here's an idea: You do what you want and the rest of the
world will do what they want. Simples.
You might be able to clear up something that's been puzzling me.
There's a TV ad here where a meerkat ends his spiel by saying
"simples". I thought he was saying that his audience was made up of
simples, i.e. people who aren't very bright. (Think of Simple
Simon.) But it looks as if you're using it in a different way.
Is this existing slang that I've managed to overlook?
Totes. There have been others recently: laters, defs, probs, for reals,
ceebs. They seem to have been used independently (outside of an
expressed sentence structure) at least at first; and most of them seem
to be adverbs.

I found some of them at

http://www.srcf.ucam.org/polyglossia/ ,

a little more than halfway down.
The Peeler
2017-04-16 23:29:44 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sun, 16 Apr 2017 23:11:02 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by GordonD
I'm not disputing that. But that kind of person needs to feel he's
important.
That's his problem. I've told everyone their names.
A clinical sociopath like you can NEVER understand societal rules,
Birdbrain! Talk with your psychiatrists about it!
--
Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) about his driving habits (no.2):
"Now you see, the proper way to soak somebody is to aim for the puddle from
100 yards back, then it looks like an accident to any moronic nosy hasn't
got a life cyclist. Of course you must adjust your speed inconspicuously
(use gears not brakes which cause lights to come on...).
MID: <***@red.lan>
Don Phillipson
2017-04-16 20:39:52 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
"Mr Smith, Mr Jones. Mr Jones, Mr Smith."
You only need to say each name ONCE.
Because "introduce" is the current shorthand for
"present to." When you introduce two people, you
present Mr. Smith to Mr. Jones and Mr. Jones to
Mr. Smith. For simplicity's sake, the same words
are used for both sentences of presentation.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-16 21:17:02 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Don Phillipson
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
"Mr Smith, Mr Jones. Mr Jones, Mr Smith."
You only need to say each name ONCE.
Because "introduce" is the current shorthand for
"present to." When you introduce two people, you
present Mr. Smith to Mr. Jones and Mr. Jones to
Mr. Smith. For simplicity's sake, the same words
are used for both sentences of presentation.
But each sentence effectively introduces both.
--
god said:

"The Divergence of the B Field = 0
The Curl of the E Field + the partial time derivative of the B field = 0
The Divergence of the D field = the charge density
The Curl of the H field - the partial time derivative of the D field = the current density"

and there was light, and he saw that it was good and of constant speed.
The Peeler
2017-04-16 22:16:49 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sun, 16 Apr 2017 22:17:02 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
But each sentence effectively introduces both.
Geezuz Christ ...shut your stupid psychopathic gob finally!
--
Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson") about himself:
"My IQ is superiour to that of most people".
"I am inferior in some ways but superior in other ways".
"I admit I should not have been born".
(Courtesy of Mr Pounder)
Lothar Frings
2017-04-21 13:43:59 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by GordonD
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
"Mr Smith, Mr Jones. Mr Jones, Mr Smith."
You only need to say each name ONCE.
Because if you only say the name once, Mr Jones will feel slighted
because he feels that Mr Smith has been told who he is, but *he* hasn't
been told who Mr Smith is and this makes him feel inferior.
Even the most stupid Mr. Jones will conclude
from the fact that I address the other one
as "Mr. Smith" that he is Mr. Smith.
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-21 13:46:12 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Lothar Frings
Post by GordonD
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
"Mr Smith, Mr Jones. Mr Jones, Mr Smith."
You only need to say each name ONCE.
Because if you only say the name once, Mr Jones will feel slighted
because he feels that Mr Smith has been told who he is, but *he* hasn't
been told who Mr Smith is and this makes him feel inferior.
Even the most stupid Mr. Jones will conclude
from the fact that I address the other one
as "Mr. Smith" that he is Mr. Smith.
I just point to each person and say their name. Clearly when I say each one, I'm introducing him to every other person present.
--
Law of mechanical repair: After your hands become coated with grease, your nose will begin to itch and you'll have to pee.
Lothar Frings
2017-04-21 14:00:56 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Lothar Frings
Post by GordonD
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
"Mr Smith, Mr Jones. Mr Jones, Mr Smith."
You only need to say each name ONCE.
Because if you only say the name once, Mr Jones will feel slighted
because he feels that Mr Smith has been told who he is, but *he* hasn't
been told who Mr Smith is and this makes him feel inferior.
Even the most stupid Mr. Jones will conclude
from the fact that I address the other one
as "Mr. Smith" that he is Mr. Smith.
I just point to each person and say their name. Clearly when I say each one, I'm introducing him to every other person present.
That's how I do it, too. But I'm German;
Americans, for example, are a little
more prickly[*] in some respects.

-----
[*] Is that a proper word for "easily offended"?
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-21 14:12:36 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Lothar Frings
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Lothar Frings
Post by GordonD
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
"Mr Smith, Mr Jones. Mr Jones, Mr Smith."
You only need to say each name ONCE.
Because if you only say the name once, Mr Jones will feel slighted
because he feels that Mr Smith has been told who he is, but *he* hasn't
been told who Mr Smith is and this makes him feel inferior.
Even the most stupid Mr. Jones will conclude
from the fact that I address the other one
as "Mr. Smith" that he is Mr. Smith.
I just point to each person and say their name. Clearly when I say each one, I'm introducing him to every other person present.
That's how I do it, too. But I'm German;
Germans tend to be very shortwinded (I can't think of the right word!). For example a German once saw me reversing out of a parking space and held up one finger to indicate there was something coming and I should wait. Unfortunately I misunderstood it as him waving that it was ok to go and almost collided with the other car.
Post by Lothar Frings
Americans, for example, are a little
more prickly[*] in some respects.
-----
[*] Is that a proper word for "easily offended"?
I knew what you meant, but I might have just assumed from context.
--
If Russia invaded Turkey from behind, would Greece help?
Lothar Frings
2017-04-21 14:29:32 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Germans tend to be very shortwinded (I can't think of the right word!). For example a German once saw me reversing out of a parking space and held up one finger to indicate there was something coming and I should wait. Unfortunately I misunderstood it as him waving that it was ok to go and almost collided with the other car.
If you snatch away a parking space
from a German, he possibly also
will hold up a finger. A different one.
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-21 14:33:58 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Lothar Frings
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Germans tend to be very shortwinded (I can't think of the right word!). For example a German once saw me reversing out of a parking space and held up one finger to indicate there was something coming and I should wait. Unfortunately I misunderstood it as him waving that it was ok to go and almost collided with the other car.
If you snatch away a parking space
from a German, he possibly also
will hold up a finger. A different one.
I snatch them from Scots all the time. The ones that drive past then want to reverse back in. I drive in forwards and walk off. Sometime they shout swearwords, so I just say "you drove past it".
--
The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire. -- US Air Force training manual.
The Peeler
2017-04-21 15:23:28 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Fri, 21 Apr 2017 15:33:58 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
I snatch them from Scots all the time. The ones that drive past then
want to reverse back in. I drive in forwards and walk off. Sometime
they shout swearwords, so I just say "you drove past it".
Just think of the ATTENTION you got again with this your newest story,
Birdbrain! <BG>
--
Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson") about himself:
"I can sleep outside in a temperature of -20C wearing only shorts".
"I once took a dump behind some bushes and slid down a hill to wipe my
arse".
(Courtesy of Mr Pounder)
The Peeler
2017-04-21 15:21:58 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Fri, 21 Apr 2017 15:12:36 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
I knew what you meant, but I might have just assumed from context.
HE still doesn't know to what kind of an idiot he keeps talking. <BG>
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) "deep thinking":
"Do you play musical instruments like that? No. Why would I want several
notes instead of one? That would be like playing the piano with parkinsons
disease."
MID: <***@red.lan>
Charles Bishop
2017-04-21 14:18:23 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Lothar Frings
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Lothar Frings
Post by GordonD
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
"Mr Smith, Mr Jones. Mr Jones, Mr Smith."
You only need to say each name ONCE.
Because if you only say the name once, Mr Jones will feel slighted
because he feels that Mr Smith has been told who he is, but *he* hasn't
been told who Mr Smith is and this makes him feel inferior.
Even the most stupid Mr. Jones will conclude
from the fact that I address the other one
as "Mr. Smith" that he is Mr. Smith.
I just point to each person and say their name. Clearly when I say each
one, I'm introducing him to every other person present.
That's how I do it, too. But I'm German;
Americans, for example, are a little
more prickly[*] in some respects.
-----
[*] Is that a proper word for "easily offended"?
You've got my hackles up, you,. . . you, . . .you . . . German!
--
charles
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-21 14:24:26 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Charles Bishop
Post by Lothar Frings
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Lothar Frings
Post by GordonD
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
"Mr Smith, Mr Jones. Mr Jones, Mr Smith."
You only need to say each name ONCE.
Because if you only say the name once, Mr Jones will feel slighted
because he feels that Mr Smith has been told who he is, but *he* hasn't
been told who Mr Smith is and this makes him feel inferior.
Even the most stupid Mr. Jones will conclude
from the fact that I address the other one
as "Mr. Smith" that he is Mr. Smith.
I just point to each person and say their name. Clearly when I say each
one, I'm introducing him to every other person present.
That's how I do it, too. But I'm German;
Americans, for example, are a little
more prickly[*] in some respects.
-----
[*] Is that a proper word for "easily offended"?
You've got my hackles up, you,. . . you, . . .you . . . German!
Don't mention the war!
--
A brunette, a blonde, and a redhead are all in third grade. Who has the biggest breasts?
The blonde, because she's 18.
The Peeler
2017-04-21 15:24:11 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Fri, 21 Apr 2017 15:24:26 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Charles Bishop
You've got my hackles up, you,. . . you, . . .you . . . German!
Don't mention the war!
I will just keep mentioning your idiocy, Birdbrain! <BG>
--
More from Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) strange sociopathic
world:
"If I don't get AC for this summer, I'm going to frighten my neighbours
again by walking around naked."
MID: <***@red.lan>
Tony Cooper
2017-04-21 15:59:51 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Fri, 21 Apr 2017 07:00:56 -0700 (PDT), Lothar Frings
Post by Lothar Frings
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Lothar Frings
Post by GordonD
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
"Mr Smith, Mr Jones. Mr Jones, Mr Smith."
You only need to say each name ONCE.
Because if you only say the name once, Mr Jones will feel slighted
because he feels that Mr Smith has been told who he is, but *he* hasn't
been told who Mr Smith is and this makes him feel inferior.
Even the most stupid Mr. Jones will conclude
from the fact that I address the other one
as "Mr. Smith" that he is Mr. Smith.
I just point to each person and say their name. Clearly when I say each one, I'm introducing him to every other person present.
That's how I do it, too. But I'm German;
Americans, for example, are a little
more prickly[*] in some respects.
-----
[*] Is that a proper word for "easily offended"?
GordonD, the prickly person above, is a Scot...not that I have noticed
any prickliness on his part.

And, yes, a person who is prickly is one who is easily offended or
easily angered.

On the subject of introductions, Americans are casual about who is
introduced first in general social situations. In social situations
there's no concept of rank, but a husband aware of social conventions
might present a person to his wife rather than his wife to the other
person.

In formal business situations, status is considered but not always
observed in introductions. Most Americans are not schooled in social
conventions of this nature and wouldn't have a concept of who should
be introduced first.

The only time I've been in formal business situations where there was
a definite sense of the need to observe this type of social convention
was when I was dealing with Germans at Carl Zeiss, Inc. As a
distributor for Zeiss products, I spent quite a bit of time in Zeiss's
US headquarters and I also visited several Zeiss facilities in
Germany. My impression was that the Germans were much more formal
than Americans.

One American that was with the same group I was with in Oberkochen
addressed a high-ranking Zeiss executive as "Dieter" instead of "Dr
(name)" and the wincing of the other Germans in the group was
palpable.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Rich Ulrich
2017-04-21 17:35:28 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Fri, 21 Apr 2017 11:59:51 -0400, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 21 Apr 2017 07:00:56 -0700 (PDT), Lothar Frings
Post by Lothar Frings
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Lothar Frings
Post by GordonD
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
"Mr Smith, Mr Jones. Mr Jones, Mr Smith."
You only need to say each name ONCE.
Because if you only say the name once, Mr Jones will feel slighted
because he feels that Mr Smith has been told who he is, but *he* hasn't
been told who Mr Smith is and this makes him feel inferior.
Even the most stupid Mr. Jones will conclude
from the fact that I address the other one
as "Mr. Smith" that he is Mr. Smith.
I just point to each person and say their name. Clearly when I say each one, I'm introducing him to every other person present.
That's how I do it, too. But I'm German;
Americans, for example, are a little
more prickly[*] in some respects.
-----
[*] Is that a proper word for "easily offended"?
GordonD, the prickly person above, is a Scot...not that I have noticed
any prickliness on his part.
And, yes, a person who is prickly is one who is easily offended or
easily angered.
On the subject of introductions, Americans are casual about who is
introduced first in general social situations. In social situations
there's no concept of rank, but a husband aware of social conventions
might present a person to his wife rather than his wife to the other
person.
In formal business situations, status is considered but not always
observed in introductions. Most Americans are not schooled in social
conventions of this nature and wouldn't have a concept of who should
be introduced first.
All around the world, a smile is a smile. All around the world,
a frown is a frown. All around the world, human beings will
act protective and caring when it comes to the people they
are close to or love or admire or respect. - In a social situation,
that would translate to telling a dear person, /first/, who
someone else is. Naturally, others present can read the clues.

Now, some Important People, narcissists, hate to think that
/they/ are not /first/ in the minds and hearts of everyone
around them and might punish anyone who shows "disrespect".
So that's a pragmatic reason to introduce others "to them".

Pragmatically, in the same direction, the Important Person
is apt to be known without introduction ... which seems to be
added for completeness or symmetry.

"King, this is my wife, Betsy. Betsy, (of course) this is the King."

Maybe you could be forgiven for reversing the order when
introducing a small, confused child to the King. The small child
might feel slightly ignored if it went the other way. (If you
believe children have feelings.)
Post by Tony Cooper
The only time I've been in formal business situations where there was
a definite sense of the need to observe this type of social convention
was when I was dealing with Germans at Carl Zeiss, Inc. As a
distributor for Zeiss products, I spent quite a bit of time in Zeiss's
US headquarters and I also visited several Zeiss facilities in
Germany. My impression was that the Germans were much more formal
than Americans.
One American that was with the same group I was with in Oberkochen
addressed a high-ranking Zeiss executive as "Dieter" instead of "Dr
(name)" and the wincing of the other Germans in the group was
palpable.
--
Rich Ulrich
Paul Wolff
2017-04-21 20:55:30 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Rich Ulrich
On Fri, 21 Apr 2017 11:59:51 -0400, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
On the subject of introductions, Americans are casual about who is
introduced first in general social situations. In social situations
there's no concept of rank, but a husband aware of social conventions
might present a person to his wife rather than his wife to the other
person.
In formal business situations, status is considered but not always
observed in introductions. Most Americans are not schooled in social
conventions of this nature and wouldn't have a concept of who should
be introduced first.
All around the world, a smile is a smile. All around the world,
a frown is a frown. All around the world, human beings will
act protective and caring when it comes to the people they
are close to or love or admire or respect. - In a social situation,
that would translate to telling a dear person, /first/, who
someone else is. Naturally, others present can read the clues.
Now, some Important People, narcissists, hate to think that
/they/ are not /first/ in the minds and hearts of everyone
around them and might punish anyone who shows "disrespect".
So that's a pragmatic reason to introduce others "to them".
Pragmatically, in the same direction, the Important Person
is apt to be known without introduction ... which seems to be
added for completeness or symmetry.
"King, this is my wife, Betsy. Betsy, (of course) this is the King."
Maybe you could be forgiven for reversing the order when
introducing a small, confused child to the King. The small child
might feel slightly ignored if it went the other way. (If you
believe children have feelings.)
Well done. There is a rationale, developed over the years and even
centuries, that underlies our social guidelines and smoothes our
relations. Conventions developed and hung on for good reasons - those
who adopt them, survive and even thrive; those who don't, don't.
--
Paul
Katy Jennison
2017-04-21 18:14:58 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 21 Apr 2017 07:00:56 -0700 (PDT), Lothar Frings
Post by Lothar Frings
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Lothar Frings
Post by GordonD
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
"Mr Smith, Mr Jones. Mr Jones, Mr Smith."
You only need to say each name ONCE.
Because if you only say the name once, Mr Jones will feel slighted
because he feels that Mr Smith has been told who he is, but *he* hasn't
been told who Mr Smith is and this makes him feel inferior.
Even the most stupid Mr. Jones will conclude
from the fact that I address the other one
as "Mr. Smith" that he is Mr. Smith.
I just point to each person and say their name. Clearly when I say each one, I'm introducing him to every other person present.
That's how I do it, too. But I'm German;
Americans, for example, are a little
more prickly[*] in some respects.
-----
[*] Is that a proper word for "easily offended"?
GordonD, the prickly person above, is a Scot...not that I have noticed
any prickliness on his part.
And, yes, a person who is prickly is one who is easily offended or
easily angered.
On the subject of introductions, Americans are casual about who is
introduced first in general social situations. In social situations
there's no concept of rank, but a husband aware of social conventions
might present a person to his wife rather than his wife to the other
person.
My experience is that Americans are very good at sticking out a hand and
saying [their own name], eliminating the need for third-party
introductions altogether. Took me a while to get used to, but I learnt
to do it too.
--
Katy Jennison
Tony Cooper
2017-04-21 19:36:54 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Fri, 21 Apr 2017 19:14:58 +0100, Katy Jennison
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 21 Apr 2017 07:00:56 -0700 (PDT), Lothar Frings
Post by Lothar Frings
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Lothar Frings
Post by GordonD
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
"Mr Smith, Mr Jones. Mr Jones, Mr Smith."
You only need to say each name ONCE.
Because if you only say the name once, Mr Jones will feel slighted
because he feels that Mr Smith has been told who he is, but *he* hasn't
been told who Mr Smith is and this makes him feel inferior.
Even the most stupid Mr. Jones will conclude
from the fact that I address the other one
as "Mr. Smith" that he is Mr. Smith.
I just point to each person and say their name. Clearly when I say each one, I'm introducing him to every other person present.
That's how I do it, too. But I'm German;
Americans, for example, are a little
more prickly[*] in some respects.
-----
[*] Is that a proper word for "easily offended"?
GordonD, the prickly person above, is a Scot...not that I have noticed
any prickliness on his part.
And, yes, a person who is prickly is one who is easily offended or
easily angered.
On the subject of introductions, Americans are casual about who is
introduced first in general social situations. In social situations
there's no concept of rank, but a husband aware of social conventions
might present a person to his wife rather than his wife to the other
person.
My experience is that Americans are very good at sticking out a hand and
saying [their own name], eliminating the need for third-party
introductions altogether. Took me a while to get used to, but I learnt
to do it too.
That's pretty much what I do, but I have noticed that when I do this
in other countries that the other person seems a bit put off by this.
Sometimes they have reacted like my outstretched hand was reaching for
their wallet.

While my name is not all that complicated, I tend to offer my name
before someone introduces me. Saves me from saying "It's 'Tony', not
'Tommy'" or somesuch.

My wife's first name is Kathleen, but she's either Kathy or Kate to
me. It's kinda surprising when she's introduced how many people ask
if it's Kathy with K or Cathy with a C. Since anything that follows
is verbal, and the two are pronounced the same, it doesn't make any
difference. I guess it's just a conversation filler question.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
RH Draney
2017-04-21 21:55:16 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tony Cooper
While my name is not all that complicated, I tend to offer my name
before someone introduces me. Saves me from saying "It's 'Tony', not
'Tommy'" or somesuch.
ObUsage: here we have an interesting case, in which "it" is a
first-person pronoun....r
David Kleinecke
2017-04-22 00:25:04 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by RH Draney
Post by Tony Cooper
While my name is not all that complicated, I tend to offer my name
before someone introduces me. Saves me from saying "It's 'Tony', not
'Tommy'" or somesuch.
ObUsage: here we have an interesting case, in which "it" is a
first-person pronoun....r
Third person for an unexpressed "Your name" or the like.
[What's your name?]
It's Tony
RH Draney
2017-04-22 03:13:25 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by RH Draney
Post by Tony Cooper
While my name is not all that complicated, I tend to offer my name
before someone introduces me. Saves me from saying "It's 'Tony', not
'Tommy'" or somesuch.
ObUsage: here we have an interesting case, in which "it" is a
first-person pronoun....r
Third person for an unexpressed "Your name" or the like.
[What's your name?]
It's Tony
Note second line of the following:

Person inside the house: "Who is it?"
Person outside the door: "It's Dave, man."
PITH: "Who?"
POTD: "Dave, man. Open up."
PITH: "Dave?"
POTD: "Yeah. Dave."
PITH: [long pause] "Dave's not here.'

....r
Katy Jennison
2017-04-22 06:50:13 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 21 Apr 2017 19:14:58 +0100, Katy Jennison
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 21 Apr 2017 07:00:56 -0700 (PDT), Lothar Frings
Post by Lothar Frings
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Lothar Frings
Post by GordonD
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
"Mr Smith, Mr Jones. Mr Jones, Mr Smith."
You only need to say each name ONCE.
Because if you only say the name once, Mr Jones will feel slighted
because he feels that Mr Smith has been told who he is, but *he* hasn't
been told who Mr Smith is and this makes him feel inferior.
Even the most stupid Mr. Jones will conclude
from the fact that I address the other one
as "Mr. Smith" that he is Mr. Smith.
I just point to each person and say their name. Clearly when I say each one, I'm introducing him to every other person present.
That's how I do it, too. But I'm German;
Americans, for example, are a little
more prickly[*] in some respects.
-----
[*] Is that a proper word for "easily offended"?
GordonD, the prickly person above, is a Scot...not that I have noticed
any prickliness on his part.
And, yes, a person who is prickly is one who is easily offended or
easily angered.
On the subject of introductions, Americans are casual about who is
introduced first in general social situations. In social situations
there's no concept of rank, but a husband aware of social conventions
might present a person to his wife rather than his wife to the other
person.
My experience is that Americans are very good at sticking out a hand and
saying [their own name], eliminating the need for third-party
introductions altogether. Took me a while to get used to, but I learnt
to do it too.
That's pretty much what I do, but I have noticed that when I do this
in other countries that the other person seems a bit put off by this.
Sometimes they have reacted like my outstretched hand was reaching for
their wallet.
Brits may be disconcerted when they first meet at American who does
this, because it hasn't caught on here except, maybe, in international
conference-going circles. We may say our names, but without initiating
or expecting a handshake. And we'd say "Hallo, I'm [name]" rather than
the plain name with nothing else. You Americans are more direct.
--
Katy Jennison
RH Draney
2017-04-22 08:08:58 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 21 Apr 2017 19:14:58 +0100, Katy Jennison
Post by Katy Jennison
My experience is that Americans are very good at sticking out a hand and
saying [their own name], eliminating the need for third-party
introductions altogether. Took me a while to get used to, but I learnt
to do it too.
That's pretty much what I do, but I have noticed that when I do this
in other countries that the other person seems a bit put off by this.
Sometimes they have reacted like my outstretched hand was reaching for
their wallet.
Brits may be disconcerted when they first meet at American who does
this, because it hasn't caught on here except, maybe, in international
conference-going circles. We may say our names, but without initiating
or expecting a handshake. And we'd say "Hallo, I'm [name]" rather than
the plain name with nothing else. You Americans are more direct.
Time I literally LOL'd (is that LLOL?) watching BBC America:

"Harriet Jones, Prime Minister."
"Yes, we know who you are."

No extended hand in that one, but some sort of identity card was held up
for display....r
GordonD
2017-04-22 10:26:26 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by RH Draney
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 21 Apr 2017 19:14:58 +0100, Katy Jennison
Post by Katy Jennison
My experience is that Americans are very good at sticking out a hand and
saying [their own name], eliminating the need for third-party
introductions altogether. Took me a while to get used to, but I learnt
to do it too.
That's pretty much what I do, but I have noticed that when I do this
in other countries that the other person seems a bit put off by this.
Sometimes they have reacted like my outstretched hand was reaching for
their wallet.
Brits may be disconcerted when they first meet at American who does
this, because it hasn't caught on here except, maybe, in international
conference-going circles. We may say our names, but without initiating
or expecting a handshake. And we'd say "Hallo, I'm [name]" rather than
the plain name with nothing else. You Americans are more direct.
"Harriet Jones, Prime Minister."
"Yes, we know who you are."
No extended hand in that one, but some sort of identity card was held up
for display....r
That was from 'Doctor Who' and was actually a running joke - when the
character first appeared she was a non-entity back-bencher who had to
introduce herself. She carried on doing this after she became PM, with
everybody (including a group of Daleks) replying the same way.
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
David Kleinecke
2017-04-22 17:11:21 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 21 Apr 2017 19:14:58 +0100, Katy Jennison
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 21 Apr 2017 07:00:56 -0700 (PDT), Lothar Frings
Post by Lothar Frings
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Lothar Frings
Post by GordonD
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
"Mr Smith, Mr Jones. Mr Jones, Mr Smith."
You only need to say each name ONCE.
Because if you only say the name once, Mr Jones will feel slighted
because he feels that Mr Smith has been told who he is, but *he* hasn't
been told who Mr Smith is and this makes him feel inferior.
Even the most stupid Mr. Jones will conclude
from the fact that I address the other one
as "Mr. Smith" that he is Mr. Smith.
I just point to each person and say their name. Clearly when I say each one, I'm introducing him to every other person present.
That's how I do it, too. But I'm German;
Americans, for example, are a little
more prickly[*] in some respects.
-----
[*] Is that a proper word for "easily offended"?
GordonD, the prickly person above, is a Scot...not that I have noticed
any prickliness on his part.
And, yes, a person who is prickly is one who is easily offended or
easily angered.
On the subject of introductions, Americans are casual about who is
introduced first in general social situations. In social situations
there's no concept of rank, but a husband aware of social conventions
might present a person to his wife rather than his wife to the other
person.
My experience is that Americans are very good at sticking out a hand and
saying [their own name], eliminating the need for third-party
introductions altogether. Took me a while to get used to, but I learnt
to do it too.
That's pretty much what I do, but I have noticed that when I do this
in other countries that the other person seems a bit put off by this.
Sometimes they have reacted like my outstretched hand was reaching for
their wallet.
Brits may be disconcerted when they first meet at American who does
this, because it hasn't caught on here except, maybe, in international
conference-going circles. We may say our names, but without initiating
or expecting a handshake. And we'd say "Hallo, I'm [name]" rather than
the plain name with nothing else. You Americans are more direct.
--
Katy Jennison
Or perhaps "I'm David, who you?"
GordonD
2017-04-22 10:08:20 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 21 Apr 2017 07:00:56 -0700 (PDT), Lothar Frings
On Fri, 21 Apr 2017 14:43:59 +0100, Lothar Frings
Post by GordonD
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
"Mr Smith, Mr Jones. Mr Jones, Mr Smith."
You only need to say each name ONCE.
Because if you only say the name once, Mr Jones will feel
slighted because he feels that Mr Smith has been told who
he is, but *he* hasn't been told who Mr Smith is and this
makes him feel inferior.
Even the most stupid Mr. Jones will conclude from the fact
that I address the other one as "Mr. Smith" that he is Mr.
Smith.
I just point to each person and say their name. Clearly when I
say each one, I'm introducing him to every other person
present.
That's how I do it, too. But I'm German; Americans, for example,
are a little more prickly[*] in some respects.
----- [*] Is that a proper word for "easily offended"?
GordonD, the prickly person above, is a Scot...not that I have
noticed any prickliness on his part.
And, yes, a person who is prickly is one who is easily offended or
easily angered.
On the subject of introductions, Americans are casual about who is
introduced first in general social situations. In social
situations there's no concept of rank, but a husband aware of
social conventions might present a person to his wife rather than
his wife to the other person.
My experience is that Americans are very good at sticking out a hand
and saying [their own name], eliminating the need for third-party
introductions altogether. Took me a while to get used to, but I
learnt to do it too.
There's a joke about a Scotsman, an Englishman, an Australian, a
Frenchman and an American who are all marooned on a desert island.
Within six months the Scotsman has built a still and is creating his own
whisky and running a bar, in which the Australian works selling drinks
to the American while the Frenchman cooks tasty meals. The Englishman
hasn't spoken to any of them and keeps himself to himself because he
hasn't been introduced.
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
Quinn C
2017-04-21 18:44:07 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tony Cooper
On the subject of introductions, Americans are casual about who is
introduced first in general social situations. In social situations
there's no concept of rank, but a husband aware of social conventions
might present a person to his wife rather than his wife to the other
person.
On introspection, I notice that it feels more appropriate to me to
introduce a guest to a host, or an outsider to insiders, than the
other way around. So I would introduce a friend visiting my house
to my wife, but my wife to the colleagues if I brought her to a
company event.

Not sure if I have other internalized rules in the matter.
--
Democracy means government by the uneducated,
while aristocracy means government by the badly educated.
-- G. K. Chesterton
GordonD
2017-04-22 10:00:32 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 21 Apr 2017 07:00:56 -0700 (PDT), Lothar Frings
Post by Lothar Frings
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Lothar Frings
Post by GordonD
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
"Mr Smith, Mr Jones. Mr Jones, Mr Smith."
You only need to say each name ONCE.
Because if you only say the name once, Mr Jones will feel slighted
because he feels that Mr Smith has been told who he is, but *he* hasn't
been told who Mr Smith is and this makes him feel inferior.
Even the most stupid Mr. Jones will conclude
from the fact that I address the other one
as "Mr. Smith" that he is Mr. Smith.
I just point to each person and say their name. Clearly when I say each one, I'm introducing him to every other person present.
That's how I do it, too. But I'm German;
Americans, for example, are a little
more prickly[*] in some respects.
-----
[*] Is that a proper word for "easily offended"?
GordonD, the prickly person above, is a Scot...not that I have noticed
any prickliness on his part.
Thank you... I think.
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
The Peeler
2017-04-21 15:19:18 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Fri, 21 Apr 2017 14:46:12 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Lothar Frings
Post by GordonD
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
"Mr Smith, Mr Jones. Mr Jones, Mr Smith."
You only need to say each name ONCE.
Because if you only say the name once, Mr Jones will feel slighted
because he feels that Mr Smith has been told who he is, but *he* hasn't
been told who Mr Smith is and this makes him feel inferior.
Even the most stupid Mr. Jones will conclude
from the fact that I address the other one
as "Mr. Smith" that he is Mr. Smith.
I just point to each person and say their name.
No, you don't even know any people to introduce to other people, you
endlessly blithering sociopathic cunt!
--
More details from Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sociopathic
"mind":
"If I wanted you to stab me with a knife and kill me, you should not
get into trouble for it".
"I would kill my sister if I thought I'd get away with it".
"I'm not what most people think of as human".
(Courtesy of Mr Pounder)
b***@aol.com
2017-04-16 23:09:56 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
"Mr Smith, Mr Jones. Mr Jones, Mr Smith."
You only need to say each name ONCE.
When you're introducing two people who aren't of the same "rank" (social status, hierarchical level, age, etc.) the etiquette requires you to introduce the lower-rank person to the higer-rank one. In that case, the names are not repeated and the introductions are not reversed.

Therefore, conversely, to avoid implying one person is considered of a higher rank than the other, it may be advisable to reverse the introduction.
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
--
"Get as far away from the nuclear explosion as possible" - Rodney McKay, Stargate Atlantis.
RH Draney
2017-04-16 23:39:18 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
"Mr Smith, Mr Jones. Mr Jones, Mr Smith."
You only need to say each name ONCE.
When you're introducing two people who aren't of the same "rank" (social status, hierarchical level, age, etc.) the etiquette requires you to introduce the lower-rank person to the higer-rank one. In that case, the names are not repeated and the introductions are not reversed.
Therefore, conversely, to avoid implying one person is considered of a higher rank than the other, it may be advisable to reverse the introduction.
Plus, not reversing the introduction kills Letterman's joke at the
Oscars: Oprah, Uma; "Uma, Oprah"....r
Peter T. Daniels
2017-04-17 03:26:48 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by RH Draney
Post by b***@aol.com
When you're introducing two people who aren't of the same "rank" (social status, hierarchical level, age, etc.) the etiquette requires you to introduce the lower-rank person to the higer-rank one. In that case, the names are not repeated and the introductions are not reversed.
Therefore, conversely, to avoid implying one person is considered of a higher rank than the other, it may be advisable to reverse the introduction.
Plus, not reversing the introduction kills Letterman's joke at the
Oscars: Oprah, Uma; "Uma, Oprah"....r
Joke? He himself made fun of it for weeks afterward. Thougb in recent years his
sole stint has been looking like a golden age of Oscar-hosting.
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-17 00:24:12 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Le dimanche 16 avril 2017 19:28:00 UTC+2, James Wilkinson Sword a =E9c=
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
"Mr Smith, Mr Jones. Mr Jones, Mr Smith."
You only need to say each name ONCE.
When you're introducing two people who aren't of the same "rank" (soci=
al status, hierarchical level, age, etc.) the etiquette requires you to =
introduce the lower-rank person to the higer-rank one. In that case, the=
names are not repeated and the introductions are not reversed.
Therefore, conversely, to avoid implying one person is considered of a=
higher rank than the other, it may be advisable to reverse the introduc=
tion.

Anyone egotistical enough to care who was introduced first, I don't give=
a shit about.

-- =

A drunk was in front of a judge. The judge says, "You've been brought h=
ere for drinking."
The drunk says, "Okay, let's get started."
b***@aol.com
2017-04-17 00:50:13 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
"Mr Smith, Mr Jones. Mr Jones, Mr Smith."
You only need to say each name ONCE.
When you're introducing two people who aren't of the same "rank" (social status, hierarchical level, age, etc.) the etiquette requires you to introduce the lower-rank person to the higer-rank one. In that case, the names are not repeated and the introductions are not reversed.
Therefore, conversely, to avoid implying one person is considered of a higher rank than the other, it may be advisable to reverse the introduction.
Anyone egotistical enough to care who was introduced first, I don't give a shit about.
It's not about who was introduced first: when you only say "Mr Smith, Mr Jones" it's short for "Mr Smith, this is Mr Jones, so that you're actually only addressing the former and sort of disregarding the latter.
--
A drunk was in front of a judge. The judge says, "You've been brought here for drinking."
The drunk says, "Okay, let's get started."
Quinn C
2017-04-18 18:31:35 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by b***@aol.com
It's not about who was introduced first: when you only say "Mr
Smith, Mr Jones" it's short for "Mr Smith, this is Mr Jones,
so that you're actually only addressing the former and sort of
disregarding the latter.
"Ah, you two haven't met yet! Mr. Smith [hand gesture] ... Mr.
Jones [hand gesture]", while glancing from one to the other.
--
Some things are taken away from you, some you leave behind-and
some you carry with you, world without end.
-- Robert C. Wilson, Vortex (novel), p.31
b***@aol.com
2017-04-18 19:42:20 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Quinn C
Post by b***@aol.com
It's not about who was introduced first: when you only say "Mr
Smith, Mr Jones" it's short for "Mr Smith, this is Mr Jones,
so that you're actually only addressing the former and sort of
disregarding the latter.
"Ah, you two haven't met yet! Mr. Smith [hand gesture] ... Mr.
Jones [hand gesture]", while glancing from one to the other.
That's right, I thought of that too, but deliberately excluded any deictic factors to answer the OP's "raw" question.
Post by Quinn C
--
Some things are taken away from you, some you leave behind-and
some you carry with you, world without end.
-- Robert C. Wilson, Vortex (novel), p.31
The Peeler
2017-04-17 10:35:58 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Mon, 17 Apr 2017 01:24:12 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by b***@aol.com
When you're introducing two people who aren't of the same "rank" (social
status, hierarchical level, age, etc.) the etiquette requires you to
introduce the lower-rank person to the higer-rank one. In that case, the
names are not repeated and the introductions are not reversed.
Therefore, conversely, to avoid implying one person is considered of a
higher rank than the other, it may be advisable to reverse the
introduction.
Anyone egotistical enough to care who was introduced first, I don't give a shit about.
Bingo, Birdbrain! You unwashed Scottish sow successfully baited yet more
than ten simpletons on a.u.e. with your insipid troll ...while, as always,
you knew your own answer to your own stupid "question" all along! LOL
--
More details from Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sociopathic
"mind":
"If I wanted you to stab me with a knife and kill me, you should not
get into trouble for it".
"I would kill my sister if I thought I'd get away with it".
"I'm not what most people think of as human".
(Courtesy of Mr Pounder)
GordonD
2017-04-17 08:16:21 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Le dimanche 16 avril 2017 19:28:00 UTC+2, James Wilkinson Sword a
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
"Mr Smith, Mr Jones. Mr Jones, Mr Smith."
You only need to say each name ONCE.
When you're introducing two people who aren't of the same "rank"
(social status, hierarchical level, age, etc.) the etiquette requires
you to introduce the lower-rank person to the higer-rank one. In that
case, the names are not repeated and the introductions are not
reversed.
Therefore, conversely, to avoid implying one person is considered of
a higher rank than the other, it may be advisable to reverse the
introduction.
That's more or less what I was trying to say but you have expressed it a
lot more clearly. The example I had in my head is somebody being
presented to the Queen, where obviously the Queen is *not* introduced to
the other person, because it's assumed he already knows who she is!
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-04-17 08:48:37 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by GordonD
Le dimanche 16 avril 2017 19:28:00 UTC+2, James Wilkinson Sword a
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
"Mr Smith, Mr Jones. Mr Jones, Mr Smith."
You only need to say each name ONCE.
When you're introducing two people who aren't of the same "rank"
(social status, hierarchical level, age, etc.) the etiquette requires
you to introduce the lower-rank person to the higer-rank one. In that
case, the names are not repeated and the introductions are not
reversed.
Therefore, conversely, to avoid implying one person is considered of
a higher rank than the other, it may be advisable to reverse the
introduction.
That's more or less what I was trying to say but you have expressed it a
lot more clearly. The example I had in my head is somebody being
presented to the Queen, where obviously the Queen is *not* introduced to
the other person, because it's assumed he already knows who she is!
Indeed, but where do you draw the line? The current (for the next
couple of weeks) President of France is such a nondescript-looking
person (he could model for Private Eye's "A Doctor Writes") that people
who are not interested in politics could well have no idea what he
looks like.
--
athel
GordonD
2017-04-17 09:00:59 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by GordonD
Le dimanche 16 avril 2017 19:28:00 UTC+2, James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
"Mr Smith, Mr Jones. Mr Jones, Mr Smith."
You only need to say each name ONCE.
When you're introducing two people who aren't of the same "rank"
(social status, hierarchical level, age, etc.) the etiquette
requires you to introduce the lower-rank person to the higer-rank
one. In that case, the names are not repeated and the
introductions are not reversed.
Therefore, conversely, to avoid implying one person is considered
of a higher rank than the other, it may be advisable to reverse
the introduction.
That's more or less what I was trying to say but you have expressed
it a lot more clearly. The example I had in my head is somebody
being presented to the Queen, where obviously the Queen is *not*
introduced to the other person, because it's assumed he already
knows who she is!
Indeed, but where do you draw the line? The current (for the next
couple of weeks) President of France is such a nondescript-looking
person (he could model for Private Eye's "A Doctor Writes") that
people who are not interested in politics could well have no idea
what he looks like.
Well, in that specific example they're hardly likely to bump into him
in, say, a lap-dancing bar (now if you were talking about Silvio
Berlusconi...) so they'll be aware that they're about to meet the
President. And if not, when the person doing the introduction begins by
saying, "Monsieur le President..."
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-04-17 09:15:08 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by GordonD
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by GordonD
Le dimanche 16 avril 2017 19:28:00 UTC+2, James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
"Mr Smith, Mr Jones. Mr Jones, Mr Smith."
You only need to say each name ONCE.
When you're introducing two people who aren't of the same "rank"
(social status, hierarchical level, age, etc.) the etiquette
requires you to introduce the lower-rank person to the higer-rank
one. In that case, the names are not repeated and the
introductions are not reversed.
Therefore, conversely, to avoid implying one person is considered
of a higher rank than the other, it may be advisable to reverse
the introduction.
That's more or less what I was trying to say but you have expressed
it a lot more clearly. The example I had in my head is somebody
being presented to the Queen, where obviously the Queen is *not*
introduced to the other person, because it's assumed he already
knows who she is!
Indeed, but where do you draw the line? The current (for the next
couple of weeks) President of France is such a nondescript-looking
person (he could model for Private Eye's "A Doctor Writes") that
people who are not interested in politics could well have no idea
what he looks like.
Well, in that specific example they're hardly likely to bump into him
in, say, a lap-dancing bar
If only because you wouldn't find me in a lap-dancing bar!
Post by GordonD
(now if you were talking about Silvio
Berlusconi...)
The curator (curatrix?) of an art gallery somewhere in the region of
Nice is called Silvia Berlasconi. She appeared once on television, and
I thought it was an unfortunate name.
Post by GordonD
so they'll be aware that they're about to meet the
President. And if not, when the person doing the introduction begins by
saying, "Monsieur le President..."
President of what?, you might be inclined to ask, as Jimmy Carter's
mother was reported to have asked when he announced his intention of
becoming President.
--
athel
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-22 17:51:03 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Le dimanche 16 avril 2017 19:28:00 UTC+2, James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
"Mr Smith, Mr Jones. Mr Jones, Mr Smith."
You only need to say each name ONCE.
When you're introducing two people who aren't of the same "rank"
(social status, hierarchical level, age, etc.) the etiquette
requires you to introduce the lower-rank person to the higer-rank
one. In that case, the names are not repeated and the
introductions are not reversed.
Therefore, conversely, to avoid implying one person is considered
of a higher rank than the other, it may be advisable to reverse
the introduction.
That's more or less what I was trying to say but you have expressed=
it a lot more clearly. The example I had in my head is somebody
being presented to the Queen, where obviously the Queen is *not*
introduced to the other person, because it's assumed he already
knows who she is!
Indeed, but where do you draw the line? The current (for the next
couple of weeks) President of France is such a nondescript-looking
person (he could model for Private Eye's "A Doctor Writes") that
people who are not interested in politics could well have no idea
what he looks like.
Well, in that specific example they're hardly likely to bump into him=
in, say, a lap-dancing bar
If only because you wouldn't find me in a lap-dancing bar!
(now if you were talking about Silvio
Berlusconi...)
The curator (curatrix?) of an art gallery somewhere in the region of
Nice is called Silvia Berlasconi. She appeared once on television, and=
I thought it was an unfortunate name.
so they'll be aware that they're about to meet the
President. And if not, when the person doing the introduction begins =
by
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
saying, "Monsieur le President..."
President of what?, you might be inclined to ask, as Jimmy Carter's
mother was reported to have asked when he announced his intention of
becoming President.
This is the president of the NSP I use:
https://www.linkedin.com/in/chris-caputo-964117

-- =

Runtime Error 6D at 417A:32CF: Incompetent User.
The Peeler
2017-04-22 19:02:14 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sat, 22 Apr 2017 18:51:03 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
the pathological attention whore of all the uk ngs, blathered again:

<FLUSH the sick shit unread>
--
More from Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) strange sociopathic
world:
"I don't use doors much."
MID: <***@red.lan>
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-22 17:49:16 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Le dimanche 16 avril 2017 19:28:00 UTC+2, James Wilkinson Sword a
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
"Mr Smith, Mr Jones. Mr Jones, Mr Smith."
You only need to say each name ONCE.
When you're introducing two people who aren't of the same "rank"
(social status, hierarchical level, age, etc.) the etiquette require=
s
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
you to introduce the lower-rank person to the higer-rank one. In tha=
t
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
case, the names are not repeated and the introductions are not
reversed.
Therefore, conversely, to avoid implying one person is considered of=
a higher rank than the other, it may be advisable to reverse the
introduction.
That's more or less what I was trying to say but you have expressed i=
t a
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
lot more clearly. The example I had in my head is somebody being
presented to the Queen, where obviously the Queen is *not* introduced=
to
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
the other person, because it's assumed he already knows who she is!
Indeed, but where do you draw the line? The current (for the next
couple of weeks) President of France is such a nondescript-looking
person (he could model for Private Eye's "A Doctor Writes") that peopl=
e
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
who are not interested in politics could well have no idea what he
looks like.
Hey, I don't even know who the current UK Prime Minister is (and I live =
here). Margaret Thatcher, Tony Blair, David Cameron, Gordon Brown, they=
were unique. But the current woman just looks like any old woman.

-- =

Bad command or file name! Go stand in the corner.
The Peeler
2017-04-22 19:02:58 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sat, 22 Apr 2017 18:49:16 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
the pathological attention whore of all the uk ngs, blathered again:

<FLUSH the incredibly idiotic BULLSHIT>
--
More from Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) strange sociopathic
world:
"If I don't get AC for this summer, I'm going to frighten my neighbours
again by walking around naked."
MID: <***@red.lan>
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-04-17 10:18:49 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by GordonD
Le dimanche 16 avril 2017 19:28:00 UTC+2, James Wilkinson Sword a
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
"Mr Smith, Mr Jones. Mr Jones, Mr Smith."
You only need to say each name ONCE.
When you're introducing two people who aren't of the same "rank"
(social status, hierarchical level, age, etc.) the etiquette requires
you to introduce the lower-rank person to the higer-rank one. In that
case, the names are not repeated and the introductions are not
reversed.
Therefore, conversely, to avoid implying one person is considered of
a higher rank than the other, it may be advisable to reverse the
introduction.
That's more or less what I was trying to say but you have expressed it a
lot more clearly. The example I had in my head is somebody being
presented to the Queen, where obviously the Queen is *not* introduced to
the other person, because it's assumed he already knows who she is!
If there is a group of several people the process is likely to be along
the lines of:

The "introducer" greets the people as a group:

"Good afternoon ladies and gentlemen" / "Hi folks" / whatever.

And then indicates and names individuals:

"This/there/that is A."
"This/there/that is B."
"This/there/that is C."
"This/there/that is D."
etc.

It is likely that A, B, C, D, etc will respond when mentioned with some
sort of gesture of acknowledgement.

Where there are only two people the minimum necessary to inform each one
of the name of the other is to say: "Hello A and B", however that lacks
the essence of an introduction.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-22 17:54:24 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Le dimanche 16 avril 2017 19:28:00 UTC+2, James Wilkinson Sword a
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
"Mr Smith, Mr Jones. Mr Jones, Mr Smith."
You only need to say each name ONCE.
When you're introducing two people who aren't of the same "rank"
(social status, hierarchical level, age, etc.) the etiquette require=
s
you to introduce the lower-rank person to the higer-rank one. In tha=
t
case, the names are not repeated and the introductions are not
reversed.
Therefore, conversely, to avoid implying one person is considered of=
a higher rank than the other, it may be advisable to reverse the
introduction.
That's more or less what I was trying to say but you have expressed i=
t a
lot more clearly. The example I had in my head is somebody being
presented to the Queen, where obviously the Queen is *not* introduced=
to
the other person, because it's assumed he already knows who she is!
If there is a group of several people the process is likely to be alon=
g
"Good afternoon ladies and gentlemen" / "Hi folks" / whatever.
"This/there/that is A."
"This/there/that is B."
"This/there/that is C."
"This/there/that is D."
etc.
Imagine doing that in full. You'd have to make 12 introductions. Somet=
hing like

It is likely that A, B, C, D, etc will respond when mentioned with som=
e
sort of gesture of acknowledgement.
Where there are only two people the minimum necessary to inform each o=
ne
of the name of the other is to say: "Hello A and B", however that lack=
s
the essence of an introduction.
Rubbish. "This is Mr Smith, and this is Mr Jones." I'd call that an in=
troduction. Same format as your long list above, but just two. Why wou=
ld two change the effect?

-- =

What happens if you install windows 98 on a system with 2 processors?
It crashes twice.
Richard Tobin
2017-04-17 10:08:36 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by b***@aol.com
When you're introducing two people who aren't of the same "rank" (social
status, hierarchical level, age, etc.) the etiquette requires you to
introduce the lower-rank person to the higer-rank one.
What century are you living in?

-- Richard
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-04-17 11:17:26 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by b***@aol.com
When you're introducing two people who aren't of the same "rank" (social
status, hierarchical level, age, etc.) the etiquette requires you to
introduce the lower-rank person to the higer-rank one.
What century are you living in?
This century.

"hierarchical level" is relevant in businesses and many other
organisations.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Richard Tobin
2017-04-17 11:32:08 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by b***@aol.com
When you're introducing two people who aren't of the same "rank" (social
status, hierarchical level, age, etc.) the etiquette requires you to
introduce the lower-rank person to the higer-rank one.
What century are you living in?
This century.
"hierarchical level" is relevant in businesses and many other
organisations.
Ah, I've always thought I wasn't suited to business.

-- Richard
CDB
2017-04-17 14:31:00 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by b***@aol.com
When you're introducing two people who aren't of the same "rank"
(social status, hierarchical level, age, etc.) the etiquette
requires you to introduce the lower-rank person to the higer-rank
one.
What century are you living in?
This century.
"hierarchical level" is relevant in businesses and many other
organisations.
And there are other criteria when business hierarchy is inapplicable.
You present male to female, younger to older, friend or family member to
acquaintance.
Jerry Friedman
2017-04-20 22:58:12 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by CDB
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by b***@aol.com
When you're introducing two people who aren't of the same "rank"
(social status, hierarchical level, age, etc.) the etiquette
requires you to introduce the lower-rank person to the higer-rank
one.
What century are you living in?
This century.
"hierarchical level" is relevant in businesses and many other
organisations.
And there are other criteria when business hierarchy is inapplicable.
You present male to female, younger to older, friend or family member to
acquaintance.
Which creates the problem of whether you present the archbishop's
niece to the professor emeritus's husband or the other way around.

When my college friends visited my home, I always introduced them
to my parents, but I don't know whether anyone involved noticed.
--
Jerry Friedman
CDB
2017-04-21 12:25:11 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by CDB
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by b***@aol.com
When you're introducing two people who aren't of the same
"rank" (social status, hierarchical level, age, etc.) the
etiquette requires you to introduce the lower-rank person to
the higer-rank one.
What century are you living in?
This century.
"hierarchical level" is relevant in businesses and many other
organisations.
And there are other criteria when business hierarchy is
inapplicable. You present male to female, younger to older, friend
or family member to acquaintance.
Which creates the problem of whether you present the archbishop's
niece to the professor emeritus's husband or the other way around.
That's where the skill comes in. Sometimes you have to decide on short
notice.

I would present the niece to the husband, unless there were complicating
factors (personalities if known, small difference in age, a personal
connection to one of them, for example).
Post by Jerry Friedman
When my college friends visited my home, I always introduced them to
my parents, but I don't know whether anyone involved noticed.
To your mother first, we hope.
Quinn C
2017-04-21 13:16:38 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by CDB
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by CDB
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by b***@aol.com
When you're introducing two people who aren't of the same
"rank" (social status, hierarchical level, age, etc.) the
etiquette requires you to introduce the lower-rank person to
the higer-rank one.
What century are you living in?
This century.
"hierarchical level" is relevant in businesses and many other
organisations.
And there are other criteria when business hierarchy is
inapplicable. You present male to female, younger to older, friend
or family member to acquaintance.
Which creates the problem of whether you present the archbishop's
niece to the professor emeritus's husband or the other way around.
That's where the skill comes in. Sometimes you have to decide on short
notice.
I would present the niece to the husband, unless there were complicating
factors (personalities if known, small difference in age, a personal
connection to one of them, for example).
Post by Jerry Friedman
When my college friends visited my home, I always introduced them to
my parents, but I don't know whether anyone involved noticed.
To your mother first, we hope.
Does this include stepmothers?

In case of doubt: my question is meant to ridicule such detail of
prescription. To me, the principle that we're all born equal is a
much more important value to protect than minutes of perceived
"status".
--
If Helen Keller is alone in the forest and falls down, does she
make a sound?
CDB
2017-04-21 14:03:28 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Quinn C
Post by CDB
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by CDB
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by b***@aol.com
When you're introducing two people who aren't of the
same "rank" (social status, hierarchical level, age,
etc.) the etiquette requires you to introduce the
lower-rank person to the higer-rank one.
What century are you living in?
This century.
"hierarchical level" is relevant in businesses and many
other organisations.
And there are other criteria when business hierarchy is
inapplicable. You present male to female, younger to older,
friend or family member to acquaintance.
Which creates the problem of whether you present the
archbishop's niece to the professor emeritus's husband or the
other way around.
That's where the skill comes in. Sometimes you have to decide on
short notice.
I would present the niece to the husband, unless there were
complicating factors (personalities if known, small difference in
age, a personal connection to one of them, for example).
Post by Jerry Friedman
When my college friends visited my home, I always introduced them
to my parents, but I don't know whether anyone involved noticed.
To your mother first, we hope.
Does this include stepmothers?
Yes.
Post by Quinn C
In case of doubt: my question is meant to ridicule such detail of
prescription. To me, the principle that we're all born equal is a
much more important value to protect than minutes of perceived
"status".
OK, scratch that.

What you say reminds me of the levelling approach of the
linguisticians*. They set aside the use of English
(say) as an art-form, high or low, and deny that there are
rules to be observed that are not instinctive to native speakers.

In principle, we are all equal; you should let them introduce
themselves. In practice, there are customs that have grown up and rules
that have been elaborated that some people follow because they value
them, and some because they want others to think well of them.

I am am an agnostic about these rules as a moral requirement, but have
found knowing them useful at times.
________________
*Disambiguation.
David Kleinecke
2017-04-21 15:51:08 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by CDB
Post by Quinn C
Post by CDB
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by CDB
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by b***@aol.com
When you're introducing two people who aren't of the
same "rank" (social status, hierarchical level, age,
etc.) the etiquette requires you to introduce the
lower-rank person to the higer-rank one.
What century are you living in?
This century.
"hierarchical level" is relevant in businesses and many
other organisations.
And there are other criteria when business hierarchy is
inapplicable. You present male to female, younger to older,
friend or family member to acquaintance.
Which creates the problem of whether you present the
archbishop's niece to the professor emeritus's husband or the
other way around.
That's where the skill comes in. Sometimes you have to decide on
short notice.
I would present the niece to the husband, unless there were
complicating factors (personalities if known, small difference in
age, a personal connection to one of them, for example).
Post by Jerry Friedman
When my college friends visited my home, I always introduced them
to my parents, but I don't know whether anyone involved noticed.
To your mother first, we hope.
Does this include stepmothers?
Yes.
Post by Quinn C
In case of doubt: my question is meant to ridicule such detail of
prescription. To me, the principle that we're all born equal is a
much more important value to protect than minutes of perceived
"status".
OK, scratch that.
What you say reminds me of the levelling approach of the
linguisticians*. They set aside the use of English
(say) as an art-form, high or low, and deny that there are
rules to be observed that are not instinctive to native speakers.
In principle, we are all equal; you should let them introduce
themselves. In practice, there are customs that have grown up and rules
that have been elaborated that some people follow because they value
them, and some because they want others to think well of them.
I am am an agnostic about these rules as a moral requirement, but have
found knowing them useful at times.
________________
*Disambiguation.
Disrespecting linguistics is a different thread.
CDB
2017-04-22 05:53:59 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by CDB
Post by Quinn C
Post by CDB
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by CDB
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by b***@aol.com
When you're introducing two people who aren't of the
same "rank" (social status, hierarchical level, age,
etc.) the etiquette requires you to introduce the
lower-rank person to the higer-rank one.
What century are you living in?
This century.
"hierarchical level" is relevant in businesses and many
other organisations.
And there are other criteria when business hierarchy is
inapplicable. You present male to female, younger to
older, friend or family member to acquaintance.
Which creates the problem of whether you present the
archbishop's niece to the professor emeritus's husband or
the other way around.
That's where the skill comes in. Sometimes you have to decide
on short notice.
I would present the niece to the husband, unless there were
complicating factors (personalities if known, small difference
in age, a personal connection to one of them, for example).
Post by Jerry Friedman
When my college friends visited my home, I always introduced
them to my parents, but I don't know whether anyone involved
noticed.
To your mother first, we hope.
Does this include stepmothers?
Yes.
Post by Quinn C
In case of doubt: my question is meant to ridicule such detail
of prescription. To me, the principle that we're all born equal
is a much more important value to protect than minutes of
perceived "status".
OK, scratch that.
What you say reminds me of the levelling approach of the
linguisticians*. They set aside the use of English (say) as an
art-form, high or low, and deny that there are rules to be observed
that are not instinctive to native speakers.
In principle, we are all equal; you should let them introduce
themselves. In practice, there are customs that have grown up and
rules that have been elaborated that some people follow because
they value them, and some because they want others to think well of
them.
I am am an agnostic about these rules as a moral requirement, but
have found knowing them useful at times. ________________
*Disambiguation.
Disrespecting linguistics is a different thread.
I have sufficient respect for linguistics, and some interest in it. As
I said, I chose that form because its meaning is unmistakable.

In a
group dedicated to discussing language, including English, as a form of
animal behaviour (sci.lang, for instance), the approach I referred to is
appropriate. In a group like AUE it is not, and should at least
be accompanied by a polite acknowledgement of trespass.
Peter T. Daniels
2017-04-22 13:03:11 UTC
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Post by CDB
In a
group dedicated to discussing language, including English, as a form of
animal behaviour (sci.lang, for instance),
What a strange notion. Language is apparently the _only_ behavior
that distinguishes human from non-human.

Though a paleoanthropologist interviewed on last night's *Science at
the Movies* (the topic was the 2016 Tarzan movie and the two streams
of Planet of the Apes movies) insisted that exclusively-bipedal
locomotion is another. (His institutions are Lehmann College of
the City University of New York, and the American Museum of Natural
History.)
CDB
2017-04-22 13:47:57 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
In a group dedicated to discussing language, including English, as
a form of animal behaviour (sci.lang, for instance),
What a strange notion.
Our version of animal behaviour, of course.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Language is apparently the _only_ behavior that distinguishes human
from non-human.
I suggest the distinction is better defined by our talent and propensity
for lying. Or for destructiveness. Pan desolator.

Humans are certainly outliers in the animal population. Our behaviour
is largely distinguishable from that of the other animals by the
complications our overgrown cerebral cortices allow us to engage
in. We will probably also be among the last mammalian species to become
extinct, amid the disasters we have created.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Though a paleoanthropologist interviewed on last night's *Science at
the Movies* (the topic was the 2016 Tarzan movie and the two streams
of Planet of the Apes movies) insisted that exclusively-bipedal
locomotion is another. (His institutions are Lehmann College of the
City University of New York, and the American Museum of Natural
History.)
The upright mammal. It's true that we have the capacity for that, being
able to distinguish good from evil (forebrains again). Unfortunately,
"upright" is only a physical description of our species.
Carcinopithecus nocens.
GordonD
2017-04-22 15:07:37 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
In a group dedicated to discussing language, including English,
as a form of animal behaviour (sci.lang, for instance),
What a strange notion.
Our version of animal behaviour, of course.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Language is apparently the _only_ behavior that distinguishes
human from non-human.
I suggest the distinction is better defined by our talent and
propensity for lying. Or for destructiveness. Pan desolator.
Primates do both. Koko, the gorilla who communicates through ASL, once
ripped a stainless steel sink off the wall of her enclosure then told
her handler that her pet kitten had done it!
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
Quinn C
2017-04-21 18:51:27 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by CDB
Post by Quinn C
Post by CDB
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by CDB
And there are other criteria when business hierarchy is
inapplicable. You present male to female, younger to older,
friend or family member to acquaintance.
Which creates the problem of whether you present the
archbishop's niece to the professor emeritus's husband or the
other way around.
That's where the skill comes in. Sometimes you have to decide on
short notice.
I would present the niece to the husband, unless there were
complicating factors (personalities if known, small difference in
age, a personal connection to one of them, for example).
Post by Jerry Friedman
When my college friends visited my home, I always introduced them
to my parents, but I don't know whether anyone involved noticed.
To your mother first, we hope.
Does this include stepmothers?
Yes.
Post by Quinn C
In case of doubt: my question is meant to ridicule such detail of
prescription. To me, the principle that we're all born equal is a
much more important value to protect than minutes of perceived
"status".
OK, scratch that.
What you say reminds me of the levelling approach of the
linguisticians*. They set aside the use of English
(say) as an art-form, high or low, and deny that there are
rules to be observed that are not instinctive to native speakers.
In principle, we are all equal; you should let them introduce
themselves. In practice, there are customs that have grown up and rules
that have been elaborated that some people follow because they value
them, and some because they want others to think well of them.
I am am an agnostic about these rules as a moral requirement, but have
found knowing them useful at times.
Not sure about linguisticians, but linguists would argue only
against the widespread belief that literary language is
intrinsically better, and that we would all gain from using it in
all situations. Rather, they'd say, each situation has it's own
most appropriate and effective form of language.

I guess a similar approach would be appropriate for introductions,
with more or less detailed rules for formal vs. informal, or
private vs, business meetings.

Still, the "archbishop's niece", if she's nothing beyond that, is
a nobody in most situations. That was the more explicit target of
ridicule in my comment.
--
... man muss oft schon Wissenschaft infrage stellen bei den Wirt-
schaftsmenschen [...] das Denken wird haeufig blockiert von einem
ideologischen Ueberbau [...] Es ist halt in vielen Teilen eher
eine Religion als eine Wissenschaft. -- Heiner Flassbeck
Peter T. Daniels
2017-04-21 19:29:14 UTC
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Post by Quinn C
Not sure about linguisticians, but linguists would argue only
against the widespread belief that literary language is
intrinsically better, and that we would all gain from using it in
all situations. Rather, they'd say, each situation has it's own
most appropriate and effective form of language.
But we'd _write_ that each situation has its own most appropriate and effective
form of language.
CDB
2017-04-22 06:01:05 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by CDB
Post by Quinn C
Post by CDB
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by CDB
And there are other criteria when business hierarchy is
inapplicable. You present male to female, younger to
older, friend or family member to acquaintance.
Which creates the problem of whether you present the
archbishop's niece to the professor emeritus's husband or
the other way around.
That's where the skill comes in. Sometimes you have to decide
on short notice.
I would present the niece to the husband, unless there were
complicating factors (personalities if known, small difference
in age, a personal connection to one of them, for example).
Post by Jerry Friedman
When my college friends visited my home, I always introduced
them to my parents, but I don't know whether anyone involved
noticed.
To your mother first, we hope.
Does this include stepmothers?
Yes.
Post by Quinn C
In case of doubt: my question is meant to ridicule such detail
of prescription. To me, the principle that we're all born equal
is a much more important value to protect than minutes of
perceived "status".
OK, scratch that.
What you say reminds me of the levelling approach of the
linguisticians*. They set aside the use of English (say) as an
art-form, high or low, and deny that there are rules to be observed
that are not instinctive to native speakers.
In principle, we are all equal; you should let them introduce
themselves. In practice, there are customs that have grown up and
rules that have been elaborated that some people follow because
they value them, and some because they want others to think well of
them.
I am am an agnostic about these rules as a moral requirement, but
have found knowing them useful at times.
Not sure about linguisticians, but linguists would argue only against
the widespread belief that literary language is intrinsically better,
and that we would all gain from using it in all situations. Rather,
they'd say, each situation has it's own most appropriate and
effective form of language.
I agree entirely that "literary" English is not intrinsically better
than another variety: the difference is made by particular circumstances.
I guess a similar approach would be appropriate for introductions,
with more or less detailed rules for formal vs. informal, or private
vs, business meetings.
Exactly. There are contexts in which formal introductions are called
for, and are useful to know; in many other contexts, including the ones
I encounter these days, they are to be avoided.
Still, the "archbishop's niece", if she's nothing beyond that, is a
nobody in most situations. That was the more explicit target of
ridicule in my comment.
It's the kind of situation when particular circumstances may determine
the best approach. Is the archbishop moderating the discussion?
Janet
2017-04-17 12:33:50 UTC
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In article <od2474$195v$***@macpro.inf.ed.ac.uk>, ***@cogsci.ed.ac.uk
says...
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by b***@aol.com
When you're introducing two people who aren't of the same "rank" (social
status, hierarchical level, age, etc.) the etiquette requires you to
introduce the lower-rank person to the higer-rank one.
What century are you living in?
-- Richard
I tend to say something like "Anne, this is Bob who has just moved
to the area. Anne works at the library"; giving each a little bit of
context and information from which they can start a conversation.

I can't even remember the last time I introduced two people by both
their full names (These days, they can count themselves lucky I
remembered one name each).

Janet
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