Discussion:
What's the rightpondian answer to 'beat' as a past participle?
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Dingbat
2017-04-18 04:21:29 UTC
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Would they replace 'beat' with 'beaten' or would they restructure the sentence, in the following exchange?


Re: Doctor hospitalized after United gets police to violently bump him from overbooked flight

'Fly the Friendly Skies with United.'

John Stockwell wrote:
Indeed. It's gives new meaning to "friendly".


I respond: Clear skies have friendly skies beat:-> See:

where seldom is heard a discouraging word
and the skies are not cloudy all day
https://www.stlyrics.com/lyrics/woodysroundup/homeontherange.htm
grabber
2017-04-18 05:59:25 UTC
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Post by Dingbat
Would they replace 'beat' with 'beaten' or would they restructure the sentence, in the following exchange?
Re: Doctor hospitalized after United gets police to violently bump him from overbooked flight
'Fly the Friendly Skies with United.'
Indeed. It's gives new meaning to "friendly".
where seldom is heard a discouraging word
and the skies are not cloudy all day
https://www.stlyrics.com/lyrics/woodysroundup/homeontherange.htm
"Beat" used to be quite normal in BrE as a past participle, but it is
rare (or dialect) now.

The construction "X has Y beat" is distinctively American, and would be
a deliberate Americanism if used by a BrE speaker. Possibly we might
BrAnglicise it to "X has got Y beaten".

"X beats Y", "X has beaten Y" and "X will beat Y" are possible
substitutions in different contexts but none of them is an exact
translation.
Ian Jackson
2017-04-18 15:31:26 UTC
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Post by grabber
Post by Dingbat
Would they replace 'beat' with 'beaten' or would they restructure the
sentence, in the following exchange?
Re: Doctor hospitalized after United gets police to violently bump
him from overbooked flight
'Fly the Friendly Skies with United.'
Indeed. It's gives new meaning to "friendly".
where seldom is heard a discouraging word
and the skies are not cloudy all day
https://www.stlyrics.com/lyrics/woodysroundup/homeontherange.htm
"Beat" used to be quite normal in BrE as a past participle, but it is
rare (or dialect) now.
As a straightforward past participle, I don't recall "beat" ever being
considered correct BrE grammar. However (as has been illustrated) it
does exist in certain colloquial or informal phrases.
Post by grabber
The construction "X has Y beat" is distinctively American, and would be
a deliberate Americanism if used by a BrE speaker.
Here, "beat" is almost sort of an adjective (a description of how Y is).
[I'm sure there is a technical term for this.]
Post by grabber
Possibly we might BrAnglicise it to "X has got Y beaten".
We might even omit the "got"!

However, I wouldn't hesitate to say "You've got me beat" (even though it
bends the rules a little). However, the end of this line in 'Alice's
Restaurant' does sound very American to a UK ear:
"That's what we did, and drove back to the church, had a Thanksgiving
dinner that couldn't be beat."
Post by grabber
"X beats Y", "X has beaten Y" and "X will beat Y" are possible
substitutions in different contexts but none of them is an exact
translation.
--
Ian
CDB
2017-04-18 20:09:30 UTC
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Post by Ian Jackson
Post by grabber
Post by Dingbat
Would they replace 'beat' with 'beaten' or would they restructure
the sentence, in the following exchange?
Re: Doctor hospitalized after United gets police to violently
bump him from overbooked flight
'Fly the Friendly Skies with United.'
John Stockwell wrote: Indeed. It's gives new meaning to
"friendly".
where seldom is heard a discouraging word and the skies are not
cloudy all day
https://www.stlyrics.com/lyrics/woodysroundup/homeontherange.htm
"Beat" used to be quite normal in BrE as a past participle, but it
is rare (or dialect) now.
"Pig was eat and Tom was beat and Tom ran crying down the street."
Post by Ian Jackson
As a straightforward past participle, I don't recall "beat" ever
being considered correct BrE grammar. However (as has been
illustrated) it does exist in certain colloquial or informal
phrases.
Post by grabber
The construction "X has Y beat" is distinctively American, and
would be a deliberate Americanism if used by a BrE speaker.
Here, "beat" is almost sort of an adjective (a description of how Y
is). [I'm sure there is a technical term for this.]
Post by grabber
Possibly we might BrAnglicise it to "X has got Y beaten".
We might even omit the "got"!
However, I wouldn't hesitate to say "You've got me beat" (even though
it bends the rules a little). However, the end of this line in
'Alice's Restaurant' does sound very American to a UK ear: "That's
what we did, and drove back to the church, had a Thanksgiving dinner
that couldn't be beat."
Post by grabber
"X beats Y", "X has beaten Y" and "X will beat Y" are possible
substitutions in different contexts but none of them is an exact
translation.
PG Wodehouse used it, although I suppose he used a lot of Americanisms
after he had been living in the US for a while; F and G are Brits, though.

4. "... what do we do for that eye of yours?"
"I was about to take it to bed."
"It wants bathing in warm water."
"It wants 'avin' a bit of steak put on it," said _F_ with decision. His
had been a life into which at one time injured eyes had entered rather
largely. "You trot along to the larder, ducky, and get a nice piece of
raw steak. Have him fixed up in no time."
"I think you're right," said _G_.
"I know I'm right. You can't beat steak."
"Cruel Sports of the Past – Beating the Steak. I hate to give you all
this trouble."

GooBoo has failed me again; damn tool. The only trace of the
exchange I could find was in a list of quiz questions from the Wodehouse
Society. I don't know when it was written.

http://www.pgwodehousesociety.org.uk/qq361370.htm

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