Discussion:
Reax
(too old to reply)
Mark Brader
2018-07-10 07:19:30 UTC
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Raw Message
This NBC News story:

http://www.nbcnews.com/politics/anykey-n890066

currently has the headline:

GOP senators applaud Trump's SCOTUS pick, swing votes offer measured reax

This is the first time I've seen "reax". Obviously it means "reactions",
which is confirmed in the lead paragraph. My guess is that it's a bit of
newsroom jargon that escaped into the wild... but I could be wrong.
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "Police Stop Slaying Suspect Look-alikes"
***@vex.net | --Yakima, WA, Herald-Republic, 2001-08-26
Peter Moylan
2018-07-10 08:33:34 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Mark Brader
http://www.nbcnews.com/politics/anykey-n890066
GOP senators applaud Trump's SCOTUS pick, swing votes offer measured reax
This is the first time I've seen "reax". Obviously it means
"reactions", which is confirmed in the lead paragraph. My guess is
that it's a bit of newsroom jargon that escaped into the wild... but
I could be wrong.
Until I read your "reactions" interpretation, I thought it mean that he
was going to be chopped off again.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-10 12:33:56 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mark Brader
http://www.nbcnews.com/politics/anykey-n890066
GOP senators applaud Trump's SCOTUS pick, swing votes offer measured reax
This is the first time I've seen "reax". Obviously it means
"reactions", which is confirmed in the lead paragraph. My guess is
that it's a bit of newsroom jargon that escaped into the wild... but
I could be wrong.
Until I read your "reactions" interpretation, I thought it mean that he
was going to be chopped off again.
?? An Ozzie complaining about unorthodox clipping of a word ???
Steve Hayes
2018-07-10 10:44:45 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Mark Brader
This is the first time I've seen "reax". Obviously it means
"reactions",
which is confirmed in the lead paragraph. My guess is that it's a bit
of newsroom jargon that escaped into the wild... but I could be wrong.
By analogy with "pix" and "vax".
--
Steve Hayes http://khanya.wordpress.com
Paul Carmichael
2018-07-10 11:46:16 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Mark Brader
http://www.nbcnews.com/politics/anykey-n890066
GOP senators applaud Trump's SCOTUS pick, swing votes offer measured reax
I haven't the faintest idea what that means. Is swing a verb or a substantive? Just looks
like nonsense to me. I suppose news headlines are written by monkeys.
--
Paul.

https://paulc.es/
https://asetrad.org
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-07-10 12:20:50 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Mark Brader
http://www.nbcnews.com/politics/anykey-n890066
GOP senators applaud Trump's SCOTUS pick, swing votes offer measured reax
I haven't the faintest idea what that means. Is swing a verb or a substantive? Just looks
like nonsense to me. I suppose news headlines are written by monkeys.
--
'swing vote' - a voter who does not have fixed party allegiances
and makes decisions based on policies, record, etc. Also known
as 'weirdo'!
Paul Carmichael
2018-07-11 14:50:26 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Mark Brader
http://www.nbcnews.com/politics/anykey-n890066
GOP senators applaud Trump's SCOTUS pick, swing votes offer measured reax
I haven't the faintest idea what that means. Is swing a verb or a substantive? Just looks
like nonsense to me. I suppose news headlines are written by monkeys.
--
Leaving sig-seperators in cuts the post here for some newsreaders (I've removed the
trailing space).
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
'swing vote' - a voter who does not have fixed party allegiances
and makes decisions based on policies, record, etc. Also known
as 'weirdo'!
Oh, a floating voter (BrE).
--
Paul.

https://paulc.es/
https://asetrad.org
Kerr-Mudd,John
2018-07-11 21:19:36 UTC
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Raw Message
On Wed, 11 Jul 2018 14:50:26 GMT, Paul Carmichael
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Mark Brader
http://www.nbcnews.com/politics/anykey-n890066
GOP senators applaud Trump's SCOTUS pick, swing votes offer measured reax
I haven't the faintest idea what that means. Is swing a verb or a
substantive? Just looks like nonsense to me. I suppose news
headlines are written by monkeys.
--
Leaving sig-seperators in cuts the post here for some newsreaders
(I've removed the trailing space).
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
'swing vote' - a voter who does not have fixed party allegiances
and makes decisions based on policies, record, etc. Also known
as 'weirdo'!
Oh, a floating voter (BrE).
desp/e/rate. sep/a/rate.
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Paul Carmichael
2018-07-12 09:01:19 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Wed, 11 Jul 2018 14:50:26 GMT, Paul Carmichael
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Mark Brader
http://www.nbcnews.com/politics/anykey-n890066
GOP senators applaud Trump's SCOTUS pick, swing votes offer
measured reax
I haven't the faintest idea what that means. Is swing a verb or a
substantive? Just looks like nonsense to me. I suppose news
headlines are written by monkeys.
--
Leaving sig-seperators in cuts the post here for some newsreaders
(I've removed the trailing space).
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
'swing vote' - a voter who does not have fixed party allegiances
and makes decisions based on policies, record, etc. Also known
as 'weirdo'!
Oh, a floating voter (BrE).
desp/e/rate. sep/a/rate.
<embarrassed> I always did well in spelling at school. My excuse here is complacency. My
spillchucker is set to Spanish.
--
Paul.

https://paulc.es/
https://asetrad.org
Jerry Friedman
2018-07-10 12:26:44 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Paul Carmichael
    http://www.nbcnews.com/politics/anykey-n890066
    GOP senators applaud Trump's SCOTUS pick, swing votes offer
measured reax
I haven't the faintest idea what that means. Is swing a verb or a
substantive?
A swing vote is a vote by (or in this case a metonymy for) a swing
voter, someone who "swings" between different parties at different times
and thus can help "swing" an election one way or the other. Here it
refers to the two or three senators of President Trump's party (the
Republicans or "Grand Old Party") who might vote against his nominee to
fill the vacancy on the Supreme Court of the United States.

If you're interested.
Post by Paul Carmichael
Just looks like nonsense to me. I suppose news headlines
are written by monkeys.
You're not part of the intended audience. NBC is an American company
that produces news mostly for Americans. Pretty much any literate
American would know what GOP stands for, the great majority would know
what SCOTUS stands for, and anyone following the the news would know
what "swing votes" refers to here. However, "reax" is new to me.
--
Jerry Friedman
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-10 12:39:03 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Paul Carmichael
    http://www.nbcnews.com/politics/anykey-n890066
    GOP senators applaud Trump's SCOTUS pick, swing votes offer
measured reax
I haven't the faintest idea what that means. Is swing a verb or a
substantive?
A swing vote is a vote by (or in this case a metonymy for) a swing
voter, someone who "swings" between different parties at different times
and thus can help "swing" an election one way or the other. Here it
refers to the two or three senators of President Trump's party (the
Republicans or "Grand Old Party") who might vote against his nominee to
fill the vacancy on the Supreme Court of the United States.
If you're interested.
Post by Paul Carmichael
Just looks like nonsense to me. I suppose news headlines
are written by monkeys.
You're not part of the intended audience. NBC is an American company
that produces news mostly for Americans. Pretty much any literate
American would know what GOP stands for, the great majority would know
what SCOTUS stands for, and anyone following the the news would know
what "swing votes" refers to here. However, "reax" is new to me.
Not to mention whom -- Susan Collins (R-ME), Lisa Murkowski (R-AK),
Joe Donnelly (D-IN), Heidi Heitkamp (D-ND), Joe Manchin (D-WV), and
Claire McCaskill (D-MO).
Jerry Friedman
2018-07-10 12:59:03 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Paul Carmichael
    http://www.nbcnews.com/politics/anykey-n890066
    GOP senators applaud Trump's SCOTUS pick, swing votes offer
measured reax
I haven't the faintest idea what that means. Is swing a verb or a
substantive?
A swing vote is a vote by (or in this case a metonymy for) a swing
voter, someone who "swings" between different parties at different times
and thus can help "swing" an election one way or the other. Here it
refers to the two or three senators of President Trump's party (the
Republicans or "Grand Old Party") who might vote against his nominee to
fill the vacancy on the Supreme Court of the United States.
If you're interested.
Post by Paul Carmichael
Just looks like nonsense to me. I suppose news headlines
are written by monkeys.
You're not part of the intended audience. NBC is an American company
that produces news mostly for Americans. Pretty much any literate
American
Make that "American literate in English".
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
would know what GOP stands for, the great majority would know
what SCOTUS stands for, and anyone following the the news would know
what "swing votes" refers to here. However, "reax" is new to me.
Not to mention whom -- Susan Collins (R-ME), Lisa Murkowski (R-AK),
Joe Donnelly (D-IN), Heidi Heitkamp (D-ND), Joe Manchin (D-WV), and
Claire McCaskill (D-MO).
The article also mentioned Rand Paul (Republican of Kentucky).
--
Jerry Friedman
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-10 13:07:02 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Paul Carmichael
    http://www.nbcnews.com/politics/anykey-n890066
    GOP senators applaud Trump's SCOTUS pick, swing votes offer
measured reax
I haven't the faintest idea what that means. Is swing a verb or a
substantive?
A swing vote is a vote by (or in this case a metonymy for) a swing
voter, someone who "swings" between different parties at different times
and thus can help "swing" an election one way or the other. Here it
refers to the two or three senators of President Trump's party (the
Republicans or "Grand Old Party") who might vote against his nominee to
fill the vacancy on the Supreme Court of the United States.
If you're interested.
Post by Paul Carmichael
Just looks like nonsense to me. I suppose news headlines
are written by monkeys.
You're not part of the intended audience. NBC is an American company
that produces news mostly for Americans. Pretty much any literate
American
Make that "American literate in English".
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
would know what GOP stands for, the great majority would know
what SCOTUS stands for, and anyone following the the news would know
what "swing votes" refers to here. However, "reax" is new to me.
Not to mention whom -- Susan Collins (R-ME), Lisa Murkowski (R-AK),
Joe Donnelly (D-IN), Heidi Heitkamp (D-ND), Joe Manchin (D-WV), and
Claire McCaskill (D-MO).
The article also mentioned Rand Paul (Republican of Kentucky).
Really!! He has escaped the attention of Chuck Todd, Margaret Brennan,
Nina Totenberg, and NPR's new White House reporter, who cultivates her
AAVE accent.
Jerry Friedman
2018-07-11 01:56:12 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Paul Carmichael
    http://www.nbcnews.com/politics/anykey-n890066
    GOP senators applaud Trump's SCOTUS pick, swing votes offer
measured reax
I haven't the faintest idea what that means. Is swing a verb or a
substantive?
A swing vote is a vote by (or in this case a metonymy for) a swing
voter, someone who "swings" between different parties at different times
and thus can help "swing" an election one way or the other. Here it
refers to the two or three senators of President Trump's party (the
Republicans or "Grand Old Party") who might vote against his nominee to
fill the vacancy on the Supreme Court of the United States.
If you're interested.
Post by Paul Carmichael
Just looks like nonsense to me. I suppose news headlines
are written by monkeys.
You're not part of the intended audience. NBC is an American company
that produces news mostly for Americans. Pretty much any literate
American
Make that "American literate in English".
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
would know what GOP stands for, the great majority would know
what SCOTUS stands for, and anyone following the the news would know
what "swing votes" refers to here. However, "reax" is new to me.
Not to mention whom -- Susan Collins (R-ME), Lisa Murkowski (R-AK),
Joe Donnelly (D-IN), Heidi Heitkamp (D-ND), Joe Manchin (D-WV), and
Claire McCaskill (D-MO).
Yes, I should have mentioned that there are Democratic swing voters in
this situation too, as the NBC article did.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
The article also mentioned Rand Paul (Republican of Kentucky).
Really!!
It didn't exactly say he was a swing voter, I must admit.

"Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., who doesn't always follow his party's leaders,
tweeted, "I look forward to the upcoming hearings, reviewing the record,
and meeting personally with Judge Kavanaugh, with an open mind."

I'd prefer a more parallel structure.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
He has escaped the attention of Chuck Todd, Margaret Brennan,
Nina Totenberg, and NPR's new White House reporter, who cultivates her
AAVE accent.
Ayesha Rascoe. I was surprised to hear an only slightly toned-down AAVE
accent from an NPR reporter.
--
Jerry Friedman
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-11 03:31:31 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Paul Carmichael
    http://www.nbcnews.com/politics/anykey-n890066
    GOP senators applaud Trump's SCOTUS pick, swing votes offer
measured reax
I haven't the faintest idea what that means. Is swing a verb or a
substantive?
A swing vote is a vote by (or in this case a metonymy for) a swing
voter, someone who "swings" between different parties at different times
and thus can help "swing" an election one way or the other. Here it
refers to the two or three senators of President Trump's party (the
Republicans or "Grand Old Party") who might vote against his nominee to
fill the vacancy on the Supreme Court of the United States.
If you're interested.
Post by Paul Carmichael
Just looks like nonsense to me. I suppose news headlines
are written by monkeys.
You're not part of the intended audience. NBC is an American company
that produces news mostly for Americans. Pretty much any literate
American
Make that "American literate in English".
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
would know what GOP stands for, the great majority would know
what SCOTUS stands for, and anyone following the the news would know
what "swing votes" refers to here. However, "reax" is new to me.
Not to mention whom -- Susan Collins (R-ME), Lisa Murkowski (R-AK),
Joe Donnelly (D-IN), Heidi Heitkamp (D-ND), Joe Manchin (D-WV), and
Claire McCaskill (D-MO).
Yes, I should have mentioned that there are Democratic swing voters in
this situation too, as the NBC article did.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
The article also mentioned Rand Paul (Republican of Kentucky).
Really!!
It didn't exactly say he was a swing voter, I must admit.
"Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., who doesn't always follow his party's leaders,
tweeted, "I look forward to the upcoming hearings, reviewing the record,
and meeting personally with Judge Kavanaugh, with an open mind."
I'd prefer a more parallel structure.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
He has escaped the attention of Chuck Todd, Margaret Brennan,
Nina Totenberg, and NPR's new White House reporter, who cultivates her
AAVE accent.
Ayesha Rascoe. I was surprised to hear an only slightly toned-down AAVE
accent from an NPR reporter.
Anchropeople of color whom I would never have guessed if they didn't
sometimes turn up on the Sunday morning shows include Audie Cornish
and Joshua Johnson of 1A (out of WAMU in D.C., which we now get as an
alternative to Fresh Air at 2 on weekdays, so I switch to AM when Terry
is talking to a musician or novelist). And on WNYC, Jami Floyd, who used
to be a lawyer, then WNYC's legal analyst, and now ATC host.
CDB
2018-07-11 13:42:06 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
[journax abbreviax; Rand-Boy]
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter T. Daniels
He has escaped the attention of Chuck Todd, Margaret Brennan,
Nina Totenberg, and NPR's new White House reporter, who
cultivates her AAVE accent.
Ayesha Rascoe. I was surprised to hear an only slightly toned-down
AAVE accent from an NPR reporter.
Anchropeople of color whom I would never have guessed if they didn't
sometimes turn up on the Sunday morning shows include Audie Cornish
and Joshua Johnson of 1A (out of WAMU in D.C., which we now get as
an alternative to Fresh Air at 2 on weekdays, so I switch to AM when
Terry is talking to a musician or novelist). And on WNYC, Jami Floyd,
who used to be a lawyer, then WNYC's legal analyst, and now ATC
host.
Hunh. You think you so big. I didn't realise Chuck Berry was Black
until years after I started listening to him. All those Southerners
sounded alike to me.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-11 14:54:04 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by CDB
[journax abbreviax; Rand-Boy]
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter T. Daniels
He has escaped the attention of Chuck Todd, Margaret Brennan,
Nina Totenberg, and NPR's new White House reporter, who
cultivates her AAVE accent.
Ayesha Rascoe. I was surprised to hear an only slightly toned-down
AAVE accent from an NPR reporter.
Anchorpeople of color whom I would never have guessed if they didn't
sometimes turn up on the Sunday morning shows include Audie Cornish
and Joshua Johnson of "1A" (out of WAMU in D.C., which we now get as
an alternative to Fresh Air at 2 on weekdays, so I switch to AM when
Terry is talking to a musician or novelist). And on WNYC, Jami Floyd,
who used to be a lawyer, then WNYC's legal analyst, and now ATC host.
Hunh. You think you so big. I didn't realise Chuck Berry was Black
until years after I started listening to him. All those Southerners
sounded alike to me.
Whereas Jerry Lee Lewis seems to be white. (He's the one who married his
cousin at 14.)

NPR has had one unmistakable Texan for decades, John Burnett. They used to
assign their reporters by region, so he would do all the Southwest stories.
He doesn't "sound black" (and isn't).

When I started listening to WBBM in Chicago (the transition from WCBS was
eased by having all the familiar CBS Radio network people, including
Charles Osgood), I somehow got the impression that their morning anchor,
Felicia Middlebrooks, was black, and eventually I figured out that I was
picking up on her devoicing of final stops. Years later I saw a photo of
their newsroom staff, and indeed she was; I posted to LINGUIST List (back when it was a forum for discussing linguistics and not just a commercial
outlet for publishers and meeting and job announcements) -- and got an
email from Felicia Middlebrooks! (She wanted to know what "final devoicing"
was.) Apparently she had a service that seined (can't say trolled any
more) the Net (mixed metaphor?) for mentions of celebrities' names.
Tony Cooper
2018-07-11 15:35:34 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by CDB
[journax abbreviax; Rand-Boy]
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter T. Daniels
He has escaped the attention of Chuck Todd, Margaret Brennan,
Nina Totenberg, and NPR's new White House reporter, who
cultivates her AAVE accent.
Ayesha Rascoe. I was surprised to hear an only slightly toned-down
AAVE accent from an NPR reporter.
Anchropeople of color whom I would never have guessed if they didn't
sometimes turn up on the Sunday morning shows include Audie Cornish
and Joshua Johnson of 1A (out of WAMU in D.C., which we now get as
an alternative to Fresh Air at 2 on weekdays, so I switch to AM when
Terry is talking to a musician or novelist). And on WNYC, Jami Floyd,
who used to be a lawyer, then WNYC's legal analyst, and now ATC
host.
Hunh. You think you so big. I didn't realise Chuck Berry was Black
until years after I started listening to him. All those Southerners
sounded alike to me.
I am a great fan of Mose Allison.



Listen and try to determine his race.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-07-11 16:04:12 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by CDB
[journax abbreviax; Rand-Boy]
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter T. Daniels
He has escaped the attention of Chuck Todd, Margaret Brennan,
Nina Totenberg, and NPR's new White House reporter, who
cultivates her AAVE accent.
Ayesha Rascoe. I was surprised to hear an only slightly toned-down
AAVE accent from an NPR reporter.
Anchropeople of color whom I would never have guessed if they didn't
sometimes turn up on the Sunday morning shows include Audie Cornish
and Joshua Johnson of 1A (out of WAMU in D.C., which we now get as
an alternative to Fresh Air at 2 on weekdays, so I switch to AM when
Terry is talking to a musician or novelist). And on WNYC, Jami Floyd,
who used to be a lawyer, then WNYC's legal analyst, and now ATC
host.
Hunh. You think you so big. I didn't realise Chuck Berry was Black
until years after I started listening to him. All those Southerners
sounded alike to me.
I am a great fan of Mose Allison.
http://youtu.be/1EngRmYu_vs
Listen and try to determine his race.
--
The 400 metres?
CDB
2018-07-11 18:13:25 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by CDB
[journax abbreviax; Rand-Boy]
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter T. Daniels
He has escaped the attention of Chuck Todd, Margaret
Brennan, Nina Totenberg, and NPR's new White House reporter,
who cultivates her AAVE accent.
Ayesha Rascoe. I was surprised to hear an only slightly
toned-down AAVE accent from an NPR reporter.
Anchropeople of color whom I would never have guessed if they
didn't sometimes turn up on the Sunday morning shows include
Audie Cornish and Joshua Johnson of 1A (out of WAMU in D.C.,
which we now get as an alternative to Fresh Air at 2 on weekdays,
so I switch to AM when Terry is talking to a musician or
novelist). And on WNYC, Jami Floyd, who used to be a lawyer, then
WNYC's legal analyst, and now ATC host.
Hunh. You think you so big. I didn't realise Chuck Berry was
Black until years after I started listening to him. All those
Southerners sounded alike to me.
I am a great fan of Mose Allison.
http://youtu.be/1EngRmYu_vs
Listen and try to determine his race.
First, thank you for the clip. I will have to listen to more of him.

I tried to wipe his picture from memory while listening, and I think I
detected some minor elements of Black English in his Southern accent,
but that is what I would have expected from seeing him: a man who is
"Black" under the "one-drop" regime, but who is in fact almost entirely
"White".

I should add that what I said above was that "Southerners sounded" alike
to me -- past tense. It was 1957. What did I know?

What a bunch of scare-quotes. Not that last one, though.
Tony Cooper
2018-07-11 20:55:47 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by CDB
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by CDB
[journax abbreviax; Rand-Boy]
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter T. Daniels
He has escaped the attention of Chuck Todd, Margaret
Brennan, Nina Totenberg, and NPR's new White House reporter,
who cultivates her AAVE accent.
Ayesha Rascoe. I was surprised to hear an only slightly
toned-down AAVE accent from an NPR reporter.
Anchropeople of color whom I would never have guessed if they
didn't sometimes turn up on the Sunday morning shows include
Audie Cornish and Joshua Johnson of 1A (out of WAMU in D.C.,
which we now get as an alternative to Fresh Air at 2 on weekdays,
so I switch to AM when Terry is talking to a musician or
novelist). And on WNYC, Jami Floyd, who used to be a lawyer, then
WNYC's legal analyst, and now ATC host.
Hunh. You think you so big. I didn't realise Chuck Berry was
Black until years after I started listening to him. All those
Southerners sounded alike to me.
I am a great fan of Mose Allison.
http://youtu.be/1EngRmYu_vs
Listen and try to determine his race.
First, thank you for the clip. I will have to listen to more of him.
I tried to wipe his picture from memory while listening, and I think I
detected some minor elements of Black English in his Southern accent,
but that is what I would have expected from seeing him: a man who is
"Black" under the "one-drop" regime, but who is in fact almost entirely
"White".
I should add that what I said above was that "Southerners sounded" alike
to me -- past tense. It was 1957. What did I know?
What a bunch of scare-quotes. Not that last one, though.
I learned that he was white when sitting with a group of jazz and
blues musicians at an after-hours bottle club back in the early 1960s.
One of them asked me to list my top five black jazz/blues musicians,
and Allison was on my list.

I'd never seen a photo of him.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Quinn C
2018-07-11 18:01:22 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by CDB
[journax abbreviax; Rand-Boy]
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter T. Daniels
He has escaped the attention of Chuck Todd, Margaret Brennan,
Nina Totenberg, and NPR's new White House reporter, who
cultivates her AAVE accent.
Ayesha Rascoe. I was surprised to hear an only slightly toned-down
AAVE accent from an NPR reporter.
Anchropeople of color whom I would never have guessed if they didn't
sometimes turn up on the Sunday morning shows include Audie Cornish
and Joshua Johnson of 1A (out of WAMU in D.C., which we now get as
an alternative to Fresh Air at 2 on weekdays, so I switch to AM when
Terry is talking to a musician or novelist). And on WNYC, Jami Floyd,
who used to be a lawyer, then WNYC's legal analyst, and now ATC
host.
Hunh. You think you so big. I didn't realise Chuck Berry was Black
until years after I started listening to him. All those Southerners
sounded alike to me.
I made the converse wrong assumption a few times. Can't name names
right now.
--
Learning the rules that govern intelligible speech is an
inculcation into normalized language, where the price of not
conforming is the loss of intelligibility itself.
-- Judith Butler
Tony Cooper
2018-07-10 13:54:49 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Tue, 10 Jul 2018 06:26:44 -0600, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Paul Carmichael
    http://www.nbcnews.com/politics/anykey-n890066
    GOP senators applaud Trump's SCOTUS pick, swing votes offer
measured reax
I haven't the faintest idea what that means. Is swing a verb or a
substantive?
A swing vote is a vote by (or in this case a metonymy for) a swing
voter, someone who "swings" between different parties at different times
and thus can help "swing" an election one way or the other. Here it
refers to the two or three senators of President Trump's party (the
Republicans or "Grand Old Party") who might vote against his nominee to
fill the vacancy on the Supreme Court of the United States.
If you're interested.
Post by Paul Carmichael
Just looks like nonsense to me. I suppose news headlines
are written by monkeys.
You're not part of the intended audience. NBC is an American company
that produces news mostly for Americans. Pretty much any literate
American would know what GOP stands for, the great majority would know
what SCOTUS stands for, and anyone following the the news would know
what "swing votes" refers to here. However, "reax" is new to me.
I would figure it out if it was a headline in "Variety", but not in
any other publication.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
bill van
2018-07-10 18:32:32 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Paul Carmichael
    http://www.nbcnews.com/politics/anykey-n890066
    GOP senators applaud Trump's SCOTUS pick, swing votes offer measured reax
I haven't the faintest idea what that means. Is swing a verb or a substantive?
A swing vote is a vote by (or in this case a metonymy for) a swing
voter, someone who "swings" between different parties at different
times and thus can help "swing" an election one way or the other. Here
it refers to the two or three senators of President Trump's party (the
Republicans or "Grand Old Party") who might vote against his nominee to
fill the vacancy on the Supreme Court of the United States.
If you're interested.
Post by Paul Carmichael
Just looks like nonsense to me. I suppose news headlines are written by
monkeys.
You're not part of the intended audience. NBC is an American company
that produces news mostly for Americans. Pretty much any literate
American would know what GOP stands for, the great majority would know
what SCOTUS stands for, and anyone following the the news would know
what "swing votes" refers to here. However, "reax" is new to me.
I've probably seen it in newsroom and wire service internal memos.
Similarly, "pox" are police and "lox" are locals, people who live near
where an event happened. The "x" indicates that the rest of the word
has been truncated. It looks to me like "reax" accidentally slipped
through, as Mark suggested. It can't be intended as a space-saver,
since there is plenty of space in the second line to spell out
"reactions".

bill
Ken Blake
2018-07-10 19:09:44 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by bill van
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Paul Carmichael
    http://www.nbcnews.com/politics/anykey-n890066
    GOP senators applaud Trump's SCOTUS pick, swing votes offer measured reax
I haven't the faintest idea what that means. Is swing a verb or a substantive?
A swing vote is a vote by (or in this case a metonymy for) a swing
voter, someone who "swings" between different parties at different
times and thus can help "swing" an election one way or the other. Here
it refers to the two or three senators of President Trump's party (the
Republicans or "Grand Old Party") who might vote against his nominee to
fill the vacancy on the Supreme Court of the United States.
If you're interested.
Post by Paul Carmichael
Just looks like nonsense to me. I suppose news headlines are written by
monkeys.
You're not part of the intended audience. NBC is an American company
that produces news mostly for Americans. Pretty much any literate
American would know what GOP stands for, the great majority would know
what SCOTUS stands for, and anyone following the the news would know
what "swing votes" refers to here. However, "reax" is new to me.
I've probably seen it in newsroom and wire service internal memos.
Similarly, "pox" are police and "lox" are locals, people who live near
where an event happened. The "x" indicates that the rest of the word
has been truncated. It looks to me like "reax" accidentally slipped
through, as Mark suggested. It can't be intended as a space-saver,
since there is plenty of space in the second line to spell out
"reactions".
I just looked up SCOTUS on Google, so I now know what it means. A few
minutes ago, I didn't know. But I know what swing votes are.

Until I read your message above, I had never seen "pox," "lox," or
"reax" and had no idea what they meant (except, of course, for other
meanings of "lox" and "pox").
bill van
2018-07-10 19:17:46 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ken Blake
Post by bill van
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Paul Carmichael
    http://www.nbcnews.com/politics/anykey-n890066
    GOP senators applaud Trump's SCOTUS pick, swing votes offer measured reax
I haven't the faintest idea what that means. Is swing a verb or a substantive?
A swing vote is a vote by (or in this case a metonymy for) a swing
voter, someone who "swings" between different parties at different
times and thus can help "swing" an election one way or the other. Here
it refers to the two or three senators of President Trump's party (the
Republicans or "Grand Old Party") who might vote against his nominee to
fill the vacancy on the Supreme Court of the United States.
If you're interested.
Post by Paul Carmichael
Just looks like nonsense to me. I suppose news headlines are written by
monkeys.
You're not part of the intended audience. NBC is an American company
that produces news mostly for Americans. Pretty much any literate
American would know what GOP stands for, the great majority would know
what SCOTUS stands for, and anyone following the the news would know
what "swing votes" refers to here. However, "reax" is new to me.
I've probably seen it in newsroom and wire service internal memos.
Similarly, "pox" are police and "lox" are locals, people who live near
where an event happened. The "x" indicates that the rest of the word
has been truncated. It looks to me like "reax" accidentally slipped
through, as Mark suggested. It can't be intended as a space-saver,
since there is plenty of space in the second line to spell out
"reactions".
I just looked up SCOTUS on Google, so I now know what it means. A few
minutes ago, I didn't know. But I know what swing votes are.
Until I read your message above, I had never seen "pox," "lox," or
"reax" and had no idea what they meant (except, of course, for other
meanings of "lox" and "pox").
They were shorthand used at the wire service UPI when I worked for them
in the 1970s, when teletype was used for internal and external
communications. Many newspaper people got some of their early training
at wire services, and brought the abbreviations with them when they
moved to newspapers. They wouldn't normally be seen outside news
organizations.

bill
Quinn C
2018-07-10 22:26:01 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ken Blake
Post by bill van
[...] Pretty much any literate
American would know what GOP stands for, the great majority would know
what SCOTUS stands for, and anyone following the the news would know
what "swing votes" refers to here. However, "reax" is new to me.
I've probably seen it in newsroom and wire service internal memos.
Similarly, "pox" are police and "lox" are locals, people who live near
where an event happened. The "x" indicates that the rest of the word
has been truncated. It looks to me like "reax" accidentally slipped
through, as Mark suggested. It can't be intended as a space-saver,
since there is plenty of space in the second line to spell out
"reactions".
I just looked up SCOTUS on Google, so I now know what it means. A few
minutes ago, I didn't know. But I know what swing votes are.
Until I read your message above, I had never seen "pox," "lox," or
"reax" and had no idea what they meant (except, of course, for other
meanings of "lox" and "pox").
I wouldn't wish those pox on any of my friends, either.

Pax! to everyone on the plane ...
--
Who would know aught of art must learn and then take his ease.
Joseph C. Fineman
2018-07-10 21:19:29 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by bill van
Similarly, "pox" are police
I think I would avoid that abbreviation the the presence of police.
Post by bill van
and "lox" are locals, people who live near where an event happened.
An overworked one! Elsewhere it means smoked salmon (not an
abbreviation, tho) or liquid oxygen.
--
--- Joe Fineman ***@verizon.net

||: The second mouse gets the cheese. :||
bill van
2018-07-10 23:58:43 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Joseph C. Fineman
Post by bill van
Similarly, "pox" are police
I think I would avoid that abbreviation the the presence of police.
It was a way to save a few keystrokes in internal memos, exclusively.
Post by Joseph C. Fineman
Post by bill van
and "lox" are locals, people who live near where an event happened.
An overworked one! Elsewhere it means smoked salmon (not an
abbreviation, tho) or liquid oxygen.
I'm aware of both of those. I'm not proposing that these abbreviations
be widely adopted or asking you to approve of them, only reporting that
they were in use as described, and might still be for all I know.

bill
CDB
2018-07-11 13:41:51 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Joseph C. Fineman
Post by bill van
Similarly, "pox" are police
I think I would avoid that abbreviation the the presence of police.
Post by bill van
and "lox" are locals, people who live near where an event
happened.
Could be a "long 'o'", as in "po-lice". Pokes.
Post by Joseph C. Fineman
An overworked one! Elsewhere it means smoked salmon (not an
abbreviation, tho) or liquid oxygen.
Invading zombies prefer lox -- pokes baffled.
Mark Brader
2018-07-11 18:29:53 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
I've probably seen ["reax"] in newsroom and wire service internal memos.
Similarly, "pox" are police and "lox" are locals, people who live near
where an event happened. The "x" indicates that the rest of the word
has been truncated.
Hah, I like those! Cf. also the travel industry's "pax" for a passenger
or passengers.
It can't be intended as a space-saver, since there is plenty of
space in the second line to spell out "reactions".
That depends on the size of your browser window relative to the size of
the lettering.
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "This is as 'real' as your so-called life gets!"
***@vex.net | "Q Who", ST:TNG, Maurice Hurley
Garrett Wollman
2018-07-10 15:50:38 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Mark Brader
http://www.nbcnews.com/politics/anykey-n890066
GOP senators applaud Trump's SCOTUS pick, swing votes offer measured reax
This is the first time I've seen "reax". Obviously it means "reactions",
which is confirmed in the lead paragraph. My guess is that it's a bit of
newsroom jargon that escaped into the wild... but I could be wrong.
I think you're right, maybe reinforced by social-media jargon "react"
(n.).

-GAWollman
--
Garrett A. Wollman | "Act to avoid constraining the future; if you can,
***@bimajority.org| act to remove constraint from the future. This is
Opinions not shared by| a thing you can do, are able to do, to do together."
my employers. | - Graydon Saunders, _A Succession of Bad Days_ (2015)
b***@aol.com
2018-07-13 13:06:10 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Mark Brader
http://www.nbcnews.com/politics/anykey-n890066
GOP senators applaud Trump's SCOTUS pick, swing votes offer measured reax
This is the first time I've seen "reax". Obviously it means "reactions",
which is confirmed in the lead paragraph. My guess is that it's a bit of
newsroom jargon that escaped into the wild... but I could be wrong.
Indeed, how about, for instance:

"But Christ is greater than he who reax havoc in the world"?

(KJV Study Bible, 4:4)
Post by Mark Brader
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "Police Stop Slaying Suspect Look-alikes"
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