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Scheetje
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Mack A. Damia
2018-09-10 03:05:15 UTC
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"Scheetje"

"There's nothing wrong with Meghan's pet name for Harry - it's
certainly better than what the Dutch call each other"

"Although I reckon we should all be grateful we’re not Dutch because
they refer to one another as “scheetje”, which translates, I discover,
as “little fart”."

https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/apos-nothing-wrong-meghan-apos-060000375.html
b***@aol.com
2018-09-10 03:47:15 UTC
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Le lundi 10 septembre 2018 05:05:21 UTC+2, Mack A. Damia a écrit :
> "Scheetje"
>
> "There's nothing wrong with Meghan's pet name for Harry - it's
> certainly better than what the Dutch call each other"
>
> "Although I reckon we should all be grateful we’re not Dutch because
> they refer to one another as “scheetje”, which translates, I discover,
> as “little fart”."

So that "little fart" is a pet name in Dutch, when coincidentally "pet"
means "fart" in French.

>
> https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/apos-nothing-wrong-meghan-apos-060000375.html
Peter Young
2018-09-10 06:19:40 UTC
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On 10 Sep 2018 Mack A. Damia <***@yahoo.com> wrote:


> "Scheetje"

> "There's nothing wrong with Meghan's pet name for Harry - it's
> certainly better than what the Dutch call each other"

> "Although I reckon we should all be grateful we’re not Dutch because
> they refer to one another as “scheetje”, which translates, I discover,
> as “little fart”."

Which to some extent makes my name appropriate.

Peter.

--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Au)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Peter Moylan
2018-09-10 07:04:16 UTC
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On 10/09/18 16:19, Peter Young wrote:
> On 10 Sep 2018 Mack A. Damia <***@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>
>> "Scheetje"
>
>> "There's nothing wrong with Meghan's pet name for Harry - it's
>> certainly better than what the Dutch call each other"
>
>> "Although I reckon we should all be grateful we’re not Dutch because
>> they refer to one another as “scheetje”, which translates, I discover,
>> as “little fart”."
>
> Which to some extent makes my name appropriate.

It used to bother me when a French colleague kept pronouncing my name as
Péteur.

--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
RHDraney
2018-09-10 12:44:52 UTC
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On 9/10/2018 12:04 AM, Peter Moylan wrote:
> On 10/09/18 16:19, Peter Young wrote:
>> On 10 Sep 2018  Mack A. Damia <***@yahoo.com> wrote:
>>
>>
>>> "Scheetje"
>>
>>> "There's nothing wrong with Meghan's pet name for Harry - it's
>>> certainly better than what the Dutch call each other"
>>
>>> "Although I reckon we should all be grateful we’re not Dutch because
>>> they refer to one another as “scheetje”, which translates, I discover,
>>> as “little fart”."
>>
>> Which to some extent makes my name appropriate.
>
> It used to bother me when a French colleague kept pronouncing my name as
> Péteur.

A Brazilian woman with whom I used to work used to laugh herself silly
every other Friday when people would run around yelling "Payday!"...r
b***@aol.com
2018-09-10 13:08:02 UTC
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Le lundi 10 septembre 2018 14:45:55 UTC+2, RHDraney a écrit :
> On 9/10/2018 12:04 AM, Peter Moylan wrote:
> > On 10/09/18 16:19, Peter Young wrote:
> >> On 10 Sep 2018  Mack A. Damia <***@yahoo.com> wrote:
> >>
> >>
> >>> "Scheetje"
> >>
> >>> "There's nothing wrong with Meghan's pet name for Harry - it's
> >>> certainly better than what the Dutch call each other"
> >>
> >>> "Although I reckon we should all be grateful we’re not Dutch because
> >>> they refer to one another as “scheetje”, which translates, I discover,
> >>> as “little fart”."
> >>
> >> Which to some extent makes my name appropriate.
> >
> > It used to bother me when a French colleague kept pronouncing my name as
> > Péteur.
>
> A Brazilian woman with whom I used to work used to laugh herself silly
> every other Friday when people would run around yelling "Payday!"...r

Were they paid with travelo's cheques?
occam
2018-09-10 13:30:44 UTC
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On 10/09/2018 14:44, RHDraney wrote:
> On 9/10/2018 12:04 AM, Peter Moylan wrote:
>> On 10/09/18 16:19, Peter Young wrote:
>>> On 10 Sep 2018  Mack A. Damia <***@yahoo.com> wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>> "Scheetje"
>>>
>>>> "There's nothing wrong with Meghan's pet name for Harry - it's
>>>> certainly better than what the Dutch call each other"
>>>
>>>> "Although I reckon we should all be grateful we’re not Dutch because
>>>> they refer to one another as “scheetje”, which translates, I discover,
>>>> as “little fart”."
>>>
>>> Which to some extent makes my name appropriate.
>>
>> It used to bother me when a French colleague kept pronouncing my name
>> as Péteur.
>
> A Brazilian woman with whom I used to work used to laugh herself silly
> every other Friday when people would run around yelling "Payday!"...r
>

If she were French, she would have been disgusted.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-09-10 14:59:26 UTC
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On Monday, September 10, 2018 at 9:30:48 AM UTC-4, occam wrote:
> On 10/09/2018 14:44, RHDraney wrote:

> > A Brazilian woman with whom I used to work used to laugh herself silly
> > every other Friday when people would run around yelling "Payday!"...r
>
> If she were French, she would have been disgusted.

One might extrapolate to exactly the same point regarding Brazilian Portuguese.
b***@aol.com
2018-09-10 16:15:01 UTC
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Le lundi 10 septembre 2018 16:59:29 UTC+2, Peter T. Daniels a écrit :
> On Monday, September 10, 2018 at 9:30:48 AM UTC-4, occam wrote:
> > On 10/09/2018 14:44, RHDraney wrote:
>
> > > A Brazilian woman with whom I used to work used to laugh herself silly
> > > every other Friday when people would run around yelling "Payday!"...r
> >
> > If she were French, she would have been disgusted.
>
> One might extrapolate to exactly the same point regarding Brazilian Portuguese.

?? But "payday" can't be taken to refer to anything else than the day
on which wages are paid in Portuguese - unlike in French, where the
assonance with "pédé"("fag") is striking.
RHDraney
2018-09-10 17:11:03 UTC
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On 9/10/2018 9:15 AM, ***@aol.com wrote:
> Le lundi 10 septembre 2018 16:59:29 UTC+2, Peter T. Daniels a écrit :
>> On Monday, September 10, 2018 at 9:30:48 AM UTC-4, occam wrote:
>>> On 10/09/2018 14:44, RHDraney wrote:
>>
>>>> A Brazilian woman with whom I used to work used to laugh herself silly
>>>> every other Friday when people would run around yelling "Payday!"...r
>>>
>>> If she were French, she would have been disgusted.
>>
>> One might extrapolate to exactly the same point regarding Brazilian Portuguese.
>
> ?? But "payday" can't be taken to refer to anything else than the day
> on which wages are paid in Portuguese - unlike in French, where the
> assonance with "pédé"("fag") is striking.

As she explained it, the joke was that English "Payday!" sounds like
Portuguese for "I farted!"...

The same woman thought it funny that I put "adobo" seasoning into a
recipe ("it means 'poop'"), and in turn was offended when I spoke of
"sheet music"....r
Mack A. Damia
2018-09-10 18:22:56 UTC
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On Mon, 10 Sep 2018 10:11:03 -0700, RHDraney <***@cox.net> wrote:

>On 9/10/2018 9:15 AM, ***@aol.com wrote:
>> Le lundi 10 septembre 2018 16:59:29 UTC+2, Peter T. Daniels a écrit :
>>> On Monday, September 10, 2018 at 9:30:48 AM UTC-4, occam wrote:
>>>> On 10/09/2018 14:44, RHDraney wrote:
>>>
>>>>> A Brazilian woman with whom I used to work used to laugh herself silly
>>>>> every other Friday when people would run around yelling "Payday!"...r
>>>>
>>>> If she were French, she would have been disgusted.
>>>
>>> One might extrapolate to exactly the same point regarding Brazilian Portuguese.
>>
>> ?? But "payday" can't be taken to refer to anything else than the day
>> on which wages are paid in Portuguese - unlike in French, where the
>> assonance with "pédé"("fag") is striking.
>
>As she explained it, the joke was that English "Payday!" sounds like
>Portuguese for "I farted!"...
>
>The same woman thought it funny that I put "adobo" seasoning into a
>recipe ("it means 'poop'"), and in turn was offended when I spoke of
>"sheet music"....r

We had a good ol' Texas boy as an instructor in Air Force tech school;
we nicknamed him, "Ace Huggins".

He used to BS a lot, and he would say:

"Sheeeeeeeeeet, man......."
b***@aol.com
2018-09-10 18:47:01 UTC
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Le lundi 10 septembre 2018 19:11:59 UTC+2, RHDraney a écrit :
> On 9/10/2018 9:15 AM, ***@aol.com wrote:
> > Le lundi 10 septembre 2018 16:59:29 UTC+2, Peter T. Daniels a écrit :
> >> On Monday, September 10, 2018 at 9:30:48 AM UTC-4, occam wrote:
> >>> On 10/09/2018 14:44, RHDraney wrote:
> >>
> >>>> A Brazilian woman with whom I used to work used to laugh herself silly
> >>>> every other Friday when people would run around yelling "Payday!"...r
> >>>
> >>> If she were French, she would have been disgusted.
> >>
> >> One might extrapolate to exactly the same point regarding Brazilian Portuguese.
> >
> > ?? But "payday" can't be taken to refer to anything else than the day
> > on which wages are paid in Portuguese - unlike in French, where the
> > assonance with "pédé"("fag") is striking.
>
> As she explained it, the joke was that English "Payday!" sounds like
> Portuguese for "I farted!"...

I missed that, and I thought it was a hint to French as PM's anecdote
you were responding to was about French.

>
> The same woman thought it funny that I put "adobo" seasoning into a
> recipe ("it means 'poop'"), and in turn was offended when I spoke of
> "sheet music"....r

She probably would have been too if you'd spoken about "poop music".
b***@aol.com
2018-09-12 14:16:23 UTC
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Le lundi 10 septembre 2018 20:47:04 UTC+2, ***@aol.com a écrit :
> Le lundi 10 septembre 2018 19:11:59 UTC+2, RHDraney a écrit :
> > On 9/10/2018 9:15 AM, ***@aol.com wrote:
> > > Le lundi 10 septembre 2018 16:59:29 UTC+2, Peter T. Daniels a écrit :
> > >> On Monday, September 10, 2018 at 9:30:48 AM UTC-4, occam wrote:
> > >>> On 10/09/2018 14:44, RHDraney wrote:
> > >>
> > >>>> A Brazilian woman with whom I used to work used to laugh herself silly
> > >>>> every other Friday when people would run around yelling "Payday!"...r
> > >>>
> > >>> If she were French, she would have been disgusted.
> > >>
> > >> One might extrapolate to exactly the same point regarding Brazilian Portuguese.
> > >
> > > ?? But "payday" can't be taken to refer to anything else than the day
> > > on which wages are paid in Portuguese - unlike in French, where the
> > > assonance with "pédé"("fag") is striking.
> >
> > As she explained it, the joke was that English "Payday!" sounds like
> > Portuguese for "I farted!"...
>
> I missed that, and I thought it was a hint to French as PM's anecdote
> you were responding to was about French.
>
> >
> > The same woman thought it funny that I put "adobo" seasoning into a
> > recipe ("it means 'poop'"), and in turn was offended when I spoke of
> > "sheet music"....r
>
> She probably would have been too if you'd spoken about "poop music".

Addendum: Though, on second thoughts, "pop music" in itself is evocative
of a fart noise, which brings us back to Portuguese "peidei" (= "payday"):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HrT6-TBKmp0

Incidentally, "poop music" could be the grand finale of a "pop music"
concert.
Peter Young
2018-09-12 14:55:12 UTC
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On 12 Sep 2018 ***@aol.com wrote:

> Le lundi 10 septembre 2018 20:47:04 UTC+2, ***@aol.com a écrit :
>> Le lundi 10 septembre 2018 19:11:59 UTC+2, RHDraney a écrit :
>>> On 9/10/2018 9:15 AM, ***@aol.com wrote:
>>>> Le lundi 10 septembre 2018 16:59:29 UTC+2, Peter T. Daniels a écrit :
>>>>> On Monday, September 10, 2018 at 9:30:48 AM UTC-4, occam wrote:
>>>>>> On 10/09/2018 14:44, RHDraney wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>>> A Brazilian woman with whom I used to work used to laugh herself silly
>>>>>>> every other Friday when people would run around yelling "Payday!"...r
>>>>>>
>>>>>> If she were French, she would have been disgusted.
>>>>>
>>>>> One might extrapolate to exactly the same point regarding Brazilian
>>>>> Portuguese.
>>>>
>>>> ?? But "payday" can't be taken to refer to anything else than the day
>>>> on which wages are paid in Portuguese - unlike in French, where the
>>>> assonance with "pédé"("fag") is striking.
>>>
>>> As she explained it, the joke was that English "Payday!" sounds like
>>> Portuguese for "I farted!"...
>>
>> I missed that, and I thought it was a hint to French as PM's anecdote
>> you were responding to was about French.
>>
>>>
>>> The same woman thought it funny that I put "adobo" seasoning into a
>>> recipe ("it means 'poop'"), and in turn was offended when I spoke of
>>> "sheet music"....r
>>
>> She probably would have been too if you'd spoken about "poop music".

> Addendum: Though, on second thoughts, "pop music" in itself is evocative
> of a fart noise, which brings us back to Portuguese "peidei" (= "payday"):

> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HrT6-TBKmp0

> Incidentally, "poop music" could be the grand finale of a "pop music"
> concert.

Would that be sheet music?

Peter.

--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Au)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
J. J. Lodder
2018-09-11 13:05:38 UTC
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Mack A. Damia <***@yahoo.com> wrote:

> "Scheetje"
>
> "There's nothing wrong with Meghan's pet name for Harry - it's
> certainly better than what the Dutch call each other"
>
> "Although I reckon we should all be grateful we're not Dutch because
> they refer to one another as 'scheetje', which translates, I discover,
> as 'little fart'
>
> https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/apos-nothing-wrong-meghan-apos-060000375.h
tml

'Scheetje' ('humorous' variation on 'schatje')
is not a common Dutch term of endearment,
or even a conventional term of reference.
Don't try it on anyone you haven't know for a long time.

It can't be used like 'love' or 'dear' in some Englishes,

Jan
Peter Moylan
2018-09-11 22:44:12 UTC
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On 11/09/18 23:05, J. J. Lodder wrote:
> Mack A. Damia <***@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>> "Scheetje"
>>
>> "There's nothing wrong with Meghan's pet name for Harry - it's
>> certainly better than what the Dutch call each other"
>>
>> "Although I reckon we should all be grateful we're not Dutch
>> because they refer to one another as 'scheetje', which translates,
>> I discover, as 'little fart'
>>
>> https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/apos-nothing-wrong-meghan-apos-060000375.h
>
>>
tml
>
> 'Scheetje' ('humorous' variation on 'schatje') is not a common Dutch
> term of endearment, or even a conventional term of reference. Don't
> try it on anyone you haven't know for a long time.

Anyone who hasn't spoken Dutch for a long time probably wouldn't be able
to pronounce it.

> It can't be used like 'love' or 'dear' in some Englishes,

--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
J. J. Lodder
2018-09-12 18:07:32 UTC
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Peter Moylan <***@pmoylan.org.invalid> wrote:

> On 11/09/18 23:05, J. J. Lodder wrote:
> > Mack A. Damia <***@yahoo.com> wrote:
> >
> >> "Scheetje"
> >>
> >> "There's nothing wrong with Meghan's pet name for Harry - it's
> >> certainly better than what the Dutch call each other"
> >>
> >> "Although I reckon we should all be grateful we're not Dutch
> >> because they refer to one another as 'scheetje', which translates,
> >> I discover, as 'little fart'
> >>
> >> https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/apos-nothing-wrong-meghan-apos-06000037
5.h
> >
> >>
> tml
> >
> > 'Scheetje' ('humorous' variation on 'schatje') is not a common Dutch
> > term of endearment, or even a conventional term of reference. Don't
> > try it on anyone you haven't know for a long time.
>
> Anyone who hasn't spoken Dutch for a long time probably wouldn't be able
> to pronounce it.
>
> > It can't be used like 'love' or 'dear' in some Englishes,

Pronounce it 'scatje' and you will be OK.
Just a charming accent.

BTW, an American I met a long time ago carried a phrase book:
'How to chat up a bird in ten languages.
He even scored a Swedish girl with it,

Jan
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-09-12 18:27:23 UTC
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On Wednesday, 12 September 2018 19:07:34 UTC+1, J. J. Lodder wrote:
> Peter Moylan <***@pmoylan.org.invalid> wrote:
>
> > On 11/09/18 23:05, J. J. Lodder wrote:
> > > Mack A. Damia <***@yahoo.com> wrote:
> > >
> > >> "Scheetje"
> > >>
> > >> "There's nothing wrong with Meghan's pet name for Harry - it's
> > >> certainly better than what the Dutch call each other"
> > >>
> > >> "Although I reckon we should all be grateful we're not Dutch
> > >> because they refer to one another as 'scheetje', which translates,
> > >> I discover, as 'little fart'
> > >>
> > >> https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/apos-nothing-wrong-meghan-apos-06000037
> 5.h
> > >
> > >>
> > tml
> > >
> > > 'Scheetje' ('humorous' variation on 'schatje') is not a common Dutch
> > > term of endearment, or even a conventional term of reference. Don't
> > > try it on anyone you haven't know for a long time.
> >
> > Anyone who hasn't spoken Dutch for a long time probably wouldn't be able
> > to pronounce it.
> >
> > > It can't be used like 'love' or 'dear' in some Englishes,
>
> Pronounce it 'scatje' and you will be OK.
> Just a charming accent.
>
> BTW, an American I met a long time ago carried a phrase book:
> 'How to chat up a bird in ten languages.
> He even scored a Swedish girl with it,
>

Must have been a thin book to be sharp enough. Did she press
charges for ABH (assault occasioning actual bodily harm, for the
unedu ... er ... I mean non-Brits)?
J. J. Lodder
2018-09-12 19:10:59 UTC
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Madrigal Gurneyhalt <***@googlemail.com> wrote:

> On Wednesday, 12 September 2018 19:07:34 UTC+1, J. J. Lodder wrote:
> > Peter Moylan <***@pmoylan.org.invalid> wrote:
> >
> > > On 11/09/18 23:05, J. J. Lodder wrote:
> > > > Mack A. Damia <***@yahoo.com> wrote:
> > > >
> > > >> "Scheetje"
> > > >>
> > > >> "There's nothing wrong with Meghan's pet name for Harry - it's
> > > >> certainly better than what the Dutch call each other"
> > > >>
> > > >> "Although I reckon we should all be grateful we're not Dutch
> > > >> because they refer to one another as 'scheetje', which translates,
> > > >> I discover, as 'little fart'
> > > >>
> > > >> https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/apos-nothing-wrong-meghan-apos-0600
0037
> > 5.h
> > > >
> > > >>
> > > tml
> > > >
> > > > 'Scheetje' ('humorous' variation on 'schatje') is not a common Dutch
> > > > term of endearment, or even a conventional term of reference. Don't
> > > > try it on anyone you haven't know for a long time.
> > >
> > > Anyone who hasn't spoken Dutch for a long time probably wouldn't be able
> > > to pronounce it.
> > >
> > > > It can't be used like 'love' or 'dear' in some Englishes,
> >
> > Pronounce it 'scatje' and you will be OK.
> > Just a charming accent.
> >
> > BTW, an American I met a long time ago carried a phrase book:
> > 'How to chat up a bird in ten languages.
> > He even scored a Swedish girl with it,
> >
>
> Must have been a thin book to be sharp enough. Did she press
> charges for ABH (assault occasioning actual bodily harm, for the
> unedu ... er ... I mean non-Brits)?

I told you, an American,

Jan
Snidely
2018-09-14 06:04:32 UTC
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J. J. Lodder wrote on 9/12/2018 :
> Madrigal Gurneyhalt <***@googlemail.com> wrote:
>
>> On Wednesday, 12 September 2018 19:07:34 UTC+1, J. J. Lodder wrote:
>>> Peter Moylan <***@pmoylan.org.invalid> wrote:
>>>
>>>> On 11/09/18 23:05, J. J. Lodder wrote:
>>>>> Mack A. Damia <***@yahoo.com> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> "Scheetje"
>>>>>>
>>>>>> "There's nothing wrong with Meghan's pet name for Harry - it's
>>>>>> certainly better than what the Dutch call each other"
>>>>>>
>>>>>> "Although I reckon we should all be grateful we're not Dutch
>>>>>> because they refer to one another as 'scheetje', which translates,
>>>>>> I discover, as 'little fart'
>>>>>>
>>>>>> https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/apos-nothing-wrong-meghan-apos-0600
>>>>>> 0037 5.h
>>>>>>
>>>> tml
>>>>>
>>>>> 'Scheetje' ('humorous' variation on 'schatje') is not a common Dutch
>>>>> term of endearment, or even a conventional term of reference. Don't
>>>>> try it on anyone you haven't know for a long time.
>>>>
>>>> Anyone who hasn't spoken Dutch for a long time probably wouldn't be able
>>>> to pronounce it.
>>>>
>>>>> It can't be used like 'love' or 'dear' in some Englishes,
>>>
>>> Pronounce it 'scatje' and you will be OK.
>>> Just a charming accent.
>>>
>>> BTW, an American I met a long time ago carried a phrase book:
>>> 'How to chat up a bird in ten languages.
>>> He even scored a Swedish girl with it,
>>>
>>
>> Must have been a thin book to be sharp enough. Did she press
>> charges for ABH (assault occasioning actual bodily harm, for the
>> unedu ... er ... I mean non-Brits)?
>
> I told you, an American,

What would be the Dutch term for Assault with Bodily Harm?

/dps

--
Maybe C282Y is simply one of the hangers-on, a groupie following a
future guitar god of the human genome: an allele with undiscovered
virtuosity, currently soloing in obscurity in Mom's garage.
Bradley Wertheim, theAtlantic.com, Jan 10 2013
J. J. Lodder
2018-09-14 07:35:07 UTC
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Snidely <***@gmail.com> wrote:

> J. J. Lodder wrote on 9/12/2018 :
> > Madrigal Gurneyhalt <***@googlemail.com> wrote:
> >
> >> On Wednesday, 12 September 2018 19:07:34 UTC+1, J. J. Lodder wrote:
> >>> Peter Moylan <***@pmoylan.org.invalid> wrote:
> >>>
> >>>> On 11/09/18 23:05, J. J. Lodder wrote:
> >>>>> Mack A. Damia <***@yahoo.com> wrote:
> >>>>>
> >>>>>> "Scheetje"
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> "There's nothing wrong with Meghan's pet name for Harry - it's
> >>>>>> certainly better than what the Dutch call each other"
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> "Although I reckon we should all be grateful we're not Dutch
> >>>>>> because they refer to one another as 'scheetje', which translates,
> >>>>>> I discover, as 'little fart'
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/apos-nothing-wrong-meghan-apos-0600
> >>>>>> 0037 5.h
> >>>>>>
> >>>> tml
> >>>>>
> >>>>> 'Scheetje' ('humorous' variation on 'schatje') is not a common Dutch
> >>>>> term of endearment, or even a conventional term of reference. Don't
> >>>>> try it on anyone you haven't know for a long time.
> >>>>
> >>>> Anyone who hasn't spoken Dutch for a long time probably wouldn't be able
> >>>> to pronounce it.
> >>>>
> >>>>> It can't be used like 'love' or 'dear' in some Englishes,
> >>>
> >>> Pronounce it 'scatje' and you will be OK.
> >>> Just a charming accent.
> >>>
> >>> BTW, an American I met a long time ago carried a phrase book:
> >>> 'How to chat up a bird in ten languages.
> >>> He even scored a Swedish girl with it,
> >>>
> >>
> >> Must have been a thin book to be sharp enough. Did she press
> >> charges for ABH (assault occasioning actual bodily harm, for the
> >> unedu ... er ... I mean non-Brits)?
> >
> > I told you, an American,
>
> What would be the Dutch term for Assault with Bodily Harm?
>
> /dps

Assault -> Aanval Bodily harm -> Lichamelijk letsl
https://www.interglot.nl/woordenboek/en/nl/vertaal/assaulting

So lit. Aanval met lichamelijk letsel (als gevolg)

However a Dutch prosecutor
would probably use 'geweldpleging',
(E. commiting violence)

Jan
Tony Cooper
2018-09-14 14:14:23 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
On Thu, 13 Sep 2018 23:04:32 -0700, Snidely <***@gmail.com>
wrote:

>J. J. Lodder wrote on 9/12/2018 :
>> Madrigal Gurneyhalt <***@googlemail.com> wrote:
>>
>>> On Wednesday, 12 September 2018 19:07:34 UTC+1, J. J. Lodder wrote:
>>>> Peter Moylan <***@pmoylan.org.invalid> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> On 11/09/18 23:05, J. J. Lodder wrote:
>>>>>> Mack A. Damia <***@yahoo.com> wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> "Scheetje"
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> "There's nothing wrong with Meghan's pet name for Harry - it's
>>>>>>> certainly better than what the Dutch call each other"
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> "Although I reckon we should all be grateful we're not Dutch
>>>>>>> because they refer to one another as 'scheetje', which translates,
>>>>>>> I discover, as 'little fart'
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/apos-nothing-wrong-meghan-apos-0600
>>>>>>> 0037 5.h
>>>>>>>
>>>>> tml
>>>>>>
>>>>>> 'Scheetje' ('humorous' variation on 'schatje') is not a common Dutch
>>>>>> term of endearment, or even a conventional term of reference. Don't
>>>>>> try it on anyone you haven't know for a long time.
>>>>>
>>>>> Anyone who hasn't spoken Dutch for a long time probably wouldn't be able
>>>>> to pronounce it.
>>>>>
>>>>>> It can't be used like 'love' or 'dear' in some Englishes,
>>>>
>>>> Pronounce it 'scatje' and you will be OK.
>>>> Just a charming accent.
>>>>
>>>> BTW, an American I met a long time ago carried a phrase book:
>>>> 'How to chat up a bird in ten languages.
>>>> He even scored a Swedish girl with it,
>>>>
>>>
>>> Must have been a thin book to be sharp enough. Did she press
>>> charges for ABH (assault occasioning actual bodily harm, for the
>>> unedu ... er ... I mean non-Brits)?
>>
>> I told you, an American,
>
>What would be the Dutch term for Assault with Bodily Harm?
>
Said, in Dutch, it would be an assault on the ears.

--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
J. J. Lodder
2018-09-14 19:54:55 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
Tony Cooper <***@invalid.com> wrote:

> On Thu, 13 Sep 2018 23:04:32 -0700, Snidely <***@gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
> >J. J. Lodder wrote on 9/12/2018 :
> >> Madrigal Gurneyhalt <***@googlemail.com> wrote:
> >>
> >>> On Wednesday, 12 September 2018 19:07:34 UTC+1, J. J. Lodder wrote:
> >>>> Peter Moylan <***@pmoylan.org.invalid> wrote:
> >>>>
> >>>>> On 11/09/18 23:05, J. J. Lodder wrote:
> >>>>>> Mack A. Damia <***@yahoo.com> wrote:
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>>> "Scheetje"
> >>>>>>>
> >>>>>>> "There's nothing wrong with Meghan's pet name for Harry - it's
> >>>>>>> certainly better than what the Dutch call each other"
> >>>>>>>
> >>>>>>> "Although I reckon we should all be grateful we're not Dutch
> >>>>>>> because they refer to one another as 'scheetje', which translates,
> >>>>>>> I discover, as 'little fart'
> >>>>>>>
> >>>>>>> https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/apos-nothing-wrong-meghan-apos-060
0
> >>>>>>> 0037 5.h
> >>>>>>>
> >>>>> tml
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> 'Scheetje' ('humorous' variation on 'schatje') is not a common Dutch
> >>>>>> term of endearment, or even a conventional term of reference. Don't
> >>>>>> try it on anyone you haven't know for a long time.
> >>>>>
> >>>>> Anyone who hasn't spoken Dutch for a long time probably wouldn't be able
> >>>>> to pronounce it.
> >>>>>
> >>>>>> It can't be used like 'love' or 'dear' in some Englishes,
> >>>>
> >>>> Pronounce it 'scatje' and you will be OK.
> >>>> Just a charming accent.
> >>>>
> >>>> BTW, an American I met a long time ago carried a phrase book:
> >>>> 'How to chat up a bird in ten languages.
> >>>> He even scored a Swedish girl with it,
> >>>>
> >>>
> >>> Must have been a thin book to be sharp enough. Did she press
> >>> charges for ABH (assault occasioning actual bodily harm, for the
> >>> unedu ... er ... I mean non-Brits)?
> >>
> >> I told you, an American,
> >
> >What would be the Dutch term for Assault with Bodily Harm?
> >
> Said, in Dutch, it would be an assault on the ears.

So what?
Anything not in your provicial dialect of English
is an assault on your ears, by your standards,

Jan
Quinn C
2018-09-12 18:48:57 UTC
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* J. J. Lodder:

> BTW, an American I met a long time ago carried a phrase book:
> 'How to chat up a bird in ten languages.

German: piep piep ... tschilp! tirili ...

Depends on the kind of bird, I think.

--
Ice hockey is a form of disorderly conduct
in which the score is kept.
-- Doug Larson
Snidely
2018-09-14 06:05:03 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
Quinn C explained on 9/12/2018 :
> * J. J. Lodder:
>
>> BTW, an American I met a long time ago carried a phrase book:
>> 'How to chat up a bird in ten languages.
>
> German: piep piep ... tschilp! tirili ...
>
> Depends on the kind of bird, I think.

Sparrow.

/dps

--
Killing a mouse was hardly a Nobel Prize-worthy exercise, and Lawrence
went apopleptic when he learned a lousy rodent had peed away all his
precious heavy water.
_The Disappearing Spoon_, Sam Kean
J. J. Lodder
2018-09-14 07:35:10 UTC
Reply
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Snidely <***@gmail.com> wrote:

> Quinn C explained on 9/12/2018 :
> > * J. J. Lodder:
> >
> >> BTW, an American I met a long time ago carried a phrase book:
> >> 'How to chat up a bird in ten languages.
> >
> > German: piep piep ... tschilp! tirili ...
> >
> > Depends on the kind of bird, I think.
>
> Sparrow.

You've earned a reference to a well known Dutch poem
(Jan Hanlo, 1949, then an avant-garde poet)

========================================================================
De Mus

Tjielp tjielp - tjielp tjielp tjielp
tjielp tjielp tjielp - tjielp tjielp
tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp
tjielp tjielp tjielp

Tjielp
etc.

========================================================================

You are no doubt capable of producing an adequate translation,

Jan
Quinn C
2018-09-14 12:35:01 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
* J. J. Lodder:

> Snidely <***@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> Quinn C explained on 9/12/2018 :
>>> * J. J. Lodder:
>>>
>>>> BTW, an American I met a long time ago carried a phrase book:
>>>> 'How to chat up a bird in ten languages.
>>>
>>> German: piep piep ... tschilp! tirili ...
>>>
>>> Depends on the kind of bird, I think.
>>
>> Sparrow.
>
> You've earned a reference to a well known Dutch poem
> (Jan Hanlo, 1949, then an avant-garde poet)
>
> ========================================================================
> De Mus
>
> Tjielp tjielp - tjielp tjielp tjielp
> tjielp tjielp tjielp - tjielp tjielp
> tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp
> tjielp tjielp tjielp
>
> Tjielp
> etc.

The Night song of the fish, by Christian Morgenstern 1905


ˉ
˘ ˘
ˉ ˉ ˉ
˘ ˘ ˘ ˘
ˉ ˉ ˉ
˘ ˘ ˘ ˘
ˉ ˉ ˉ
˘ ˘ ˘ ˘
ˉ ˉ ˉ
˘ ˘ ˘ ˘
ˉ ˉ ˉ
˘ ˘
ˉ

--
Skyler: Uncle Cosmo ... why do they call this a word processor?
Cosmo: It's simple, Skyler ... you've seen what food processors
do to food, right?
Cartoon by Jeff MacNelley

Disclaimer: I, Quinn, don't believe this fairly describes word
processing in general
Jerry Friedman
2018-09-14 13:47:25 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
On 9/14/18 1:35 AM, J. J. Lodder wrote:
> Snidely <***@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> Quinn C explained on 9/12/2018 :
>>> * J. J. Lodder:
>>>
>>>> BTW, an American I met a long time ago carried a phrase book:
>>>> 'How to chat up a bird in ten languages.
>>>
>>> German: piep piep ... tschilp! tirili ...
>>>
>>> Depends on the kind of bird, I think.
>>
>> Sparrow.
>
> You've earned a reference to a well known Dutch poem
> (Jan Hanlo, 1949, then an avant-garde poet)
>
> ========================================================================
> De Mus
>
> Tjielp tjielp - tjielp tjielp tjielp
> tjielp tjielp tjielp - tjielp tjielp
> tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp
> tjielp tjielp tjielp
>
> Tjielp
> etc.
>
> ========================================================================
>
> You are no doubt capable of producing an adequate translation,

Can I assume "tjielp" means "Get me off your fucking mailing list"?

--
Jerry Friedman
J. J. Lodder
2018-09-14 19:54:56 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
Jerry Friedman <***@yahoo.com> wrote:

> On 9/14/18 1:35 AM, J. J. Lodder wrote:
> > Snidely <***@gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> >> Quinn C explained on 9/12/2018 :
> >>> * J. J. Lodder:
> >>>
> >>>> BTW, an American I met a long time ago carried a phrase book:
> >>>> 'How to chat up a bird in ten languages.
> >>>
> >>> German: piep piep ... tschilp! tirili ...
> >>>
> >>> Depends on the kind of bird, I think.
> >>
> >> Sparrow.
> >
> > You've earned a reference to a well known Dutch poem
> > (Jan Hanlo, 1949, then an avant-garde poet)
> >
> > ========================================================================
> > De Mus
> >
> > Tjielp tjielp - tjielp tjielp tjielp
> > tjielp tjielp tjielp - tjielp tjielp
> > tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp
> > tjielp tjielp tjielp
> >
> > Tjielp
> > etc.
> >
> > ========================================================================
> >
> > You are no doubt capable of producing an adequate translation,
>
> Can I assume "tjielp" means "Get me off your fucking mailing list"?

Anything you want,

Jan
Peter Moylan
2018-09-15 05:00:52 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
On 14/09/18 23:47, Jerry Friedman wrote:
> On 9/14/18 1:35 AM, J. J. Lodder wrote:
>> Snidely <***@gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>> Quinn C explained on 9/12/2018 :
>>>> * J. J. Lodder:
>>>>
>>>>> BTW, an American I met a long time ago carried a phrase
>>>>> book: 'How to chat up a bird in ten languages.
>>>>
>>>> German: piep piep ... tschilp! tirili ...
>>>>
>>>> Depends on the kind of bird, I think.
>>>
>>> Sparrow.
>>
>> You've earned a reference to a well known Dutch poem (Jan Hanlo,
>> 1949, then an avant-garde poet)
>>
>> ========================================================================
>>
>>
De Mus
>>
>> Tjielp tjielp - tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp - tjielp
>> tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp
>> tjielp
>>
>> Tjielp etc.
>>
>> ========================================================================
>>
>>
>>
You are no doubt capable of producing an adequate translation,
>
> Can I assume "tjielp" means "Get me off your fucking mailing list"?

According to Google Translate, "De Mus" means "Pastor". It autodected
the words as being in Chinese.

(I did know that it doesn't mean "mouse", but couldn't remember what
else it was.)

--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
bill van
2018-09-15 05:38:16 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
On 2018-09-15 05:00:52 +0000, Peter Moylan said:

> On 14/09/18 23:47, Jerry Friedman wrote:
>> On 9/14/18 1:35 AM, J. J. Lodder wrote:
>>> Snidely <***@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Quinn C explained on 9/12/2018 :
>>>>> * J. J. Lodder:
>>>>>
>>>>>> BTW, an American I met a long time ago carried a phrase
>>>>>> book: 'How to chat up a bird in ten languages.
>>>>>
>>>>> German: piep piep ... tschilp! tirili ...
>>>>>
>>>>> Depends on the kind of bird, I think.
>>>>
>>>> Sparrow.
>>>
>>> You've earned a reference to a well known Dutch poem (Jan Hanlo,
>>> 1949, then an avant-garde poet)
>>>
>>> ========================================================================
>>>
>>>
> De Mus
>>>
>>> Tjielp tjielp - tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp - tjielp
>>> tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp
>>> tjielp
>>>
>>> Tjielp etc.
>>>
>>> ========================================================================
>>>
>>>
>>>
> You are no doubt capable of producing an adequate translation,

The Sparrow

Chirp chirp - chirp chirp chirp etc.

>>
>> Can I assume "tjielp" means "Get me off your fucking mailing list"?
>
> According to Google Translate, "De Mus" means "Pastor". It autodected
> the words as being in Chinese.
>
> (I did know that it doesn't mean "mouse", but couldn't remember what
> else it was.)

In Dutch, it means sparrow, the very common brownish songbirds here and there.

bill
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-09-15 12:17:29 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
On Saturday, 15 September 2018 06:38:18 UTC+1, bill van wrote:
> On 2018-09-15 05:00:52 +0000, Peter Moylan said:
>
> > On 14/09/18 23:47, Jerry Friedman wrote:
> >> On 9/14/18 1:35 AM, J. J. Lodder wrote:
> >>> Snidely <***@gmail.com> wrote:
> >>>
> >>>> Quinn C explained on 9/12/2018 :
> >>>>> * J. J. Lodder:
> >>>>>
> >>>>>> BTW, an American I met a long time ago carried a phrase
> >>>>>> book: 'How to chat up a bird in ten languages.
> >>>>>
> >>>>> German: piep piep ... tschilp! tirili ...
> >>>>>
> >>>>> Depends on the kind of bird, I think.
> >>>>
> >>>> Sparrow.
> >>>
> >>> You've earned a reference to a well known Dutch poem (Jan Hanlo,
> >>> 1949, then an avant-garde poet)
> >>>
> >>> ========================================================================
> >>>
> >>>
> > De Mus
> >>>
> >>> Tjielp tjielp - tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp - tjielp
> >>> tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp
> >>> tjielp
> >>>
> >>> Tjielp etc.
> >>>
> >>> ========================================================================
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> > You are no doubt capable of producing an adequate translation,
>
> The Sparrow
>
> Chirp chirp - chirp chirp chirp etc.
>
> >>
> >> Can I assume "tjielp" means "Get me off your fucking mailing list"?
> >
> > According to Google Translate, "De Mus" means "Pastor". It autodected
> > the words as being in Chinese.
> >
> > (I did know that it doesn't mean "mouse", but couldn't remember what
> > else it was.)
>
> In Dutch, it means sparrow, the very common brownish songbirds here and there.
>

And, indeed, everywhere. There are sparrows on every continent except
Antarctica.
Peter Moylan
2018-09-15 12:37:37 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
On 15/09/18 22:17, Madrigal Gurneyhalt wrote:
> On Saturday, 15 September 2018 06:38:18 UTC+1, bill van wrote:
>> On 2018-09-15 05:00:52 +0000, Peter Moylan said:
>>
>>> On 14/09/18 23:47, Jerry Friedman wrote:
>>>> On 9/14/18 1:35 AM, J. J. Lodder wrote:
>>>>> Snidely <***@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> Quinn C explained on 9/12/2018 :
>>>>>>> * J. J. Lodder:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> BTW, an American I met a long time ago carried a
>>>>>>>> phrase book: 'How to chat up a bird in ten languages.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> German: piep piep ... tschilp! tirili ...
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Depends on the kind of bird, I think.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Sparrow.
>>>>>
>>>>> You've earned a reference to a well known Dutch poem (Jan
>>>>> Hanlo, 1949, then an avant-garde poet)
>>>>>
>>>>> ========================================================================
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
De Mus
>>>>>
>>>>> Tjielp tjielp - tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp -
>>>>> tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp
>>>>> tjielp tjielp tjielp
>>>>>
>>>>> Tjielp etc.
>>>>>
>>>>> ========================================================================
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
You are no doubt capable of producing an adequate translation,
>>
>> The Sparrow
>>
>> Chirp chirp - chirp chirp chirp etc.
>>
>>>>
>>>> Can I assume "tjielp" means "Get me off your fucking mailing
>>>> list"?
>>>
>>> According to Google Translate, "De Mus" means "Pastor". It
>>> autodected the words as being in Chinese.
>>>
>>> (I did know that it doesn't mean "mouse", but couldn't remember
>>> what else it was.)
>>
>> In Dutch, it means sparrow, the very common brownish songbirds here
>> and there.
>
> And, indeed, everywhere. There are sparrows on every continent
> except Antarctica.

They're not native to Australia. They were brought here from India in
the 1860s. These days I hardly ever see them; I think they've been
driven out by the Indian Mynahs.

--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
J. J. Lodder
2018-09-16 11:21:15 UTC
Reply
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Peter Moylan <***@pmoylan.org.invalid> wrote:

> On 15/09/18 22:17, Madrigal Gurneyhalt wrote:
> > On Saturday, 15 September 2018 06:38:18 UTC+1, bill van wrote:
> >> On 2018-09-15 05:00:52 +0000, Peter Moylan said:
> >>
> >>> On 14/09/18 23:47, Jerry Friedman wrote:
> >>>> On 9/14/18 1:35 AM, J. J. Lodder wrote:
> >>>>> Snidely <***@gmail.com> wrote:
> >>>>>
> >>>>>> Quinn C explained on 9/12/2018 :
> >>>>>>> * J. J. Lodder:
> >>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>> BTW, an American I met a long time ago carried a
> >>>>>>>> phrase book: 'How to chat up a bird in ten languages.
> >>>>>>>
> >>>>>>> German: piep piep ... tschilp! tirili ...
> >>>>>>>
> >>>>>>> Depends on the kind of bird, I think.
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> Sparrow.
> >>>>>
> >>>>> You've earned a reference to a well known Dutch poem (Jan
> >>>>> Hanlo, 1949, then an avant-garde poet)
> >>>>>
> >>>>> ========================================================================
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> De Mus
> >>>>>
> >>>>> Tjielp tjielp - tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp -
> >>>>> tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp
> >>>>> tjielp tjielp tjielp
> >>>>>
> >>>>> Tjielp etc.
> >>>>>
> >>>>> ========================================================================
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> You are no doubt capable of producing an adequate translation,
> >>
> >> The Sparrow
> >>
> >> Chirp chirp - chirp chirp chirp etc.
> >>
> >>>>
> >>>> Can I assume "tjielp" means "Get me off your fucking mailing
> >>>> list"?
> >>>
> >>> According to Google Translate, "De Mus" means "Pastor". It
> >>> autodected the words as being in Chinese.
> >>>
> >>> (I did know that it doesn't mean "mouse", but couldn't remember
> >>> what else it was.)
> >>
> >> In Dutch, it means sparrow, the very common brownish songbirds here
> >> and there.
> >
> > And, indeed, everywhere. There are sparrows on every continent
> > except Antarctica.
>
> They're not native to Australia. They were brought here from India in
> the 1860s. These days I hardly ever see them; I think they've been
> driven out by the Indian Mynahs.

They used to be the most common birds in NL by far,
but there has been some crisis that is not understood,
a virus perhaps..
Still a common bird, and not threatened
but no longer omnipresent in large numbers,
They seem to be recovering,

Jan
Quinn C
2018-09-17 18:44:51 UTC
Reply
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* J. J. Lodder:

> Peter Moylan <***@pmoylan.org.invalid> wrote:
>
>> On 15/09/18 22:17, Madrigal Gurneyhalt wrote:
>>>
>>> There are sparrows on every continent
>>> except Antarctica.
>>
>> They're not native to Australia. They were brought here from India in
>> the 1860s. These days I hardly ever see them; I think they've been
>> driven out by the Indian Mynahs.
>
> They used to be the most common birds in NL by far,

ObContext: not having checked who wrote this, I suspected Cheryl, and
had a completely wrong part of the world in mind at first.

--
... man muss oft schon Wissenschaft infrage stellen bei den Wirt-
schaftsmenschen [...] das Denken wird haeufig blockiert von einem
ideologischen Ueberbau [...] Es ist halt in vielen Teilen eher
eine Religion als eine Wissenschaft. -- Heiner Flassbeck
bill van
2018-09-17 00:04:27 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
On 2018-09-15 12:37:37 +0000, Peter Moylan said:

> On 15/09/18 22:17, Madrigal Gurneyhalt wrote:
>>
>> And, indeed, everywhere. There are sparrows on every continent
>> except Antarctica.
>
> They're not native to Australia. They were brought here from India in
> the 1860s. These days I hardly ever see them; I think they've been
> driven out by the Indian Mynahs.

Vancouver had a population of crested mynas, introduced in the 1890s
from India.
There were reportedly in the tens of thousands of them in the 1930s but
they were
scarce by the time I moved here in 1981, and the last pair is thought
to have died in 2003.

bill
Peter T. Daniels
2018-09-17 02:44:51 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
On Sunday, September 16, 2018 at 8:04:29 PM UTC-4, bill van wrote:
> On 2018-09-15 12:37:37 +0000, Peter Moylan said:
> > On 15/09/18 22:17, Madrigal Gurneyhalt wrote:

> >> And, indeed, everywhere. There are sparrows on every continent
> >> except Antarctica.
> > They're not native to Australia. They were brought here from India in
> > the 1860s. These days I hardly ever see them; I think they've been
> > driven out by the Indian Mynahs.
>
> Vancouver had a population of crested mynas, introduced in the 1890s
> from India.
> There were reportedly in the tens of thousands of them in the 1930s but
> they were
> scarce by the time I moved here in 1981, and the last pair is thought
> to have died in 2003.

Wow, how do you get an introduced species to die off? Some idiot in the
19th century decided that every bird mentioned by Shakespeare should
inhabit Central Park, and America has been overrun with starlings ever
since.

Both Chicago and New York have populations of parakeets (BrE budgerigars)
descended from caged parakeets who escaped. A big old tree outside the
late Mayor Harold Washington's apartment on 51st Street near Lake Shore
Drive, and the monumental entrance arches to Green-Wood Cemetery in
Brooklyn, house notable colonies.
Jerry Friedman
2018-09-17 21:06:31 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
On Sunday, September 16, 2018 at 8:44:53 PM UTC-6, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
> On Sunday, September 16, 2018 at 8:04:29 PM UTC-4, bill van wrote:
> > On 2018-09-15 12:37:37 +0000, Peter Moylan said:
> > > On 15/09/18 22:17, Madrigal Gurneyhalt wrote:
>
> > >> And, indeed, everywhere. There are sparrows on every continent
> > >> except Antarctica.
> > > They're not native to Australia. They were brought here from India in
> > > the 1860s. These days I hardly ever see them; I think they've been
> > > driven out by the Indian Mynahs.
> >
> > Vancouver had a population of crested mynas, introduced in the 1890s
> > from India.
> > There were reportedly in the tens of thousands of them in the 1930s but
> > they were
> > scarce by the time I moved here in 1981, and the last pair is thought
> > to have died in 2003.
>
> Wow, how do you get an introduced species to die off? Some idiot in the
> 19th century decided that every bird mentioned by Shakespeare should
> inhabit Central Park, and America has been overrun with starlings ever
> since.

An outstanding example of answering your own question.

> Both Chicago and New York have populations of parakeets (BrE budgerigars)
> descended from caged parakeets who escaped.

The feral parakeets in those cities and others with such cold winters
are Monk Parakeets (BrE Quaker Parrots), a species native to temperate
South America.

> A big old tree outside the
> late Mayor Harold Washington's apartment on 51st Street near Lake Shore
> Drive, and the monumental entrance arches to Green-Wood Cemetery in
> Brooklyn, house notable colonies.

I should have looked for them back when I visited Chicago now and
then.

--
Jerry Friedman
Jerry Friedman
2018-09-17 21:23:24 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
On Monday, September 17, 2018 at 3:06:33 PM UTC-6, Jerry Friedman wrote:
> On Sunday, September 16, 2018 at 8:44:53 PM UTC-6, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
> > On Sunday, September 16, 2018 at 8:04:29 PM UTC-4, bill van wrote:
> > > On 2018-09-15 12:37:37 +0000, Peter Moylan said:
...

> > > Vancouver had a population of crested mynas, introduced in the 1890s
> > > from India.
> > > There were reportedly in the tens of thousands of them in the 1930s but
> > > they were
> > > scarce by the time I moved here in 1981, and the last pair is thought
> > > to have died in 2003.
> >
> > Wow, how do you get an introduced species to die off? Some idiot in the
> > 19th century decided that every bird mentioned by Shakespeare should
> > inhabit Central Park, and America has been overrun with starlings ever
> > since.
...

> > Both Chicago and New York have populations of parakeets (BrE budgerigars)
> > descended from caged parakeets who escaped.
>
> The feral parakeets in those cities and others with such cold winters
> are Monk Parakeets (BrE Quaker Parrots), a species native to temperate
> South America.
...

I meant to add that around 1980 there were tens of thousands of
Budgerigars (which are from Australia) on the Gulf Coast of Florida,
but they seem to have almost disappeared.

--
Jerry Friedman
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-09-17 21:41:52 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
On Monday, 17 September 2018 22:23:27 UTC+1, Jerry Friedman wrote:
> On Monday, September 17, 2018 at 3:06:33 PM UTC-6, Jerry Friedman wrote:
> > On Sunday, September 16, 2018 at 8:44:53 PM UTC-6, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
> > > On Sunday, September 16, 2018 at 8:04:29 PM UTC-4, bill van wrote:
> > > > On 2018-09-15 12:37:37 +0000, Peter Moylan said:
> ...
>
> > > > Vancouver had a population of crested mynas, introduced in the 1890s
> > > > from India.
> > > > There were reportedly in the tens of thousands of them in the 1930s but
> > > > they were
> > > > scarce by the time I moved here in 1981, and the last pair is thought
> > > > to have died in 2003.
> > >
> > > Wow, how do you get an introduced species to die off? Some idiot in the
> > > 19th century decided that every bird mentioned by Shakespeare should
> > > inhabit Central Park, and America has been overrun with starlings ever
> > > since.
> ...
>
> > > Both Chicago and New York have populations of parakeets (BrE budgerigars)
> > > descended from caged parakeets who escaped.
> >
> > The feral parakeets in those cities and others with such cold winters
> > are Monk Parakeets (BrE Quaker Parrots), a species native to temperate
> > South America.
> ...
>
> I meant to add that around 1980 there were tens of thousands of
> Budgerigars (which are from Australia) on the Gulf Coast of Florida,
> but they seem to have almost disappeared.
>

A phenomenon worthy of a scientific paper ...

<https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/nab/v055n04/p00389-p00397.pdf>

... which neatly puts the blame, or at least a large part of it on
... yup ... sparrows!
Tony Cooper
2018-09-17 22:24:16 UTC
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On Mon, 17 Sep 2018 14:23:24 -0700 (PDT), Jerry Friedman
<***@yahoo.com> wrote:

>On Monday, September 17, 2018 at 3:06:33 PM UTC-6, Jerry Friedman wrote:
>> On Sunday, September 16, 2018 at 8:44:53 PM UTC-6, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
>> > On Sunday, September 16, 2018 at 8:04:29 PM UTC-4, bill van wrote:
>> > > On 2018-09-15 12:37:37 +0000, Peter Moylan said:
>...
>
>> > > Vancouver had a population of crested mynas, introduced in the 1890s
>> > > from India.
>> > > There were reportedly in the tens of thousands of them in the 1930s but
>> > > they were
>> > > scarce by the time I moved here in 1981, and the last pair is thought
>> > > to have died in 2003.
>> >
>> > Wow, how do you get an introduced species to die off? Some idiot in the
>> > 19th century decided that every bird mentioned by Shakespeare should
>> > inhabit Central Park, and America has been overrun with starlings ever
>> > since.
>...
>
>> > Both Chicago and New York have populations of parakeets (BrE budgerigars)
>> > descended from caged parakeets who escaped.
>>
>> The feral parakeets in those cities and others with such cold winters
>> are Monk Parakeets (BrE Quaker Parrots), a species native to temperate
>> South America.
>...
>
>I meant to add that around 1980 there were tens of thousands of
>Budgerigars (which are from Australia) on the Gulf Coast of Florida,
>but they seem to have almost disappeared.

But we have monkeys!

In the mid-1930s, six rhesus macaques were imported and put on an
island in the Silver River near what is now Silver Springs State Park
as a tourist attraction. A colony of monkeys developed, but some swam
across the river and set up in the surrounding forests. Six more were
added about 1948.

Now, there are an estimated 200 in the park area, and at least 72
descendents have been spotted outside of the park and as far away as
the Panhandle and Sarasota. There's one that lives somewhere in St
Petersburg that has been evading capture for several years.




--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Peter T. Daniels
2018-09-17 21:36:01 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
On Monday, September 17, 2018 at 5:06:33 PM UTC-4, Jerry Friedman wrote:
> On Sunday, September 16, 2018 at 8:44:53 PM UTC-6, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
> > On Sunday, September 16, 2018 at 8:04:29 PM UTC-4, bill van wrote:
> > > On 2018-09-15 12:37:37 +0000, Peter Moylan said:
> > > > On 15/09/18 22:17, Madrigal Gurneyhalt wrote:

> > > >> And, indeed, everywhere. There are sparrows on every continent
> > > >> except Antarctica.
> > > > They're not native to Australia. They were brought here from India in
> > > > the 1860s. These days I hardly ever see them; I think they've been
> > > > driven out by the Indian Mynahs.
> > > Vancouver had a population of crested mynas, introduced in the 1890s
> > > from India.
> > > There were reportedly in the tens of thousands of them in the 1930s but
> > > they were
> > > scarce by the time I moved here in 1981, and the last pair is thought
> > > to have died in 2003.
> > Wow, how do you get an introduced species to die off? Some idiot in the
> > 19th century decided that every bird mentioned by Shakespeare should
> > inhabit Central Park, and America has been overrun with starlings ever
> > since.
>
> An outstanding example of answering your own question.

No -- just think of Australia's rabbits and whatever it was that was
brought in to control them, and those monster snakes that are taking
over the Everglades. It's almost impossible to get rid of introduced
species (or invasive ones, too, such as the mussels that are clogging
up waterworks in the easternmore Great Lakes) -- yet Vancouver has
managed it, even if not by human doing.

> > Both Chicago and New York have populations of parakeets (BrE budgerigars)
> > descended from caged parakeets who escaped.
>
> The feral parakeets in those cities and others with such cold winters
> are Monk Parakeets (BrE Quaker Parrots), a species native to temperate
> South America.
>
> > A big old tree outside the
> > late Mayor Harold Washington's apartment on 51st Street near Lake Shore
> > Drive, and the monumental entrance arches to Green-Wood Cemetery in
> > Brooklyn, house notable colonies.
>
> I should have looked for them back when I visited Chicago now and
> then.

The Brooklyn ones are a lot easier to spot.

And sometimes Manhattan's various red-tailed hawks will soar around at
dusk to show off for the people.
Jerry Friedman
2018-09-17 22:00:33 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
On Monday, September 17, 2018 at 3:36:03 PM UTC-6, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
> On Monday, September 17, 2018 at 5:06:33 PM UTC-4, Jerry Friedman wrote:
> > On Sunday, September 16, 2018 at 8:44:53 PM UTC-6, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
> > > On Sunday, September 16, 2018 at 8:04:29 PM UTC-4, bill van wrote:
> > > > On 2018-09-15 12:37:37 +0000, Peter Moylan said:
> > > > > On 15/09/18 22:17, Madrigal Gurneyhalt wrote:
>
> > > > >> And, indeed, everywhere. There are sparrows on every continent
> > > > >> except Antarctica.
> > > > > They're not native to Australia. They were brought here from India in
> > > > > the 1860s. These days I hardly ever see them; I think they've been
> > > > > driven out by the Indian Mynahs.
> > > > Vancouver had a population of crested mynas, introduced in the 1890s
> > > > from India.
> > > > There were reportedly in the tens of thousands of them in the 1930s but
> > > > they were
> > > > scarce by the time I moved here in 1981, and the last pair is thought
> > > > to have died in 2003.
> > > Wow, how do you get an introduced species to die off? Some idiot in the
> > > 19th century decided that every bird mentioned by Shakespeare should
> > > inhabit Central Park, and America has been overrun with starlings ever
> > > since.
> >
> > An outstanding example of answering your own question.
>
> No -- just think of Australia's rabbits and whatever it was that was
> brought in to control them, and those monster snakes that are taking
> over the Everglades.

Guess you didn't look them up. An important reason for the mynas'
disappearance was the arrival of starlings.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/mynas-swan-song-saddens-vancouver/article4129449/

> It's almost impossible to get rid of introduced
> species (or invasive ones, too, such as the mussels that are clogging
> up waterworks in the easternmore Great Lakes) -- yet Vancouver has
> managed it, even if not by human doing.

That happens often, but the opposite can happen too--introduced species
appear to be well established, but then decline and disappear. In
addition to the budgies that I mentioned in my response to myself and
the mynas in Vancouver, North American examples include European
Goldfinches on Long Island and Black Francolins in Lousiana.

--
Jerry Friedman
Tony Cooper
2018-09-17 23:12:05 UTC
Reply
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On Mon, 17 Sep 2018 14:36:01 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
<***@verizon.net> wrote:

>No -- just think of Australia's rabbits and whatever it was that was
>brought in to control them, and those monster snakes that are taking
>over the Everglades. It's almost impossible to get rid of introduced
>species (or invasive ones, too, such as the mussels that are clogging
>up waterworks in the easternmore Great Lakes) -- yet Vancouver has
>managed it, even if not by human doing.

The pythons in the Everglades are there because individuals who bought
them as pets finally decided that creature that can grow up to 18-foot
in length is not the ideal housepet. They dumped them in the 'Glades.
Those snakes, and their descendents, are now posing a serious threat
to native wildlife.

The state is paying hunters to destroy the snakes and eggs. Over
1,000 pythons were killed in a little over a year. The hunters are
paid $8 to $10 an hour plus a bounty depending on the length of the
snake or if the snake is on a nest of eggs. A female python can lay
up to 70 eggs a season.







--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Peter T. Daniels
2018-09-18 03:18:22 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
On Monday, September 17, 2018 at 7:12:06 PM UTC-4, Tony Cooper wrote:
> On Mon, 17 Sep 2018 14:36:01 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
> <***@verizon.net> wrote:
>
> >No -- just think of Australia's rabbits and whatever it was that was
> >brought in to control them, and those monster snakes that are taking
> >over the Everglades. It's almost impossible to get rid of introduced
> >species (or invasive ones, too, such as the mussels that are clogging
> >up waterworks in the easternmore Great Lakes) -- yet Vancouver has
> >managed it, even if not by human doing.
>
> The pythons in the Everglades are there because individuals who bought
> them as pets finally decided that creature that can grow up to 18-foot
> in length is not the ideal housepet. They dumped them in the 'Glades.
> Those snakes, and their descendents, are now posing a serious threat
> to native wildlife.

That is the meaning of "introduced species." I suppose you are doing
ecosplaining.

> The state is paying hunters to destroy the snakes and eggs. Over
> 1,000 pythons were killed in a little over a year. The hunters are
> paid $8 to $10 an hour plus a bounty depending on the length of the
> snake or if the snake is on a nest of eggs. A female python can lay
> up to 70 eggs a season.

And has no natural predators.
bill van
2018-09-18 00:03:10 UTC
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Raw Message
On 2018-09-17 21:36:01 +0000, Peter T. Daniels said:

> On Monday, September 17, 2018 at 5:06:33 PM UTC-4, Jerry Friedman wrote:
>> On Sunday, September 16, 2018 at 8:44:53 PM UTC-6, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
>>> On Sunday, September 16, 2018 at 8:04:29 PM UTC-4, bill van wrote:
>>>> On 2018-09-15 12:37:37 +0000, Peter Moylan said:
>>>>> On 15/09/18 22:17, Madrigal Gurneyhalt wrote:
>
>>>>>> And, indeed, everywhere. There are sparrows on every continent
>>>>>> except Antarctica.
>>>>> They're not native to Australia. They were brought here from India in
>>>>> the 1860s. These days I hardly ever see them; I think they've been
>>>>> driven out by the Indian Mynahs.
>>>> Vancouver had a population of crested mynas, introduced in the 1890s
>>>> from India.
>>>> There were reportedly in the tens of thousands of them in the 1930s but
>>>> they were
>>>> scarce by the time I moved here in 1981, and the last pair is thought
>>>> to have died in 2003.
>>> Wow, how do you get an introduced species to die off? Some idiot in the
>>> 19th century decided that every bird mentioned by Shakespeare should
>>> inhabit Central Park, and America has been overrun with starlings ever
>>> since.
>>
>> An outstanding example of answering your own question.
>
> No -- just think of Australia's rabbits and whatever it was that was
> brought in to control them, and those monster snakes that are taking
> over the Everglades. It's almost impossible to get rid of introduced
> species (or invasive ones, too, such as the mussels that are clogging
> up waterworks in the easternmore Great Lakes) -- yet Vancouver has
> managed it, even if not by human doing.

Starlings did have a role in the demise of Vancouver's mynas.
birdsna.org said in the 1990s,
when there were just a few mynas left:

Reasons for this steady decline over the past several decades probably
reflect maladaptation to the Vancouver climate in recent decades,
increased competition with European Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) which
invaded British Columbia in the early 1950s, changes in building
structures (fewer crevices and ledges), and loss of agricultural
habitat to urban development. The Crested Myna is likely to be
extirpated from North America within several decades.

bill
Peter Moylan
2018-09-17 05:17:04 UTC
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On 17/09/18 10:04, bill van wrote:
> On 2018-09-15 12:37:37 +0000, Peter Moylan said:
>
>> On 15/09/18 22:17, Madrigal Gurneyhalt wrote:
>>>
>>> And, indeed, everywhere. There are sparrows on every continent
>>> except Antarctica.
>>
>> They're not native to Australia. They were brought here from India
>> in the 1860s. These days I hardly ever see them; I think they've
>> been driven out by the Indian Mynahs.
>
> Vancouver had a population of crested mynas, introduced in the 1890s
> from India. There were reportedly in the tens of thousands of them
> in the 1930s but they were scarce by the time I moved here in 1981,
> and the last pair is thought to have died in 2003.

A lot of people here would be pleased to know how Vancouver got rid of
its mynas.

--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
J. J. Lodder
2018-09-17 07:26:43 UTC
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bill van <***@shaw.ca> wrote:

> On 2018-09-15 12:37:37 +0000, Peter Moylan said:
>
> > On 15/09/18 22:17, Madrigal Gurneyhalt wrote:
> >>
> >> And, indeed, everywhere. There are sparrows on every continent
> >> except Antarctica.
> >
> > They're not native to Australia. They were brought here from India in
> > the 1860s. These days I hardly ever see them; I think they've been
> > driven out by the Indian Mynahs.
>
> Vancouver had a population of crested mynas, introduced in the 1890s
> from India.

Vancouver has an interesting etymology btw.
The place was named after an English captain, also named Vancouver.
His greatgrandfather was a Dutch immigrant named 'Van Coevorden',
(of lesser nobility) after the Dutch town of Coevorden.
Coevorden in turn derived from 'Koe' + 'voorde',
so lit.'Cowford'.

So, otherthreadwise, Vancouver is indirectly
one of the many -ford places,

Jan
bill van
2018-09-17 18:32:40 UTC
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On 2018-09-17 07:26:43 +0000, J. J. Lodder said:

> bill van <***@shaw.ca> wrote:
>
>> On 2018-09-15 12:37:37 +0000, Peter Moylan said:
>>
>>> On 15/09/18 22:17, Madrigal Gurneyhalt wrote:
>>>>
>>>> And, indeed, everywhere. There are sparrows on every continent
>>>> except Antarctica.
>>>
>>> They're not native to Australia. They were brought here from India in
>>> the 1860s. These days I hardly ever see them; I think they've been
>>> driven out by the Indian Mynahs.
>>
>> Vancouver had a population of crested mynas, introduced in the 1890s
>> from India.
>
> Vancouver has an interesting etymology btw.
> The place was named after an English captain, also named Vancouver.
> His greatgrandfather was a Dutch immigrant named 'Van Coevorden',
> (of lesser nobility) after the Dutch town of Coevorden.
> Coevorden in turn derived from 'Koe' + 'voorde',
> so lit.'Cowford'.
>
> So, otherthreadwise, Vancouver is indirectly
> one of the many -ford places,
>
That story is well known here. A local businessman and politician named
Bill Vander Zalm
had a scale replica of the castle of Coevorden built for Vancouver's
world fair in 1986. It
sat in an empty space in downtown Vancouver during the fair, and was
then dismantled
and rebuilt at an amusement park owned by Vander Zalm.

bill
J. J. Lodder
2018-09-17 19:37:19 UTC
Reply
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bill van <***@shaw.ca> wrote:

> On 2018-09-17 07:26:43 +0000, J. J. Lodder said:
>
> > bill van <***@shaw.ca> wrote:
> >
> >> On 2018-09-15 12:37:37 +0000, Peter Moylan said:
> >>
> >>> On 15/09/18 22:17, Madrigal Gurneyhalt wrote:
> >>>>
> >>>> And, indeed, everywhere. There are sparrows on every continent
> >>>> except Antarctica.
> >>>
> >>> They're not native to Australia. They were brought here from India in
> >>> the 1860s. These days I hardly ever see them; I think they've been
> >>> driven out by the Indian Mynahs.
> >>
> >> Vancouver had a population of crested mynas, introduced in the 1890s
> >> from India.
> >
> > Vancouver has an interesting etymology btw.
> > The place was named after an English captain, also named Vancouver.
> > His greatgrandfather was a Dutch immigrant named 'Van Coevorden',
> > (of lesser nobility) after the Dutch town of Coevorden.
> > Coevorden in turn derived from 'Koe' + 'voorde',
> > so lit.'Cowford'.
> >
> > So, otherthreadwise, Vancouver is indirectly
> > one of the many -ford places,
> >
> That story is well known here. A local businessman and politician named
> Bill Vander Zalm
> had a scale replica of the castle of Coevorden built for Vancouver's
> world fair in 1986.

Replica it is. It is a 80% scale model.

> It
> sat in an empty space in downtown Vancouver during the fair, and was
> then dismantled
> and rebuilt at an amusement park owned by Vander Zalm.

Work for you. The Vancouver replica is mentioned
on the Dutch wikip page on the Vancouver castle.
<https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kasteel_van_Coevorden>
No English version of the page exists.

BTW, the castle has been restored and expanded.
It is nowadays a hotel/restaurant, very good,
if the reviews are to be believed,

Jan
Peter Young
2018-09-17 18:45:47 UTC
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On 17 Sep 2018 ***@de-ster.demon.nl (J. J. Lodder) wrote:

> bill van <***@shaw.ca> wrote:

>> On 2018-09-15 12:37:37 +0000, Peter Moylan said:
>>
>>> On 15/09/18 22:17, Madrigal Gurneyhalt wrote:
>>>>
>>>> And, indeed, everywhere. There are sparrows on every continent
>>>> except Antarctica.
>>>
>>> They're not native to Australia. They were brought here from India in
>>> the 1860s. These days I hardly ever see them; I think they've been
>>> driven out by the Indian Mynahs.
>>
>> Vancouver had a population of crested mynas, introduced in the 1890s
>> from India.

> Vancouver has an interesting etymology btw.
> The place was named after an English captain, also named Vancouver.
> His greatgrandfather was a Dutch immigrant named 'Van Coevorden',
> (of lesser nobility) after the Dutch town of Coevorden.
> Coevorden in turn derived from 'Koe' + 'voorde',
> so lit.'Cowford'.

> So, otherthreadwise, Vancouver is indirectly
> one of the many -ford places,

Oxford, to name but a few?

Peter.

--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Au)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-09-15 12:21:27 UTC
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On Saturday, 15 September 2018 06:00:57 UTC+1, Peter Moylan wrote:
> On 14/09/18 23:47, Jerry Friedman wrote:
> > On 9/14/18 1:35 AM, J. J. Lodder wrote:
> >> Snidely <***@gmail.com> wrote:
> >>
> >>> Quinn C explained on 9/12/2018 :
> >>>> * J. J. Lodder:
> >>>>
> >>>>> BTW, an American I met a long time ago carried a phrase
> >>>>> book: 'How to chat up a bird in ten languages.
> >>>>
> >>>> German: piep piep ... tschilp! tirili ...
> >>>>
> >>>> Depends on the kind of bird, I think.
> >>>
> >>> Sparrow.
> >>
> >> You've earned a reference to a well known Dutch poem (Jan Hanlo,
> >> 1949, then an avant-garde poet)
> >>
> >> ========================================================================
> >>
> >>
> De Mus
> >>
> >> Tjielp tjielp - tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp - tjielp
> >> tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp
> >> tjielp
> >>
> >> Tjielp etc.
> >>
> >> ========================================================================
> >>
> >>
> >>
> You are no doubt capable of producing an adequate translation,
> >
> > Can I assume "tjielp" means "Get me off your fucking mailing list"?
>
> According to Google Translate, "De Mus" means "Pastor". It autodected
> the words as being in Chinese.
>
> (I did know that it doesn't mean "mouse", but couldn't remember what
> else it was.)
>

It does mean mouse in Latin. But in Dutch a mouse is egocentric;
it has to feature I - muis.
J. J. Lodder
2018-09-16 11:21:14 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
Peter Moylan <***@pmoylan.org.invalid> wrote:

> On 14/09/18 23:47, Jerry Friedman wrote:
> > On 9/14/18 1:35 AM, J. J. Lodder wrote:
> >> Snidely <***@gmail.com> wrote:
> >>
> >>> Quinn C explained on 9/12/2018 :
> >>>> * J. J. Lodder:
> >>>>
> >>>>> BTW, an American I met a long time ago carried a phrase
> >>>>> book: 'How to chat up a bird in ten languages.
> >>>>
> >>>> German: piep piep ... tschilp! tirili ...
> >>>>
> >>>> Depends on the kind of bird, I think.
> >>>
> >>> Sparrow.
> >>
> >> You've earned a reference to a well known Dutch poem (Jan Hanlo,
> >> 1949, then an avant-garde poet)
> >>
> >> ========================================================================
> >>
> >>
> De Mus
> >>
> >> Tjielp tjielp - tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp - tjielp
> >> tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp tjielp
> >> tjielp
> >>
> >> Tjielp etc.
> >>
> >> ========================================================================
> >>
> >>
> >>
> You are no doubt capable of producing an adequate translation,
> >
> > Can I assume "tjielp" means "Get me off your fucking mailing list"?
>
> According to Google Translate, "De Mus" means "Pastor". It autodected
> the words as being in Chinese.
>
> (I did know that it doesn't mean "mouse", but couldn't remember what
> else it was.)

Strange mistake.
Perhaps from its dignified name, Passer domesticus (L)
BTW, 'huismus' is also used figuratively,
for a dull girl/woman who stays at home as much as possible,
because that's the only place where she feels comfortable,

Jan
Peter Moylan
2018-09-14 08:46:53 UTC
Reply
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On 14/09/18 16:05, Snidely wrote:
> Quinn C explained on 9/12/2018 :
>> * J. J. Lodder:
>>
>>> BTW, an American I met a long time ago carried a phrase book:
>>> 'How to chat up a bird in ten languages.
>>
>> German: piep piep ... tschilp! tirili ...
>>
>> Depends on the kind of bird, I think.
>
> Sparrow.

Just for kicks
I ride out through the night
My bird hangs on in fright

When that song first came out, I had a mental picture of the fellow
frantically pedalling down the M1, with a cockatoo hanging on to his
shoulder.

I'm not sure when I was introduced to the idea that "bike" can mean
"motorcycle", but it must have been later than that.

--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
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