Discussion:
Murdoch: touched
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Marius Hancu
2017-04-11 12:16:55 UTC
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Hello,

~~~
[Martin Lynch-Gibbon's in Cambridge]

Beyond the slim street lamps the great crested form of King's chapel
rose towards the moon, its pinnacles touched to a pallid blue against
the starry distance beyond.

Iris Murdoch, A Severed Head
~~~

1. King's chapel: is that same with King's College chapel?

2. "its pinnacles touched to a pallid blue against the starry distance
beyond"

"touched to a pallid blue": painted in a color approaching a/the pallid
blue?

or perhaps:

"its pinnacles touched/pressed against the starry distance beyond until
they reached a pallid blue"?

Thanks.
--
Marius Hancu
Horace LaBadie
2017-04-11 12:35:58 UTC
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Post by Marius Hancu
Hello,
~~~
[Martin Lynch-Gibbon's in Cambridge]
Beyond the slim street lamps the great crested form of King's chapel
rose towards the moon, its pinnacles touched to a pallid blue against
the starry distance beyond.
Iris Murdoch, A Severed Head
~~~
1. King's chapel: is that same with King's College chapel?
Yes.
Post by Marius Hancu
2. "its pinnacles touched to a pallid blue against the starry distance
beyond"
"touched to a pallid blue": painted in a color approaching a/the pallid
blue?
Took on a pallid blue hue.
Post by Marius Hancu
"its pinnacles touched/pressed against the starry distance beyond until
they reached a pallid blue"?
Thanks.
Marius Hancu
2017-04-11 16:48:55 UTC
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Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Marius Hancu
~~~
[Martin Lynch-Gibbon's in Cambridge]
Beyond the slim street lamps the great crested form of King's chapel
rose towards the moon, its pinnacles touched to a pallid blue against
the starry distance beyond.
Iris Murdoch, A Severed Head
~~~
1. King's chapel: is that same with King's College chapel?
Yes.
Post by Marius Hancu
2. "its pinnacles touched to a pallid blue against the starry distance
beyond"
"touched to a pallid blue": painted in a color approaching a/the pallid
blue?
Took on a pallid blue hue.
Post by Marius Hancu
"its pinnacles touched/pressed against the starry distance beyond until
they reached a pallid blue"?
Trouble is your reading is close to one of my alternatives, while Janet's close to my other alternative. And I understand each of you.

I honestly believe the passage allows multiple readings.

Thanks to both of you though.
--
Marius Hancu
Janet
2017-04-11 12:53:17 UTC
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In article <ocihfo$1fk6$***@gioia.aioe.org>, ***@gmail.com
says...
Post by Marius Hancu
Hello,
~~~
[Martin Lynch-Gibbon's in Cambridge]
Beyond the slim street lamps the great crested form of King's chapel
rose towards the moon, its pinnacles touched to a pallid blue against
the starry distance beyond.
Iris Murdoch, A Severed Head
~~~
1. King's chapel: is that same with King's College chapel?
Yes
Post by Marius Hancu
2. "its pinnacles touched to a pallid blue against the starry distance
beyond"
"touched to a pallid blue": painted in a color approaching a/the pallid
blue?
No; it means the outline is seen against (as if touching) a pallid
blue sky. The horizon looks paler than the zenith.

Janet
CDB
2017-04-11 19:04:54 UTC
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Post by Marius Hancu
[Martin Lynch-Gibbon's in Cambridge]
Beyond the slim street lamps the great crested form of King's chapel
rose towards the moon, its pinnacles touched to a pallid blue
against the starry distance beyond.
Iris Murdoch, A Severed Head
1. King's chapel: is that same with King's College chapel?
2. "its pinnacles touched to a pallid blue against the starry
distance beyond"
"touched to a pallid blue": painted in a color approaching a/the
pallid blue?
"its pinnacles touched/pressed against the starry distance beyond
until they reached a pallid blue"?
The moon is mentioned. Far above the light of the streetlamps, the
moonlight "touches (up?)" the towers in a washed-out blue, against the
night sky.
Marius Hancu
2017-04-11 20:20:49 UTC
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Post by CDB
Post by Marius Hancu
[Martin Lynch-Gibbon's in Cambridge]
Beyond the slim street lamps the great crested form of King's chapel
rose towards the moon, its pinnacles touched to a pallid blue
against the starry distance beyond.
Iris Murdoch, A Severed Head
1. King's chapel: is that same with King's College chapel?
2. "its pinnacles touched to a pallid blue against the starry
distance beyond"
"touched to a pallid blue": painted in a color approaching a/the
pallid blue?
"its pinnacles touched/pressed against the starry distance beyond
until they reached a pallid blue"?
The moon is mentioned. Far above the light of the streetlamps, the
moonlight "touches (up?)" the towers in a washed-out blue, against the
night sky.
How do you read the "to" in text?

Thanks.
--
Marius Hancu
CDB
2017-04-12 12:17:18 UTC
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Post by Marius Hancu
Post by CDB
Post by Marius Hancu
[Martin Lynch-Gibbon's in Cambridge]
Beyond the slim street lamps the great crested form of King's
chapel rose towards the moon, its pinnacles touched to a pallid
blue against the starry distance beyond.
Iris Murdoch, A Severed Head
1. King's chapel: is that same with King's College chapel?
2. "its pinnacles touched to a pallid blue against the starry
distance beyond"
"touched to a pallid blue": painted in a color approaching a/the
pallid blue?
"its pinnacles touched/pressed against the starry distance
beyond until they reached a pallid blue"?
The moon is mentioned. Far above the light of the streetlamps,
the moonlight "touches (up?)" the towers in a washed-out blue,
against the night sky.
How do you read the "to" in text?
The towers were touched by the moonlight, which changed their apparent
colour to pallid blue. I suppose that's why I wrote "'touches (up?)'"
above. To "touch up" is to improve or complete the colouring of
something, to put the finishing touches on it, to improve its appearance.
Snidely
2017-04-13 04:38:46 UTC
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On Wednesday or thereabouts, CDB asked ...
Post by CDB
Post by Marius Hancu
Post by CDB
Post by Marius Hancu
[Martin Lynch-Gibbon's in Cambridge]
Beyond the slim street lamps the great crested form of King's
chapel rose towards the moon, its pinnacles touched to a pallid
blue against the starry distance beyond.
Iris Murdoch, A Severed Head
1. King's chapel: is that same with King's College chapel?
2. "its pinnacles touched to a pallid blue against the starry
distance beyond"
"touched to a pallid blue": painted in a color approaching a/the
pallid blue?
"its pinnacles touched/pressed against the starry distance
beyond until they reached a pallid blue"?
The moon is mentioned. Far above the light of the streetlamps,
the moonlight "touches (up?)" the towers in a washed-out blue,
against the night sky.
How do you read the "to" in text?
The towers were touched by the moonlight, which changed their apparent
colour to pallid blue. I suppose that's why I wrote "'touches (up?)'"
above. To "touch up" is to improve or complete the colouring of
something, to put the finishing touches on it, to improve its appearance.
I wouldn't take a "touched up" reading for the quoted passage. It
isn't a matter of finishing touches or repair the wear, but of
transforming. Perhaps the "touch" is like that of a wizard's finger.
Or, to be more selenic, an enchantress' finger.

/dps "my mental voice says <<enchantress's>>"
--
The presence of this syntax results from the fact that SQLite is really
a Tcl extension that has escaped into the wild.
<http://www.sqlite.org/lang_expr.html>
Peter T. Daniels
2017-04-13 13:10:54 UTC
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Post by Snidely
On Wednesday or thereabouts, CDB asked ...
Post by CDB
The towers were touched by the moonlight, which changed their apparent
colour to pallid blue. I suppose that's why I wrote "'touches (up?)'"
above. To "touch up" is to improve or complete the colouring of
something, to put the finishing touches on it, to improve its appearance.
I wouldn't take a "touched up" reading for the quoted passage. It
isn't a matter of finishing touches or repair the wear, but of
transforming. Perhaps the "touch" is like that of a wizard's finger.
Or, to be more selenic, an enchantress' finger.
/dps "my mental voice says <<enchantress's>>"
Your mental voice is in tune with current practice.
CDB
2017-04-13 13:32:27 UTC
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Post by Snidely
CDB asked ...
Post by CDB
Post by Marius Hancu
Post by CDB
Post by Marius Hancu
[Martin Lynch-Gibbon's in Cambridge]
Beyond the slim street lamps the great crested form of
King's chapel rose towards the moon, its pinnacles touched to
a pallid blue against the starry distance beyond.
Iris Murdoch, A Severed Head
1. King's chapel: is that same with King's College chapel?
2. "its pinnacles touched to a pallid blue against the
starry distance beyond"
"touched to a pallid blue": painted in a color approaching
a/the pallid blue?
"its pinnacles touched/pressed against the starry distance
beyond until they reached a pallid blue"?
The moon is mentioned. Far above the light of the
streetlamps, the moonlight "touches (up?)" the towers in a
washed-out blue, against the night sky.
How do you read the "to" in text?
The towers were touched by the moonlight, which changed their
"'touches (up?)'" above. To "touch up" is to improve or complete
the colouring of something, to put the finishing touches on it, to
improve its appearance.
I wouldn't take a "touched up" reading for the quoted passage. It
isn't a matter of finishing touches or repair the wear, but of
transforming. Perhaps the "touch" is like that of a wizard's finger.
Or, to be more selenic, an enchantress' finger.
/dps "my mental voice says <<enchantress's>>"
Your mental voice is channelling the AUE consensus, AFAICR.

"Tu potens Trivia et notho es dicta lumine luna". "You are powerful
Hecate, called Moon for your bastard light", says Catullus in his hymn
to the Goddess.



I wasn't proposing "touched up" as an exact equivalent of the author's
phrase. I wrote "up" with a question mark, both originally and in
repetition, to hint at that; but I think it points out* something useful
about the picture. I intended to say that the verb "touched" in context
implies something partial and tentative (think Debussy), since only the
parts in moonlight would be coloured.

*Sorry. I started to write "sheds some light on", which might have been
worse.
Jerry Friedman
2017-04-13 17:22:42 UTC
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Post by CDB
Post by Marius Hancu
Post by CDB
Post by Marius Hancu
[Martin Lynch-Gibbon's in Cambridge]
Beyond the slim street lamps the great crested form of King's
chapel rose towards the moon, its pinnacles touched to a pallid
blue against the starry distance beyond.
Iris Murdoch, A Severed Head
1. King's chapel: is that same with King's College chapel?
2. "its pinnacles touched to a pallid blue against the starry
distance beyond"
"touched to a pallid blue": painted in a color approaching a/the
pallid blue?
"its pinnacles touched/pressed against the starry distance
beyond until they reached a pallid blue"?
The moon is mentioned. Far above the light of the streetlamps,
the moonlight "touches (up?)" the towers in a washed-out blue,
against the night sky.
How do you read the "to" in text?
The towers were touched by the moonlight, which changed their apparent
colour to pallid blue.
Which would make it a fantasy image, since moonlight isn't blue.
Also, if the towers are rising toward the moon, then you're probably
seeing mostly the shadow side.

I suppose they didn't have mercury-vapor streetlamps in Cambridge,
and wondering whether their bluish light was involved would be too
literal-minded.
Post by CDB
I suppose that's why I wrote "'touches (up?)'"
above. To "touch up" is to improve or complete the colouring of
something, to put the finishing touches on it, to improve its appearance.
--
Jerry Friedman
CDB
2017-04-14 13:21:12 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by CDB
Post by Marius Hancu
Post by CDB
Post by Marius Hancu
[Martin Lynch-Gibbon's in Cambridge]
Beyond the slim street lamps the great crested form of
King's chapel rose towards the moon, its pinnacles touched to
a pallid blue against the starry distance beyond.
Iris Murdoch, A Severed Head
1. King's chapel: is that same with King's College chapel?
2. "its pinnacles touched to a pallid blue against the
starry distance beyond"
"touched to a pallid blue": painted in a color approaching
a/the pallid blue?
"its pinnacles touched/pressed against the starry distance
beyond until they reached a pallid blue"?
The moon is mentioned. Far above the light of the
streetlamps, the moonlight "touches (up?)" the towers in a
washed-out blue, against the night sky.
How do you read the "to" in text?
The towers were touched by the moonlight, which changed their
apparent colour to pallid blue.
Which would make it a fantasy image, since moonlight isn't blue.
I'm sure you're right about the colour. Isn't moonlight polarised, so
that things don't look as one would expect? But moonlight has a bluish
tinge for me, in memory. Maybe it's a matter of individual
colour-perception.
Post by Jerry Friedman
Also, if the towers are rising toward the moon, then you're probably
seeing mostly the shadow side.
I can think of arrangements that would have a different result: anything
that had the moon directly overhead would do, even one that
put it a little behind the viewer, but still high enough to be in the
field of vision when the viewer looked upward.
Post by Jerry Friedman
I suppose they didn't have mercury-vapor streetlamps in Cambridge,
and wondering whether their bluish light was involved would be too
literal-minded.
On the whole, I preferred the old orange ones. Blue light keeps the
birds awake past their bedtime.

[...]
Snidely
2017-04-15 07:42:37 UTC
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Post by CDB
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by CDB
Post by Marius Hancu
Post by CDB
Post by Marius Hancu
[Martin Lynch-Gibbon's in Cambridge]
Beyond the slim street lamps the great crested form of
King's chapel rose towards the moon, its pinnacles touched to
a pallid blue against the starry distance beyond.
Iris Murdoch, A Severed Head
1. King's chapel: is that same with King's College chapel?
2. "its pinnacles touched to a pallid blue against the
starry distance beyond"
"touched to a pallid blue": painted in a color approaching
a/the pallid blue?
"its pinnacles touched/pressed against the starry distance
beyond until they reached a pallid blue"?
The moon is mentioned. Far above the light of the
streetlamps, the moonlight "touches (up?)" the towers in a
washed-out blue, against the night sky.
How do you read the "to" in text?
The towers were touched by the moonlight, which changed their
apparent colour to pallid blue.
Which would make it a fantasy image, since moonlight isn't blue.
I'm sure you're right about the colour. Isn't moonlight polarised, so
that things don't look as one would expect? But moonlight has a bluish
tinge for me, in memory. Maybe it's a matter of individual
colour-perception.
Post by Jerry Friedman
Also, if the towers are rising toward the moon, then you're probably
seeing mostly the shadow side.
I can think of arrangements that would have a different result: anything
that had the moon directly overhead would do, even one that
put it a little behind the viewer, but still high enough to be in the
field of vision when the viewer looked upward.
Post by Jerry Friedman
I suppose they didn't have mercury-vapor streetlamps in Cambridge,
and wondering whether their bluish light was involved would be too
literal-minded.
On the whole, I preferred the old orange ones. Blue light keeps the
birds awake past their bedtime.
Tradeoffs. I think mocking birds run 3 shifts anyway, and I have
trouble seeing clearly under sodium street lights. Most of the new LED
fixtures are plenty white, but better focused.
Post by CDB
[...]
{'''}

/dps "raise you one"
--
The presence of this syntax results from the fact that SQLite is really
a Tcl extension that has escaped into the wild.
<http://www.sqlite.org/lang_expr.html>
CDB
2017-04-15 12:48:21 UTC
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[taking away the night]
Post by Snidely
Post by CDB
On the whole, I preferred the old orange ones. Blue light keeps
the birds awake past their bedtime.
Tradeoffs. I think mocking birds run 3 shifts anyway, and I have
trouble seeing clearly under sodium street lights. Most of the new
LED fixtures are plenty white, but better focused.
Post by CDB
[...]
{'''}
/dps "raise you one"
[!]
Jerry Friedman
2017-04-17 16:14:52 UTC
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Post by CDB
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by CDB
Post by Marius Hancu
Post by CDB
Post by Marius Hancu
[Martin Lynch-Gibbon's in Cambridge]
Beyond the slim street lamps the great crested form of
King's chapel rose towards the moon, its pinnacles touched to
a pallid blue against the starry distance beyond.
Iris Murdoch, A Severed Head
1. King's chapel: is that same with King's College chapel?
2. "its pinnacles touched to a pallid blue against the
starry distance beyond"
"touched to a pallid blue": painted in a color approaching
a/the pallid blue?
"its pinnacles touched/pressed against the starry distance
beyond until they reached a pallid blue"?
The moon is mentioned. Far above the light of the
streetlamps, the moonlight "touches (up?)" the towers in a
washed-out blue, against the night sky.
How do you read the "to" in text?
The towers were touched by the moonlight, which changed their
apparent colour to pallid blue.
Which would make it a fantasy image, since moonlight isn't blue.
I'm sure you're right about the colour. Isn't moonlight polarised, so
that things don't look as one would expect?
Nope.
Post by CDB
But moonlight has a bluish
tinge for me, in memory. Maybe it's a matter of individual
colour-perception.
Possibly. Also, theatrical lighting uses blue for night or moonlight.
Post by CDB
Post by Jerry Friedman
Also, if the towers are rising toward the moon, then you're probably
seeing mostly the shadow side.
I can think of arrangements that would have a different result: anything
that had the moon directly overhead would do, even one that
put it a little behind the viewer, but still high enough to be in the
field of vision when the viewer looked upward.
Ah, could be.
Post by CDB
Post by Jerry Friedman
I suppose they didn't have mercury-vapor streetlamps in Cambridge,
and wondering whether their bluish light was involved would be too
literal-minded.
On the whole, I preferred the old orange ones. Blue light keeps the
birds awake past their bedtime.
I think of the blue ones as old and the yellow-orange ones as new, but
there must have been gaslights at some point, unless people are just
telling me that to make me think I'm crazy.
--
Jerry Friedman
CDB
2017-04-17 19:25:23 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by CDB
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by CDB
Post by Marius Hancu
Post by CDB
Post by Marius Hancu
[Martin Lynch-Gibbon's in Cambridge]
Beyond the slim street lamps the great crested form of
King's chapel rose towards the moon, its pinnacles
touched to a pallid blue against the starry distance
beyond.
Iris Murdoch, A Severed Head
1. King's chapel: is that same with King's College
chapel?
2. "its pinnacles touched to a pallid blue against the
starry distance beyond"
"touched to a pallid blue": painted in a color
approaching a/the pallid blue?
"its pinnacles touched/pressed against the starry
distance beyond until they reached a pallid blue"?
The moon is mentioned. Far above the light of the
streetlamps, the moonlight "touches (up?)" the towers in a
washed-out blue, against the night sky.
How do you read the "to" in text?
The towers were touched by the moonlight, which changed their
apparent colour to pallid blue.
Which would make it a fantasy image, since moonlight isn't blue.
I'm sure you're right about the colour. Isn't moonlight polarised,
so that things don't look as one would expect?
Nope.
Ah. Not covered in highschool physics as I took it, so I must have
gotten it from SF stories.

OTOH, aside from mechanism, I find this:

The color of moonlight, particularly near full Moon, appears bluish to
the human eye compared to most artificial light sources. This is because
of the Purkinje effect* - the light is not actually tinted blue, and
although moonlight is often referred to as "silvery" it has no inherent
silvery quality.
************************************
*The Purkinje effect (sometimes called the Purkinje shift or dark
adaptation) is the tendency for the peak luminance sensitivity of the
human eye to shift toward the blue end of the color spectrum at low
illumination levels.[1][2][page needed] The effect is named after the
Czech anatomist Jan Evangelista Purkyně.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moonlight
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by CDB
But moonlight has a bluish tinge for me, in memory. Maybe it's a
matter of individual colour-perception.
Possibly. Also, theatrical lighting uses blue for night or
moonlight.
Post by CDB
Post by Jerry Friedman
Also, if the towers are rising toward the moon, then you're
probably seeing mostly the shadow side.
anything that had the moon directly overhead would do, even one
that put it a little behind the viewer, but still high enough to be
in the field of vision when the viewer looked upward.
Ah, could be.
Post by CDB
Post by Jerry Friedman
I suppose they didn't have mercury-vapor streetlamps in
Cambridge, and wondering whether their bluish light was involved
would be too literal-minded.
On the whole, I preferred the old orange ones. Blue light keeps
the birds awake past their bedtime.
I think of the blue ones as old and the yellow-orange ones as new,
but there must have been gaslights at some point, unless people are
just telling me that to make me think I'm crazy.
The new ones around here are LEDs, and far too blue. I think that, in
the old parts of the city, there are still a few white glass globes on
molded comglomerate pillars, with incandescent bulbs in them. I
remember those from my childhood, and they are my favourites.

Ha. Strathcona Park, where we used to go sliding:

<Loading Image...>
Jerry Friedman
2017-04-17 21:38:07 UTC
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Post by CDB
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by CDB
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by CDB
Post by Marius Hancu
Post by CDB
Post by Marius Hancu
[Martin Lynch-Gibbon's in Cambridge]
Beyond the slim street lamps the great crested form of
King's chapel rose towards the moon, its pinnacles
touched to a pallid blue against the starry distance
beyond.
Iris Murdoch, A Severed Head
1. King's chapel: is that same with King's College
chapel?
2. "its pinnacles touched to a pallid blue against the
starry distance beyond"
"touched to a pallid blue": painted in a color
approaching a/the pallid blue?
"its pinnacles touched/pressed against the starry
distance beyond until they reached a pallid blue"?
The moon is mentioned. Far above the light of the
streetlamps, the moonlight "touches (up?)" the towers in a
washed-out blue, against the night sky.
How do you read the "to" in text?
The towers were touched by the moonlight, which changed their
apparent colour to pallid blue.
Which would make it a fantasy image, since moonlight isn't blue.
I'm sure you're right about the colour. Isn't moonlight polarised,
so that things don't look as one would expect?
Nope.
Ah. Not covered in highschool physics as I took it, so I must have
gotten it from SF stories.
Maybe I should have mentioned that light from the blue sky is
polarized.
Post by CDB
The color of moonlight, particularly near full Moon, appears bluish to
the human eye compared to most artificial light sources. This is because
of the Purkinje effect* - the light is not actually tinted blue, and
although moonlight is often referred to as "silvery" it has no inherent
silvery quality.
************************************
*The Purkinje effect (sometimes called the Purkinje shift or dark
adaptation) is the tendency for the peak luminance sensitivity of the
human eye to shift toward the blue end of the color spectrum at low
illumination levels.[1][2][page needed] The effect is named after the
Czech anatomist Jan Evangelista Purkyně.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moonlight
...

I have grave doubts. The rods are more sensitive to blue, but you
can't see color just with the rods. Blue objects look brighter
than red or yellow ones in low light, but I don't think the
Purkinje effect makes dull-colored objects look bluish.

On the other hand, the Purkinje effect might be part of the reason
blue light is conventionally used to indicate darkness.
Post by CDB
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by CDB
Post by Jerry Friedman
I suppose they didn't have mercury-vapor streetlamps in
Cambridge, and wondering whether their bluish light was involved
would be too literal-minded.
On the whole, I preferred the old orange ones. Blue light keeps
the birds awake past their bedtime.
I think of the blue ones as old and the yellow-orange ones as new,
but there must have been gaslights at some point, unless people are
just telling me that to make me think I'm crazy.
The new ones around here are LEDs, and far too blue.
I haven't noticed those here yet.
Post by CDB
I think that, in
the old parts of the city, there are still a few white glass globes on
molded comglomerate pillars, with incandescent bulbs in them. I
remember those from my childhood, and they are my favourites.
<https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-TfbN9iaordI/VrK8eVybkNI/AAAAAAAAUg4/ipVX-daAFOA/s1600/strathpav20s.jpg>
--
Jerry Friedman
Marius Hancu
2017-04-17 13:23:49 UTC
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Post by Marius Hancu
Post by CDB
Post by Marius Hancu
[Martin Lynch-Gibbon's in Cambridge]
Beyond the slim street lamps the great crested form of King's
chapel rose towards the moon, its pinnacles touched to a pallid
blue against the starry distance beyond.
Iris Murdoch, A Severed Head
1. King's chapel: is that same with King's College chapel?
2. "its pinnacles touched to a pallid blue against the starry
distance beyond"
"touched to a pallid blue": painted in a color approaching a/the
pallid blue?
"its pinnacles touched/pressed against the starry distance
beyond until they reached a pallid blue"?
The moon is mentioned. Far above the light of the streetlamps,
the moonlight "touches (up?)" the towers in a washed-out blue,
against the night sky.
How do you read the "to" in text?
The towers were touched by the moonlight, which changed their apparent
colour to pallid blue. I suppose that's why I wrote "'touches (up?)'"
above. To "touch up" is to improve or complete the colouring of
something, to put the finishing touches on it, to improve its appearance.
I know "touches up":-)

Thanks, everyone.
--
Marius Hancu
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