Discussion:
Different from/than/to
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HVS
2017-11-21 14:24:13 UTC
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The thread on this has reminded me of a recurring problem, so I'm asking for
suggestions.

Personally, I'm not remotely fussed which form of "different from/than/to"
people use, and I don't notice which one's used when I'm reading or hearing
it. Consequently, I have trouble remembering which one form is the one that
annoys some people to a quite remarkable extent, and which one isn't.

When I'm writing the sort of reports that I write, I'm trying to transmit
meaning rather than to open a grammar or usage argument, and so I try to
avoid forms that potentially trigger outraged offence. (Even if the disputed
usage is entirely defendable, I'd rather not have a discussion of, say, which
form of dormer window is historically appropriate for Georgian buildings
sidetracked down the rabbit-hole into an argument about "correct" usage.)

Because of the long thread on this, I'm currently aware that "different
from" is the non-outrage-triggering form. I'm willing to bet, though, that
in a few months' time I'll have forgotten it, and will once more have to haul
down Fowler's to check it again.

Anyone suggest a trick for remembering that the form I want is "different
from"? (ISTR trying "it's the one that would come first in an alphabetical
list of possibilities", but that didn't stick in my mind.)
--
Cheers, Harvey
CanEng (30yrs) and BrEng (34yrs), indiscriminately mixed
Richard Yates
2017-11-21 14:32:45 UTC
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Post by HVS
The thread on this has reminded me of a recurring problem, so I'm asking for
suggestions.
Personally, I'm not remotely fussed which form of "different from/than/to"
people use, and I don't notice which one's used when I'm reading or hearing
it. Consequently, I have trouble remembering which one form is the one that
annoys some people to a quite remarkable extent, and which one isn't.
When I'm writing the sort of reports that I write, I'm trying to transmit
meaning rather than to open a grammar or usage argument, and so I try to
avoid forms that potentially trigger outraged offence. (Even if the disputed
usage is entirely defendable, I'd rather not have a discussion of, say, which
form of dormer window is historically appropriate for Georgian buildings
sidetracked down the rabbit-hole into an argument about "correct" usage.)
Because of the long thread on this, I'm currently aware that "different
from" is the non-outrage-triggering form. I'm willing to bet, though, that
in a few months' time I'll have forgotten it, and will once more have to haul
down Fowler's to check it again.
Anyone suggest a trick for remembering that the form I want is "different
from"? (ISTR trying "it's the one that would come first in an alphabetical
list of possibilities", but that didn't stick in my mind.)
Maybe "different" and "from" both have "f"s. Or remember the
alliterative "frent-from". (If you then start misspelling "different"
I can't help you; you're on your own.)
HVS
2017-11-21 14:40:00 UTC
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-snip-
Post by Richard Yates
Post by HVS
Anyone suggest a trick for remembering that the form I want is
"different from"? (ISTR trying "it's the one that would come first in
an alphabetical list of possibilities", but that didn't stick in my
mind.)
Maybe "different" and "from" both have "f"s. Or remember the
alliterative "frent-from". (If you then start misspelling "different"
I can't help you; you're on your own.)
That's very useful; thanks. (I think I insert a vestigial third syllable in
there, so I'll try not to spell it diffrently...)
--
Cheers, Harvey
CanEng (30yrs) and BrEng (34yrs), indiscriminately mixed
Peter T. Daniels
2017-11-21 14:50:54 UTC
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Post by HVS
Post by Richard Yates
Post by HVS
Anyone suggest a trick for remembering that the form I want is
"different from"? (ISTR trying "it's the one that would come first in
an alphabetical list of possibilities", but that didn't stick in my
mind.)
Maybe "different" and "from" both have "f"s. Or remember the
alliterative "frent-from". (If you then start misspelling "different"
I can't help you; you're on your own.)
That's very useful; thanks. (I think I insert a vestigial third syllable in
there, so I'll try not to spell it diffrently...)
Unfortunately the orthographic mnemonic could also lead you to the one Brits
don't like (ends with n) and the one Americans don't like (ends with o).
Richard Heathfield
2017-11-21 15:13:49 UTC
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Post by HVS
The thread on this has reminded me of a recurring problem, so I'm asking for
suggestions.
<snip>
Post by HVS
Anyone suggest a trick for remembering that the form I want is "different
from"? (ISTR trying "it's the one that would come first in an alphabetical
list of possibilities", but that didn't stick in my mind.)
Perhaps you can fall back on good old etymology.

"Differ" comes from "dis-" (from, away, apart) and "fero" (I bring, I
carry, I bear).

Thus, "I carry (away) FROM".

The "di-" prefix is very often used for something that is getting
further away FROM another thing. "Diverge" (one path gets further FROM
another), "disarray" (the room is getting further FROM being tidy),
"disarm" (the arms are carried away FROM the person who had them), and
so on. When you disarm someone, you aren't taking arms /to/ them or
/than/ them, but /from/ them.

Doth that helpst?
--
Richard Heathfield
Email: rjh at cpax dot org dot uk
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Sig line 4 vacant - apply within
Whiskers
2017-11-21 15:44:47 UTC
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Post by HVS
The thread on this has reminded me of a recurring problem, so I'm asking for
suggestions.
Personally, I'm not remotely fussed which form of "different from/than/to"
people use, and I don't notice which one's used when I'm reading or hearing
it. Consequently, I have trouble remembering which one form is the one that
annoys some people to a quite remarkable extent, and which one isn't.
When I'm writing the sort of reports that I write, I'm trying to transmit
meaning rather than to open a grammar or usage argument, and so I try to
avoid forms that potentially trigger outraged offence. (Even if the disputed
usage is entirely defendable, I'd rather not have a discussion of, say, which
form of dormer window is historically appropriate for Georgian buildings
sidetracked down the rabbit-hole into an argument about "correct" usage.)
Because of the long thread on this, I'm currently aware that "different
from" is the non-outrage-triggering form. I'm willing to bet, though, that
in a few months' time I'll have forgotten it, and will once more have to haul
down Fowler's to check it again.
Anyone suggest a trick for remembering that the form I want is "different
from"? (ISTR trying "it's the one that would come first in an alphabetical
list of possibilities", but that didn't stick in my mind.)
'Different' has moved away from being 'the same'.
--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
Janet
2017-11-21 15:55:38 UTC
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Post by HVS
Anyone suggest a trick for remembering that the form I want is "different
from"?
Feathers are different from fur but they all have an F.


Janet.
g***@gmail.com
2017-11-21 16:47:26 UTC
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Post by HVS
The thread on this has reminded me of a recurring problem, so I'm asking for
suggestions.
Personally, I'm not remotely fussed which form of "different from/than/to"
people use, and I don't notice which one's used when I'm reading or hearing
it. Consequently, I have trouble remembering which one form is the one that
annoys some people to a quite remarkable extent, and which one isn't.
The verb phrase is "to differ from".
Have you come across the phrase "to differ than"?

I can't see how "than" applies.
HVS
2017-11-21 17:30:33 UTC
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Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by HVS
The thread on this has reminded me of a recurring problem, so I'm
asking for suggestions.
Personally, I'm not remotely fussed which form of "different
from/than/to" people use, and I don't notice which one's used when I'm
reading or hearing it. Consequently, I have trouble remembering which
one form is the one that annoys some people to a quite remarkable
extent, and which one isn't.
The verb phrase is "to differ from".
Have you come across the phrase "to differ than"?
I can't see how "than" applies.
As I explained, apart from adopting the non-controversial form so that I'm
not waving red rags in front of people who get upset about it, I really,
honestly could not care less about the rationale for objecting to "different
than", and I have zero interest in debating the issue.

Sorry.
--
Cheers, Harvey
CanEng (30yrs) and BrEng (34yrs), indiscriminately mixed
grabber
2017-11-21 20:30:20 UTC
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Post by HVS
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by HVS
The thread on this has reminded me of a recurring problem, so I'm
asking for suggestions.
Personally, I'm not remotely fussed which form of "different
from/than/to" people use, and I don't notice which one's used when I'm
reading or hearing it. Consequently, I have trouble remembering which
one form is the one that annoys some people to a quite remarkable
extent, and which one isn't.
The verb phrase is "to differ from".
Have you come across the phrase "to differ than"?
I can't see how "than" applies.
As I explained, apart from adopting the non-controversial form so that I'm
not waving red rags in front of people who get upset about it, I really,
honestly could not care less about the rationale for objecting to "different
than", and I have zero interest in debating the issue.
Yebbut I think grandadkipling's point is not that this is necessarily a
"correct" argument for preferring "from" but a potentially memorable
one, which is what you say you are in need of.
HVS
2017-11-21 21:03:44 UTC
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Post by grabber
Post by HVS
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by HVS
The thread on this has reminded me of a recurring problem, so I'm
asking for suggestions.
Personally, I'm not remotely fussed which form of "different
from/than/to" people use, and I don't notice which one's used when I'm
reading or hearing it. Consequently, I have trouble
remembering which
Post by grabber
Post by HVS
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by HVS
one form is the one that annoys some people to a quite
remarkable
Post by grabber
Post by HVS
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by HVS
extent, and which one isn't.
The verb phrase is "to differ from".
Have you come across the phrase "to differ than"?
I can't see how "than" applies.
As I explained, apart from adopting the non-controversial form so that I'm
not waving red rags in front of people who get upset about it, I really,
honestly could not care less about the rationale for objecting to "different
than", and I have zero interest in debating the issue.
Yebbut I think grandadkipling's point is not that this is
necessarily a
Post by grabber
"correct" argument for preferring "from" but a potentially
memorable
Post by grabber
one, which is what you say you are in need of.
How embarrassing - I missed that entirely; you're absolutely right.

Many apologies.
--
--
Cheers, Harvey
CanEng(30 years); BrEng (34 years),
indiscriminately mixed
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-11-21 18:35:24 UTC
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Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by HVS
The thread on this has reminded me of a recurring problem, so I'm asking for
suggestions.
Personally, I'm not remotely fussed which form of "different from/than/to"
people use, and I don't notice which one's used when I'm reading or hearing
it. Consequently, I have trouble remembering which one form is the one that
annoys some people to a quite remarkable extent, and which one isn't.
The verb phrase is "to differ from".
Have you come across the phrase "to differ than"?
I can't see how "than" applies.
I've not met the phrase "to differ than".

I have met "different than".

It is possible that people use it becuse "than" is correctly used in
describing specific differences.
For example:

He is taller than her.
She is a faster runner than her brother.
Fred is more intelligent that Jim.
etc.

Those are cases of one person being in some way "different than" someone
else.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
g***@gmail.com
2017-11-21 22:38:07 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by g***@gmail.com
The verb phrase is "to differ from".
Have you come across the phrase "to differ than"?
I can't see how "than" applies.
I've not met the phrase "to differ than".
I have met "different than".
It is possible that people use it becuse "than" is correctly used in
describing specific differences.
He is taller than her.
She is a faster runner than her brother.
Fred is more intelligent that Jim.
etc.
Those are cases of one person being in some way "different than" someone
else.
They are different FROM others because of their height. But their heights do not differ THAN other people's heights.

Sven is taller THAN Milosz; in that respect he differs FROM Milosz. In other words, Sven is different FROM Milosz.

The -er endings show comparison within one scale of measurement.
If people differ from others, we don't know how they differ.
g***@gmail.com
2017-11-21 22:40:06 UTC
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Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by g***@gmail.com
The verb phrase is "to differ from".
Have you come across the phrase "to differ than"?
I can't see how "than" applies.
I've not met the phrase "to differ than".
I have met "different than".
It is possible that people use it becuse "than" is correctly used in
describing specific differences.
He is taller than her.
She is a faster runner than her brother.
Fred is more intelligent that Jim.
etc.
Those are cases of one person being in some way "different than" someone
else.
They are different FROM others because of their height. But their heights do not differ THAN other people's heights.
Sven is taller THAN Milosz; in that respect he differs FROM Milosz. In other words, Sven is different FROM Milosz.
I wish I had stopped just here --- ;-)
Harrison Hill
2017-11-22 15:40:45 UTC
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Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by g***@gmail.com
The verb phrase is "to differ from".
Have you come across the phrase "to differ than"?
I can't see how "than" applies.
I've not met the phrase "to differ than".
I have met "different than".
It is possible that people use it becuse "than" is correctly used in
describing specific differences.
He is taller than her.
She is a faster runner than her brother.
Fred is more intelligent that Jim.
etc.
Those are cases of one person being in some way "different than" someone
else.
They are different FROM others because of their height. But their heights do not differ THAN other people's heights.
I cannot make any sense of that, and have no idea what is it trying
to say :(
Post by g***@gmail.com
Sven is taller THAN Milosz; in that respect he differs FROM Milosz. In other words, Sven is different FROM Milosz.
That I understand and is good BrE.
Post by g***@gmail.com
The -er endings show comparison within one scale of measurement.
If people differ from others, we don't know how they differ.
Peter Moylan
2017-11-22 01:19:20 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
I have met "different than".
It is possible that people use it becuse "than" is correctly used in
describing specific differences.
He is taller than her.
She is a faster runner than her brother.
Fred is more intelligent that Jim.
etc.
These are all examples of using a comparative. That means you have
produced an argument that supports using "more different than".

(Not that there are many situations where you would want to say that;
but in those few situations it is perfectly correct.)
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Mark Brader
2017-11-22 07:35:40 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
I have met "different than".
It is possible that people use it becuse "than" is correctly used in
He is taller than her...
These are all examples of using a comparative. That means you have
produced an argument that supports using "more different than".
As you know, "than" can also be a conjunction:

He is taller than she is.

Now consider:

1. He does it differently than Peter would.
2. He does it differently than Peter.
3. His method is different than Peter's.

I assume nobody objects to 1. My personal suspicion is that this gave
rise to 2 and in turn to 3.
--
Mark Brader "He added a 3-point lead" is pronounced
Toronto differently in Snooker than in Typography...
***@vex.net -- Liam Quin

My text in this article is in the public domain.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-11-22 07:43:04 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
I have met "different than".
It is possible that people use it becuse "than" is correctly used in
He is taller than her...
These are all examples of using a comparative. That means you have
produced an argument that supports using "more different than".
He is taller than she is.
1. He does it differently than Peter would.
2. He does it differently than Peter.
3. His method is different than Peter's.
I assume nobody objects to 1.
Hmm. If you assume that you've lived in North America too long.
Post by Mark Brader
My personal suspicion is that this gave
rise to 2 and in turn to 3.
--
athel
Mark Brader
2017-11-22 10:49:12 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Mark Brader
I assume nobody objects to 1.
Hmm. If you assume that you've lived in North America too long.
If I assume that, then what? :-)
--
Mark Brader | "To a guy, an RGB value is three bits rather than bytes.
Toronto | ...000 Black, 001 Blue, 010 Green, ..., 111 White."
***@vex.net |
s***@gmail.com
2017-12-05 02:12:38 UTC
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On Wednesday, November 22, 2017 at 2:49:19 AM UTC-8, Mark Brader wrote:

[sig-nificant comment]
Post by Mark Brader
"To a guy, an RGB value is three bits rather than bytes.
...000 Black, 001 Blue, 010 Green, ..., 111 White."
This system seems to be missing four values easily distinguished
by many guys:

Chrome, Rust, Primergray, and Primerblack.

/dps "pin-tucked isn't a color, though"

John Varela
2017-11-22 19:25:52 UTC
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On Wed, 22 Nov 2017 07:43:04 UTC, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Mark Brader
1. He does it differently than Peter would.
2. He does it differently than Peter.
3. His method is different than Peter's.
I assume nobody objects to 1.
Hmm. If you assume that you've lived in North America too long.
I take it you do object to 1. How would you express that thought?
--
John Varela
Peter Moylan
2017-11-22 11:09:04 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
I have met "different than".
It is possible that people use it becuse "than" is correctly used in
He is taller than her...
These are all examples of using a comparative. That means you have
produced an argument that supports using "more different than".
He is taller than she is.
1. He does it differently than Peter would.
2. He does it differently than Peter.
3. His method is different than Peter's.
I assume nobody objects to 1. My personal suspicion is that this gave
rise to 2 and in turn to 3.
I would object rather strenuously to 1. I accept that some people do say
that, but not where I live.

My spontaneous version of 1 would be "He does it differently from the
way Peter does."
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Mark Brader
2017-11-22 19:04:31 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
1. He does it differently than Peter would...
I assume nobody objects to 1.
I would object rather strenuously to 1. I accept that some people do say
that, but not where I live.
Huh? You can't say "He does it differently from Peter would"!
It has to be "than".
--
Mark Brader | "One reason that life is complex is that it has
Toronto | a real part and an imaginary part."
***@vex.net | --Andrew Koenig
Richard Tobin
2017-11-22 20:13:21 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
Post by Peter Moylan
1. He does it differently than Peter would...
I assume nobody objects to 1.
I would object rather strenuously to 1. I accept that some people do say
that, but not where I live.
Huh? You can't say "He does it differently from Peter would"!
It has to be "than".
"from how".

-- Richard
Mark Brader
2017-11-22 22:52:40 UTC
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Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Peter Moylan
1. He does it differently than Peter would...
I assume nobody objects to 1.
I would object rather strenuously to 1. I accept that some people do say
that, but not where I live.
(Oh, by the way, this means that I *do* do it differently than Peter would.
QED!)
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Mark Brader
Huh? You can't say "He does it differently from Peter would"!
It has to be "than".
"from how".
Too many words!
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "It's been proven. Places stay clean until somebody
***@vex.net | drops the first piece of litter." -- TTC poster

My text in this article is in the public domain.
Peter Moylan
2017-11-23 04:54:21 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Peter Moylan
1. He does it differently than Peter would...
I assume nobody objects to 1.
I would object rather strenuously to 1. I accept that some people do say
that, but not where I live.
(Oh, by the way, this means that I *do* do it differently than Peter would.
QED!)
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Mark Brader
Huh? You can't say "He does it differently from Peter would"!
It has to be "than".
"from how".
Too many words!
If that were our criterion for correctness, we'd have a lot of cryptic
sentences.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Dingbat
2017-11-23 05:02:10 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
Post by Peter Moylan
1. He does it differently than Peter would...
I assume nobody objects to 1.
I would object rather strenuously to 1. I accept that some people do say
that, but not where I live.
Huh? You can't say "He does it differently from Peter would"!
It has to be "than".
... but you can say "He does it differently from how Peter would".
Katy Jennison
2017-11-23 07:03:30 UTC
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Post by Dingbat
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Peter Moylan
1. He does it differently than Peter would...
I assume nobody objects to 1.
I would object rather strenuously to 1. I accept that some people do say
that, but not where I live.
Huh? You can't say "He does it differently from Peter would"!
It has to be "than".
... but you can say "He does it differently from how Peter would".
I wouldn't notice anything strange about a plain "He does it differently
from Peter."
--
Katy Jennison
m***@att.net
2017-11-21 23:13:15 UTC
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Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by HVS
The thread on this has reminded me of a recurring problem, so I'm asking for
suggestions.
Personally, I'm not remotely fussed which form of "different from/than/to"
people use, and I don't notice which one's used when I'm reading or hearing
it. Consequently, I have trouble remembering which one form is the one that
annoys some people to a quite remarkable extent, and which one isn't.
The verb phrase is "to differ from".
Have you come across the phrase "to differ than"?
I can't see how "than" applies.
Have ya come across 'to differ to'? Doesn't apply either, by that 'test'.
Dingbat
2017-11-22 22:22:13 UTC
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Post by g***@gmail.com
I'm not fussed which form of "different from/than/to" people use, and I
don't notice which one's used. Consequently, I have trouble remembering
which annoys people.
The verb phrase is "to differ from".
Have you come across the phrase "to differ than"?
I can't see how "than" applies.
A page on American Heritage Dictionary's website says:

My grandmother looks different than I remember.
My grandmother looks different from that old photograph of her.

When what follows is a clause, than can be the more elegant choice:
From works best when what follows is a noun or noun phrase:

http://www.dictionary.com/e/different-from-or-different-than/


The British use 'different to' (the ones who don't always use 'different
from'). Perhaps they have an explanation for when 'different to' seems
more elegant to them than 'different from'. They don't use 'different
than'. So how can the American express AHD's 1st example to the
British? The canonical way, that would make sense to Americans too, is:

My grandmother looks different from what I remember.
Mark Brader
2017-11-21 23:54:11 UTC
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Post by HVS
Anyone suggest a trick for remembering that the form I want is "different
from"?
My mother learned a mnemonic: "similar TO, different FROM".
--
Mark Brader | "Countries with strong economic ties tend
Toronto | not to fight each other"
***@vex.net | "$54.40 or fight" --Michael Wares
Peter Moylan
2017-11-22 01:21:36 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
Post by HVS
Anyone suggest a trick for remembering that the form I want is "different
from"?
My mother learned a mnemonic: "similar TO, different FROM".
Sorry. I should have read to the end of the thread.

This is always a dilemma for me. Should I read ahead to avoid making a
point that someone else has already made, or should I reply while I can
still remember which post I wanted to reply to?
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
musika
2017-11-22 01:57:06 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mark Brader
Post by HVS
Anyone suggest a trick for remembering that the form I want is "different
from"?
My mother learned a mnemonic: "similar TO, different FROM".
Sorry. I should have read to the end of the thread.
This is always a dilemma for me. Should I read ahead to avoid making a
point that someone else has already made, or should I reply while I can
still remember which post I wanted to reply to?
I would say, always read ahead. When you read a post you want to reply
to - mark it as Unread or add a Star and go back to it at the end.
--
Ray
UK
Joy Beeson
2017-11-24 02:02:17 UTC
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On Wed, 22 Nov 2017 12:21:36 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
This is always a dilemma for me. Should I read ahead to avoid making a
point that someone else has already made, or should I reply while I can
still remember which post I wanted to reply to?
You can do both. I started this message, then saved it as a draft.

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Now, having read the rest of the thread, I'm going to send it.
--
Joy Beeson, U.S.A., mostly central Hoosier,
some Northern Indiana, Upstate New York, Florida, and Hawaii
joy beeson at comcast dot net http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-11-22 06:44:15 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
Post by HVS
Anyone suggest a trick for remembering that the form I want is "different
from"?
My mother learned a mnemonic: "similar TO, different FROM".
My teachers learned me that one as well.
--
athel
Peter Moylan
2017-11-22 06:58:40 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Mark Brader
Post by HVS
Anyone suggest a trick for remembering that the form I want is "different
from"?
My mother learned a mnemonic: "similar TO, different FROM".
My teachers learned me that one as well.
My teachers learned me to talk proper.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
HVS
2017-11-22 08:04:20 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
Post by HVS
Anyone suggest a trick for remembering that the form I want is "different
from"?
My mother learned a mnemonic: "similar TO, different FROM".
That's useful ; thanks, Mark.
--
--
Cheers, Harvey
CanEng(30 years); BrEng (34 years),
indiscriminately mixed
Dingbat
2017-11-22 22:43:03 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
Post by HVS
Anyone suggest a trick for remembering that the form I want is "different
from"?
My mother learned a mnemonic: "similar TO, different FROM".
I like punny tricks.

Defer to vs differ from.

... or deferential to vs different from.
Peter Moylan
2017-11-22 01:15:25 UTC
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Post by HVS
Because of the long thread on this, I'm currently aware that "different
from" is the non-outrage-triggering form. I'm willing to bet, though, that
in a few months' time I'll have forgotten it, and will once more have to haul
down Fowler's to check it again.
Anyone suggest a trick for remembering that the form I want is "different
from"? (ISTR trying "it's the one that would come first in an alphabetical
list of possibilities", but that didn't stick in my mind.)
"Different from" is the opposite of "similar to".
to = closer from = further away
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
s***@my-deja.com
2017-11-22 16:42:40 UTC
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Post by HVS
The thread on this has reminded me of a recurring problem, so I'm asking for
suggestions.
Personally, I'm not remotely fussed which form of "different from/than/to"
people use, and I don't notice which one's used when I'm reading or hearing
it. Consequently, I have trouble remembering which one form is the one that
annoys some people to a quite remarkable extent, and which one isn't.
When I'm writing the sort of reports that I write, I'm trying to transmit
meaning rather than to open a grammar or usage argument, and so I try to
avoid forms that potentially trigger outraged offence. (Even if the disputed
usage is entirely defendable, I'd rather not have a discussion of, say, which
form of dormer window is historically appropriate for Georgian buildings
sidetracked down the rabbit-hole into an argument about "correct" usage.)
Because of the long thread on this, I'm currently aware that "different
from" is the non-outrage-triggering form. I'm willing to bet, though, that
in a few months' time I'll have forgotten it, and will once more have to haul
down Fowler's to check it again.
Anyone suggest a trick for remembering that the form I want is "different
from"? (ISTR trying "it's the one that would come first in an alphabetical
list of possibilities", but that didn't stick in my mind.)
--
Cheers, Harvey
CanEng (30yrs) and BrEng (34yrs), indiscriminately mixed
you have stated that you are looking for the correct FORM

Think of an anagram
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