Discussion:
Bomb
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Lothar Frings
2017-04-18 16:15:08 UTC
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In a story by I. Asimov I came across
the word "bomb" for a slow and boring
party. Google finds it as an AE word
for a failure, so that's consistent,
but for example a "bombshell" is a
sexy woman, AFAIR.[*] Is this use of
"bomb" still in use? The Asimov story
is from the 70s.

-----
[*] And for that matter, every German
word beginning with "Bomb..."
means something great.
Peter Young
2017-04-18 16:21:08 UTC
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Post by Lothar Frings
In a story by I. Asimov I came across
the word "bomb" for a slow and boring
party. Google finds it as an AE word
for a failure, so that's consistent,
but for example a "bombshell" is a
sexy woman, AFAIR.[*] Is this use of
"bomb" still in use? The Asimov story
is from the 70s.
-----
[*] And for that matter, every German
word beginning with "Bomb..."
means something great.
Transpondian. In AmE a show that bombs had failed. In BrE it would
mean that it's a great success.

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Ir)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Tony Cooper
2017-04-18 16:39:34 UTC
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Post by Peter Young
Post by Lothar Frings
In a story by I. Asimov I came across
the word "bomb" for a slow and boring
party. Google finds it as an AE word
for a failure, so that's consistent,
but for example a "bombshell" is a
sexy woman, AFAIR.[*] Is this use of
"bomb" still in use? The Asimov story
is from the 70s.
-----
[*] And for that matter, every German
word beginning with "Bomb..."
means something great.
Transpondian. In AmE a show that bombs had failed. In BrE it would
mean that it's a great success.
No, "bomb" is either "great" or "a failure" in AmE depending on
context.

"The party was da bomb". Great party. A slang usage employed by
people who refer to "dudes", but the use is declining. The "da" is
essential to this usage.

"The play was a bomb". It was a failure.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Lothar Frings
2017-04-18 18:29:16 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Peter Young
Post by Lothar Frings
In a story by I. Asimov I came across
the word "bomb" for a slow and boring
party. Google finds it as an AE word
for a failure, so that's consistent,
but for example a "bombshell" is a
sexy woman, AFAIR.[*] Is this use of
"bomb" still in use? The Asimov story
is from the 70s.
-----
[*] And for that matter, every German
word beginning with "Bomb..."
means something great.
Transpondian. In AmE a show that bombs had failed. In BrE it would
mean that it's a great success.
No, "bomb" is either "great" or "a failure" in AmE depending on
context.
One word with two contrary meanings???
musika
2017-04-18 18:34:47 UTC
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Post by Lothar Frings
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Peter Young
Post by Lothar Frings
In a story by I. Asimov I came across
the word "bomb" for a slow and boring
party. Google finds it as an AE word
for a failure, so that's consistent,
but for example a "bombshell" is a
sexy woman, AFAIR.[*] Is this use of
"bomb" still in use? The Asimov story
is from the 70s.
-----
[*] And for that matter, every German
word beginning with "Bomb..."
means something great.
Transpondian. In AmE a show that bombs had failed. In BrE it would
mean that it's a great success.
No, "bomb" is either "great" or "a failure" in AmE depending on
context.
One word with two contrary meanings???
Do not cleave to a single word lest it cleave you in twain.
He left and I was left behind
Clip the papers together then clip the corners off.

There are lots more.
--
Ray
UK
Lothar Frings
2017-04-18 18:52:56 UTC
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Post by musika
Post by Lothar Frings
One word with two contrary meanings???
Do not cleave to a single word lest it cleave you in twain.
He left and I was left behind
Clip the papers together then clip the corners off.
With _contrary_ meanings.
Let's take the "left" example:
This is as if "to leave" could mean
"to go away" and "to come".
Lewis
2017-04-19 02:14:12 UTC
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Post by Lothar Frings
Post by musika
Post by Lothar Frings
One word with two contrary meanings???
Do not cleave to a single word lest it cleave you in twain.
He left and I was left behind
Clip the papers together then clip the corners off.
With _contrary_ meanings.
Yes. Cleave means "stick together" and "split apart"

Leave means to go and to stay.

Clip means to attach and to cut.
Post by Lothar Frings
This is as if "to leave" could mean
"to go away" and "to come".
The opposite of an action can certainly be no action.
--
'Somewhere, A Crime Is Happening,' said Dorfl. --Feet of Clay
Tony Cooper
2017-04-18 18:46:36 UTC
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On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 11:29:16 -0700 (PDT), Lothar Frings
Post by Lothar Frings
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Peter Young
Post by Lothar Frings
In a story by I. Asimov I came across
the word "bomb" for a slow and boring
party. Google finds it as an AE word
for a failure, so that's consistent,
but for example a "bombshell" is a
sexy woman, AFAIR.[*] Is this use of
"bomb" still in use? The Asimov story
is from the 70s.
-----
[*] And for that matter, every German
word beginning with "Bomb..."
means something great.
Transpondian. In AmE a show that bombs had failed. In BrE it would
mean that it's a great success.
No, "bomb" is either "great" or "a failure" in AmE depending on
context.
One word with two contrary meanings???
Why do you delete the examples and then ask the question?

There are many contronyms in English.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
b***@aol.com
2017-04-18 19:08:22 UTC
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Post by Lothar Frings
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Peter Young
Post by Lothar Frings
In a story by I. Asimov I came across
the word "bomb" for a slow and boring
party. Google finds it as an AE word
for a failure, so that's consistent,
but for example a "bombshell" is a
sexy woman, AFAIR.[*] Is this use of
"bomb" still in use? The Asimov story
is from the 70s.
-----
[*] And for that matter, every German
word beginning with "Bomb..."
means something great.
Transpondian. In AmE a show that bombs had failed. In BrE it would
mean that it's a great success.
No, "bomb" is either "great" or "a failure" in AmE depending on
context.
One word with two contrary meanings???
Yes, the very definition of a contranym. In that case, the explanation could be that the metaphor inherent in "bomb" can be double, as bombs both illuminate the sky like fireworks and destroy everything.
CDB
2017-04-18 19:54:22 UTC
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Post by Lothar Frings
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Peter Young
Post by Lothar Frings
In a story by I. Asimov I came across
the word "bomb" for a slow and boring
party. Google finds it as an AE word
for a failure, so that's consistent,
but for example a "bombshell" is a
sexy woman, AFAIR.[*] Is this use of
"bomb" still in use? The Asimov story
is from the 70s.
-----
[*] And for that matter, every German
word beginning with "Bomb..."
means something great.
Transpondian. In AmE a show that bombs had failed. In BrE it would
mean that it's a great success.
No, "bomb" is either "great" or "a failure" in AmE depending on
context.
One word with two contrary meanings???
Sacré vieux farceur!

C'est en latin que se manifeste le mieux la division entre le profane et
le sacré; c'est aussi en latin qu'on découvre le caractère ambigu du «
sacré »: consacré aux dieux et chargé d'une souillure ineffaçable,
auguste et maudit, digne de vénération et suscitant l'horreur. Cette
double valeur est propre à sacer; elle contribue à distinguer sacer et
sanctus, car elle n'affecte à aucun degré l'adjectif apparenté sanctus.
É. BENVENISTE, Le Vocab. des instit. indo-européennes, Paris, éd. de
Minuit, t. 2, 1969, pp. 187-188.

It is in Latin that we can best see the distinction between profane and
sacred, and also in Latin that we find how ambiguous the word "sacré"
is: dedicated to the gods and forever stained with filth, honoured and
cursed, worthy of admiration and hair-raisingly terrible. This double
meaning is found in the Latin ancestor of the word, "sacer". (Etc.)

http://stella.atilf.fr/Dendien/scripts/tlfiv5/visusel.exe?12;s=3659885460;r=1;nat=;sol=1;
CDB
2017-04-18 20:19:13 UTC
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On 4/18/2017 3:54 PM, CDB wrote:

[extreme contronyms]
Post by CDB
C'est en latin que se manifeste le mieux la division entre le profane
et le sacré; c'est aussi en latin qu'on découvre le caractère ambigu
du « sacré »: consacré aux dieux et chargé d'une souillure
ineffaçable, auguste et maudit, digne de vénération et suscitant
l'horreur. Cette double valeur est propre à sacer; elle contribue à
distinguer sacer et sanctus, car elle n'affecte à aucun degré
l'adjectif apparenté sanctus. É. BENVENISTE, Le Vocab. des instit.
indo-européennes, Paris, éd. de Minuit, t. 2, 1969, pp. 187-188.
It is in Latin that we can best see the distinction between profane
and sacred, and also in Latin that we find how ambiguous the word
"sacré" is: dedicated to the gods and forever stained with filth,
honoured and cursed, worthy of admiration and hair-raisingly
terrible. This double meaning is found in the Latin ancestor of the
word, "sacer". (Etc.)
I don't like to correct the small stuff, but this is bad.

"... and also in Latin that we find out how ambiguous "the sacred" is ..."
b***@aol.com
2017-04-18 20:34:54 UTC
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Post by CDB
Post by Lothar Frings
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Peter Young
Post by Lothar Frings
In a story by I. Asimov I came across
the word "bomb" for a slow and boring
party. Google finds it as an AE word
for a failure, so that's consistent,
but for example a "bombshell" is a
sexy woman, AFAIR.[*] Is this use of
"bomb" still in use? The Asimov story
is from the 70s.
-----
[*] And for that matter, every German
word beginning with "Bomb..."
means something great.
Transpondian. In AmE a show that bombs had failed. In BrE it would
mean that it's a great success.
No, "bomb" is either "great" or "a failure" in AmE depending on
context.
One word with two contrary meanings???
Sacré vieux farceur!
C'est en latin que se manifeste le mieux la division entre le profane et
le sacré; c'est aussi en latin qu'on découvre le caractère ambigu du «
sacré »: consacré aux dieux et chargé d'une souillure ineffaçable,
auguste et maudit, digne de vénération et suscitant l'horreur. Cette
double valeur est propre à sacer; elle contribue à distinguer sacer et
sanctus, car elle n'affecte à aucun degré l'adjectif apparenté sanctus.
É. BENVENISTE, Le Vocab. des instit. indo-européennes, Paris, éd. de
Minuit, t. 2, 1969, pp. 187-188.
It is in Latin that we can best see the distinction between profane and
sacred, and also in Latin that we find how ambiguous the word "sacré"
is: dedicated to the gods and forever stained with filth, honoured and
cursed, worthy of admiration and hair-raisingly terrible. This double
meaning is found in the Latin ancestor of the word, "sacer". (Etc.)
Doesn't that apparent contradiction simply reflect the sharp
contrast between the different gods, and particularly between
"dei superi" and "dei inferi"?
Post by CDB
http://stella.atilf.fr/Dendien/scripts/tlfiv5/visusel.exe?12;s=3659885460;r=1;nat=;sol=1;
CDB
2017-04-19 11:30:37 UTC
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Post by CDB
Post by Lothar Frings
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Peter Young
In a story by I. Asimov I came across the word "bomb" for a
slow and boring party. Google finds it as an AE word for a
failure, so that's consistent, but for example a
"bombshell" is a sexy woman, AFAIR.[*] Is this use of
"bomb" still in use? The Asimov story is from the 70s.
----- [*] And for that matter, every German word beginning
with "Bomb..." means something great.
Transpondian. In AmE a show that bombs had failed. In BrE it
would mean that it's a great success.
No, "bomb" is either "great" or "a failure" in AmE depending
on context.
One word with two contrary meanings???
Sacré vieux farceur!
C'est en latin que se manifeste le mieux la division entre le
profane et le sacré; c'est aussi en latin qu'on découvre le
caractère ambigu du « sacré »: consacré aux dieux et chargé d'une
souillure ineffaçable, auguste et maudit, digne de vénération et
suscitant l'horreur. Cette double valeur est propre à sacer; elle
contribue à distinguer sacer et sanctus, car elle n'affecte à aucun
degré l'adjectif apparenté sanctus. É. BENVENISTE, Le Vocab. des
instit. indo-européennes, Paris, éd. de Minuit, t. 2, 1969, pp.
187-188.
It is in Latin that we can best see the distinction between profane
and sacred, and also in Latin that we find how ambiguous the word
"sacré" is: dedicated to the gods and forever stained with filth,
honoured and cursed, worthy of admiration and hair-raisingly
terrible. This double meaning is found in the Latin ancestor of
the word, "sacer". (Etc.)
Doesn't that apparent contradiction simply reflect the sharp contrast
between the different gods, and particularly between "dei superi" and
"dei inferi"?
Post by CDB
http://stella.atilf.fr/Dendien/scripts/tlfiv5/visusel.exe?12;s=3659885460;r=1;nat=;sol=1;
I would approach the question differently. I think polytheism is
simply a reflection of our partial apprehension of God,
which allows some people to take different aspects of God as separate
beings (Jesus, Mary, and Satan, for example). It seems to me that the
parable of the blind sages and the elephant is intended to point that out*.

It's still one word with two contrary meanings. I suppose "taboo" might
be an English parallel.
___________________________________________________
*Among other things. Wikipedia have an article on it, bless them.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blind_men_and_an_elephant
Peter Young
2017-04-18 20:52:53 UTC
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Post by Lothar Frings
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Peter Young
Post by Lothar Frings
In a story by I. Asimov I came across
the word "bomb" for a slow and boring
party. Google finds it as an AE word
for a failure, so that's consistent,
but for example a "bombshell" is a
sexy woman, AFAIR.[*] Is this use of
"bomb" still in use? The Asimov story
is from the 70s.
-----
[*] And for that matter, every German
word beginning with "Bomb..."
means something great.
Transpondian. In AmE a show that bombs had failed. In BrE it would
mean that it's a great success.
No, "bomb" is either "great" or "a failure" in AmE depending on
context.
One word with two contrary meanings???
"Cleave".

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Ir)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
HVS
2017-04-18 21:11:54 UTC
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On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 21:52:53 +0100, Peter Young
Post by Peter Young
Post by Lothar Frings
On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 17:21:08 +0100, Peter Young
Post by Peter Young
Post by Lothar Frings
In a story by I. Asimov I came across
the word "bomb" for a slow and boring
party. Google finds it as an AE word
for a failure, so that's consistent,
but for example a "bombshell" is a
sexy woman, AFAIR.[*] Is this use of
"bomb" still in use? The Asimov story
is from the 70s.
[*] And for that matter, every German
word beginning with "Bomb..."
means something great.
Transpondian. In AmE a show that bombs had failed. In BrE it would
mean that it's a great success.
No, "bomb" is either "great" or "a failure" in AmE depending on
context.
One word with two contrary meanings???
"Cleave".
"Sanction"
--
--
Cheers, Harvey
CanEng(30 years); BrEng (34 years),
indiscriminately mixed
John Varela
2017-04-19 01:09:59 UTC
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On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 21:11:54 UTC, HVS
Post by HVS
On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 21:52:53 +0100, Peter Young
Post by Peter Young
Post by Lothar Frings
On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 17:21:08 +0100, Peter Young
Post by Peter Young
Post by Lothar Frings
In a story by I. Asimov I came across
the word "bomb" for a slow and boring
party. Google finds it as an AE word
for a failure, so that's consistent,
but for example a "bombshell" is a
sexy woman, AFAIR.[*] Is this use of
"bomb" still in use? The Asimov story
is from the 70s.
[*] And for that matter, every German
word beginning with "Bomb..."
means something great.
Transpondian. In AmE a show that bombs had failed. In BrE it
would
Post by Peter Young
Post by Lothar Frings
Post by Peter Young
mean that it's a great success.
No, "bomb" is either "great" or "a failure" in AmE depending on
context.
One word with two contrary meanings???
"Cleave".
"Sanction"
"Cite". "Fast"
--
John Varela
Don Phillipson
2017-04-19 18:59:12 UTC
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Post by Lothar Frings
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Peter Young
Transpondian. In AmE a show that bombs had failed. In BrE it would
mean that it's a great success.
No, "bomb" is either "great" or "a failure" in AmE depending on
context.
One word with two contrary meanings???
Yes. One minor difference is that BrE uses bomb to mean a success
usually only as a noun (e.g.: "My new sports car goes like a bomb")
while AmE expresses failure just as often by the verb (e.g. "It
bombed on Broadway but was nevertheless filmed.")
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-19 19:08:28 UTC
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Post by Lothar Frings
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Peter Young
Post by Lothar Frings
In a story by I. Asimov I came across
the word "bomb" for a slow and boring
party. Google finds it as an AE word
for a failure, so that's consistent,
but for example a "bombshell" is a
sexy woman, AFAIR.[*] Is this use of
"bomb" still in use? The Asimov story
is from the 70s.
-----
[*] And for that matter, every German
word beginning with "Bomb..."
means something great.
Transpondian. In AmE a show that bombs had failed. In BrE it would
mean that it's a great success.
No, "bomb" is either "great" or "a failure" in AmE depending on
context.
One word with two contrary meanings???
You can tell da meaning by da colour of his skin.
--
Mick and Paddy are reading head stones at a nearby cemetery.
Mick says "Crikey! There's a bloke here who was 152!"
Paddy says "What's his name?"
Mick replies "Miles, from London!"
The Peeler
2017-04-19 19:32:41 UTC
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On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 20:08:28 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
You can tell da meaning by da colour of his skin.
One can always tell your idiocy by your idiotic input, Birdbrain!
--
More from Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) strange sociopathic
world:
"I don't use doors much."
MID: <***@red.lan>
bert
2017-04-19 20:55:09 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Mick and Paddy are reading head stones at a nearby cemetery.
Mick says "Crikey! There's a bloke here who was 152!"
Paddy says "What's his name?"
Mick replies "Miles, from London!"
Donald, from the Outer Hebrides, is visiting Glasgow.
On seeing a brass nameplate "D. Smith, ground flat",
he sighs, and says "Oh, what a terrible way to die."
--
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-19 21:48:47 UTC
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Post by bert
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Mick and Paddy are reading head stones at a nearby cemetery.
Mick says "Crikey! There's a bloke here who was 152!"
Paddy says "What's his name?"
Mick replies "Miles, from London!"
Donald, from the Outer Hebrides, is visiting Glasgow.
On seeing a brass nameplate "D. Smith, ground flat",
he sighs, and says "Oh, what a terrible way to die."
Groan....
--
They have Mother's day for Mothers and Father's day for Fathers -- so what do they have for Single Men?
Palm Sunday
The Peeler
2017-04-19 22:15:01 UTC
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On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 22:48:47 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Groan....
That word sums up your entire abnormal existence, Birdbrain!
--
Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson") on Pain:
"Pain is not harmful. The victim may well want rid of it, but it's
no reason for anyone to rush there".
(Courtesy of Mr Pounder)
John Varela
2017-04-19 01:07:04 UTC
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On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 16:39:34 UTC, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Peter Young
Post by Lothar Frings
In a story by I. Asimov I came across
the word "bomb" for a slow and boring
party. Google finds it as an AE word
for a failure, so that's consistent,
but for example a "bombshell" is a
sexy woman, AFAIR.[*] Is this use of
"bomb" still in use? The Asimov story
is from the 70s.
-----
[*] And for that matter, every German
word beginning with "Bomb..."
means something great.
Transpondian. In AmE a show that bombs had failed. In BrE it would
mean that it's a great success.
No, "bomb" is either "great" or "a failure" in AmE depending on
context.
"The party was da bomb". Great party. A slang usage employed by
people who refer to "dudes", but the use is declining. The "da" is
essential to this usage.
I've never heard that one. Of course, it's been a long time since I
went to that sort of party.

Are you sure your midwestern origin isn't leaking out and you're not
thinking of "Da Bears"?
Post by Tony Cooper
"The play was a bomb". It was a failure.
It's also a verb: "The play bombed".
--
John Varela
Tony Cooper
2017-04-19 03:12:05 UTC
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Post by John Varela
On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 16:39:34 UTC, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Peter Young
Post by Lothar Frings
In a story by I. Asimov I came across
the word "bomb" for a slow and boring
party. Google finds it as an AE word
for a failure, so that's consistent,
but for example a "bombshell" is a
sexy woman, AFAIR.[*] Is this use of
"bomb" still in use? The Asimov story
is from the 70s.
-----
[*] And for that matter, every German
word beginning with "Bomb..."
means something great.
Transpondian. In AmE a show that bombs had failed. In BrE it would
mean that it's a great success.
No, "bomb" is either "great" or "a failure" in AmE depending on
context.
"The party was da bomb". Great party. A slang usage employed by
people who refer to "dudes", but the use is declining. The "da" is
essential to this usage.
I've never heard that one. Of course, it's been a long time since I
went to that sort of party.
Are you sure your midwestern origin isn't leaking out and you're not
thinking of "Da Bears"?
I'm sure. Da Bears and Da Mayor are Chicagoisms, but Da Bomb probably
originated from Kris Kross's 1993 hip hop album titled "Da Bomb".
Kross is from Atlanta. However, Shawntae Harris, from Joliet IL -
whose stage name was "Da Brat" - contributed vocals to that album.

Kriss Kross was riding a wave of popularity at the time after the
double platinum Billboard-topping hit for 8 weeks of "Jump" and then
"Totally Krossed Out".

While Chicago may have influenced the "Da" part, the term "Da Bomb"
was not localized to Chicago or the Midwest.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Charles Bishop
2017-04-19 03:22:13 UTC
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Post by John Varela
On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 16:39:34 UTC, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Peter Young
Post by Lothar Frings
In a story by I. Asimov I came across
the word "bomb" for a slow and boring
party. Google finds it as an AE word
for a failure, so that's consistent,
but for example a "bombshell" is a
sexy woman, AFAIR.[*] Is this use of
"bomb" still in use? The Asimov story
is from the 70s.
-----
[*] And for that matter, every German
word beginning with "Bomb..."
means something great.
Transpondian. In AmE a show that bombs had failed. In BrE it would
mean that it's a great success.
No, "bomb" is either "great" or "a failure" in AmE depending on
context.
"The party was da bomb". Great party. A slang usage employed by
people who refer to "dudes", but the use is declining. The "da" is
essential to this usage.
I've never heard that one. Of course, it's been a long time since I
went to that sort of party.
Are you sure your midwestern origin isn't leaking out and you're not
thinking of "Da Bears"?
I've heard it on the west coast. Though I have a MWO, I haven't used "Da
Bears".
Post by John Varela
Post by Tony Cooper
"The play was a bomb". It was a failure.
It's also a verb: "The play bombed".
--
charles
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-04-18 17:34:49 UTC
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Post by Peter Young
Post by Lothar Frings
In a story by I. Asimov I came across
the word "bomb" for a slow and boring
party. Google finds it as an AE word
for a failure, so that's consistent,
but for example a "bombshell" is a
sexy woman, AFAIR.[*] Is this use of
"bomb" still in use? The Asimov story
is from the 70s.
-----
[*] And for that matter, every German
word beginning with "Bomb..."
means something great.
Transpondian. In AmE a show that bombs had failed. In BrE it would
mean that it's a great success.
I'm not sure about that. I think that in BrE if a show bombs it fails.

However, if it "goes down a bomb" it is a great success.

ODO BrE version (many senses snipped):
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/bomb

noun

informal A film, play, or other event that fails badly.
‘that bomb of an old movie’

verb

3 informal no object (of a film, play, or other event) fail badly.
‘it just became another big-budget film that bombed’

Phrases

go down a bomb

informal Be very well received.
‘those gigs we did went down a bomb’

go like a bomb

1 informal Be very successful.
‘the party went like a bomb’

So, "bomb": resounding success or resounding failure.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
bert
2017-04-18 16:28:46 UTC
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Post by Lothar Frings
In a story by I. Asimov I came across
the word "bomb" for a slow and boring
party. Google finds it as an AE word
for a failure, so that's consistent,
but for example a "bombshell" is a
sexy woman, AFAIR.[*] Is this use of
"bomb" still in use? The Asimov story
is from the 70s.
There is contradictory current usage. "It bombed" refers to
a film/play which drew few customers and derogatory reviews.
However, "it went down a bomb" refers to something which was
enthusiastically received. And while a "bombshell" is a sexy
woman, "that was a bombshell" refers to some unpleasant piece
of information which will wreck one's current plans.
--
Mark Brader
2017-04-18 23:54:20 UTC
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In a story by I. Asimov I came across the word "bomb" for a slow and boring
party.
What story, and what does the passage actually say?
--
Mark Brader, Toronto But that's what all the other
***@vex.net individualists are doing!
Lothar Frings
2017-04-19 06:13:46 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
In a story by I. Asimov I came across the word "bomb" for a slow and boring
party.
What story, and what does the passage actually say?
It's one of the "Black Widowers" stories,
"When No Man Pursueth", and says:

"Then he said, 'What do you think of the evening?'“
I said cautiously, 'Oh well, sort of slow,' because
for all I knew he was the hostess' lover and I didn't
want to be needlessly offensive. “And he said,
'I think it's a bomb. It's too formal and that
doesn't fit the American scene these days.'

The scene is on a boring party, the narrator
is an author who explains how he came into
contact with a certain editor ("he").

The whole book is here:
<https://de.scribd.com/doc/235788919/Isaac-Asimov-Black-Widowers-2-More-Tales-of-the-Black-Widowers>
Mark Brader
2017-04-19 06:28:14 UTC
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Post by Lothar Frings
Post by Mark Brader
What story, and what does the passage actually say?
It's one of the "Black Widowers" stories,
"Then he said, 'What do you think of the evening?'"
I said cautiously, 'Oh well, sort of slow,' because
for all I knew he was the hostess' lover and I didn't
want to be needlessly offensive. "And he said,
'I think it's a bomb. It's too formal and that
doesn't fit the American scene these days.'
Then yes, the character is staying that it's failed badly.
--
Mark Brader | "This was followed by a vocal response which
Toronto | would now be reserved for kicking a ball in a net."
***@vex.net | --Derrick Beckett
Richard Heathfield
2017-04-19 06:37:28 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
Post by Lothar Frings
Post by Mark Brader
What story, and what does the passage actually say?
It's one of the "Black Widowers" stories,
"Then he said, 'What do you think of the evening?'"
I said cautiously, 'Oh well, sort of slow,' because
for all I knew he was the hostess' lover and I didn't
want to be needlessly offensive. "And he said,
'I think it's a bomb. It's too formal and that
doesn't fit the American scene these days.'
Then yes, the character is staying that it's failed badly.
Perhaps the character should have left instead of staying.

(The character, by the way, is Isaac Asimov himself, who has hidden
himself beneath a very thin veneer.)
--
Richard Heathfield
Email: rjh at cpax dot org dot uk
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Sig line 4 vacant - apply within
Lothar Frings
2017-04-19 08:57:04 UTC
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Post by Richard Heathfield
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Lothar Frings
Post by Mark Brader
What story, and what does the passage actually say?
It's one of the "Black Widowers" stories,
"Then he said, 'What do you think of the evening?'"
I said cautiously, 'Oh well, sort of slow,' because
for all I knew he was the hostess' lover and I didn't
want to be needlessly offensive. "And he said,
'I think it's a bomb. It's too formal and that
doesn't fit the American scene these days.'
Then yes, the character is staying that it's failed badly.
Perhaps the character should have left instead of staying.
(The character, by the way, is Isaac Asimov himself, who has hidden
himself beneath a very thin veneer.)
Yes, Asimov says so in the afterword which
follows each Black Widower story and
in some cases is more fun to read than the
story itself. They tend to be a little lengthy
which Asimov eventually explained (AFAIR
in "Opus 300").
Robert Bannister
2017-04-23 23:23:43 UTC
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Post by Lothar Frings
Post by Mark Brader
In a story by I. Asimov I came across the word "bomb" for a slow and boring
party.
What story, and what does the passage actually say?
It's one of the "Black Widowers" stories,
"Then he said, 'What do you think of the evening?'“
I said cautiously, 'Oh well, sort of slow,' because
for all I knew he was the hostess' lover and I didn't
want to be needlessly offensive. “And he said,
'I think it's a bomb. It's too formal and that
doesn't fit the American scene these days.'
The scene is on a boring party, the narrator
is an author who explains how he came into
contact with a certain editor ("he").
<https://de.scribd.com/doc/235788919/Isaac-Asimov-Black-Widowers-2-More-Tales-of-the-Black-Widowers>
That looks like the usual meaning of "bomb" (mainly of theatre plays): a
failure.
--
Robert B. born England a long time ago;
Western Australia since 1972
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