Discussion:
Initials at the End
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a***@gmail.com
2017-05-18 16:18:52 UTC
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When writing letters for someone else, a secretary usually ends the letter
with variations of initials (e.g. TMD:jcrd or TMD/jcrd). Sometimes I've
just seen one set of initials though (e.g. :jcrd or /jcrd, or even :JCRD or
/JCRD). Can someone provide the rules of using these ... what are they
called anyway? (Links are helpful as well.) Thanks a lot.
http://www.csus.edu/indiv/s/stanleyc/obe130/obe130notes.html
<quote>
Reference Information: Reference initials: If you compose and dictate
the letter,
but someone else prepares the printed copy, both
individuals' initials should appear at the bottom of
the letter.
The composer's initials are in all capitals with no
punctuation followed by a slash or colon
Then the preparer's initials in small letters.
Reference Information: Reference initials: If you do everything,
You do not need to include reference initials.
No reference initials means the signer has full
responsibility for the letter.
Very common with wordprocessors.
</quote>
jc
Hello, what about if my boss asked me to write a letter (boss didn't tell me what to write), boss looks it over and says its good and signs it. Where would I put my initials, and HOW? Does my boss's initials go there to even though she didn't tell me what to write?
Tony Cooper
2017-05-18 16:38:07 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
When writing letters for someone else, a secretary usually ends the letter
with variations of initials (e.g. TMD:jcrd or TMD/jcrd). Sometimes I've
just seen one set of initials though (e.g. :jcrd or /jcrd, or even :JCRD or
/JCRD). Can someone provide the rules of using these ... what are they
called anyway? (Links are helpful as well.) Thanks a lot.
http://www.csus.edu/indiv/s/stanleyc/obe130/obe130notes.html
<quote>
Reference Information: Reference initials: If you compose and dictate
the letter,
but someone else prepares the printed copy, both
individuals' initials should appear at the bottom of
the letter.
The composer's initials are in all capitals with no
punctuation followed by a slash or colon
Then the preparer's initials in small letters.
Reference Information: Reference initials: If you do everything,
You do not need to include reference initials.
No reference initials means the signer has full
responsibility for the letter.
Very common with wordprocessors.
</quote>
jc
Hello, what about if my boss asked me to write a letter (boss didn't tell me what to write), boss looks it over and says its good and signs it. Where would I put my initials, and HOW? Does my boss's initials go there to even though she didn't tell me what to write?
The style I followed was TC:js under the signature, with "TC" being my
initials and "js" being the initials of the person who typed the
letter.

If the boss signs it, the letter is from her regardless of who
composed or typed it.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Jerry Friedman
2017-05-18 16:41:48 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
When writing letters for someone else, a secretary usually ends the letter
with variations of initials (e.g. TMD:jcrd or TMD/jcrd). Sometimes I've
just seen one set of initials though (e.g. :jcrd or /jcrd, or even :JCRD or
/JCRD). Can someone provide the rules of using these ... what are they
called anyway? (Links are helpful as well.) Thanks a lot.
http://www.csus.edu/indiv/s/stanleyc/obe130/obe130notes.html
<quote>
Reference Information: Reference initials: If you compose and dictate
the letter,
but someone else prepares the printed copy, both
individuals' initials should appear at the bottom of
the letter.
The composer's initials are in all capitals with no
punctuation followed by a slash or colon
Then the preparer's initials in small letters.
Reference Information: Reference initials: If you do everything,
You do not need to include reference initials.
No reference initials means the signer has full
responsibility for the letter.
Very common with wordprocessors.
</quote>
jc
Hello, what about if my boss asked me to write a letter (boss didn't tell me what to write), boss looks it over and says its good and signs it. Where would I put my initials, and HOW? Does my boss's initials go there to even though she didn't tell me what to write?
I'm not an expert in business etiquette, but I'd guess you shouldn't
put your initials on it at all. However, if you're a secretary or
admin. assistant, then since you did the typing, it seems fair to put
the boss's intials in caps followed by yours in lower-case. If you're
not, I think the idea is that the boss wrote the letter and you shouldn't
counteract that.
--
JF:jf
Tony Cooper
2017-05-18 17:33:16 UTC
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On Thu, 18 May 2017 09:41:48 -0700 (PDT), Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by a***@gmail.com
When writing letters for someone else, a secretary usually ends the letter
with variations of initials (e.g. TMD:jcrd or TMD/jcrd). Sometimes I've
just seen one set of initials though (e.g. :jcrd or /jcrd, or even :JCRD or
/JCRD). Can someone provide the rules of using these ... what are they
called anyway? (Links are helpful as well.) Thanks a lot.
http://www.csus.edu/indiv/s/stanleyc/obe130/obe130notes.html
<quote>
Reference Information: Reference initials: If you compose and dictate
the letter,
but someone else prepares the printed copy, both
individuals' initials should appear at the bottom of
the letter.
The composer's initials are in all capitals with no
punctuation followed by a slash or colon
Then the preparer's initials in small letters.
Reference Information: Reference initials: If you do everything,
You do not need to include reference initials.
No reference initials means the signer has full
responsibility for the letter.
Very common with wordprocessors.
</quote>
jc
Hello, what about if my boss asked me to write a letter (boss didn't tell me what to write), boss looks it over and says its good and signs it. Where would I put my initials, and HOW? Does my boss's initials go there to even though she didn't tell me what to write?
I'm not an expert in business etiquette, but I'd guess you shouldn't
put your initials on it at all. However, if you're a secretary or
admin. assistant, then since you did the typing, it seems fair to put
the boss's intials in caps followed by yours in lower-case. If you're
not, I think the idea is that the boss wrote the letter and you shouldn't
counteract that.
I haven't been on the receiving end of many - any - business letters
other than form letters in the last decade or so. Back when
secretaries typed letters dictated by bosses, the initial custom was
very prevalent. If nothing else, it gave the boss an "out" for an
incorrect statement because he could claim the typist misheard what he
dictated.

I'm not sure what the current custom is, but a business can set their
own custom. If the poster is asking, then I assume the custom is that
initials should be used.

Why the poster doesn't just ask the boss, or a more experienced person
in that business, it beyond me.

I also remember receiving letters with "Dictated but not read" at the
bottom.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Sam Plusnet
2017-05-18 18:34:58 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
On Thu, 18 May 2017 09:41:48 -0700 (PDT), Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by a***@gmail.com
When writing letters for someone else, a secretary usually ends the letter
with variations of initials (e.g. TMD:jcrd or TMD/jcrd). Sometimes I've
just seen one set of initials though (e.g. :jcrd or /jcrd, or even :JCRD or
/JCRD). Can someone provide the rules of using these ... what are they
called anyway? (Links are helpful as well.) Thanks a lot.
http://www.csus.edu/indiv/s/stanleyc/obe130/obe130notes.html
<quote>
Reference Information: Reference initials: If you compose and dictate
the letter,
but someone else prepares the printed copy, both
individuals' initials should appear at the bottom of
the letter.
The composer's initials are in all capitals with no
punctuation followed by a slash or colon
Then the preparer's initials in small letters.
Reference Information: Reference initials: If you do everything,
You do not need to include reference initials.
No reference initials means the signer has full
responsibility for the letter.
Very common with wordprocessors.
</quote>
jc
Hello, what about if my boss asked me to write a letter (boss didn't tell me what to write), boss looks it over and says its good and signs it. Where would I put my initials, and HOW? Does my boss's initials go there to even though she didn't tell me what to write?
I'm not an expert in business etiquette, but I'd guess you shouldn't
put your initials on it at all. However, if you're a secretary or
admin. assistant, then since you did the typing, it seems fair to put
the boss's intials in caps followed by yours in lower-case. If you're
not, I think the idea is that the boss wrote the letter and you shouldn't
counteract that.
I haven't been on the receiving end of many - any - business letters
other than form letters in the last decade or so. Back when
secretaries typed letters dictated by bosses, the initial custom was
very prevalent. If nothing else, it gave the boss an "out" for an
incorrect statement because he could claim the typist misheard what he
dictated.
I'm not sure what the current custom is, but a business can set their
own custom. If the poster is asking, then I assume the custom is that
initials should be used.
Why the poster doesn't just ask the boss, or a more experienced person
in that business, it beyond me.
I also remember receiving letters with "Dictated but not read" at the
bottom.
"From the desk of..."
--
Sam Plusnet
Peter Moylan
2017-05-18 16:54:51 UTC
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When writing letters for someone else, a secretary usually ends the letter
with variations of initials (e.g. TMD:jcrd or TMD/jcrd). Sometimes I've
just seen one set of initials though (e.g. :jcrd or /jcrd, or even :JCRD or
/JCRD). Can someone provide the rules of using these ... what are they
called anyway? (Links are helpful as well.) Thanks a lot.
What is it about the replies in 1998 that you did not understand?
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
BugHunter
2017-05-18 17:01:49 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
When writing letters for someone else, a secretary usually ends the letter
with variations of initials (e.g. TMD:jcrd or TMD/jcrd). Sometimes I've
just seen one set of initials though (e.g. :jcrd or /jcrd, or even :JCRD or
/JCRD). Can someone provide the rules of using these ... what are they
called anyway? (Links are helpful as well.) Thanks a lot.
What is it about the replies in 1998 that you did not understand?
You react against the wrong one.
--
\ / http://nieuwsgroepen.tk
------------///-----------------------------
/ \ Bye, BugHunter
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