Discussion:
What does "tatted up" mean?
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uri
2008-08-31 17:14:55 UTC
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What does "tatted up" mean?
the Omrud
2008-08-31 17:18:16 UTC
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Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
I had never seen or heard this expression before, but it seems to mean
"covered in tattoos".
--
David
John O'Flaherty
2008-08-31 18:10:22 UTC
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On Sun, 31 Aug 2008 17:18:16 GMT, the Omrud
Post by the Omrud
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
I had never seen or heard this expression before, but it seems to mean
"covered in tattoos".
Some women use tattooing for permanent eyebrows or eyelashes... I
guest they would be tatted and tarted, if not tattered.
--
John
John Dean
2008-08-31 23:07:19 UTC
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Post by John O'Flaherty
On Sun, 31 Aug 2008 17:18:16 GMT, the Omrud
Post by the Omrud
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
I had never seen or heard this expression before, but it seems to
mean "covered in tattoos".
Some women use tattooing for permanent eyebrows or eyelashes... I
guest they would be tatted and tarted, if not tattered.
And singing "Put on your Tata little girlie"
--
John Dean
Oxford
Garrett Wollman
2008-09-01 00:45:07 UTC
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Post by the Omrud
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
I had never seen or heard this expression before, but it seems to mean
"covered in tattoos".
I would have guessed that it meant "decorated in poor taste" (based on
the known-to-me BrE gloss of "tat" as "cheap plastic decojunk" blended
with "tarted up", "decorated superficially").

-GAWollman
--
Garrett A. Wollman | The real tragedy of human existence is not that we are
***@csail.mit.edu| nasty by nature, but that a cruel structural asymmetry
Opinions not those | grants to rare events of meanness such power to shape
of MIT or CSAIL. | our history. - S.J. Gould, Ten Thousand Acts of Kindness
Purl Gurl
2008-09-01 01:19:00 UTC
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Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by the Omrud
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
I had never seen or heard this expression before, but it seems to mean
"covered in tattoos".
I would have guessed that it meant "decorated in poor taste" (based on
the known-to-me BrE gloss of "tat" as "cheap plastic decojunk" blended
with "tarted up", "decorated superficially").
I am sure you boys will remember this gal from
early last year.

Loading Image...

Loading Image...

Loading Image...

Loading Image...


She is not what I consider "decorated in poor taste".
--
Purl Gurl
--
So many are stumped by what slips right off the top of my mind
like a man's bad fitting hairpiece.
Will
2008-09-01 21:15:50 UTC
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Post by Purl Gurl
Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by the Omrud
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
I had never seen or heard this expression before, but it seems to mean
"covered in tattoos".
I would have guessed that it meant "decorated in poor taste" (based on
the known-to-me BrE gloss of "tat" as "cheap plastic decojunk" blended
with "tarted up", "decorated superficially").
I am sure you boys will remember this gal from
early last year.
Not me.
Post by Purl Gurl
http://www.purlgurl.net/aue/show_go_12.jpg
http://www.purlgurl.net/aue/show_go_13.jpg
http://www.purlgurl.net/aue/show_go_14.jpg
http://www.purlgurl.net/aue/show_go_15.jpg
She is not what I consider "decorated in poor taste".
Not so much poor, as execrable.

Will.
Don Aitken
2008-09-01 17:16:28 UTC
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Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by the Omrud
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
I had never seen or heard this expression before, but it seems to mean
"covered in tattoos".
I would have guessed that it meant "decorated in poor taste" (based on
the known-to-me BrE gloss of "tat" as "cheap plastic decojunk" blended
with "tarted up", "decorated superficially").
There is also a more extended sense, equivalent to "stuff", which is
at least twenty years old, and probably more. Those who make a habit
of foraging in skips sometimes call it "tatting".
--
Don Aitken
Mail to the From: address is not read.
To email me, substitute "clara.co.uk" for "freeuk.com"
the Omrud
2008-09-01 17:38:22 UTC
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Post by Don Aitken
Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by the Omrud
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
I had never seen or heard this expression before, but it seems to mean
"covered in tattoos".
I would have guessed that it meant "decorated in poor taste" (based on
the known-to-me BrE gloss of "tat" as "cheap plastic decojunk" blended
with "tarted up", "decorated superficially").
There is also a more extended sense, equivalent to "stuff", which is
at least twenty years old, and probably more. Those who make a habit
of foraging in skips sometimes call it "tatting".
Rag and bone men were known as "tatters" in some parts of England.
--
David
Raymond O'Hara
2008-09-01 06:28:54 UTC
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Post by the Omrud
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
I had never seen or heard this expression before, but it seems to mean
"covered in tattoos".
--
David
Having tattoos,
Its reletively newAmerican slang.
Purl Gurl
2008-08-31 18:01:55 UTC
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Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
Two common meanings. Most historical common meaning
is tatting, a type of handmade lace. Very pretty!

Loading Image...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tatting


A more modern slang meaning, but not historical,
is to be tattooed. Not so very pretty.

This is my husband, "tatted up". He does wear
nice penny loafers, though.

Loading Image...
--
Purl Gurl
--
So many are stumped by what slips right off the top of my mind
like a man's bad fitting hairpiece.
Don Phillipson
2008-08-31 17:18:38 UTC
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Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
You will not get good replies to this sort of question
unless you provide the context/ source. If this were
an English text, we might think it a misprint for
"tarted up" = bedizened. But we do not know . . .
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
the Omrud
2008-08-31 19:38:01 UTC
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Post by Don Phillipson
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
You will not get good replies to this sort of question
unless you provide the context/ source. If this were
an English text, we might think it a misprint for
"tarted up" = bedizened. But we do not know . . .
In the vast majority of cases I agree with you and I was about to reply
similarly. However, I was surprised to find that "tatted up" has a
common modern meaning, which we old fogies were unaware of.
--
David
Peter Duncanson (BrE)
2008-08-31 21:16:21 UTC
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On Sun, 31 Aug 2008 19:38:01 GMT, the Omrud
Post by the Omrud
Post by Don Phillipson
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
You will not get good replies to this sort of question
unless you provide the context/ source. If this were
an English text, we might think it a misprint for
"tarted up" = bedizened. But we do not know . . .
In the vast majority of cases I agree with you and I was about to reply
similarly. However, I was surprised to find that "tatted up" has a
common modern meaning, which we old fogies were unaware of.
"Tat" is now a common abbreviation of "tattoo" in BrYouthE.

Judging from my cautious sampling of youth TV shows "tat" is
used more frequently than "tattoo".
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
tinwhistler
2008-09-01 17:42:11 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson (BrE)
On Sun, 31 Aug 2008 19:38:01 GMT, the Omrud
Post by the Omrud
Post by Don Phillipson
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
You will not get good replies to this sort of question
unless you provide the context/ source.   If this were
an English text, we might think it a misprint for
"tarted up" = bedizened.   But we do not know . . .
In the vast majority of cases I agree with you and I was about to reply
similarly.  However, I was surprised to find that "tatted up" has a
common modern meaning, which we old fogies were unaware of.
"Tat" is now a common abbreviation of "tattoo" in BrYouthE.
Judging from my cautious sampling of youth TV shows "tat" is
used more frequently than "tattoo".
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
So what would be the modern sense of TIT FOR TAT?
--
Aloha ~~~ Ozzie Maland ~~~ San Diego
R H Draney
2008-09-01 19:40:28 UTC
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Post by tinwhistler
Post by Peter Duncanson (BrE)
"Tat" is now a common abbreviation of "tattoo" in BrYouthE.
Judging from my cautious sampling of youth TV shows "tat" is
used more frequently than "tattoo".
So what would be the modern sense of TIT FOR TAT?
I'm sure Kira has some pictures....r
--
Evelyn Wood just looks at the pictures.
Purl Gurl
2008-09-02 00:45:06 UTC
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Post by R H Draney
Post by tinwhistler
Post by Peter Duncanson (BrE)
"Tat" is now a common abbreviation of "tattoo" in BrYouthE.
Judging from my cautious sampling of youth TV shows "tat" is
used more frequently than "tattoo".
So what would be the modern sense of TIT FOR TAT?
I'm sure Kira has some pictures.
You really do not want me to go there.
--
Purl Gurl
--
So many are stumped by what slips right off the top of my mind
like a man's bad fitting hairpiece.
R H Draney
2008-09-02 05:28:58 UTC
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Post by Purl Gurl
Post by R H Draney
Post by tinwhistler
So what would be the modern sense of TIT FOR TAT?
I'm sure Kira has some pictures.
You really do not want me to go there.
Perhaps not, but when has that ever stopped you?...r
--
Evelyn Wood just looks at the pictures.
Chuck Riggs
2008-09-02 15:03:33 UTC
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Post by R H Draney
Post by Purl Gurl
Post by R H Draney
Post by tinwhistler
So what would be the modern sense of TIT FOR TAT?
I'm sure Kira has some pictures.
You really do not want me to go there.
Perhaps not, but when has that ever stopped you?...r
I'm disappointed in Kira. I know what tits look like, but tats?
--
Regards,

Chuck Riggs
Near Dublin, Ireland
Oleg Lego <>
2008-09-01 20:00:23 UTC
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Post by tinwhistler
Post by Peter Duncanson (BrE)
On Sun, 31 Aug 2008 19:38:01 GMT, the Omrud
Post by the Omrud
Post by Don Phillipson
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
You will not get good replies to this sort of question
unless you provide the context/ source.   If this were
an English text, we might think it a misprint for
"tarted up" = bedizened.   But we do not know . . .
In the vast majority of cases I agree with you and I was about to reply
similarly.  However, I was surprised to find that "tatted up" has a
common modern meaning, which we old fogies were unaware of.
"Tat" is now a common abbreviation of "tattoo" in BrYouthE.
Judging from my cautious sampling of youth TV shows "tat" is
used more frequently than "tattoo".
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
So what would be the modern sense of TIT FOR TAT?
Same as it was for the young lady named Pratt.
--
roses are #FF0000
violets are #0000FF
all my base
are belong to you
Oleg Lego <>
2008-09-01 04:51:50 UTC
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Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
If it's from a passage in an older book, it might well mean "decorated
with lace".
--
roses are #FF0000
violets are #0000FF
all my base
are belong to you
b***@warren.k12.in.us
2017-05-17 13:29:17 UTC
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Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-05-17 16:36:07 UTC
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Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
Yes, and? What light can you shed on this important question nine years later?
--
athel
Don Phillipson
2017-05-18 15:10:17 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
Yes, and? What light can you shed on this important question nine years later?
It is an interesting case of multiple back-formation.
We started (it appears) with the adjective tatty, meaning
tawdry or untidy. This prompted a noun tat, for instances
of this character: and in turn a verb tat, for decorating or
ornamenting something with characteristically tatty materials.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
CDB
2017-05-18 16:24:10 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
Yes, and? What light can you shed on this important question nine years later?
It is an interesting case of multiple back-formation. We started (it
appears) with the adjective tatty, meaning tawdry or untidy. This
prompted a noun tat, for instances of this character: and in turn a
verb tat, for decorating or ornamenting something with
characteristically tatty materials.
I can't help thinking there's a connection with "tatters", apparently
from a Scandinavian word meaning "rags". To "tat" or make lace, is
another possibility, perhaps a back-formation from "tatting", "lace
woven from thread". And there it stops, or goes back around the circle:
OOO.
HVS
2017-05-17 17:26:41 UTC
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Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
Did the OP ever find out, I wonder....
--
Cheers, Harvey
CanE (30 years) & BrE (34 years),
indiscriminately mixed
Peter T. Daniels
2017-05-17 17:59:38 UTC
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Post by HVS
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
Did the OP ever find out, I wonder....
There's no evidence that uri came back to see the answers given initially by
Omrud and Purl Gurl.

It was only 9 years ago; several current posters contributed to the thread.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-05-17 18:19:29 UTC
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Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
It probably means "tangled up" or something like that.

"Tatted" means made "tatty".

OED:

tatted, adj.

Etymology: Probably an alteration (with suffix substitution: see -ed
suffix2) of tatty adj.1

orig. Sc.
= tatty adj.1

tatty, adj.1
Sc.

Of hair, tangled, matted; of an animal or skin, shaggy with matted
hair.

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/tatty

tatty
adjective
informal

1 Worn and shabby; in poor condition.
‘tatty upholstered furniture’

1.1 Of poor quality.
‘the generally tatty output of the current Celtic revival’

Origin
Early 16th century (originally Scots, in the sense ‘tangled, matted,
shaggy’): apparently ultimately related to Old English tættec ‘rag’,
of Germanic origin; compare with tattered.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Richard Tobin
2017-05-17 18:27:14 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
It probably means "tangled up" or something like that.
More likely "tattooed".

-- Richard
bill van
2017-05-17 21:04:03 UTC
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Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
It probably means "tangled up" or something like that.
More likely "tattooed".
Yes. I'm not sure if this usage has been around for some time or came
with the recent popularity of tattoos -- I'm guessing the latter -- but
a web search for "tatted up" returns almost nothing but results that say
it means having many tattoos.
--
bill
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-05-17 22:22:41 UTC
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Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
It probably means "tangled up" or something like that.
More likely "tattooed".
-- Richard
Yes. I've looked at the original thread using Google Groups.
I have to be embarrassed or to have a laugh. I'll settle for an awkward
laugh.

My contribution 9 years ago was:

<quote>
"Tat" is now a common abbreviation of "tattoo" in BrYouthE.

Judging from my cautious sampling of youth TV shows "tat" is
used more frequently than "tattoo".
<endquote>
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
RH Draney
2017-05-18 04:43:06 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
<quote>
"Tat" is now a common abbreviation of "tattoo" in BrYouthE.
Judging from my cautious sampling of youth TV shows "tat" is
used more frequently than "tattoo".
<endquote>
Supplanted in the intervening nine years by "ink"....r
Robert Bannister
2017-05-18 00:27:42 UTC
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Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
It probably means "tangled up" or something like that.
More likely "tattooed".
With "up"? Surely a misprint for "tarted up".
--
Robert B. born England a long time ago;
Western Australia since 1972
Peter T. Daniels
2017-05-18 11:38:16 UTC
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Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
It probably means "tangled up" or something like that.
More likely "tattooed".
With "up"? Surely a misprint for "tarted up".
Seems inevitable for those who don't know what <r> is for.
Tony Cooper
2017-05-17 18:38:33 UTC
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On Wed, 17 May 2017 19:19:29 +0100, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
It probably means "tangled up" or something like that.
"Tatted" means made "tatty".
tatted, adj.
Etymology: Probably an alteration (with suffix substitution: see -ed
suffix2) of tatty adj.1
orig. Sc.
= tatty adj.1
tatty, adj.1
Sc.
Of hair, tangled, matted; of an animal or skin, shaggy with matted
hair.
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/tatty
tatty
adjective
informal
1 Worn and shabby; in poor condition.
‘tatty upholstered furniture’
1.1 Of poor quality.
‘the generally tatty output of the current Celtic revival’
Origin
Early 16th century (originally Scots, in the sense ‘tangled, matted,
shaggy’): apparently ultimately related to Old English tættec ‘rag’,
of Germanic origin; compare with tattered.
Things and places are tatted up in the UK in a misguided effort to
make them look more attractive. People are tatted up in the US in a
misguided effort to make them look more attractive.

At least the UK tatting-up can be easily undone by a change of decor,
but the US tats require laser removal or skin grafts.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Janet
2017-05-17 18:55:51 UTC
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In article <***@4ax.com>, tonycooper214
@gmail.com says...
Post by Tony Cooper
On Wed, 17 May 2017 19:19:29 +0100, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
It probably means "tangled up" or something like that.
"Tatted" means made "tatty".
tatted, adj.
Etymology: Probably an alteration (with suffix substitution: see -ed
suffix2) of tatty adj.1
orig. Sc.
= tatty adj.1
tatty, adj.1
Sc.
Of hair, tangled, matted; of an animal or skin, shaggy with matted
hair.
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/tatty
tatty
adjective
informal
1 Worn and shabby; in poor condition.
?tatty upholstered furniture?
1.1 Of poor quality.
?the generally tatty output of the current Celtic revival?
Origin
Early 16th century (originally Scots, in the sense ?tangled, matted,
shaggy?): apparently ultimately related to Old English tættec ?rag?,
of Germanic origin; compare with tattered.
Things and places are tatted up in the UK in a misguided effort to
make them look more attractive.
That's tarted up, not tatted up

Janet
Tony Cooper
2017-05-17 19:42:00 UTC
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Post by Janet
@gmail.com says...
Post by Tony Cooper
On Wed, 17 May 2017 19:19:29 +0100, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
It probably means "tangled up" or something like that.
"Tatted" means made "tatty".
tatted, adj.
Etymology: Probably an alteration (with suffix substitution: see -ed
suffix2) of tatty adj.1
orig. Sc.
= tatty adj.1
tatty, adj.1
Sc.
Of hair, tangled, matted; of an animal or skin, shaggy with matted
hair.
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/tatty
tatty
adjective
informal
1 Worn and shabby; in poor condition.
?tatty upholstered furniture?
1.1 Of poor quality.
?the generally tatty output of the current Celtic revival?
Origin
Early 16th century (originally Scots, in the sense ?tangled, matted,
shaggy?): apparently ultimately related to Old English tættec ?rag?,
of Germanic origin; compare with tattered.
Things and places are tatted up in the UK in a misguided effort to
make them look more attractive.
That's tarted up, not tatted up
Janet
You don't add tat when tarting-up?
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
musika
2017-05-17 18:44:58 UTC
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On Wed, 17 May 2017 06:29:17 -0700 (PDT),
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
It probably means "tangled up" or something like that.
"Tatted" means made "tatty".
Depending on context it could also mean having a lot of tattoos.
--
Ray
UK
Peter T. Daniels
2017-05-17 21:12:37 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Don Phillipson
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
It probably means "tangled up" or something like that.
"Tatted" means made "tatty".
tatted, adj.
Etymology: Probably an alteration (with suffix substitution: see -ed
suffix2) of tatty adj.1
orig. Sc.
= tatty adj.1
tatty, adj.1
Sc.
Of hair, tangled, matted; of an animal or skin, shaggy with matted
hair.
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/tatty
tatty
adjective
informal
1 Worn and shabby; in poor condition.
‘tatty upholstered furniture’
1.1 Of poor quality.
‘the generally tatty output of the current Celtic revival’
Origin
Early 16th century (originally Scots, in the sense ‘tangled, matted,
shaggy’): apparently ultimately related to Old English tættec ‘rag’,
of Germanic origin; compare with tattered.
On August 31, 2008, you wrote:


On Sun, 31 Aug 2008 19:38:01 GMT, the Omrud
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Don Phillipson
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
You will not get good replies to this sort of question
unless you provide the context/ source. If this were
an English text, we might think it a misprint for
"tarted up" = bedizened. But we do not know . . .
In the vast majority of cases I agree with you and I was about to reply
similarly. However, I was surprised to find that "tatted up" has a
common modern meaning, which we old fogies were unaware of.
"Tat" is now a common abbreviation of "tattoo" in BrYouthE.

Judging from my cautious sampling of youth TV shows "tat" is
used more frequently than "tattoo".
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
b***@aol.com
2017-05-18 18:17:19 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson (BrE)
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Don Phillipson
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
It probably means "tangled up" or something like that.
"Tatted" means made "tatty".
tatted, adj.
Etymology: Probably an alteration (with suffix substitution: see -ed
suffix2) of tatty adj.1
orig. Sc.
= tatty adj.1
tatty, adj.1
Sc.
Of hair, tangled, matted; of an animal or skin, shaggy with matted
hair.
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/tatty
tatty
adjective
informal
1 Worn and shabby; in poor condition.
‘tatty upholstered furniture’
1.1 Of poor quality.
‘the generally tatty output of the current Celtic revival’
Origin
Early 16th century (originally Scots, in the sense ‘tangled, matted,
shaggy’): apparently ultimately related to Old English tættec ‘rag’,
of Germanic origin; compare with tattered.
On Sun, 31 Aug 2008 19:38:01 GMT, the Omrud
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Don Phillipson
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
You will not get good replies to this sort of question
unless you provide the context/ source. If this were
an English text, we might think it a misprint for
"tarted up" = bedizened. But we do not know . . .
In the vast majority of cases I agree with you and I was about to reply
similarly. However, I was surprised to find that "tatted up" has a
common modern meaning, which we old fogies were unaware of.
"Tat" is now a common abbreviation of "tattoo" in BrYouthE.
Judging from my cautious sampling of youth TV shows "tat" is
used more frequently than "tattoo".
Still, does an English girl about to have her breast tattoed have
a tit for tat?
Post by Peter Duncanson (BrE)
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Robert Bannister
2017-05-19 00:24:11 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by b***@aol.com
Still, does an English girl about to have her breast tattoed have
a tit for tat?
But surely she asks for a tat for tit.
--
Robert B. born England a long time ago;
Western Australia since 1972
Dingbat
2017-05-19 01:56:04 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter Duncanson (BrE)
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Don Phillipson
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
It probably means "tangled up" or something like that.
"Tatted" means made "tatty".
tatted, adj.
Etymology: Probably an alteration (with suffix substitution: see -ed
suffix2) of tatty adj.1
orig. Sc.
= tatty adj.1
tatty, adj.1
Sc.
Of hair, tangled, matted; of an animal or skin, shaggy with matted
hair.
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/tatty
tatty
adjective
informal
1 Worn and shabby; in poor condition.
‘tatty upholstered furniture’
1.1 Of poor quality.
‘the generally tatty output of the current Celtic revival’
Origin
Early 16th century (originally Scots, in the sense ‘tangled, matted,
shaggy’): apparently ultimately related to Old English tættec ‘rag’,
of Germanic origin; compare with tattered.
On Sun, 31 Aug 2008 19:38:01 GMT, the Omrud
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Don Phillipson
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
You will not get good replies to this sort of question
unless you provide the context/ source. If this were
an English text, we might think it a misprint for
"tarted up" = bedizened. But we do not know . . .
In the vast majority of cases I agree with you and I was about to reply
similarly. However, I was surprised to find that "tatted up" has a
common modern meaning, which we old fogies were unaware of.
"Tat" is now a common abbreviation of "tattoo" in BrYouthE.
Judging from my cautious sampling of youth TV shows "tat" is
used more frequently than "tattoo".
Still, does an English girl about to have her breast tattoed have
a tit for tat?
Punny! If the artist is professional, he does it without finding it titillating





... and if the girl's name is Bebe, he takes care not to say Boobie.
b***@aol.com
2017-05-19 16:32:13 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dingbat
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter Duncanson (BrE)
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Don Phillipson
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
It probably means "tangled up" or something like that.
"Tatted" means made "tatty".
tatted, adj.
Etymology: Probably an alteration (with suffix substitution: see -ed
suffix2) of tatty adj.1
orig. Sc.
= tatty adj.1
tatty, adj.1
Sc.
Of hair, tangled, matted; of an animal or skin, shaggy with matted
hair.
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/tatty
tatty
adjective
informal
1 Worn and shabby; in poor condition.
‘tatty upholstered furniture’
1.1 Of poor quality.
‘the generally tatty output of the current Celtic revival’
Origin
Early 16th century (originally Scots, in the sense ‘tangled, matted,
shaggy’): apparently ultimately related to Old English tættec ‘rag’,
of Germanic origin; compare with tattered.
On Sun, 31 Aug 2008 19:38:01 GMT, the Omrud
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Don Phillipson
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
You will not get good replies to this sort of question
unless you provide the context/ source. If this were
an English text, we might think it a misprint for
"tarted up" = bedizened. But we do not know . . .
In the vast majority of cases I agree with you and I was about to reply
similarly. However, I was surprised to find that "tatted up" has a
common modern meaning, which we old fogies were unaware of.
"Tat" is now a common abbreviation of "tattoo" in BrYouthE.
Judging from my cautious sampling of youth TV shows "tat" is
used more frequently than "tattoo".
Still, does an English girl about to have her breast tattoed have
a tit for tat?
Punny! If the artist is professional, he does it without finding it titillating
... and if the girl's name is Bebe, he takes care not to say Boobie.
Thus avoiding the booby trap, so to say.

"Bebe" is not a girl's name, it's just an unfortunate short version of my
male alias, Bebercito, as displayed in this NG.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-05-19 17:03:51 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Dingbat
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter Duncanson (BrE)
Post by Don Phillipson
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
It probably means "tangled up" or something like that.> > > >> > > >
"Tatted" means made "tatty".
tatted, adj.
Etymology: Probably an alteration (with suffix substitution: see -ed
suffix2) of tatty adj.1
orig. Sc. = tatty adj.1
tatty, adj.1
Sc.
Of hair, tangled, matted; of an animal or skin, shaggy with matted
hair.
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/tatty
tatty
adjective
informal
1 Worn and shabby; in poor condition.
‘tatty upholstered furniture’
1.1 Of poor quality.
‘the generally tatty output of the current Celtic revival’
Origin Early 16th century (originally Scots, in the sense ‘tangled, matted,
shaggy’): apparently ultimately related to Old English tættec ‘rag’,
of Germanic origin; compare with tattered.
On Sun, 31 Aug 2008 19:38:01 GMT, the Omrud
Post by Don Phillipson
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
You will not get good replies to this sort of question
unless you provide the context/ source. If this were
an English text, we might think it a misprint for
"tarted up" = bedizened. But we do not know . . .
In the vast majority of cases I agree with you and I was about to
reply> > > >similarly. However, I was surprised to find that "tatted
up" has a> > > >common modern meaning, which we old fogies were unaware
of.
"Tat" is now a common abbreviation of "tattoo" in BrYouthE.
Judging from my cautious sampling of youth TV shows "tat" is
used more frequently than "tattoo".
Still, does an English girl about to have her breast tattoed have
a tit for tat?
Punny! If the artist is professional, he does it without finding it titillating
... and if the girl's name is Bebe, he takes care not to say Boobie.
Thus avoiding the booby trap, so to say.
"Bebe" is not a girl's name,
I'm surprised that Dingbat thought it was. Maybe he was confusing it
with Baby or Babe, which are not exactly names but are sometimes used
(not by me) to address girls.
Post by b***@aol.com
it's just an unfortunate short version of my
male alias, Bebercito, as displayed in this NG.
I always assumed it was a male ending. Following up from our recent
conversation, I didn't take you for a Provençal speaker, but if you
were (and if you followed the Mistralian norm) I could take -o as a
feminine ending, but that would be pretty farfetched.

Sorry to bore everything else with a topic no one else is interested
in, but you asked me why I said the norme classique was imitation
Catalan. If you compare the following example in norme mistralienne:

Tóuti li persouno naisson libro e egalo en dignita e en dre. Soun
doutado de resoun e de counsciènci e li fau agi entre éli em' un
esperit de fraternita.

with the same according to the norme classique:

Totei lei personas naisson liuras e egalas en dignitat e en drech. Son
dotadas de rason e de consciéncia e li cau agir entre elei amb un
esperit de fraternitat.

the resemblance to Catalan of the latter is obvious, complete with the
word "amb", which is normally a dead giveaway that you are reading
Catalan. Note that the b isn't pronounced either in Provençal or
Catalan: it's just there to look nice, and the word is pronounced [əm]
or even just [m]. It seems obvious to me that the inventors of the
norme classique had a political agenda, and wanted to promote the
notion that Occitan is just one language and is very closely linked to
Catalan.

The Catalan version of the quotation seems to be

Tots els éssers humans neixen lliures i iguals en dignitat i en drets.
Són dotats de raó i de consciència, i han de comportar-se fraternalment
els uns amb els altres.
--
athel
b***@aol.com
2017-05-19 18:58:52 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Dingbat
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter Duncanson (BrE)
Post by Don Phillipson
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
It probably means "tangled up" or something like that.> > > >> > > >
"Tatted" means made "tatty".
tatted, adj.
Etymology: Probably an alteration (with suffix substitution: see -ed
suffix2) of tatty adj.1
orig. Sc. = tatty adj.1
tatty, adj.1
Sc.
Of hair, tangled, matted; of an animal or skin, shaggy with matted
hair.
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/tatty
tatty
adjective
informal
1 Worn and shabby; in poor condition.
‘tatty upholstered furniture’
1.1 Of poor quality.
‘the generally tatty output of the current Celtic revival’
Origin Early 16th century (originally Scots, in the sense ‘tangled, matted,
shaggy’): apparently ultimately related to Old English tættec ‘rag’,
of Germanic origin; compare with tattered.
On Sun, 31 Aug 2008 19:38:01 GMT, the Omrud
Post by Don Phillipson
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
You will not get good replies to this sort of question
unless you provide the context/ source. If this were
an English text, we might think it a misprint for
"tarted up" = bedizened. But we do not know . . .
In the vast majority of cases I agree with you and I was about to
reply> > > >similarly. However, I was surprised to find that "tatted
up" has a> > > >common modern meaning, which we old fogies were unaware
of.
"Tat" is now a common abbreviation of "tattoo" in BrYouthE.
Judging from my cautious sampling of youth TV shows "tat" is
used more frequently than "tattoo".
Still, does an English girl about to have her breast tattoed have
a tit for tat?
Punny! If the artist is professional, he does it without finding it titillating
... and if the girl's name is Bebe, he takes care not to say Boobie.
Thus avoiding the booby trap, so to say.
"Bebe" is not a girl's name,
I'm surprised that Dingbat thought it was. Maybe he was confusing it
with Baby or Babe, which are not exactly names but are sometimes used
(not by me) to address girls.
Post by b***@aol.com
it's just an unfortunate short version of my
male alias, Bebercito, as displayed in this NG.
I always assumed it was a male ending. Following up from our recent
conversation, I didn't take you for a Provençal speaker, but if you
were (and if you followed the Mistralian norm) I could take -o as a
feminine ending, but that would be pretty farfetched.
Sorry to bore everything else with a topic no one else is interested
in, but you asked me why I said the norme classique was imitation
Tóuti li persouno naisson libro e egalo en dignita e en dre. Soun
doutado de resoun e de counsciènci e li fau agi entre éli em' un
esperit de fraternita.
Totei lei personas naisson liuras e egalas en dignitat e en drech. Son
dotadas de rason e de consciéncia e li cau agir entre elei amb un
esperit de fraternitat.
the resemblance to Catalan of the latter is obvious, complete with the
word "amb", which is normally a dead giveaway that you are reading
Catalan. Note that the b isn't pronounced either in Provençal or
Catalan: it's just there to look nice, and the word is pronounced [əm]
or even just [m]. It seems obvious to me that the inventors of the
norme classique had a political agenda, and wanted to promote the
notion that Occitan is just one language and is very closely linked to
Catalan.
The Catalan version of the quotation seems to be
Tots els éssers humans neixen lliures i iguals en dignitat i en drets.
Són dotats de raó i de consciència, i han de comportar-se fraternalment
els uns amb els altres.
Mistralian seems indeed to bear some resemblance to Catalan,
except maybe for the lack of the characteristic Catalan X's.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
--
athel
b***@aol.com
2017-05-19 19:06:18 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Dingbat
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter Duncanson (BrE)
Post by Don Phillipson
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
It probably means "tangled up" or something like that.> > > >> > > >
"Tatted" means made "tatty".
tatted, adj.
Etymology: Probably an alteration (with suffix substitution: see -ed
suffix2) of tatty adj.1
orig. Sc. = tatty adj.1
tatty, adj.1
Sc.
Of hair, tangled, matted; of an animal or skin, shaggy with matted
hair.
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/tatty
tatty
adjective
informal
1 Worn and shabby; in poor condition.
‘tatty upholstered furniture’
1.1 Of poor quality.
‘the generally tatty output of the current Celtic revival’
Origin Early 16th century (originally Scots, in the sense ‘tangled, matted,
shaggy’): apparently ultimately related to Old English tættec ‘rag’,
of Germanic origin; compare with tattered.
On Sun, 31 Aug 2008 19:38:01 GMT, the Omrud
Post by Don Phillipson
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
You will not get good replies to this sort of question
unless you provide the context/ source. If this were
an English text, we might think it a misprint for
"tarted up" = bedizened. But we do not know . . .
In the vast majority of cases I agree with you and I was about to
reply> > > >similarly. However, I was surprised to find that "tatted
up" has a> > > >common modern meaning, which we old fogies were unaware
of.
"Tat" is now a common abbreviation of "tattoo" in BrYouthE.
Judging from my cautious sampling of youth TV shows "tat" is
used more frequently than "tattoo".
Still, does an English girl about to have her breast tattoed have
a tit for tat?
Punny! If the artist is professional, he does it without finding it titillating
... and if the girl's name is Bebe, he takes care not to say Boobie.
Thus avoiding the booby trap, so to say.
"Bebe" is not a girl's name,
I'm surprised that Dingbat thought it was. Maybe he was confusing it
with Baby or Babe, which are not exactly names but are sometimes used
(not by me) to address girls.
Post by b***@aol.com
it's just an unfortunate short version of my
male alias, Bebercito, as displayed in this NG.
I always assumed it was a male ending. Following up from our recent
conversation, I didn't take you for a Provençal speaker, but if you
were (and if you followed the Mistralian norm) I could take -o as a
feminine ending, but that would be pretty farfetched.
Sorry to bore everything else with a topic no one else is interested
in, but you asked me why I said the norme classique was imitation
Tóuti li persouno naisson libro e egalo en dignita e en dre. Soun
doutado de resoun e de counsciènci e li fau agi entre éli em' un
esperit de fraternita.
Totei lei personas naisson liuras e egalas en dignitat e en drech. Son
dotadas de rason e de consciéncia e li cau agir entre elei amb un
esperit de fraternitat.
the resemblance to Catalan of the latter is obvious, complete with the
word "amb", which is normally a dead giveaway that you are reading
Catalan. Note that the b isn't pronounced either in Provençal or
Catalan: it's just there to look nice, and the word is pronounced [əm]
or even just [m]. It seems obvious to me that the inventors of the
norme classique had a political agenda, and wanted to promote the
notion that Occitan is just one language and is very closely linked to
Catalan.
The Catalan version of the quotation seems to be
Tots els éssers humans neixen lliures i iguals en dignitat i en drets.
Són dotats de raó i de consciència, i han de comportar-se fraternalment
els uns amb els altres.
Mistralian seems indeed to bear some resemblance to Catalan,
except maybe for the lack of the characteristic Catalan X's.
ERRATUM: "*Norme classique*..."
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
--
athel
Harrison Hill
2017-05-19 19:08:48 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Dingbat
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter Duncanson (BrE)
Post by Don Phillipson
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
It probably means "tangled up" or something like that.> > > >> > > >
"Tatted" means made "tatty".
tatted, adj.
Etymology: Probably an alteration (with suffix substitution: see -ed
suffix2) of tatty adj.1
orig. Sc. = tatty adj.1
tatty, adj.1
Sc.
Of hair, tangled, matted; of an animal or skin, shaggy with matted
hair.
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/tatty
tatty
adjective
informal
1 Worn and shabby; in poor condition.
‘tatty upholstered furniture’
1.1 Of poor quality.
‘the generally tatty output of the current Celtic revival’
Origin Early 16th century (originally Scots, in the sense ‘tangled, matted,
shaggy’): apparently ultimately related to Old English tættec ‘rag’,
of Germanic origin; compare with tattered.
On Sun, 31 Aug 2008 19:38:01 GMT, the Omrud
Post by Don Phillipson
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
You will not get good replies to this sort of question
unless you provide the context/ source. If this were
an English text, we might think it a misprint for
"tarted up" = bedizened. But we do not know . . .
In the vast majority of cases I agree with you and I was about to
reply> > > >similarly. However, I was surprised to find that "tatted
up" has a> > > >common modern meaning, which we old fogies were unaware
of.
"Tat" is now a common abbreviation of "tattoo" in BrYouthE.
Judging from my cautious sampling of youth TV shows "tat" is
used more frequently than "tattoo".
Still, does an English girl about to have her breast tattoed have
a tit for tat?
Punny! If the artist is professional, he does it without finding it titillating
... and if the girl's name is Bebe, he takes care not to say Boobie.
Thus avoiding the booby trap, so to say.
"Bebe" is not a girl's name,
I'm surprised that Dingbat thought it was. Maybe he was confusing it
with Baby or Babe, which are not exactly names but are sometimes used
(not by me) to address girls.
Post by b***@aol.com
it's just an unfortunate short version of my
male alias, Bebercito, as displayed in this NG.
I always assumed it was a male ending. Following up from our recent
conversation, I didn't take you for a Provençal speaker, but if you
were (and if you followed the Mistralian norm) I could take -o as a
feminine ending, but that would be pretty farfetched.
Sorry to bore everything else with a topic no one else is interested
in... [snip]
I'm not interested in it, but I love it to occur. Please
don't be least apologetic; and keep these threads coming :)
Peter Moylan
2017-05-20 12:43:19 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
I always assumed it was a male ending. Following up from our recent
conversation, I didn't take you for a Provençal speaker, but if you
were (and if you followed the Mistralian norm) I could take -o as a
feminine ending, but that would be pretty farfetched.
Sorry to bore everything else with a topic no one else is interested
in... [snip]
I'm not interested in it, but I love it to occur. Please
don't be least apologetic; and keep these threads coming :)
+1. I'm learning things.

It's a pity I didn't learn them earlier. I think my ignorance once made
me offend someone in northern Spain. (A restaurant in Figueres.) I saw
"amb" on the menu, didn't know what it meant, and used "con" when I
ordered. The waiter got a funny look on his face. Either I came across
as an imperialistic southerner, or "con" means what it means further north.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Sam Plusnet
2017-05-19 23:33:19 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by b***@aol.com
"Bebe" is not a girl's name, it's just an unfortunate short version of my
male alias, Bebercito, as displayed in this NG.
The only Bebe I've heard of was Bebe Daniels (she may be better known in
the UK than in the US).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bebe_Daniels
--
Sam Plusnet
Tony Cooper
2017-05-20 01:35:00 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by b***@aol.com
"Bebe" is not a girl's name, it's just an unfortunate short version of my
male alias, Bebercito, as displayed in this NG.
The only Bebe I've heard of was Bebe Daniels (she may be better known in
the UK than in the US).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bebe_Daniels
Funny how we associate names. "Bebe", to me, is associated with
Charles "Bebe" Reboza. That Bebe was a Florida banker who was
long-time friend of Richard Nixon. He was later accused of being
Nixon's "bagman" in accepting covert payments to Nixon.

Never heard of Bebe Daniels.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Mack A. Damia
2017-05-20 01:43:24 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Fri, 19 May 2017 21:35:00 -0400, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by b***@aol.com
"Bebe" is not a girl's name, it's just an unfortunate short version of my
male alias, Bebercito, as displayed in this NG.
The only Bebe I've heard of was Bebe Daniels (she may be better known in
the UK than in the US).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bebe_Daniels
Funny how we associate names. "Bebe", to me, is associated with
Charles "Bebe" Reboza. That Bebe was a Florida banker who was
long-time friend of Richard Nixon. He was later accused of being
Nixon's "bagman" in accepting covert payments to Nixon.
Never heard of Bebe Daniels.
"Life with the Lyons"?

Ben Lyon and Bebe Daniels.

Don't know about the USA, but they had a program on BBC Radio and
later television.

"During World War II, when the United States was still neutral, Lyon
and his wife, actress Bebe Daniels, settled in London. The couple,
along with the comedian Vic Oliver, starred in the radio series Hi,
Gang!, which ran from 1940 to 1949. Hi Gang was succeeded in 1950 by
Life with the Lyons, which also featured their real life son Richard
and daughter Barbara, and had a run on BBC and independent television
from 1954 until 1960." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ben_Lyon


Peter T. Daniels
2017-05-20 03:16:46 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by b***@aol.com
"Bebe" is not a girl's name, it's just an unfortunate short version of my
male alias, Bebercito, as displayed in this NG.
The only Bebe I've heard of was Bebe Daniels (she may be better known in
the UK than in the US).
? She was a huge star in early musicals. I've never seen an English musical film,
however much I've wanted to find out what the big deal about Ivor Novello was.
Post by Sam Plusnet
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bebe_Daniels
Richard Yates
2017-05-20 03:38:28 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by b***@aol.com
"Bebe" is not a girl's name, it's just an unfortunate short version of my
male alias, Bebercito, as displayed in this NG.
The only Bebe I've heard of was Bebe Daniels (she may be better known in
the UK than in the US).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bebe_Daniels
Actress and dancer, Bebe Neuwirth.
Mack A. Damia
2017-05-20 03:50:48 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Fri, 19 May 2017 20:38:28 -0700, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by b***@aol.com
"Bebe" is not a girl's name, it's just an unfortunate short version of my
male alias, Bebercito, as displayed in this NG.
The only Bebe I've heard of was Bebe Daniels (she may be better known in
the UK than in the US).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bebe_Daniels
Actress and dancer, Bebe Neuwirth.
When I was a kid in the 1950s and 1960s, the term "bebe" was fairly
common as a greeting, as in "Hey bebe!"; "Come on, bebe!" might be
yelled at a sporting event. Haven't heard it used that way for many
moons.

It is a nickname (variation of "Baby"). Bebe Neuwirth's name is
Beatrice; Bebe Daniels' name was Phyllis Virginia Daniels.
Ross
2017-05-20 05:33:44 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by b***@aol.com
"Bebe" is not a girl's name, it's just an unfortunate short version of my
male alias, Bebercito, as displayed in this NG.
The only Bebe I've heard of was Bebe Daniels (she may be better known in
the UK than in the US).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bebe_Daniels
Actress and dancer, Bebe Neuwirth.
Bebe Barron, who with husband Louis, created (in their apartment
kitchen) the first all-electronic film soundtrack (Forbidden Planet, 1956).
RH Draney
2017-05-20 08:55:30 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ross
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by b***@aol.com
"Bebe" is not a girl's name, it's just an unfortunate short version of my
male alias, Bebercito, as displayed in this NG.
The only Bebe I've heard of was Bebe Daniels (she may be better known in
the UK than in the US).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bebe_Daniels
Actress and dancer, Bebe Neuwirth.
Bebe Barron, who with husband Louis, created (in their apartment
kitchen) the first all-electronic film soundtrack (Forbidden Planet, 1956).
One of the girls in the fourth-grade class of Stan, Kyle, Cartman and
Kenny is called Bebe, with the "baybay" pronunciation...she was the
first in her class to grow breasts....r
Peter T. Daniels
2017-05-20 14:24:32 UTC
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Post by Richard Yates
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by b***@aol.com
"Bebe" is not a girl's name, it's just an unfortunate short version of my
male alias, Bebercito, as displayed in this NG.
The only Bebe I've heard of was Bebe Daniels (she may be better known in
the UK than in the US).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bebe_Daniels
Actress and dancer, Bebe Neuwirth.
Well ... dancer. She was perfectly cast as the emotionless Lilith (Frasier's
ex-wife) in *Cheers*. Some years later I saw her in the Broadway revival of
*Chicago*, where it became apparent that her performance on *Cheers* seemed
not to have been an act. The same could be said of her current gig on *Madam
Secretary*.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-05-20 09:25:52 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by b***@aol.com
"Bebe" is not a girl's name, it's just an unfortunate short version of my
male alias, Bebercito, as displayed in this NG.
The only Bebe I've heard of was Bebe Daniels (she may be better known
in the UK than in the US).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bebe_Daniels
I wouldn't have remembered her name, but I rememember "Life with the
Lyons", a popular television programme in my youf (though I think I
only saw it in other people's houses).

Was she related to PTD or to Mack A. Damia's wife?
--
athel
Mack A. Damia
2017-05-20 11:24:54 UTC
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On Sat, 20 May 2017 11:25:52 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Was she related to PTD or to Mack A. Damia's wife?
in my recent book where I describe the new writing system I have
discovered, "Crayon-on-Wallpaper" (the writing on the wall) I also
present graphic pictures of Mack's bouncy-bouncy relationship with his
wife.
--
P.T. Daniel
Peter T. Daniels
2017-05-20 14:29:50 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by b***@aol.com
"Bebe" is not a girl's name, it's just an unfortunate short version of my
male alias, Bebercito, as displayed in this NG.
The only Bebe I've heard of was Bebe Daniels (she may be better known
in the UK than in the US).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bebe_Daniels
I wouldn't have remembered her name, but I rememember "Life with the
Lyons", a popular television programme in my youf (though I think I
only saw it in other people's houses).
Was she related to PTD or to Mack A. Damia's wife?
The s was added by TJD during WWII because he got tired of being told by the
Army that his last name was Thomas and his first name was Daniel. Neither of
his brothers (John the eldest, Mike the youngest) felt the same need.

No relation to Harry Truman's son-in-law, either.

OTOH it's not impossible that (on the other side of the family) Norbert Wiener
is related. But not Anthony Weiner.

Recently I've occasionally been being addressed as "Daniel Peters." Don't quite see why.
Dingbat
2017-05-21 13:27:21 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by b***@aol.com
"Bebe" is not a girl's name, it's just an unfortunate short version of my
male alias, Bebercito, as displayed in this NG.
The only Bebe I've heard of was Bebe Daniels (she may be better known
in the UK than in the US).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bebe_Daniels
I wouldn't have remembered her name, but I rememember "Life with the
Lyons", a popular television programme in my youf (though I think I
only saw it in other people's houses).
Was she related to PTD or to Mack A. Damia's wife?
The s was added by TJD during WWII because he got tired of being told by the
Army that his last name was Thomas and his first name was Daniel. Neither of
his brothers (John the eldest, Mike the youngest) felt the same need.
No relation to Harry Truman's son-in-law, either.
OTOH it's not impossible that (on the other side of the family) Norbert Wiener
is related. But not Anthony Weiner.
Recently I've occasionally been being addressed as "Daniel Peters." Don't quite see why.
Seems Petrograde:-)
Robert Bannister
2017-05-20 00:23:09 UTC
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Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Dingbat
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter Duncanson (BrE)
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Don Phillipson
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
It probably means "tangled up" or something like that.
"Tatted" means made "tatty".
tatted, adj.
Etymology: Probably an alteration (with suffix substitution: see -ed
suffix2) of tatty adj.1
orig. Sc.
= tatty adj.1
tatty, adj.1
Sc.
Of hair, tangled, matted; of an animal or skin, shaggy with matted
hair.
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/tatty
tatty
adjective
informal
1 Worn and shabby; in poor condition.
‘tatty upholstered furniture’
1.1 Of poor quality.
‘the generally tatty output of the current Celtic revival’
Origin
Early 16th century (originally Scots, in the sense ‘tangled, matted,
shaggy’): apparently ultimately related to Old English tættec ‘rag’,
of Germanic origin; compare with tattered.
On Sun, 31 Aug 2008 19:38:01 GMT, the Omrud
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Don Phillipson
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
You will not get good replies to this sort of question
unless you provide the context/ source. If this were
an English text, we might think it a misprint for
"tarted up" = bedizened. But we do not know . . .
In the vast majority of cases I agree with you and I was about to reply
similarly. However, I was surprised to find that "tatted up" has a
common modern meaning, which we old fogies were unaware of.
"Tat" is now a common abbreviation of "tattoo" in BrYouthE.
Judging from my cautious sampling of youth TV shows "tat" is
used more frequently than "tattoo".
Still, does an English girl about to have her breast tattoed have
a tit for tat?
Punny! If the artist is professional, he does it without finding it titillating
... and if the girl's name is Bebe, he takes care not to say Boobie.
Thus avoiding the booby trap, so to say.
"Bebe" is not a girl's name
Well, maybe not an official name, but it was the childhood nickname and
later stage name of actress Bebe Daniels, whom some of us at least remember.


it's just an unfortunate short version of my
Post by b***@aol.com
male alias, Bebercito, as displayed in this NG.
--
Robert B. born England a long time ago;
Western Australia since 1972
Snidely
2017-05-25 06:30:47 UTC
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Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Dingbat
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter Duncanson (BrE)
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Don Phillipson
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
It probably means "tangled up" or something like that.
"Tatted" means made "tatty".
tatted, adj.
Etymology: Probably an alteration (with suffix substitution: see -ed
suffix2) of tatty adj.1
orig. Sc.
= tatty adj.1
tatty, adj.1
Sc.
Of hair, tangled, matted; of an animal or skin, shaggy with matted
hair.
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/tatty
tatty
adjective
informal
1 Worn and shabby; in poor condition.
‘tatty upholstered furniture’
1.1 Of poor quality.
‘the generally tatty output of the current Celtic revival’
Origin
Early 16th century (originally Scots, in the sense ‘tangled, matted,
shaggy’): apparently ultimately related to Old English tættec ‘rag’,
of Germanic origin; compare with tattered.
On Sun, 31 Aug 2008 19:38:01 GMT, the Omrud
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Don Phillipson
Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
You will not get good replies to this sort of question
unless you provide the context/ source. If this were
an English text, we might think it a misprint for
"tarted up" = bedizened. But we do not know . . .
In the vast majority of cases I agree with you and I was about to reply
similarly. However, I was surprised to find that "tatted up" has a
common modern meaning, which we old fogies were unaware of.
"Tat" is now a common abbreviation of "tattoo" in BrYouthE.
Judging from my cautious sampling of youth TV shows "tat" is
used more frequently than "tattoo".
Still, does an English girl about to have her breast tattoed have
a tit for tat?
Punny! If the artist is professional, he does it without finding it titillating
... and if the girl's name is Bebe, he takes care not to say Boobie.
Thus avoiding the booby trap, so to say.
"Bebe" is not a girl's name, it's just an unfortunate short version of my
male alias, Bebercito, as displayed in this NG.
And it's supplied by Google's aversion to displaying complete email
addresses unless you've vouched-safe that you are not a [Rostrum's
Universal] Robot.

(It's not usually expanded in "Show Original", either ... you're
supposed to click on the ellipsis and then give signs you're human and
maybe even sentient.)

/dps
--
I have always been glad we weren't killed that night. I do not know
any particular reason, but I have always been glad.
_Roughing It_, Mark Twain
Dingbat
2017-05-18 05:02:29 UTC
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Post by uri
What does "tatted up" mean?
Notwithstanding the other answers, tatting (but not tatting up) used to mean
something done using needle and thread. Tatting with that meaning seems to
now be also called Needle Tatting:

Learning How to Needle Tatt - Tatting supplies including shuttles
http://www.hhtatting.com/learn-how-to-do-needle-tatting-double-stitch.cfm
Joy Beeson
2017-06-05 03:33:25 UTC
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On Wed, 17 May 2017 22:02:29 -0700 (PDT), Dingbat
Post by Dingbat
Notwithstanding the other answers, tatting (but not tatting up) used to mean
something done using needle and thread. Tatting with that meaning seems to
Learning How to Needle Tatt - Tatting supplies including shuttles
http://www.hhtatting.com/learn-how-to-do-needle-tatting-double-stitch.cfm
Since I browse and read Usenet on different computers, it is not
convenient to click on that link to see whether it's as confused as
your report.

"Tatting" is done with a shuttle; in German, I've been told, it's
"schiffchenarbeit". (Spelling from my very leaky memory.) Tatting is
the art of tying an overhand knot in one thread, then transferring it
to another thread (or, in the case of rings, to another part of the
same thread).

Needle tatting is a form of air embroidery in which the effect of
tatting is achieved by tying half hitches directly in the thread that
is intended to be knotted, then sliding the knots off the needle onto
the thread that corresponds to the shuttle thread in tatting. Needle
tatting need not be limited to imitation tatting; since the knot is
not overturned, more-complicated forms of casting on *could* be used,
but I haven't seen any. (Haven't looked, since I find needle tatting
tedious to work -- and I haven't had time to make lace since
retiring.)

Just to confuse the issue, tatting can be done with the thread in a
needle instead of on a shuttle, and this *was* done before the
invention of the "join", in order to allow the thread to be passed
through a picot. (The "join" is the age old "sewing" used in bobbin
lace, but either the originator of tatting-as-we-know-it didn't do
bobbin lace, or it took a while for the connection to connect.)

And needle tatting can be done with a shuttle by forming the knot in
the air, passing a shuttle through it, then tightening the knot around
the thread from the shuttle. (This is *really* tedious, in my
opinion.)

And there's a sort of hybrid that I call "false tatting" (It has been
invented several times, therefore has several names), in which the
shuttle is used like a needle to embroider buttonhole stitches over a
thread. This is used in tatting to produce odd vertices, climb from
one round to the next without breaking the thread, and so forth.
--
Joy Beeson, U.S.A., mostly central Hoosier,
some Northern Indiana, Upstate New York, Florida, and Hawaii
joy beeson at comcast dot net http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.
Snidely
2017-06-06 07:44:25 UTC
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Post by Joy Beeson
On Wed, 17 May 2017 22:02:29 -0700 (PDT), Dingbat
Post by Dingbat
Notwithstanding the other answers, tatting (but not tatting up) used to mean
something done using needle and thread. Tatting with that meaning seems to
Learning How to Needle Tatt - Tatting supplies including shuttles
http://www.hhtatting.com/learn-how-to-do-needle-tatting-double-stitch.cfm
Since I browse and read Usenet on different computers, it is not
convenient to click on that link to see whether it's as confused as
your report.
"Tatting" is done with a shuttle; in German, I've been told, it's
"schiffchenarbeit". (Spelling from my very leaky memory.) Tatting is
the art of tying an overhand knot in one thread, then transferring it
to another thread (or, in the case of rings, to another part of the
same thread).
Needle tatting is a form of air embroidery in which the effect of
tatting is achieved by tying half hitches directly in the thread that
is intended to be knotted, then sliding the knots off the needle onto
the thread that corresponds to the shuttle thread in tatting. Needle
tatting need not be limited to imitation tatting; since the knot is
not overturned, more-complicated forms of casting on *could* be used,
but I haven't seen any. (Haven't looked, since I find needle tatting
tedious to work -- and I haven't had time to make lace since
retiring.)
Just to confuse the issue, tatting can be done with the thread in a
needle instead of on a shuttle, and this *was* done before the
invention of the "join", in order to allow the thread to be passed
through a picot. (The "join" is the age old "sewing" used in bobbin
lace, but either the originator of tatting-as-we-know-it didn't do
bobbin lace, or it took a while for the connection to connect.)
And needle tatting can be done with a shuttle by forming the knot in
the air, passing a shuttle through it, then tightening the knot around
the thread from the shuttle. (This is *really* tedious, in my
opinion.)
And there's a sort of hybrid that I call "false tatting" (It has been
invented several times, therefore has several names), in which the
shuttle is used like a needle to embroider buttonhole stitches over a
thread. This is used in tatting to produce odd vertices, climb from
one round to the next without breaking the thread, and so forth.
And I thought braiding a horse's mane was tough!

<URL:Loading Image...>
(okay, they cheat and use rubber bands)

/dps
--
Rule #0: Don't be on fire.
In case of fire, exit the building before tweeting about it.
(Sighting reported by Adam F)
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