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Richard Yates
2017-11-29 13:43:14 UTC
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In today's local paper: "...the Tide and Buckeyes in a head-to-head
battle of rsums."

I assumed a weird typo until a couple of paragraphs later: "Two
decisive losses sit on their rsum."

Now it looked like (yet one more) sports neologism and googling "rsum
sports" (without the quotes) turned up just one that said it is short
for "résumé" which makes sense in context.

Interestingly, to me anyway, was that the rest of the results were
sports pages that all had the word "résumé" and none had "rsum".

So, does that suggest the origin of "rsum"? Web pages, or people, that
cannot handle the "é" and so just dropped it?

Any aue field reports on this one?
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-11-29 13:56:04 UTC
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On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 05:43:14 -0800, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
In today's local paper: "...the Tide and Buckeyes in a head-to-head
battle of rsums."
I assumed a weird typo until a couple of paragraphs later: "Two
decisive losses sit on their rsum."
Now it looked like (yet one more) sports neologism and googling "rsum
sports" (without the quotes) turned up just one that said it is short
for "résumé" which makes sense in context.
Interestingly, to me anyway, was that the rest of the results were
sports pages that all had the word "résumé" and none had "rsum".
So, does that suggest the origin of "rsum"? Web pages, or people, that
cannot handle the "é" and so just dropped it?
Any aue field reports on this one?
My guess is that the report was corrctly typed using "résumé" but the
"é"s were lost in transferring it to be put together with the rest of
the reports, etc, because of an incompatibility of character codes.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Richard Yates
2017-11-29 14:10:16 UTC
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On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 13:56:04 +0000, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 05:43:14 -0800, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
In today's local paper: "...the Tide and Buckeyes in a head-to-head
battle of rsums."
I assumed a weird typo until a couple of paragraphs later: "Two
decisive losses sit on their rsum."
Now it looked like (yet one more) sports neologism and googling "rsum
sports" (without the quotes) turned up just one that said it is short
for "résumé" which makes sense in context.
Interestingly, to me anyway, was that the rest of the results were
sports pages that all had the word "résumé" and none had "rsum".
So, does that suggest the origin of "rsum"? Web pages, or people, that
cannot handle the "é" and so just dropped it?
Any aue field reports on this one?
My guess is that the report was corrctly typed using "résumé" but the
"é"s were lost in transferring it to be put together with the rest of
the reports, etc, because of an incompatibility of character codes.
I would not be surprised at all if the local paper dropped the "é"s
for that reason, but since the word "rsum" appears in the Urban
Dictionary, is this an example of independent origin?
b***@aol.com
2017-11-29 19:44:23 UTC
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Post by Richard Yates
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 13:56:04 +0000, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 05:43:14 -0800, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
In today's local paper: "...the Tide and Buckeyes in a head-to-head
battle of rsums."
I assumed a weird typo until a couple of paragraphs later: "Two
decisive losses sit on their rsum."
Now it looked like (yet one more) sports neologism and googling "rsum
sports" (without the quotes) turned up just one that said it is short
for "résumé" which makes sense in context.
Interestingly, to me anyway, was that the rest of the results were
sports pages that all had the word "résumé" and none had "rsum".
So, does that suggest the origin of "rsum"? Web pages, or people, that
cannot handle the "é" and so just dropped it?
Any aue field reports on this one?
My guess is that the report was corrctly typed using "résumé" but the
"é"s were lost in transferring it to be put together with the rest of
the reports, etc, because of an incompatibility of character codes.
I would not be surprised at all if the local paper dropped the "é"s
for that reason, but since the word "rsum" appears in the Urban
Dictionary, is this an example of independent origin?
It could be that someone who'd often seen "résumé" spelled "rsum" for
the above technical reasons jokingly coined the word "rsum" - the more
so since the latter must be pronounced "arsum".
GordonD
2017-11-29 19:25:57 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 05:43:14 -0800, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
In today's local paper: "...the Tide and Buckeyes in a head-to-head
battle of rsums."
I assumed a weird typo until a couple of paragraphs later: "Two
decisive losses sit on their rsum."
Now it looked like (yet one more) sports neologism and googling "rsum
sports" (without the quotes) turned up just one that said it is short
for "résumé" which makes sense in context.
Interestingly, to me anyway, was that the rest of the results were
sports pages that all had the word "résumé" and none had "rsum".
So, does that suggest the origin of "rsum"? Web pages, or people, that
cannot handle the "é" and so just dropped it?
Any aue field reports on this one?
My guess is that the report was corrctly typed using "résumé" but the
"é"s were lost in transferring it to be put together with the rest of
the reports, etc, because of an incompatibility of character codes.
Of course the word isn't often used in BrEng: we call the thing a CV
(for Curriculum Vitae).
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
Peter T. Daniels
2017-11-29 19:34:03 UTC
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Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
My guess is that the report was corrctly typed using "résumé" but the
"é"s were lost in transferring it to be put together with the rest of
the reports, etc, because of an incompatibility of character codes.
Of course the word isn't often used in BrEng: we call the thing a CV
(for Curriculum Vitae).
Different animal. Academics have CVs, listing all their publications, positions,
honors, etc.; regular people have résumés, one-page documents listing previous
jobs with contact information for references.
charles
2017-11-29 19:43:25 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
My guess is that the report was corrctly typed using "résumé" but the
"é"s were lost in transferring it to be put together with the rest of
the reports, etc, because of an incompatibility of character codes.
Of course the word isn't often used in BrEng: we call the thing a CV
(for Curriculum Vitae).
Different animal. Academics have CVs, listing all their publications,
positions, honors, etc.; regular people have résumés, one-page documents
listing previous jobs with contact information for references.
Obviously a pondial difference. Everybody over here has a CV. (not that
they know that it is a Latin phrase).
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
Peter T. Daniels
2017-11-29 20:35:13 UTC
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Post by charles
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
My guess is that the report was corrctly typed using "résumé" but the
"é"s were lost in transferring it to be put together with the rest of
the reports, etc, because of an incompatibility of character codes.
Of course the word isn't often used in BrEng: we call the thing a CV
(for Curriculum Vitae).
Different animal. Academics have CVs, listing all their publications,
positions, honors, etc.; regular people have résumés, one-page documents
listing previous jobs with contact information for references.
Obviously a pondial difference. Everybody over here has a CV. (not that
they know that it is a Latin phrase).
Does it correspond to either of the different US things, or is it something else?
Paul Wolff
2017-11-29 23:17:36 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by charles
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
My guess is that the report was corrctly typed using "résumé" but the
"é"s were lost in transferring it to be put together with the rest of
the reports, etc, because of an incompatibility of character codes.
Of course the word isn't often used in BrEng: we call the thing a CV
(for Curriculum Vitae).
Different animal. Academics have CVs, listing all their publications,
positions, honors, etc.; regular people have résumés, one-page documents
listing previous jobs with contact information for references.
Obviously a pondial difference. Everybody over here has a CV. (not that
they know that it is a Latin phrase).
Does it correspond to either of the different US things, or is it something else?
Something else. I think we should admit that a CV is in principle
all-embracing, but in practice it is most often part of an application
for employment. In that case it's a précis of those aspects of one's
life by which a prospective employer may be influenced. So it would
include date of birth, educational achievements, and marital status
(perhaps not today, among modern folk) before going on to how one has
made a living so far, and public honours received (if any). Referees
should be given separately, if they are relevant to the purpose of the
CV. A referee named inside the CV would imply a permanent referee
status, which wouldn't look good.
--
Paul
RH Draney
2017-11-30 05:31:25 UTC
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Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Different animal. Academics have CVs, listing all their publications,
positions, honors, etc.; regular people have résumés, one-page
documents
Post by Peter T. Daniels
listing previous jobs with contact information for references.
Obviously a pondial difference. Everybody over here has a CV. (not that
they know that it is a Latin phrase).
Does it correspond to either of the different US things, or is it something else?
Something else. I think we should admit that a CV is in principle
all-embracing, but in practice it is most often part of an application
for employment. In that case it's a précis of those aspects of one's
life by which a prospective employer may be influenced. So it would
include date of birth, educational achievements, and marital status
(perhaps not today, among modern folk) before going on to how one has
made a living so far, and public honours received (if any). Referees
should be given separately, if they are relevant to the purpose of the
CV. A referee named inside the CV would imply a permanent referee
status, which wouldn't look good.
Which term would be used for the following (translated from the original
Italian)?

“Most Illustrious Lord, Having now sufficiently considered the
specimens of all those who proclaim themselves skilled contrivers of
instruments of war, and that the invention and operation of the said
instruments are nothing different from those in common use: I shall
endeavor, without prejudice to any one else, to explain myself to your
Excellency, showing your Lordship my secret, and then offering them to
your best pleasure and approbation to work with effect at opportune
moments on all those things which, in part, shall be briefly noted below.

1. I have a sort of extremely light and strong bridges, adapted to be
most easily carried, and with them you may pursue, and at any time flee
from the enemy; and others, secure and indestructible by fire and
battle, easy and convenient to lift and place. Also methods of burning
and destroying those of the enemy.

2. I know how, when a place is besieged, to take the water out of the
trenches, and make endless variety of bridges, and covered ways and
ladders, and other machines pertaining to such expeditions.

3. If, by reason of the height of the banks, or the strength of the
place and its position, it is impossible, when besieging a place, to
avail oneself of the plan of bombardment, I have methods for destroying
every rock or other fortress, even if it were founded on a rock, etc.

4. Again, I have kinds of mortars; most convenient and easy to carry;
and with these I can fling small stones almost resembling a storm; and
with the smoke of these cause great terror to the enemy, to his great
detriment and confusion.

5. And if the fight should be at sea I have kinds of many machines
most efficient for offense and defense; and vessels which will resist
the attack of the largest guns and powder and fumes.

6. I have means by secret and tortuous mines and ways, made without
noise, to reach a designated spot, even if it were needed to pass under
a trench or a river.

7. I will make covered chariots, safe and unattackable, which,
entering among the enemy with their artillery, there is no body of men
so great but they would break them. And behind these, infantry could
follow quite unhurt and without any hindrance.

8. In case of need I will make big guns, mortars, and light ordnance
of fine and useful forms, out of the common type.

9. Where the operation of bombardment might fail, I would contrive
catapults, mangonels, trabocchi, and other machines of marvellous
efficacy and not in common use. And in short, according to the variety
of cases, I can contrive various and endless means of offense and defense.

10. In times of peace I believe I can give perfect satisfaction and
to the equal of any other in architecture and the composition of
buildings public and private; and in guiding water from one place to
another.

11. I can carry out sculpture in marble, bronze, or clay, and also I
can do in painting whatever may be done, as well as any other, be he who
he may.

Again, the bronze horse may be taken in hand, which is to be to the
immortal glory and eternal honor of the prince your father of happy
memory, and of the illustrious house of Sforza.

And if any of the above-named things seem to anyone to be impossible
or not feasible, I am most ready to make the experiment in your park, or
in whatever place may please your Excellency – to whom I comment myself
with the utmost humility, etc.”

....r
Tony Cooper
2017-11-30 05:45:21 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Different animal. Academics have CVs, listing all their publications,
positions, honors, etc.; regular people have résumés, one-page
documents
Post by Peter T. Daniels
listing previous jobs with contact information for references.
Obviously a pondial difference. Everybody over here has a CV. (not that
they know that it is a Latin phrase).
Does it correspond to either of the different US things, or is it something else?
Something else. I think we should admit that a CV is in principle
all-embracing, but in practice it is most often part of an application
for employment. In that case it's a précis of those aspects of one's
life by which a prospective employer may be influenced. So it would
include date of birth, educational achievements, and marital status
(perhaps not today, among modern folk) before going on to how one has
made a living so far, and public honours received (if any). Referees
should be given separately, if they are relevant to the purpose of the
CV. A referee named inside the CV would imply a permanent referee
status, which wouldn't look good.
Which term would be used for the following (translated from the original
Italian)?
“Most Illustrious Lord, Having now sufficiently considered the
specimens of all those who proclaim themselves skilled contrivers of
instruments of war, and that the invention and operation of the said
instruments are nothing different from those in common use: I shall
endeavor, without prejudice to any one else, to explain myself to your
Excellency, showing your Lordship my secret, and then offering them to
your best pleasure and approbation to work with effect at opportune
moments on all those things which, in part, shall be briefly noted below.
1. I have a sort of extremely light and strong bridges, adapted to be
most easily carried, and with them you may pursue, and at any time flee
from the enemy; and others, secure and indestructible by fire and
battle, easy and convenient to lift and place. Also methods of burning
and destroying those of the enemy.
2. I know how, when a place is besieged, to take the water out of the
trenches, and make endless variety of bridges, and covered ways and
ladders, and other machines pertaining to such expeditions.
3. If, by reason of the height of the banks, or the strength of the
place and its position, it is impossible, when besieging a place, to
avail oneself of the plan of bombardment, I have methods for destroying
every rock or other fortress, even if it were founded on a rock, etc.
4. Again, I have kinds of mortars; most convenient and easy to carry;
and with these I can fling small stones almost resembling a storm; and
with the smoke of these cause great terror to the enemy, to his great
detriment and confusion.
5. And if the fight should be at sea I have kinds of many machines
most efficient for offense and defense; and vessels which will resist
the attack of the largest guns and powder and fumes.
6. I have means by secret and tortuous mines and ways, made without
noise, to reach a designated spot, even if it were needed to pass under
a trench or a river.
7. I will make covered chariots, safe and unattackable, which,
entering among the enemy with their artillery, there is no body of men
so great but they would break them. And behind these, infantry could
follow quite unhurt and without any hindrance.
8. In case of need I will make big guns, mortars, and light ordnance
of fine and useful forms, out of the common type.
9. Where the operation of bombardment might fail, I would contrive
catapults, mangonels, trabocchi, and other machines of marvellous
efficacy and not in common use. And in short, according to the variety
of cases, I can contrive various and endless means of offense and defense.
10. In times of peace I believe I can give perfect satisfaction and
to the equal of any other in architecture and the composition of
buildings public and private; and in guiding water from one place to
another.
11. I can carry out sculpture in marble, bronze, or clay, and also I
can do in painting whatever may be done, as well as any other, be he who
he may.
Again, the bronze horse may be taken in hand, which is to be to the
immortal glory and eternal honor of the prince your father of happy
memory, and of the illustrious house of Sforza.
And if any of the above-named things seem to anyone to be impossible
or not feasible, I am most ready to make the experiment in your park, or
in whatever place may please your Excellency – to whom I comment myself
with the utmost humility, etc.”
Leonardo was a multi-talented person.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Snidely
2017-11-30 07:37:35 UTC
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["] And if any of the above-named things seem to anyone to be impossible
or not feasible, I am most ready to make the experiment in your park, or in
whatever place may please your Excellency – to whom I comment myself with the
utmost humility, etc.”
Commend, innit?

/dps
--
"This is all very fine, but let us not be carried away be excitement,
but ask calmly, how does this person feel about in in his cooler
moments next day, with six or seven thousand feet of snow and stuff on
top of him?"
_Roughing It_, Mark Twain.
Richard Heathfield
2017-11-30 08:58:29 UTC
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<snip>
Post by RH Draney
[...] I think we should admit that a CV is in principle
all-embracing, but in practice it is most often part of an application
for employment. In that case it's a précis of those aspects of one's
life by which a prospective employer may be influenced. [...]
Which term would be used for the following (translated from the original
Italian)?
“Most Illustrious Lord, Having now sufficiently considered the
specimens of all those who proclaim themselves skilled contrivers of
instruments of war, and that the invention and operation of the said
instruments are nothing different from those in common use: I shall
endeavor, without prejudice to any one else, to explain myself to your
Excellency, showing your Lordship my secret, and then offering them to
your best pleasure and approbation to work with effect at opportune
moments on all those things which, in part, shall be briefly noted below.
1. I have a sort of extremely light and strong bridges [...]
2. I know how, when a place is besieged [...]
3. [...] I have methods for destroying [...]
4. Again, I have kinds of mortars [...]
5. [...] I have kinds of many machines [...]
6. I have means by secret and tortuous mines and ways [...]
7. I will make covered chariots, safe and unattackable [...]
8. In case of need I will make big guns, mortars [...]
9. [...] I would contrive catapults, mangonels, trabocchi [...]
The term you're looking for is "targeted advertising". It's clearly a
competitive tender, directed to the Defence Minister's procurement
department.
Post by RH Draney
10. In times of peace I believe I can give perfect satisfaction and
to the equal of any other in architecture and the composition of
buildings public and private; and in guiding water from one place to
another.
The contrast between [1-9] and [10+] was beautifully done.
--
Richard Heathfield
Email: rjh at cpax dot org dot uk
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Sig line 4 vacant - apply within
Peter T. Daniels
2017-11-30 12:52:44 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Different animal. Academics have CVs, listing all their publications,
positions, honors, etc.; regular people have résumés, one-page
documents
Post by Peter T. Daniels
listing previous jobs with contact information for references.
Obviously a pondial difference. Everybody over here has a CV. (not that
they know that it is a Latin phrase).
Does it correspond to either of the different US things, or is it something else?
Something else. I think we should admit that a CV is in principle
all-embracing, but in practice it is most often part of an application
for employment. In that case it's a précis of those aspects of one's
life by which a prospective employer may be influenced. So it would
include date of birth, educational achievements, and marital status
(perhaps not today, among modern folk) before going on to how one has
made a living so far, and public honours received (if any). Referees
should be given separately, if they are relevant to the purpose of the
CV. A referee named inside the CV would imply a permanent referee
status, which wouldn't look good.
Which term would be used for the following (translated from the original
Italian)?
“Most Illustrious Lord, Having now sufficiently considered the
specimens of all those who proclaim themselves skilled contrivers of
instruments of war, and that the invention and operation of the said
instruments are nothing different from those in common use: I shall
endeavor, without prejudice to any one else, to explain myself to your
Excellency, showing your Lordship my secret, and then offering them to
your best pleasure and approbation to work with effect at opportune
moments on all those things which, in part, shall be briefly noted below.
1. I have a sort of extremely light and strong bridges, adapted to be
most easily carried, and with them you may pursue, and at any time flee
from the enemy; and others, secure and indestructible by fire and
battle, easy and convenient to lift and place. Also methods of burning
and destroying those of the enemy.
2. I know how, when a place is besieged, to take the water out of the
trenches, and make endless variety of bridges, and covered ways and
ladders, and other machines pertaining to such expeditions.
3. If, by reason of the height of the banks, or the strength of the
place and its position, it is impossible, when besieging a place, to
avail oneself of the plan of bombardment, I have methods for destroying
every rock or other fortress, even if it were founded on a rock, etc.
4. Again, I have kinds of mortars; most convenient and easy to carry;
and with these I can fling small stones almost resembling a storm; and
with the smoke of these cause great terror to the enemy, to his great
detriment and confusion.
5. And if the fight should be at sea I have kinds of many machines
most efficient for offense and defense; and vessels which will resist
the attack of the largest guns and powder and fumes.
6. I have means by secret and tortuous mines and ways, made without
noise, to reach a designated spot, even if it were needed to pass under
a trench or a river.
7. I will make covered chariots, safe and unattackable, which,
entering among the enemy with their artillery, there is no body of men
so great but they would break them. And behind these, infantry could
follow quite unhurt and without any hindrance.
8. In case of need I will make big guns, mortars, and light ordnance
of fine and useful forms, out of the common type.
9. Where the operation of bombardment might fail, I would contrive
catapults, mangonels, trabocchi, and other machines of marvellous
efficacy and not in common use. And in short, according to the variety
of cases, I can contrive various and endless means of offense and defense.
10. In times of peace I believe I can give perfect satisfaction and
to the equal of any other in architecture and the composition of
buildings public and private; and in guiding water from one place to
another.
11. I can carry out sculpture in marble, bronze, or clay, and also I
can do in painting whatever may be done, as well as any other, be he who
he may.
Again, the bronze horse may be taken in hand, which is to be to the
immortal glory and eternal honor of the prince your father of happy
memory, and of the illustrious house of Sforza.
And if any of the above-named things seem to anyone to be impossible
or not feasible, I am most ready to make the experiment in your park, or
in whatever place may please your Excellency – to whom I comment myself
with the utmost humility, etc.”
Someone's been reading Walter Isaacson ... or at least hearing his innumerable interviews over
the last couple of weeks.
Paul Carmichael
2017-12-01 09:40:19 UTC
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Something else. I think we should admit that a CV is in principle all-embracing, but in
practice it is most often part of an application for employment. In that case it's a
précis of those aspects of one's life by which a prospective employer may be influenced.
So it would include date of birth, educational achievements, and marital status (perhaps
not today, among modern folk) before going on to how one has made a living so far, and
public honours received (if any). Referees should be given separately, if they are
relevant to the purpose of the CV. A referee named inside the CV would imply a permanent
referee status, which wouldn't look good.
Heh. I get asked now and then for an "updated" CV, that is, with the bits relevant to the
job in hand fluffed up a tad. A "targeted" CV if you like.

This is in Spain, but I believe the same happens all over the world. Maybe not in the USA.
--
Paul.

https://paulc.es/
https://asetrad.org
Cheryl
2017-12-01 11:40:10 UTC
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Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Paul Wolff
Something else. I think we should admit that a CV is in principle
all-embracing, but in practice it is most often part of an application
for employment. In that case it's a précis of those aspects of one's
life by which a prospective employer may be influenced. So it would
include date of birth, educational achievements, and marital status
(perhaps not today, among modern folk) before going on to how one has
made a living so far, and public honours received (if any). Referees
should be given separately, if they are relevant to the purpose of the
CV. A referee named inside the CV would imply a permanent referee
status, which wouldn't look good.
Heh. I get asked now and then for an "updated" CV, that is, with the
bits relevant to the job in hand fluffed up a tad. A "targeted" CV if
you like.
This is in Spain, but I believe the same happens all over the world. Maybe not in the USA.
I think it's fairly normal in Canada to create a new version of the
resume which emphasizes the experience relevant to a particular position.

Sometimes a personal statement is requires. It looks really bad if you
send your resume containing a statement expressing great enthusiasm and
emphasizing your qualifications for a position at company A to company
B, but it does happen.
--
Cheryl
charles
2017-11-29 21:29:50 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by charles
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
My guess is that the report was corrctly typed using "résumé" but
the "é"s were lost in transferring it to be put together with the
rest of the reports, etc, because of an incompatibility of
character codes.
Of course the word isn't often used in BrEng: we call the thing a
CV (for Curriculum Vitae).
Different animal. Academics have CVs, listing all their publications,
positions, honors, etc.; regular people have résumés, one-page
documents listing previous jobs with contact information for
references.
Obviously a pondial difference. Everybody over here has a CV. (not that
they know that it is a Latin phrase).
Does it correspond to either of the different US things, or is it something else?
A CV incudes everything relevant. Not being in the academic world, I don't
know if their CVs include publications, etc, but I see no reason why they
wouldn't - if they were relevant.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
Peter Moylan
2017-11-30 02:07:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by charles
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
My guess is that the report was corrctly typed using "résumé" but the
"é"s were lost in transferring it to be put together with the rest of
the reports, etc, because of an incompatibility of character codes.
Of course the word isn't often used in BrEng: we call the thing a CV
(for Curriculum Vitae).
Different animal. Academics have CVs, listing all their publications,
positions, honors, etc.; regular people have résumés, one-page documents
listing previous jobs with contact information for references.
Obviously a pondial difference. Everybody over here has a CV. (not that
they know that it is a Latin phrase).
As an academic I used to keep both a résumé (one page) and a CV (many
pages), because either might be wanted depending on the circumstances.
Just recently, though, I had to provide such a thing, and having decided
that a single page was most appropriate I still headed it "Curriculum
Vitae". For some reason that felt right.

The biggest difference between the two, in my experience, is that you
list all your publications in a CV. That is something that universities
care about, and most other people don't. In my recent effort I
compromised: I put in a URL pointing to a web page that has my list of
publications.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-11-30 09:46:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by charles
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
My guess is that the report was corrctly typed using "résumé" but the
"é"s were lost in transferring it to be put together with the rest of
the reports, etc, because of an incompatibility of character codes.
Of course the word isn't often used in BrEng: we call the thing a CV
(for Curriculum Vitae).
Different animal. Academics have CVs, listing all their publications,
positions, honors, etc.; regular people have résumés, one-page documents
listing previous jobs with contact information for references.
Obviously a pondial difference. Everybody over here has a CV. (not that
they know that it is a Latin phrase).
As an academic I used to keep both a résumé (one page)
That term is used, yes, but I would call it (and others call it) a short CV.
Post by Peter Moylan
and a CV (many pages), because either might be wanted depending on the
circumstances. Just recently, though, I had to provide such a thing,
and having decided that a single page was most appropriate I still
headed it "Curriculum Vitae". For some reason that felt right.
The biggest difference between the two, in my experience, is that you
list all your publications in a CV. That is something that universities
care about, and most other people don't. In my recent effort I
compromised: I put in a URL pointing to a web page that has my list of
publications.
--
athel
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-11-30 13:00:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Thu, 30 Nov 2017 10:46:48 +0100, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by charles
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
My guess is that the report was corrctly typed using "résumé" but the
"é"s were lost in transferring it to be put together with the rest of
the reports, etc, because of an incompatibility of character codes.
Of course the word isn't often used in BrEng: we call the thing a CV
(for Curriculum Vitae).
Different animal. Academics have CVs, listing all their publications,
positions, honors, etc.; regular people have résumés, one-page documents
listing previous jobs with contact information for references.
Obviously a pondial difference. Everybody over here has a CV. (not that
they know that it is a Latin phrase).
As an academic I used to keep both a résumé (one page)
That term is used, yes, but I would call it (and others call it) a short CV.
Post by Peter Moylan
and a CV (many pages), because either might be wanted depending on the
circumstances. Just recently, though, I had to provide such a thing,
and having decided that a single page was most appropriate I still
headed it "Curriculum Vitae". For some reason that felt right.
The biggest difference between the two, in my experience, is that you
list all your publications in a CV. That is something that universities
care about, and most other people don't. In my recent effort I
compromised: I put in a URL pointing to a web page that has my list of
publications.
I am seriously out of touch with the job application process. I last
applied for a job (from outside an organisation) 45 years ago.

However, an application form on the first page of Google results is
similar to what I used to be familiar with.
www.walker-construction.co.uk/W43-Job-Application-Form.doc

The company is a Civil Engineering business which employs people with a
variety of professional and sub-professional skills and qualifications.

A separate CV is not requested. The information that would be in a CV is
specifically asked for in various sections of the form. If there is not
enough space on the form the applicant can attach additional sheets.

The sections are:

1 Personal details
name, address, other contact details

2 Present Employment
(If now unemployed give details of last employer)

3 Previous Employment
(most recent employer first). Please cover the last 10 years and
state nature of business - if not public sector

4 Education
Qualifications obtained from Schools, Colleges and Universities.
Please list highest qualification first

Professional, Technical or Management Qualifications

5 Training and Development
Please give details of any training and development courses or
non-qualifications courses which support your application. Include
any on the job training as well as formal courses.

6 Personal Statement
Abilities, skills, knowledge and experience.
Please use this section to explain in detail how you meet the
requirements of the Employee Profile. If you are or have been
involved in voluntary/unpaid activities, please also include this
information. Attach and label any additional sheets used.

Then questions relating to:
7 Rehabilitation of Offenders Act (1974)
8 Protecting Children and Vulnerable Adults
9 Disability Discrimination Act

10 Health

11 References
Please give the names and addresses of your two most recent
employers (if applicable). If you are unable to do this, please
clearly outline who your references are.

Questions on ethnicity, gender, disability and age:
12 Recruitment Monitoring Form
This sheet will be separated from your application form upon
receipt and does not form part of the selection process. It will be
retained by Walker Construction (UK) Ltd purely for monitoring
purposes.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
J. J. Lodder
2017-11-30 10:39:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by charles
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
My guess is that the report was corrctly typed using "résumé" but the
"é"s were lost in transferring it to be put together with the rest of
the reports, etc, because of an incompatibility of character codes.
Of course the word isn't often used in BrEng: we call the thing a CV
(for Curriculum Vitae).
Different animal. Academics have CVs, listing all their publications,
positions, honors, etc.; regular people have résumés, one-page documents
listing previous jobs with contact information for references.
Obviously a pondial difference. Everybody over here has a CV. (not that
they know that it is a Latin phrase).
As an academic I used to keep both a résumé (one page) and a CV (many
pages), because either might be wanted depending on the circumstances.
Just recently, though, I had to provide such a thing, and having decided
that a single page was most appropriate I still headed it "Curriculum
Vitae". For some reason that felt right.
The biggest difference between the two, in my experience, is that you
list all your publications in a CV. That is something that universities
care about, and most other people don't. In my recent effort I
compromised: I put in a URL pointing to a web page that has my list of
publications.
These days a university may be more interested
in how much money you brought in
than in the resulting publications list,

Jan
Peter Moylan
2017-11-30 11:25:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Peter Moylan
As an academic I used to keep both a résumé (one page) and a CV (many
pages), because either might be wanted depending on the circumstances.
Just recently, though, I had to provide such a thing, and having decided
that a single page was most appropriate I still headed it "Curriculum
Vitae". For some reason that felt right.
The biggest difference between the two, in my experience, is that you
list all your publications in a CV. That is something that universities
care about, and most other people don't. In my recent effort I
compromised: I put in a URL pointing to a web page that has my list of
publications.
These days a university may be more interested
in how much money you brought in
than in the resulting publications list,
True. That's one reason I'm glad I retired from the university. I never
wanted the promotion from researcher to beggar.

My latest CV is for a semi-university employer; an autonomous business
that is embedded in the university but not quite part of it. It offers
"transition" subjects to foreign students that will give them credit
towards moving into a regular degree stream. (In the past the transition
subjects were mostly English-language teaching, an occupation that
accounted for many AUE regulars, but now they offer things like
first-year engineering subjects.) That sort of employer doesn't care
about research contracts, only about teaching ability.

I don't entirely approve of the way universities have started
outsourcing such operations to separate contractors, but I have to
accept that that is the way the world works. In addition I don't approve
of this as a way to turn full-time employment into contract or casual
employment, but at the age of nearly-70 I have to accept that full-time
employment would not work for me.

Semi-related aside: on the ResearchGate web site, a place where one can
exchange one's research publications, I have been nagged to nominate a
"current project". To get them off my back, I created a "project" called
"Il faut cultiver notre jardin" [1]. So far I have 5 "followers" of that
project, which obviously isn't likely to announce any new results apart
from my garden produce. And my garden produce won't amount to much until
that distant day, if ever, when we get some rain.

[1] Those who are whooshed by that reference should read Voltaire's
"Candide".

Second aside: I also get e-mail from "Academia", a similar web site run
by Google. I ignore it all, because it's such a transparent attempt to
get money from me in return for citation counts.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-11-30 15:50:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Peter Moylan
As an academic I used to keep both a résumé (one page) and a CV (many
pages), because either might be wanted depending on the circumstances.
Just recently, though, I had to provide such a thing, and having decided
that a single page was most appropriate I still headed it "Curriculum
Vitae". For some reason that felt right.
The biggest difference between the two, in my experience, is that you
list all your publications in a CV. That is something that universities
care about, and most other people don't. In my recent effort I
compromised: I put in a URL pointing to a web page that has my list of
publications.
These days a university may be more interested
in how much money you brought in
than in the resulting publications list,
True. That's one reason I'm glad I retired from the university.
Me too. I wasn't quite that bad when I left Birmingham in 1987, but it
was obvious which way the wind was blowing, in those glorious Thatcher
years. France has more or less caught up now, but years later, too late
to affect me much.
Post by Peter Moylan
I never wanted the promotion from researcher to beggar.
My latest CV is for a semi-university employer; an autonomous business
that is embedded in the university but not quite part of it. It offers
"transition" subjects to foreign students that will give them credit
towards moving into a regular degree stream. (In the past the
transition subjects were mostly English-language teaching, an
occupation that accounted for many AUE regulars, but now they offer
things like first-year engineering subjects.) That sort of employer
doesn't care about research contracts, only about teaching ability.
I don't entirely approve of the way universities have started
outsourcing such operations to separate contractors, but I have to
accept that that is the way the world works. In addition I don't
approve of this as a way to turn full-time employment into contract or
casual employment, but at the age of nearly-70 I have to accept that
full-time employment would not work for me.
Semi-related aside: on the ResearchGate web site, a place where one can
exchange one's research publications, I have been nagged to nominate a
"current project". To get them off my back, I created a "project"
called "Il faut cultiver notre jardin" [1]. So far I have 5 "followers"
of that project, which obviously isn't likely to announce any new
results apart from my garden produce. And my garden produce won't
amount to much until that distant day, if ever, when we get some rain.
[1] Those who are whooshed by that reference should read Voltaire's "Candide".
Second aside: I also get e-mail from "Academia", a similar web site run
by Google. I ignore it all, because it's such a transparent attempt to
get money from me in return for citation counts.
--
athel
Sam Plusnet
2017-11-29 22:40:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
My guess is that the report was corrctly typed using "résumé" but the
"é"s were lost in transferring it to be put together with the rest of
the reports, etc, because of an incompatibility of character codes.
Of course the word isn't often used in BrEng: we call the thing a CV
(for Curriculum Vitae).
Different animal. Academics have CVs, listing all their publications, positions,
honors, etc.; regular people have résumés, one-page documents listing previous
jobs with contact information for references.
In the US perhaps.
In the UK, anyone who is searching for a job will be expected to polish
their CV and never their résumé.
--
Sam Plusnet
Tony Cooper
2017-11-29 23:05:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
My guess is that the report was corrctly typed using "résumé" but the
"é"s were lost in transferring it to be put together with the rest of
the reports, etc, because of an incompatibility of character codes.
Of course the word isn't often used in BrEng: we call the thing a CV
(for Curriculum Vitae).
Different animal. Academics have CVs, listing all their publications, positions,
honors, etc.; regular people have résumés, one-page documents listing previous
jobs with contact information for references.
In the US perhaps.
In the UK, anyone who is searching for a job will be expected to polish
their CV and never their résumé.
Not just the terms change. A résumé, in the US, is a short history of
the applicant's previous employment and their education. It may
contain some textual content like "Objectives" wherein the person
writes what they would like or expect to be doing on the job in the
short-term future. It may also list references. Experts on effective
résumé writing strongly suggest keeping it to one page.

When I first starting reading résumés sent to me by people applying
for jobs advertised in the newspaper, it was not uncommon to see
hobbies listed, religious affiliation, social clubs, and other
personal data. All of that is now discouraged, and sometimes the
reader can't even determine the gender* of the responder unless the
first name is a giveaway. For that matter, the newspaper has gone by
the wayside as a place to advertise job availability.

Academics and those in other positions where research is part of the
job submit a CV. A scientist applying for a job at a pharmaceutical
firm, for example.

A person applying for an office position or warehouse position would
not be asked to provide a CV. Nor would most even know what a "CV"
is.

*In a non-related subject, some might be interested to read:
https://www.snopes.com/lggbdtttiqqaapp-lgbt-inclusiveness-training-flyer/
It's about a new identification acronym: LGGBDTTTIQQAAPP.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-11-29 23:24:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 18:05:20 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
My guess is that the report was corrctly typed using "résumé" but the
"é"s were lost in transferring it to be put together with the rest of
the reports, etc, because of an incompatibility of character codes.
Of course the word isn't often used in BrEng: we call the thing a CV
(for Curriculum Vitae).
Different animal. Academics have CVs, listing all their publications, positions,
honors, etc.; regular people have résumés, one-page documents listing previous
jobs with contact information for references.
In the US perhaps.
In the UK, anyone who is searching for a job will be expected to polish
their CV and never their résumé.
Not just the terms change. A résumé, in the US, is a short history of
the applicant's previous employment and their education. It may
contain some textual content like "Objectives" wherein the person
writes what they would like or expect to be doing on the job in the
short-term future. It may also list references. Experts on effective
résumé writing strongly suggest keeping it to one page.
When I first starting reading résumés sent to me by people applying
for jobs advertised in the newspaper, it was not uncommon to see
hobbies listed, religious affiliation, social clubs, and other
personal data. All of that is now discouraged, and sometimes the
reader can't even determine the gender* of the responder unless the
first name is a giveaway. For that matter, the newspaper has gone by
the wayside as a place to advertise job availability.
Academics and those in other positions where research is part of the
job submit a CV. A scientist applying for a job at a pharmaceutical
firm, for example.
A person applying for an office position or warehouse position would
not be asked to provide a CV. Nor would most even know what a "CV"
is.
https://www.snopes.com/lggbdtttiqqaapp-lgbt-inclusiveness-training-flyer/
It's about a new identification acronym: LGGBDTTTIQQAAPP.
This website gives information and advice to people from outside the UK
wanting to apply for jobs in the UK.
https://www.expatica.com/uk/employment/Work-in-the-UK-Applying-for-a-UK-job_103183.html

If you want a job in the UK, this guide explains how to write a
British style CV and cover letter plus information and tips on job
interviews in the UK.

Once you find a job in the UK, increase you chances of getting the
job by adapting your CV and interview style to match the
expectations of British employers. To give yourself the best chance
of getting a job in the UK, you’ll need to know how to fill in a
British job application form, put together a British-style CV and
write an accompanying cover letter. You’ll also need to know what to
expect if you are invited to a job interview in the UK, to help
avoid any cultural blunders.
<details snipped>

That information is not for people looking for manual labouring jobs.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Cheryl
2017-11-30 00:05:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 18:05:20 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
My guess is that the report was corrctly typed using "résumé" but the
"é"s were lost in transferring it to be put together with the rest of
the reports, etc, because of an incompatibility of character codes.
Of course the word isn't often used in BrEng: we call the thing a CV
(for Curriculum Vitae).
Different animal. Academics have CVs, listing all their publications, positions,
honors, etc.; regular people have résumés, one-page documents listing previous
jobs with contact information for references.
In the US perhaps.
In the UK, anyone who is searching for a job will be expected to polish
their CV and never their résumé.
Not just the terms change. A résumé, in the US, is a short history of
the applicant's previous employment and their education. It may
contain some textual content like "Objectives" wherein the person
writes what they would like or expect to be doing on the job in the
short-term future. It may also list references. Experts on effective
résumé writing strongly suggest keeping it to one page.
When I first starting reading résumés sent to me by people applying
for jobs advertised in the newspaper, it was not uncommon to see
hobbies listed, religious affiliation, social clubs, and other
personal data. All of that is now discouraged, and sometimes the
reader can't even determine the gender* of the responder unless the
first name is a giveaway. For that matter, the newspaper has gone by
the wayside as a place to advertise job availability.
Academics and those in other positions where research is part of the
job submit a CV. A scientist applying for a job at a pharmaceutical
firm, for example.
A person applying for an office position or warehouse position would
not be asked to provide a CV. Nor would most even know what a "CV"
is.
https://www.snopes.com/lggbdtttiqqaapp-lgbt-inclusiveness-training-flyer/
It's about a new identification acronym: LGGBDTTTIQQAAPP.
This website gives information and advice to people from outside the UK
wanting to apply for jobs in the UK.
https://www.expatica.com/uk/employment/Work-in-the-UK-Applying-for-a-UK-job_103183.html
If you want a job in the UK, this guide explains how to write a
British style CV and cover letter plus information and tips on job
interviews in the UK.
Once you find a job in the UK, increase you chances of getting the
job by adapting your CV and interview style to match the
expectations of British employers. To give yourself the best chance
of getting a job in the UK, you’ll need to know how to fill in a
British job application form, put together a British-style CV and
write an accompanying cover letter. You’ll also need to know what to
expect if you are invited to a job interview in the UK, to help
avoid any cultural blunders.
<details snipped>
That information is not for people looking for manual labouring jobs.
Skimming through that - it's interesting that they say to give one's
birth date. In my experience, that's not done in Canada these days. Why,
I don't know, since any reader can come up with a pretty good estimate
of the candidate's age from reading through the previous employment and
education sections.

And once you've been out of school a while, you don't mention your high
school graduation. Well, maybe that's mostly for people who have since
gotten some further qualification, but really most employers aren't
terribly interested in what you did in high school unless you are just
out of high school. And you certainly wouldn't mention specific grades
unless you were going for a more academic job, in which case they may
require an official transcript of the grades, not a list of them on your
resume or CV or whatever.
--
Cheryl

---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
Katy Jennison
2017-11-30 13:11:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 18:05:20 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Academics and those in other positions where research is part of the
job submit a CV. A scientist applying for a job at a pharmaceutical
firm, for example.
A person applying for an office position or warehouse position would
not be asked to provide a CV. Nor would most even know what a "CV"
is.
This website gives information and advice to people from outside the UK
wanting to apply for jobs in the UK.
https://www.expatica.com/uk/employment/Work-in-the-UK-Applying-for-a-UK-job_103183.html
If you want a job in the UK, this guide explains how to write a
British style CV and cover letter plus information and tips on job
interviews in the UK.
Once you find a job in the UK, increase you chances of getting the
job by adapting your CV and interview style to match the
expectations of British employers. To give yourself the best chance
of getting a job in the UK, you’ll need to know how to fill in a
British job application form, put together a British-style CV and
write an accompanying cover letter. You’ll also need to know what to
expect if you are invited to a job interview in the UK, to help
avoid any cultural blunders.
<details snipped>
That information is not for people looking for manual labouring jobs.
I'm glad it says, off application forms, "Take the time to read through
carefully, making sure you fill in the form fully". When I was on
appointment panels, any applicant who had merely written "See attached
CV" in all the spaces went automatically into the reject pile.
--
Katy Jennison
g***@gmail.com
2017-11-30 05:02:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
My guess is that the report was corrctly typed using "résumé" but the
"é"s were lost in transferring it to be put together with the rest of
the reports, etc, because of an incompatibility of character codes.
Of course the word isn't often used in BrEng: we call the thing a CV
(for Curriculum Vitae).
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
The Scots are using Latin nowadays? The presumption --- ;-)
occam
2017-11-30 09:38:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
My guess is that the report was corrctly typed using "résumé" but the
"é"s were lost in transferring it to be put together with the rest of
the reports, etc, because of an incompatibility of character codes.
Of course the word isn't often used in BrEng: we call the thing a CV
(for Curriculum Vitae).
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
The Scots are using Latin nowadays? The presumption --- ;-)
Plain 'CV' is no more Latin than 'PS'. I heard 'PS' used /in
conversation/ between my teenage son and a friend. Later, I asked him if
he know what 'P.S.' stood for. He referred me to a US sitcom (which?)
and thought it meant 'yeah, I forgot to mention that...' or something.

The point is, these abbreviations get a life of their own after a while.
A bit like 'TV'.
Richard Heathfield
2017-11-30 10:01:52 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
On 30/11/17 09:38, occam wrote:

<snip>
Post by occam
The point is, these abbreviations get a life of their own after a while.
A bit like 'TV'.
Don't tell me, don't tell me...

Ah yes! Top-level domain name for Tuvalu.

Am I right?
--
Richard Heathfield
Email: rjh at cpax dot org dot uk
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Sig line 4 vacant - apply within
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-11-30 10:51:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Richard Heathfield
<snip>
Post by occam
The point is, these abbreviations get a life of their own after a while.
A bit like 'TV'.
Don't tell me, don't tell me...
Ah yes! Top-level domain name for Tuvalu.
Am I right?
Correct.

Our main commercial TV company in Northern Ireland is UTV (Ulster
Television). It had the domain name "u.tv".

I remember when it was first used (some time last century) there was a
comment that special permission had to be obtained to have just a single
letter before ".tv".

UTV was taken over be ITV in 2016 and no longer has the website
"www.u.tv". Its webpages have been included on the website of ITV.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Peter Moylan
2017-11-30 11:39:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Richard Heathfield
<snip>
Post by occam
The point is, these abbreviations get a life of their own after a while.
A bit like 'TV'.
Don't tell me, don't tell me...
Ah yes! Top-level domain name for Tuvalu.
Am I right?
Correct.
Our main commercial TV company in Northern Ireland is UTV (Ulster
Television). It had the domain name "u.tv".
I remember when it was first used (some time last century) there was a
comment that special permission had to be obtained to have just a single
letter before ".tv".
UTV was taken over be ITV in 2016 and no longer has the website
"www.u.tv". Its webpages have been included on the website of ITV.
I no longer have a university mail account, but I recall that the
University of Newcastle had a standard mail signature that included
images in one of those Pacific Island domains. The main effect of this
is that, when I received official university mail, Thunderbird would
label it with "This is probably a scam".

Most recipients would not have noticed this, because they were using
Office-365. I could not use this because I was employed at the time by a
company (half-owned by the university) that had a lot of "commercial in
confidence" e-mail. We were not happy with the agreement between
Microsoft and the US CIA that all Office-365 mail would be copied to the
CIA. We already knew that the CIA was involved in industrial espionage,
and that Australian companies had lost contracts because their bids had
been leaked to American companies. Probably most of that was leaked
through Pine Gap, but we still didn't trust Office-365.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
occam
2017-11-30 14:32:09 UTC
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Post by Richard Heathfield
<snip>
Post by occam
The point is, these abbreviations get a life of their own after a while.
A bit like 'TV'.
Don't tell me, don't tell me...
Ah yes! Top-level domain name for Tuvalu.
And before too long, that domain name may be the only surviving memory
of the islands.

From Wikipedia:

"The highest elevation is 4.6 metres (15 ft) above sea level on
Niulakita, [242] which gives Tuvalu the second-lowest maximum elevation
of any country (after the Maldives). "

More: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuvalu
J. J. Lodder
2017-11-30 16:35:13 UTC
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Post by occam
Post by Richard Heathfield
<snip>
Post by occam
The point is, these abbreviations get a life of their own after a while.
A bit like 'TV'.
Don't tell me, don't tell me...
Ah yes! Top-level domain name for Tuvalu.
And before too long, that domain name may be the only surviving memory
of the islands.
"The highest elevation is 4.6 metres (15 ft) above sea level on
Niulakita, [242] which gives Tuvalu the second-lowest maximum elevation
of any country (after the Maldives). "
More: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuvalu
They'll have to build a TV tower,

Jan
Peter Moylan
2017-11-30 23:55:29 UTC
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Post by occam
Post by Richard Heathfield
<snip>
Post by occam
The point is, these abbreviations get a life of their own after a while.
A bit like 'TV'.
Don't tell me, don't tell me...
Ah yes! Top-level domain name for Tuvalu.
And before too long, that domain name may be the only surviving memory
of the islands.
"The highest elevation is 4.6 metres (15 ft) above sea level on
Niulakita, [242] which gives Tuvalu the second-lowest maximum elevation
of any country (after the Maldives). "
More: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuvalu
Of course this doesn't imply that a sea level rise of 4.6 metres would
be required to wipe out Tuvalu. A few Pacific islands are seeing
problems already. They're OK as long as the sea is calm, but storms
cause flooding. In the case of Tuvalu, I gather that a king tide is
sufficient to cause serious flooding.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
occam
2017-12-01 08:31:41 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by occam
Post by Richard Heathfield
<snip>
Post by occam
The point is, these abbreviations get a life of their own after a while.
A bit like 'TV'.
Don't tell me, don't tell me...
Ah yes! Top-level domain name for Tuvalu.
And before too long, that domain name may be the only surviving memory
of the islands.
"The highest elevation is 4.6 metres (15 ft) above sea level on
Niulakita, [242] which gives Tuvalu the second-lowest maximum elevation
of any country (after the Maldives). "
More: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuvalu
Of course this doesn't imply that a sea level rise of 4.6 metres would
be required to wipe out Tuvalu. A few Pacific islands are seeing
problems already. They're OK as long as the sea is calm, but storms
cause flooding. In the case of Tuvalu, I gather that a king tide is
sufficient to cause serious flooding.
No doubt.
However, I am willing to bet a large sum that even after the total
submersion of Tuvalu under the waves, the US company which owns the .tv
domain (and pays a handsome sum for it) will continue to exercise its
rights and continue to pay some virtual government (Tuvalu, 7.1095° S,
177.6493° E Inc.) for the privilege.
RH Draney
2017-11-30 11:45:26 UTC
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Post by occam
Plain 'CV' is no more Latin than 'PS'. I heard 'PS' used /in
conversation/ between my teenage son and a friend. Later, I asked him if
he know what 'P.S.' stood for. He referred me to a US sitcom (which?)
and thought it meant 'yeah, I forgot to mention that...' or something.
"Peter Sellers" or "Palm Springs", depending upon context....r
Kerr-Mudd,John
2017-12-01 12:13:09 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by occam
Plain 'CV' is no more Latin than 'PS'. I heard 'PS' used /in
conversation/ between my teenage son and a friend. Later, I asked him if
he know what 'P.S.' stood for. He referred me to a US sitcom (which?)
and thought it meant 'yeah, I forgot to mention that...' or something.
"Peter Sellers" or "Palm Springs", depending upon context....r
The CV is a classic French car. HTH.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-12-01 13:40:12 UTC
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On Fri, 1 Dec 2017 12:13:09 -0000 (UTC), "Kerr-Mudd,John"
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by RH Draney
Post by occam
Plain 'CV' is no more Latin than 'PS'. I heard 'PS' used /in
conversation/ between my teenage son and a friend. Later, I asked him if
he know what 'P.S.' stood for. He referred me to a US sitcom (which?)
and thought it meant 'yeah, I forgot to mention that...' or something.
"Peter Sellers" or "Palm Springs", depending upon context....r
The CV is a classic French car. HTH.
Yes. A CV is small but not quite small enough to fit in an envelope
alongside an application form.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-12-01 17:14:15 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Fri, 1 Dec 2017 12:13:09 -0000 (UTC), "Kerr-Mudd,John"
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by RH Draney
Post by occam
Plain 'CV' is no more Latin than 'PS'. I heard 'PS' used /in
conversation/ between my teenage son and a friend. Later, I asked him if
he know what 'P.S.' stood for. He referred me to a US sitcom (which?)
and thought it meant 'yeah, I forgot to mention that...' or something.
"Peter Sellers" or "Palm Springs", depending upon context....r
The CV is a classic French car. HTH.
Not really: you're thinking of 2CV.
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Yes. A CV is small but not quite small enough to fit in an envelope
alongside an application form.
--
athel
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-12-01 23:26:53 UTC
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On Fri, 1 Dec 2017 18:14:15 +0100, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Fri, 1 Dec 2017 12:13:09 -0000 (UTC), "Kerr-Mudd,John"
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by RH Draney
Post by occam
Plain 'CV' is no more Latin than 'PS'. I heard 'PS' used /in
conversation/ between my teenage son and a friend. Later, I asked him if
he know what 'P.S.' stood for. He referred me to a US sitcom (which?)
and thought it meant 'yeah, I forgot to mention that...' or something.
"Peter Sellers" or "Palm Springs", depending upon context....r
The CV is a classic French car. HTH.
Not really: you're thinking of 2CV.
Quite possibly.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Yes. A CV is small but not quite small enough to fit in an envelope
alongside an application form.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
J. J. Lodder
2017-12-01 20:50:03 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Fri, 1 Dec 2017 12:13:09 -0000 (UTC), "Kerr-Mudd,John"
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by RH Draney
Post by occam
Plain 'CV' is no more Latin than 'PS'. I heard 'PS' used /in
conversation/ between my teenage son and a friend. Later, I asked him if
he know what 'P.S.' stood for. He referred me to a US sitcom (which?)
and thought it meant 'yeah, I forgot to mention that...' or something.
"Peter Sellers" or "Palm Springs", depending upon context....r
The CV is a classic French car. HTH.
Yes. A CV is small but not quite small enough to fit in an envelope
alongside an application form.
All French cars have CVs,

Jan
RH Draney
2017-12-01 13:42:49 UTC
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Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by RH Draney
Post by occam
Plain 'CV' is no more Latin than 'PS'. I heard 'PS' used /in
conversation/ between my teenage son and a friend. Later, I asked him if
he know what 'P.S.' stood for. He referred me to a US sitcom (which?)
and thought it meant 'yeah, I forgot to mention that...' or something.
"Peter Sellers" or "Palm Springs", depending upon context....r
The CV is a classic French car. HTH.
Shame it's a lemon....r
Quinn C
2017-12-01 17:21:05 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by RH Draney
Post by occam
Plain 'CV' is no more Latin than 'PS'. I heard 'PS' used /in
conversation/ between my teenage son and a friend. Later, I asked him if
he know what 'P.S.' stood for. He referred me to a US sitcom (which?)
and thought it meant 'yeah, I forgot to mention that...' or something.
"Peter Sellers" or "Palm Springs", depending upon context....r
The CV is a classic French car. HTH.
Shame it's a lemon....r
Usable after a bit of reno?
--
...an explanatory principle - like "gravity" or "instinct" -
really explains nothing. It’s a sort of conventional agreement
between scientists to stop trying to explain things at a
certain point. -- Gregory Bateson
charles
2017-12-01 12:18:14 UTC
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Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by RH Draney
Post by occam
Plain 'CV' is no more Latin than 'PS'. I heard 'PS' used /in
conversation/ between my teenage son and a friend. Later, I asked him if
he know what 'P.S.' stood for. He referred me to a US sitcom (which?)
and thought it meant 'yeah, I forgot to mention that...' or something.
"Peter Sellers" or "Palm Springs", depending upon context....r
The CV is a classic French car. HTH.
that's only half a car. The full one is a "2CV"
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-12-01 17:14:41 UTC
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Post by charles
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by RH Draney
Post by occam
Plain 'CV' is no more Latin than 'PS'. I heard 'PS' used /in
conversation/ between my teenage son and a friend. Later, I asked him if
he know what 'P.S.' stood for. He referred me to a US sitcom (which?)
and thought it meant 'yeah, I forgot to mention that...' or something.
"Peter Sellers" or "Palm Springs", depending upon context....r
The CV is a classic French car. HTH.
that's only half a car. The full one is a "2CV"
OK, you got there first!
--
athel
Paul Wolff
2017-12-01 17:21:22 UTC
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Post by charles
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by RH Draney
Post by occam
Plain 'CV' is no more Latin than 'PS'. I heard 'PS' used /in
conversation/ between my teenage son and a friend. Later, I asked him if
he know what 'P.S.' stood for. He referred me to a US sitcom (which?)
and thought it meant 'yeah, I forgot to mention that...' or something.
"Peter Sellers" or "Palm Springs", depending upon context....r
The CV is a classic French car. HTH.
that's only half a car. The full one is a "2CV"
But then you might have a horse of a different colour.
--
Paul
b***@aol.com
2017-12-01 17:46:47 UTC
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Post by charles
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by RH Draney
Post by occam
Plain 'CV' is no more Latin than 'PS'. I heard 'PS' used /in
conversation/ between my teenage son and a friend. Later, I asked him if
he know what 'P.S.' stood for. He referred me to a US sitcom (which?)
and thought it meant 'yeah, I forgot to mention that...' or something.
"Peter Sellers" or "Palm Springs", depending upon context....r
The CV is a classic French car. HTH.
that's only half a car. The full one is a "2CV"
Which in turn is only half of this one, which preceded it
shortly (but may not be famous out of France):

https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renault_4CV
Post by charles
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
J. J. Lodder
2017-12-01 20:50:03 UTC
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Post by b***@aol.com
Post by charles
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by RH Draney
Post by occam
Plain 'CV' is no more Latin than 'PS'. I heard 'PS' used /in
conversation/ between my teenage son and a friend. Later, I asked
him if he know what 'P.S.' stood for. He referred me to a US sitcom
(which?) and thought it meant 'yeah, I forgot to mention that...'
or something.
"Peter Sellers" or "Palm Springs", depending upon context....r
The CV is a classic French car. HTH.
that's only half a car. The full one is a "2CV"
Which in turn is only half of this one, which preceded it
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renault_4CV
Over a million were built,
which was a large number in the general post-WWII poverty.
Many were exported, so I think it was well known
also out of France. [1]
It was replaced by the Renault 4L (also a 4CV)
with a much larger production run,

Jan

[1] Here is an originally Dutch one,
yours for only 6.750 euro, if you would want it
<https://www.marktplaats.nl/a/auto-s/oldtimers/m1228179718-renault-4cv-a
ffaire-1955.html?c=a2384ef0ece270f44503df9f8598c624&previousPage=lr>
b***@aol.com
2017-12-02 04:38:24 UTC
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Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by charles
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by RH Draney
Post by occam
Plain 'CV' is no more Latin than 'PS'. I heard 'PS' used /in
conversation/ between my teenage son and a friend. Later, I asked
him if he know what 'P.S.' stood for. He referred me to a US sitcom
(which?) and thought it meant 'yeah, I forgot to mention that...'
or something.
"Peter Sellers" or "Palm Springs", depending upon context....r
The CV is a classic French car. HTH.
that's only half a car. The full one is a "2CV"
Which in turn is only half of this one, which preceded it
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renault_4CV
Over a million were built,
which was a large number in the general post-WWII poverty.
Many were exported, so I think it was well known
also out of France. [1]
Yet I'd be curious to know who's heard of it in aue.
Post by J. J. Lodder
It was replaced by the Renault 4L (also a 4CV)
Yes, but only the former was said to be "une quatre chevaux", while the
latter was commonly referred to as "Renault 4" or just "4L" (sometimes
spelled "Quatrelle").
Post by J. J. Lodder
with a much larger production run,
Jan
[1] Here is an originally Dutch one,
yours for only 6.750 euro, if you would want it
<https://www.marktplaats.nl/a/auto-s/oldtimers/m1228179718-renault-4cv-a
ffaire-1955.html?c=a2384ef0ece270f44503df9f8598c624&previousPage=lr>
Tony Cooper
2017-12-02 05:00:48 UTC
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Post by b***@aol.com
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by charles
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by RH Draney
Post by occam
Plain 'CV' is no more Latin than 'PS'. I heard 'PS' used /in
conversation/ between my teenage son and a friend. Later, I asked
him if he know what 'P.S.' stood for. He referred me to a US sitcom
(which?) and thought it meant 'yeah, I forgot to mention that...'
or something.
"Peter Sellers" or "Palm Springs", depending upon context....r
The CV is a classic French car. HTH.
that's only half a car. The full one is a "2CV"
Which in turn is only half of this one, which preceded it
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renault_4CV
Over a million were built,
which was a large number in the general post-WWII poverty.
Many were exported, so I think it was well known
also out of France. [1]
Yet I'd be curious to know who's heard of it in aue.
Some of us might be more familiar with the Citroën 2CV that "Curt
Henderson" (Richard Dryfuss) drove in "American Graffiti". For
vintage car buffs, that's the Primo movie. We don't know whether to
look at The Blonde, or the Thunderbird she's driving.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
LFS
2017-12-02 06:43:52 UTC
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Post by b***@aol.com
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by charles
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by RH Draney
Post by occam
Plain 'CV' is no more Latin than 'PS'. I heard 'PS' used /in
conversation/ between my teenage son and a friend. Later, I asked
him if he know what 'P.S.' stood for. He referred me to a US sitcom
(which?) and thought it meant 'yeah, I forgot to mention that...'
or something.
"Peter Sellers" or "Palm Springs", depending upon context....r
The CV is a classic French car. HTH.
that's only half a car. The full one is a "2CV"
Which in turn is only half of this one, which preceded it
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renault_4CV
Over a million were built,
which was a large number in the general post-WWII poverty.
Many were exported, so I think it was well known
also out of France. [1]
Yet I'd be curious to know who's heard of it in aue.
Brits will have. May even have driven one. Used to be very fashionable
here in the days when Francoise Hardy and Gauloises were also popular.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Peter T. Daniels
2017-12-02 12:27:46 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by charles
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
The CV is a classic French car. HTH.
that's only half a car. The full one is a "2CV"
Which in turn is only half of this one, which preceded it
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renault_4CV
Over a million were built,
which was a large number in the general post-WWII poverty.
Many were exported, so I think it was well known
also out of France. [1]
Yet I'd be curious to know who's heard of it in aue.
Brits will have. May even have driven one. Used to be very fashionable
here in the days when Francoise Hardy and Gauloises were also popular.
"All centuries but this and every country but his own"?
b***@aol.com
2017-12-02 17:04:40 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by LFS
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by charles
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
The CV is a classic French car. HTH.
that's only half a car. The full one is a "2CV"
Which in turn is only half of this one, which preceded it
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renault_4CV
Over a million were built,
which was a large number in the general post-WWII poverty.
Many were exported, so I think it was well known
also out of France. [1]
Yet I'd be curious to know who's heard of it in aue.
Brits will have. May even have driven one. Used to be very fashionable
here in the days when Francoise Hardy and Gauloises were also popular.
"All centuries but this and every country but his own"?
Irrelevant in all respects, I'm afraid.
Peter T. Daniels
2017-12-02 23:15:52 UTC
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Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by LFS
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by charles
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
The CV is a classic French car. HTH.
that's only half a car. The full one is a "2CV"
Which in turn is only half of this one, which preceded it
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renault_4CV
Over a million were built,
which was a large number in the general post-WWII poverty.
Many were exported, so I think it was well known
also out of France. [1]
Yet I'd be curious to know who's heard of it in aue.
Brits will have. May even have driven one. Used to be very fashionable
here in the days when Francoise Hardy and Gauloises were also popular.
"All centuries but this and every country but his own"?
Irrelevant in all respects, I'm afraid.
Eh? Mr Gilbert was referring to people who preferred [the equivalent in his day
to] French cars, cigarettes, and whatever Mme Hardy was.
b***@aol.com
2017-12-03 07:25:55 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by LFS
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by charles
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
The CV is a classic French car. HTH.
that's only half a car. The full one is a "2CV"
Which in turn is only half of this one, which preceded it
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renault_4CV
Over a million were built,
which was a large number in the general post-WWII poverty.
Many were exported, so I think it was well known
also out of France. [1]
Yet I'd be curious to know who's heard of it in aue.
Brits will have. May even have driven one. Used to be very fashionable
here in the days when Francoise Hardy and Gauloises were also popular.
"All centuries but this and every country but his own"?
Irrelevant in all respects, I'm afraid.
Eh? Mr Gilbert was referring to people who preferred [the equivalent in his day
to] French cars, cigarettes, and whatever Mme Hardy was.
But the complete quote is

"The idiot who praises, with enthusiastic tone,
All centuries but this and every country but his own."

That's quite a stretch from

"Brits will have [heard of the 4CV]. May even have driven one. Used to
be very fashionable here in the days when Francoise Hardy and Gauloises
were also popular."
Peter T. Daniels
2017-12-03 13:26:22 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by LFS
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by charles
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
The CV is a classic French car. HTH.
that's only half a car. The full one is a "2CV"
Which in turn is only half of this one, which preceded it
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renault_4CV
Over a million were built,
which was a large number in the general post-WWII poverty.
Many were exported, so I think it was well known
also out of France. [1]
Yet I'd be curious to know who's heard of it in aue.
Brits will have. May even have driven one. Used to be very fashionable
here in the days when Francoise Hardy and Gauloises were also popular.
"All centuries but this and every country but his own"?
Irrelevant in all respects, I'm afraid.
Eh? Mr Gilbert was referring to people who preferred [the equivalent in his day
to] French cars, cigarettes, and whatever Mme Hardy was.
But the complete quote is
"The idiot who praises, with enthusiastic tone,
All centuries but this and every country but his own."
That's quite a stretch from
"Brits will have [heard of the 4CV]. May even have driven one. Used to
be very fashionable here in the days when Francoise Hardy and Gauloises
were also popular."
Is "very fashionable ... also popular" too far from Gilbert's sentiment to make sense to you?

(Quoting the second line, I assumed the reader was familiar with the first line.)
b***@aol.com
2017-12-03 16:44:35 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by LFS
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by charles
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
The CV is a classic French car. HTH.
that's only half a car. The full one is a "2CV"
Which in turn is only half of this one, which preceded it
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renault_4CV
Over a million were built,
which was a large number in the general post-WWII poverty.
Many were exported, so I think it was well known
also out of France. [1]
Yet I'd be curious to know who's heard of it in aue.
Brits will have. May even have driven one. Used to be very fashionable
here in the days when Francoise Hardy and Gauloises were also popular.
"All centuries but this and every country but his own"?
Irrelevant in all respects, I'm afraid.
Eh? Mr Gilbert was referring to people who preferred [the equivalent in his day
to] French cars, cigarettes, and whatever Mme Hardy was.
But the complete quote is
"The idiot who praises, with enthusiastic tone,
All centuries but this and every country but his own."
That's quite a stretch from
"Brits will have [heard of the 4CV]. May even have driven one. Used to
be very fashionable here in the days when Francoise Hardy and Gauloises
were also popular."
Is "very fashionable ... also popular" too far from Gilbert's sentiment to make sense to you?
(Quoting the second line, I assumed the reader was familiar with the first line.)
Precisely: the second line doesn't make sense in itself and can't be
isolated from the first, where "idiot", "praises" and "enthusiastic
tone" bear no relevance to LFS's post.
Peter T. Daniels
2017-12-03 20:25:45 UTC
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Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by LFS
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by charles
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
The CV is a classic French car. HTH.
that's only half a car. The full one is a "2CV"
Which in turn is only half of this one, which preceded it
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renault_4CV
Over a million were built,
which was a large number in the general post-WWII poverty.
Many were exported, so I think it was well known
also out of France. [1]
Yet I'd be curious to know who's heard of it in aue.
Brits will have. May even have driven one. Used to be very fashionable
here in the days when Francoise Hardy and Gauloises were also popular.
"All centuries but this and every country but his own"?
Irrelevant in all respects, I'm afraid.
Eh? Mr Gilbert was referring to people who preferred [the equivalent in his day
to] French cars, cigarettes, and whatever Mme Hardy was.
But the complete quote is
"The idiot who praises, with enthusiastic tone,
All centuries but this and every country but his own."
That's quite a stretch from
"Brits will have [heard of the 4CV]. May even have driven one. Used to
be very fashionable here in the days when Francoise Hardy and Gauloises
were also popular."
Is "very fashionable ... also popular" too far from Gilbert's sentiment to make sense to you?
(Quoting the second line, I assumed the reader was familiar with the first line.)
Precisely: the second line doesn't make sense in itself and can't be
isolated from the first, where "idiot", "praises" and "enthusiastic
tone" bear no relevance to LFS's post.
It "doesn't make sense in itself" only to someone who didn't grow up with G&S
as with mother's milk -- any Anglophone (at least, of a certain age) should
immediately recognize most of G&S (just as most of Lewis Carroll), and the
essence of an allusion is _omitting_ the part that makes the allusion explicit
-- i.e., not an allusion.

I wouldn't be surprised if the song it's from is the very best known of all the
songs by G&S.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-12-03 13:35:54 UTC
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Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by charles
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
The CV is a classic French car. HTH.
that's only half a car. The full one is a "2CV"
Which in turn is only half of this one, which preceded it
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renault_4CV
Over a million were built,
which was a large number in the general post-WWII poverty.
Many were exported, so I think it was well known
also out of France. [1]
Yet I'd be curious to know who's heard of it in aue.
Brits will have. May even have driven one. Used to be very fashionable>
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by b***@aol.com
here in the days when Francoise Hardy and Gauloises were also
popular.
"All centuries but this and every country but his own"?
Irrelevant in all respects, I'm afraid.
Eh? Mr Gilbert was referring to people who preferred [the equivalent in
his day> to] French cars, cigarettes, and whatever Mme Hardy was.
"is". Anyone who knows how to use Google will have no difficulty
finding out who she is.
Post by b***@aol.com
But the complete quote is
"The idiot who praises, with enthusiastic tone,
All centuries but this and every country but his own."
That's quite a stretch from
"Brits will have [heard of the 4CV]. May even have driven one. Used to
be very fashionable here in the days when Francoise Hardy and Gauloises
were also popular."
--
athel
Peter T. Daniels
2017-12-03 14:07:45 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by charles
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
The CV is a classic French car. HTH.
that's only half a car. The full one is a "2CV"
Which in turn is only half of this one, which preceded it
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renault_4CV
Over a million were built,
which was a large number in the general post-WWII poverty.
Many were exported, so I think it was well known
also out of France. [1]
Yet I'd be curious to know who's heard of it in aue.
Brits will have. May even have driven one. Used to be very fashionable>
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by b***@aol.com
here in the days when Francoise Hardy and Gauloises were also
popular.
"All centuries but this and every country but his own"?
Irrelevant in all respects, I'm afraid.
Eh? Mr Gilbert was referring to people who preferred [the equivalent in
his day> to] French cars, cigarettes, and whatever Mme Hardy was.
"is". Anyone who knows how to use Google will have no difficulty
finding out who she is.
What does her identity have to do with the rhetoric of either the sentence or the comment?

Asshole Moron-Bowden has no conception of natural discourse. Or the meaning of "used to be."
Mack A. Damia
2017-12-02 16:28:30 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by b***@aol.com
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Post by b***@aol.com
Post by charles
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by RH Draney
Post by occam
Plain 'CV' is no more Latin than 'PS'. I heard 'PS' used /in
conversation/ between my teenage son and a friend. Later, I asked
him if he know what 'P.S.' stood for. He referred me to a US sitcom
(which?) and thought it meant 'yeah, I forgot to mention that...'
or something.
"Peter Sellers" or "Palm Springs", depending upon context....r
The CV is a classic French car. HTH.
that's only half a car. The full one is a "2CV"
Which in turn is only half of this one, which preceded it
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renault_4CV
Over a million were built,
which was a large number in the general post-WWII poverty.
Many were exported, so I think it was well known
also out of France. [1]
Yet I'd be curious to know who's heard of it in aue.
Brits will have. May even have driven one. Used to be very fashionable
here in the days when Francoise Hardy and Gauloises were also popular.
Americans will recognize the car as a "Citroën".

Many for sale in the USA.

http://citroenimportservices.com/for-sale/
Sam Plusnet
2017-12-02 20:39:41 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by charles
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by RH Draney
Post by occam
Plain 'CV' is no more Latin than 'PS'. I heard 'PS' used /in
conversation/ between my teenage son and a friend. Later, I asked
him if he know what 'P.S.' stood for. He referred me to a US sitcom
(which?) and thought it meant 'yeah, I forgot to mention that...'
or something.
"Peter Sellers" or "Palm Springs", depending upon context....r
The CV is a classic French car. HTH.
that's only half a car. The full one is a "2CV"
Which in turn is only half of this one, which preceded it
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renault_4CV
Over a million were built,
which was a large number in the general post-WWII poverty.
Many were exported, so I think it was well known
also out of France. [1]
Yet I'd be curious to know who's heard of it in aue.
Brits will have. May even have driven one. Used to be very fashionable
here in the days when Francoise Hardy and Gauloises were also popular.
I had never heard of the Renault 4CV before this post.

I did know of the 2CV.
--
Sam Plusnet
occam
2017-12-02 08:55:15 UTC
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Post by b***@aol.com
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by charles
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by RH Draney
Post by occam
Plain 'CV' is no more Latin than 'PS'. I heard 'PS' used /in
conversation/ between my teenage son and a friend. Later, I asked
him if he know what 'P.S.' stood for. He referred me to a US sitcom
(which?) and thought it meant 'yeah, I forgot to mention that...'
or something.
"Peter Sellers" or "Palm Springs", depending upon context....r
The CV is a classic French car. HTH.
that's only half a car. The full one is a "2CV"
Which in turn is only half of this one, which preceded it
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renault_4CV
Over a million were built,
which was a large number in the general post-WWII poverty.
Many were exported, so I think it was well known
also out of France. [1]
Yet I'd be curious to know who's heard of it in aue.
Post by J. J. Lodder
It was replaced by the Renault 4L (also a 4CV)
Yes, but only the former was said to be "une quatre chevaux", while the
latter was commonly referred to as "Renault 4" or just "4L" (sometimes
spelled "Quatrelle").
A second-hand Renault 4 ('4L') was my first student car, in London. Good
for moving stuff around. Unreliable, but inexpensive to run.
Janet
2017-12-02 16:14:43 UTC
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Post by occam
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by charles
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by RH Draney
Post by occam
Plain 'CV' is no more Latin than 'PS'. I heard 'PS' used /in
conversation/ between my teenage son and a friend. Later, I asked
him if he know what 'P.S.' stood for. He referred me to a US sitcom
(which?) and thought it meant 'yeah, I forgot to mention that...'
or something.
"Peter Sellers" or "Palm Springs", depending upon context....r
The CV is a classic French car. HTH.
that's only half a car. The full one is a "2CV"
Which in turn is only half of this one, which preceded it
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renault_4CV
Over a million were built,
which was a large number in the general post-WWII poverty.
Many were exported, so I think it was well known
also out of France. [1]
Yet I'd be curious to know who's heard of it in aue.
Post by J. J. Lodder
It was replaced by the Renault 4L (also a 4CV)
Yes, but only the former was said to be "une quatre chevaux", while the
latter was commonly referred to as "Renault 4" or just "4L" (sometimes
spelled "Quatrelle").
A second-hand Renault 4 ('4L') was my first student car, in London. Good
for moving stuff around. Unreliable, but inexpensive to run.
A white Renault 4 was the only car we ever bought new. Back in the
70's.

Janet
Anders D. Nygaard
2017-12-03 17:20:24 UTC
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Post by b***@aol.com
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by charles
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by RH Draney
Post by occam
Plain 'CV' is no more Latin than 'PS'. I heard 'PS' used /in
conversation/ between my teenage son and a friend. Later, I asked
him if he know what 'P.S.' stood for. He referred me to a US sitcom
(which?) and thought it meant 'yeah, I forgot to mention that...'
or something.
"Peter Sellers" or "Palm Springs", depending upon context....r
The CV is a classic French car. HTH.
that's only half a car. The full one is a "2CV"
Which in turn is only half of this one, which preceded it
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renault_4CV
Over a million were built,
which was a large number in the general post-WWII poverty.
Many were exported, so I think it was well known
also out of France. [1]
Yet I'd be curious to know who's heard of it in aue.
I thought I knew it, but the picture on wikipédia was of
a different car, so: Not me.
Post by b***@aol.com
[...]
/Anders, Denmark.
J. J. Lodder
2017-12-03 20:52:49 UTC
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Post by Anders D. Nygaard
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by charles
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by RH Draney
Post by occam
Plain 'CV' is no more Latin than 'PS'. I heard 'PS' used /in
conversation/ between my teenage son and a friend. Later, I asked
him if he know what 'P.S.' stood for. He referred me to a US sitcom
(which?) and thought it meant 'yeah, I forgot to mention that...'
or something.
"Peter Sellers" or "Palm Springs", depending upon context....r
The CV is a classic French car. HTH.
that's only half a car. The full one is a "2CV"
Which in turn is only half of this one, which preceded it
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renault_4CV
Over a million were built,
which was a large number in the general post-WWII poverty.
Many were exported, so I think it was well known
also out of France. [1]
Yet I'd be curious to know who's heard of it in aue.
I thought I knew it, but the picture on wikipédia was of
a different car, so: Not me.
The front of hte $CV is rather non-descript.
(much like other casr of the period)
It's the rear that's very characteristic,
and immediately recognisable,

Jan
Jerry Friedman
2017-12-03 21:33:00 UTC
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Post by b***@aol.com
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Post by charles
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by RH Draney
Post by occam
Plain 'CV' is no more Latin than 'PS'. I heard 'PS' used /in
conversation/ between my teenage son and a friend. Later, I asked
him if he know what 'P.S.' stood for. He referred me to a US sitcom
(which?) and thought it meant 'yeah, I forgot to mention that...'
or something.
"Peter Sellers" or "Palm Springs", depending upon context....r
The CV is a classic French car. HTH.
that's only half a car. The full one is a "2CV"
Which in turn is only half of this one, which preceded it
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renault_4CV
Over a million were built,
which was a large number in the general post-WWII poverty.
Many were exported, so I think it was well known
also out of France. [1]
Yet I'd be curious to know who's heard of it in aue.
...

I've heard of the 2CV (=German "Entchen"?) but not the double-powered one.

Back to the earlier topic: Thunderbird thinks this is e-mail, so it
warns you if your post contains an "attachment keyword" but has nothing
attached. It's warning me that this post contains "CV".
--
Jerry Friedman
J. J. Lodder
2017-12-03 22:04:04 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by charles
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by RH Draney
Post by occam
Plain 'CV' is no more Latin than 'PS'. I heard 'PS' used /in
conversation/ between my teenage son and a friend. Later, I asked
him if he know what 'P.S.' stood for. He referred me to a US
sitcom (which?) and thought it meant 'yeah, I forgot to mention
that...' or something.
"Peter Sellers" or "Palm Springs", depending upon context....r
The CV is a classic French car. HTH.
that's only half a car. The full one is a "2CV"
Which in turn is only half of this one, which preceded it
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renault_4CV
Over a million were built,
which was a large number in the general post-WWII poverty.
Many were exported, so I think it was well known
also out of France. [1]
Yet I'd be curious to know who's heard of it in aue.
...
I've heard of the 2CV (=German "Entchen"?) but not the double-powered one.
From Dutch, 'Lelijke Eend' often shortened to just 'Eend',
(from Andersen's ugly duckling)
derived from the waddling duck-like motions it could make
if not handled skilfully. (esp. early models in first gear)
The suspension was linear, not progressive, hence very soft,
and with a very long stroke.
The shock absorbers were not up to it.

The 2CV stands high on relatively big wheels,

Jan
HVS
2017-12-03 23:49:41 UTC
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On Sun, 3 Dec 2017 14:33:00 -0700, Jerry Friedman
-snip - (Sorry for piggybacking, Jerry; I don't have bebercito's post
on this computer)
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by J. J. Lodder
Over a million were built,
which was a large number in the general post-WWII poverty.
Many were exported, so I think it was well known
also out of France. [1]
Yet I'd be curious to know who's heard of it in aue.
Not familiar with it. My first thought was that it was a reference to
a Renault 4 (my first very-much-previously-owned UK car, of which I
have fond memories), but that was obviously way too late for what was
being discussed.

I wasn't aware that the "x CV" tag was used by anyone other than
Citroën.
--
Cheers, Harvey
Rich Ulrich
2017-12-04 03:27:28 UTC
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Post by HVS
On Sun, 3 Dec 2017 14:33:00 -0700, Jerry Friedman
-snip - (Sorry for piggybacking, Jerry; I don't have bebercito's post
on this computer)
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by J. J. Lodder
Over a million were built,
which was a large number in the general post-WWII poverty.
Many were exported, so I think it was well known
also out of France. [1]
Yet I'd be curious to know who's heard of it in aue.
Not familiar with it. My first thought was that it was a reference to
a Renault 4 (my first very-much-previously-owned UK car, of which I
have fond memories), but that was obviously way too late for what was
being discussed.
I wasn't aware that the "x CV" tag was used by anyone other than
Citroën.
There was a Citroën 2CV on campus in my college years.
I was amazed. My first thought was that someone had done
a remarkable job in creating his own home-made Volkswagon.
--
Rich Ulrich
J. J. Lodder
2017-12-04 09:41:14 UTC
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Post by HVS
On Sun, 3 Dec 2017 14:33:00 -0700, Jerry Friedman
-snip - (Sorry for piggybacking, Jerry; I don't have bebercito's post
on this computer)
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by J. J. Lodder
Over a million were built,
which was a large number in the general post-WWII poverty.
Many were exported, so I think it was well known
also out of France. [1]
Yet I'd be curious to know who's heard of it in aue.
Not familiar with it. My first thought was that it was a reference to
a Renault 4 (my first very-much-previously-owned UK car, of which I
have fond memories), but that was obviously way too late for what was
being discussed.
I wasn't aware that the "x CV" tag was used by anyone other than
Citroën.
Any French car has a CV rating.
(determined when a model is first marketed)
Originally it was the horsepower rating,
nowadays it is computed by means of an excessively silly formula
that isn't even dimensionally correct.
The idea seems to be that if you make it crazy and complicated enough
no one will know how to comlain about it.
The resulting CV value is understood as a 'cheveau fiscal'.

The 2CV was remarkable because it was the only car with a 2CV rating,

Jan
b***@aol.com
2017-12-04 16:33:54 UTC
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Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by HVS
On Sun, 3 Dec 2017 14:33:00 -0700, Jerry Friedman
-snip - (Sorry for piggybacking, Jerry; I don't have bebercito's post
on this computer)
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by J. J. Lodder
Over a million were built,
which was a large number in the general post-WWII poverty.
Many were exported, so I think it was well known
also out of France. [1]
Yet I'd be curious to know who's heard of it in aue.
Not familiar with it. My first thought was that it was a reference to
a Renault 4 (my first very-much-previously-owned UK car, of which I
have fond memories), but that was obviously way too late for what was
being discussed.
I wasn't aware that the "x CV" tag was used by anyone other than
Citroën.
Any French car has a CV rating.
(determined when a model is first marketed)
Originally it was the horsepower rating,
It all depends on what you call "horsepower rating" as French has
two words for English "horsepower", "cheval-vapeur", abbreviated
as "ch" (= 0.73539875 kW) and "cheval fiscal" (an arbitrary value
attributed to a vehicle for administrative purposes, the formula of
which has varied over the years), abbreviated as "cv" (though most
people mix up the two abbreviations today) -- but a cv was never equal
to a ch.
Post by J. J. Lodder
nowadays it is computed by means of an excessively silly formula
that isn't even dimensionally correct.
?
Post by J. J. Lodder
The idea seems to be that if you make it crazy and complicated enough
no one will know how to comlain about it.
In the current formula, the idea is actually to factor in ecology
(through CO2 emissions into the atmosphere).
Post by J. J. Lodder
The resulting CV value is understood as a 'cheveau fiscal'.
"cheval fiscal" (singular) and "chevaux fiscaux" (plural).
Post by J. J. Lodder
The 2CV was remarkable because it was the only car with a 2CV rating,
Jan
Ken Blake
2017-12-04 18:44:04 UTC
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Post by b***@aol.com
It all depends on what you call "horsepower rating" as French has
two words for English "horsepower", "cheval-vapeur", abbreviated
as "ch" (= 0.73539875 kW) and "cheval fiscal" (an arbitrary value
attributed to a vehicle for administrative purposes, the formula of
which has varied over the years), abbreviated as "cv" (though most
people mix up the two abbreviations today) -- but a cv was never equal
to a ch.
Thanks very much. I had always thought that the "CV" in 2CV and 4CV,
Paul Wolff
2017-12-04 20:54:48 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
Post by b***@aol.com
It all depends on what you call "horsepower rating" as French has
two words for English "horsepower", "cheval-vapeur", abbreviated
as "ch" (= 0.73539875 kW) and "cheval fiscal" (an arbitrary value
attributed to a vehicle for administrative purposes, the formula of
which has varied over the years), abbreviated as "cv" (though most
people mix up the two abbreviations today) -- but a cv was never equal
to a ch.
Thanks very much. I had always thought that the "CV" in 2CV and 4CV,
stood for "chevaux."
That would be a vaux pas. The C should be for chevaux, and the V for
vapeur(s), although M. Bebercito says otherwise. He, if he he be, may be
correct, but that would defy the French claim to be a logical people.
--
Paul
J. J. Lodder
2017-12-04 22:10:47 UTC
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Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Ken Blake
Post by b***@aol.com
It all depends on what you call "horsepower rating" as French has
two words for English "horsepower", "cheval-vapeur", abbreviated
as "ch" (= 0.73539875 kW) and "cheval fiscal" (an arbitrary value
attributed to a vehicle for administrative purposes, the formula of
which has varied over the years), abbreviated as "cv" (though most
people mix up the two abbreviations today) -- but a cv was never equal
to a ch.
Thanks very much. I had always thought that the "CV" in 2CV and 4CV,
stood for "chevaux."
That would be a vaux pas. The C should be for chevaux, and the V for
vapeur(s), although M. Bebercito says otherwise. He, if he he be, may be
correct, but that would defy the French claim to be a logical people.
Logcal? Or even rational?
The formula is (since 1998)

P_a = C/40 - (P/40)^1.5

where
P_a is 'la puissance administrative, exprimée en chevaux-vapeur' (en CV)
C is 'la quantité de CO2 rejetée', (en grammes par km)
P is the real engine power, (in kW)
and ^1.5 is to the power one and a half, as you would expect.

Not even a Frenchman can explain the rationale
behind this excessively silly formula.
(with its dimensioned constants)
Note that the CV is dimensionless, (despiten being called a 'puissance')
unless there is another hidden dimensioned constant. (with value one)

The 2V classified as 2CV under another formula,

Jan
b***@aol.com
2017-12-05 00:14:26 UTC
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Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Ken Blake
Post by b***@aol.com
It all depends on what you call "horsepower rating" as French has
two words for English "horsepower", "cheval-vapeur", abbreviated
as "ch" (= 0.73539875 kW) and "cheval fiscal" (an arbitrary value
attributed to a vehicle for administrative purposes, the formula of
which has varied over the years), abbreviated as "cv" (though most
people mix up the two abbreviations today) -- but a cv was never equal
to a ch.
Thanks very much. I had always thought that the "CV" in 2CV and 4CV,
stood for "chevaux."
That would be a vaux pas. The C should be for chevaux, and the V for
vapeur(s), although M. Bebercito says otherwise. He, if he he be, may be
correct, but that would defy the French claim to be a logical people.
Logcal? Or even rational?
The formula is (since 1998)
P_a = C/40 - (P/40)^1.5
where
P_a is 'la puissance administrative, exprimée en chevaux-vapeur' (en CV)
C is 'la quantité de CO2 rejetée', (en grammes par km)
P is the real engine power, (in kW)
and ^1.5 is to the power one and a half, as you would expect.
Not even a Frenchman can explain the rationale
behind this excessively silly formula.
(with its dimensioned constants)
Note that the CV is dimensionless, (despiten being called a 'puissance')
unless there is another hidden dimensioned constant. (with value one)
The above seems to be extracted from https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cheval_fiscal#France_.28formule_de_1956.29.

However, "P_a is 'la puissance administrative, exprimée en
chevaux-vapeur' (en CV)" is plain wrong and should read
"...(en ch)" - and, as noted before, 1 ch = 0.73539875 kW.

As a matter of fact, the French Wiki article on the "cheval-vapeur",
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cheval-vapeur, says this (emphasis
mine):

|L'abréviation est :
|ch pour le cheval-vapeur ; _il ne faut pas la confondre avec la
|notation CV du cheval fiscal_

Which is correct, except that "CV" (ideally, but illiteracy is gaining
ground) should read "cv".
Post by J. J. Lodder
The 2V classified as 2CV under another formula,
Jan
Peter Moylan
2017-12-05 02:46:01 UTC
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Post by b***@aol.com
As a matter of fact, the French Wiki article on the "cheval-vapeur",
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cheval-vapeur, says this (emphasis
|ch pour le cheval-vapeur ; _il ne faut pas la confondre avec la
|notation CV du cheval fiscal_
So h stands for "vapeur" and v stands for "fiscal".

Clear as mud. But then I was never able to get my head around a
steam-driven horse.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
b***@aol.com
2017-12-05 00:05:40 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
Post by b***@aol.com
It all depends on what you call "horsepower rating" as French has
two words for English "horsepower", "cheval-vapeur", abbreviated
as "ch" (= 0.73539875 kW) and "cheval fiscal" (an arbitrary value
attributed to a vehicle for administrative purposes, the formula of
which has varied over the years), abbreviated as "cv" (though most
people mix up the two abbreviations today) -- but a cv was never equal
to a ch.
Thanks very much. I had always thought that the "CV" in 2CV and 4CV,
stood for "chevaux."
It does, but "fiscaux" is then implied. Actually, and that's where the shoe
pinches in terms of clarity, the French can say "la 2 CV fait 2 chevaux"
(if they mean "fiscaux") or "la 2 CV fait 29 chevaux" (if they refer to
its engine power).
J. J. Lodder
2017-12-05 10:07:23 UTC
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Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by HVS
On Sun, 3 Dec 2017 14:33:00 -0700, Jerry Friedman
-snip - (Sorry for piggybacking, Jerry; I don't have bebercito's post
on this computer)
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by J. J. Lodder
Over a million were built,
which was a large number in the general post-WWII poverty.
Many were exported, so I think it was well known
also out of France. [1]
Yet I'd be curious to know who's heard of it in aue.
Not familiar with it. My first thought was that it was a reference to
a Renault 4 (my first very-much-previously-owned UK car, of which I
have fond memories), but that was obviously way too late for what was
being discussed.
I wasn't aware that the "x CV" tag was used by anyone other than
Citroën.
Any French car has a CV rating.
(determined when a model is first marketed)
Originally it was the horsepower rating,
It all depends on what you call "horsepower rating" as French has
two words for English "horsepower", "cheval-vapeur", abbreviated
as "ch" (= 0.73539875 kW) and "cheval fiscal" (an arbitrary value
attributed to a vehicle for administrative purposes, the formula of
which has varied over the years), abbreviated as "cv" (though most
people mix up the two abbreviations today) -- but a cv was never equal
to a ch.
Well, the original CV value was proportional to the amount of air
that could pass through the engine.
(number of cylinders times piston area times stroke times revs)
So it was roughly proportional to horsepower.
It had the advantage that it could be measured objectively,
avoiding all the ambiguities associated with
putting an actual engine on a test stand.
Given the amount of air put through
you know how much petrol you can burn,
hence thermal power, hence horsepower.
(give or take minor differences in efficiency)
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by J. J. Lodder
nowadays it is computed by means of an excessively silly formula
that isn't even dimensionally correct.
?
Post by J. J. Lodder
The idea seems to be that if you make it crazy and complicated enough
no one will know how to comlain about it.
In the current formula, the idea is actually to factor in ecology
(through CO2 emissions into the atmosphere).
Post by J. J. Lodder
The resulting CV value is understood as a 'cheveau fiscal'.
"cheval fiscal" (singular) and "chevaux fiscaux" (plural).
The taxes pluralise with the horses?
(strikes forehead) Ah, of course,
each horse should be taxed separately,

Jan

--
"Toc, Toc, Toc. Ils sont fous, ces Francais"
(Obelix)
RH Draney
2017-12-04 01:09:38 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Back to the earlier topic: Thunderbird thinks this is e-mail, so it
warns you if your post contains an "attachment keyword" but has nothing
attached.  It's warning me that this post contains "CV".
You're lucky it's not "helpfully" converting the "Roman numeral" to more
conventional form....r
J. J. Lodder
2017-12-04 09:41:14 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by Jerry Friedman
Back to the earlier topic: Thunderbird thinks this is e-mail, so it
warns you if your post contains an "attachment keyword" but has nothing
attached. It's warning me that this post contains "CV".
You're lucky it's not "helpfully" converting the "Roman numeral" to more
conventional form....r
That reminds me: sometime ago we tried to list
the Rooman numerals which are valid English words.
There are a few of them. CV isn't really a word.
A real one is MIX,

Jan
RH Draney
2017-12-04 14:45:40 UTC
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Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by RH Draney
Post by Jerry Friedman
Back to the earlier topic: Thunderbird thinks this is e-mail, so it
warns you if your post contains an "attachment keyword" but has nothing
attached. It's warning me that this post contains "CV".
You're lucky it's not "helpfully" converting the "Roman numeral" to more
conventional form....r
That reminds me: sometime ago we tried to list
the Rooman numerals which are valid English words.
There are a few of them. CV isn't really a word.
A real one is MIX,
And I once tried to create a regular expression to match movie titles at
IMDb ending in Roman numerals (with perhaps a colon or parentheses
following to allow for subtitles like "Ipsum Dolor IV: The Lore
Continues") to find out what the greatest number of sequels of a single
title might be...I found to my disappointment that the database included
so many Italian titles containing "di" and "mi" and Chinese titles
containing "xi" that any such formula was useless....r
Jerry Friedman
2017-12-04 14:59:28 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by RH Draney
Post by Jerry Friedman
Back to the earlier topic: Thunderbird thinks this is e-mail, so it
warns you if your post contains an "attachment keyword" but has nothing
attached.  It's warning me that this post contains "CV".
You're lucky it's not "helpfully" converting the "Roman numeral" to more
conventional form....r
That reminds me: sometime ago we tried to list
the Rooman numerals which are valid English words.
There are a few of them. CV isn't really a word.
A real one is MIX,
And I once tried to create a regular expression to match movie titles at
IMDb ending in Roman numerals (with perhaps a colon or parentheses
following to allow for subtitles like "Ipsum Dolor IV: The Lore
Continues") to find out what the greatest number of sequels of a single
title might be...I found to my disappointment that the database included
so many Italian titles containing "di" and "mi" and Chinese titles
containing "xi" that any such formula was useless....r
"DI" and "MI"? Joke, right?
--
Jerry Friedman
RH Draney
2017-12-04 21:39:35 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
And I once tried to create a regular expression to match movie titles
at IMDb ending in Roman numerals (with perhaps a colon or parentheses
following to allow for subtitles like "Ipsum Dolor IV: The Lore
Continues") to find out what the greatest number of sequels of a
single title might be...I found to my disappointment that the database
included so many Italian titles containing "di" and "mi" and Chinese
titles containing "xi" that any such formula was useless....r
"DI" and "MI"?  Joke, right?
I wish....r
Jerry Friedman
2017-12-04 23:11:25 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by RH Draney
And I once tried to create a regular expression to match movie titles
at IMDb ending in Roman numerals (with perhaps a colon or parentheses
following to allow for subtitles like "Ipsum Dolor IV: The Lore
Continues") to find out what the greatest number of sequels of a
single title might be...I found to my disappointment that the database
included so many Italian titles containing "di" and "mi" and Chinese
titles containing "xi" that any such formula was useless....r
"DI" and "MI"?  Joke, right?
I wish....r
There's a movie with over 1,000 sequels? I'd wish there weren't too.

Anyway, if you know there is, then you don't have to worry about XI,
DI, or MI.
--
Jerry Friedman has also taught his grandmother to suck eggs.
J. J. Lodder
2017-12-05 10:07:27 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by RH Draney
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by RH Draney
And I once tried to create a regular expression to match movie titles
at IMDb ending in Roman numerals (with perhaps a colon or parentheses
following to allow for subtitles like "Ipsum Dolor IV: The Lore
Continues") to find out what the greatest number of sequels of a
single title might be...I found to my disappointment that the database
included so many Italian titles containing "di" and "mi" and Chinese
titles containing "xi" that any such formula was useless....r
"DI" and "MI"? Joke, right?
I wish....r
There's a movie with over 1,000 sequels? I'd wish there weren't too.
Anyway, if you know there is, then you don't have to worry about XI,
DI, or MI.
IIRC they have 'Rocky MCCXXXVI' or something like that in 'Spaceballs',
(or was it just Rocky something in arabic?)

Jan
J. J. Lodder
2017-12-04 22:14:48 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by RH Draney
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by RH Draney
Post by Jerry Friedman
Back to the earlier topic: Thunderbird thinks this is e-mail, so it
warns you if your post contains an "attachment keyword" but has nothing
attached. It's warning me that this post contains "CV".
You're lucky it's not "helpfully" converting the "Roman numeral" to more
conventional form....r
That reminds me: sometime ago we tried to list
the Rooman numerals which are valid English words.
There are a few of them. CV isn't really a word.
A real one is MIX,
And I once tried to create a regular expression to match movie titles at
IMDb ending in Roman numerals (with perhaps a colon or parentheses
following to allow for subtitles like "Ipsum Dolor IV: The Lore
Continues") to find out what the greatest number of sequels of a single
title might be...I found to my disappointment that the database included
so many Italian titles containing "di" and "mi" and Chinese titles
containing "xi" that any such formula was useless....r
"DI" and "MI"? Joke, right?
So MI V. What's 007 in Roman numerals?

Jan
Richard Tobin
2017-12-04 22:24:32 UTC
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Post by J. J. Lodder
So MI V. What's 007 in Roman numerals?
LXXXXIIIC

-- Richard
J. J. Lodder
2017-12-05 10:07:27 UTC
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Post by Richard Tobin
Post by J. J. Lodder
So MI V. What's 007 in Roman numerals?
LXXXXIIIC
Must have been tiring on poor Moneypenny.
But at least it makes it clear that he is an underling of M

Jan

J. J. Lodder
2017-12-05 10:07:24 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by RH Draney
Post by Jerry Friedman
Back to the earlier topic: Thunderbird thinks this is e-mail, so it
warns you if your post contains an "attachment keyword" but has nothing
attached. It's warning me that this post contains "CV".
You're lucky it's not "helpfully" converting the "Roman numeral" to more
conventional form....r
That reminds me: sometime ago we tried to list
the Rooman numerals which are valid English words.
There are a few of them. CV isn't really a word.
A real one is MIX,
And I once tried to create a regular expression to match movie titles at
IMDb ending in Roman numerals (with perhaps a colon or parentheses
following to allow for subtitles like "Ipsum Dolor IV: The Lore
Continues") to find out what the greatest number of sequels of a single
title might be...I found to my disappointment that the database included
so many Italian titles containing "di" and "mi" and Chinese titles
containing "xi" that any such formula was useless....r
I tried, but it is not easy (except by rather brute force)
to write a regular expression that matches all Roman numerals,
and nothing else.
So, as a first exploration I tried: space[IVXLCDM][IVXLCDM][IVXLCDM]\W
on a library database to get all three letter 'Roman numerals'.
The most common false positive was XML,

Jan
GordonD
2017-11-30 12:54:37 UTC
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Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
My guess is that the report was corrctly typed using "résumé" but the
"é"s were lost in transferring it to be put together with the rest of
the reports, etc, because of an incompatibility of character codes.
Of course the word isn't often used in BrEng: we call the thing a CV
(for Curriculum Vitae).
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
The Scots are using Latin nowadays? The presumption --- ;-)
And we were never even occupied by the Romans...
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
charles
2017-11-30 13:56:25 UTC
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Post by GordonD
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
My guess is that the report was corrctly typed using "résumé" but the
"é"s were lost in transferring it to be put together with the rest of
the reports, etc, because of an incompatibility of character codes.
Of course the word isn't often used in BrEng: we call the thing a CV
(for Curriculum Vitae).
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
The Scots are using Latin nowadays? The presumption --- ;-)
And we were never even occupied by the Romans...
not only that, but the IX legion was never seen again.
Post by GordonD
--
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
J. J. Lodder
2017-11-30 16:35:13 UTC
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Post by charles
Post by GordonD
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
My guess is that the report was corrctly typed using "résumé" but the
"é"s were lost in transferring it to be put together with the rest of
the reports, etc, because of an incompatibility of character codes.
Of course the word isn't often used in BrEng: we call the thing a CV
(for Curriculum Vitae).
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
The Scots are using Latin nowadays? The presumption --- ;-)
And we were never even occupied by the Romans...
not only that, but the IX legion was never seen again.
They were, at Noviomagus (nowadays Nijmegen) in the Netherlands.
Their destruction in Britain is probably a myth,

Jan
occam
2017-11-30 14:36:41 UTC
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Post by GordonD
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
My guess is that the report was corrctly typed using "résumé" but the
"é"s were lost in transferring it to be put together with the rest of
the reports, etc, because of an incompatibility of character codes.
Of course the word isn't often used in BrEng: we call the thing a CV
(for Curriculum Vitae).
-- 
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
The Scots are using Latin nowadays? The presumption --- ;-)
And we were never even occupied by the Romans...
That wall of yours did the job, eh? You should provide consultancy to
the Trump administration. 'Hadrian Construction Enterprises Ltd." has a
certain ring to it.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-11-30 15:52:06 UTC
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Post by GordonD
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
My guess is that the report was corrctly typed using "résumé" but the
"é"s were lost in transferring it to be put together with the rest of
the reports, etc, because of an incompatibility of character codes.
Of course the word isn't often used in BrEng: we call the thing a CV
(for Curriculum Vitae).
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
The Scots are using Latin nowadays? The presumption --- ;-)
And we were never even occupied by the Romans...
No? Surely the Antonine Wall is well into Scotland?
--
athel
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-11-30 16:11:45 UTC
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Post by GordonD
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
My guess is that the report was corrctly typed using "résumé" but the
"é"s were lost in transferring it to be put together with the rest of
the reports, etc, because of an incompatibility of character codes.
Of course the word isn't often used in BrEng: we call the thing a CV
(for Curriculum Vitae).
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
The Scots are using Latin nowadays? The presumption --- ;-)
And we were never even occupied by the Romans...
Not Scotland as a whole, but there were some temporary occupations.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scotland_during_the_Roman_Empire
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Paul Wolff
2017-11-30 23:14:32 UTC
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Post by GordonD
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
My guess is that the report was corrctly typed using "résumé" but the
"é"s were lost in transferring it to be put together with the rest of
the reports, etc, because of an incompatibility of character codes.
Of course the word isn't often used in BrEng: we call the thing a CV
(for Curriculum Vitae).
The Scots are using Latin nowadays? The presumption --- ;-)
And we were never even occupied by the Romans...
Well, if you want to redefine the border as the Antonine wall, feel
free, and we southern Anglos will surely welcome back our rugby-playing
Scots lowland friends, and recover the true extent of Northumbria and
the kingdom of Strathclyde.
--
Paul
Peter Moylan
2017-12-01 00:09:21 UTC
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Post by GordonD
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
My guess is that the report was corrctly typed using "résumé" but the
"é"s were lost in transferring it to be put together with the rest of
the reports, etc, because of an incompatibility of character codes.
Of course the word isn't often used in BrEng: we call the thing a CV
(for Curriculum Vitae).
The Scots are using Latin nowadays? The presumption --- ;-)
And we were never even occupied by the Romans...
Except in parts. But in the long run you were invaded by Latin-speaking
Christian missionaries.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
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