Discussion:
What does it mean to "never let a camel get its nose into your tent"?
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Mario Nicoletti
2017-04-21 00:01:55 UTC
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What does it mean to "never let a camel get its nose into your tent"?

I was told, verbally, that it's an old Arab proverb.

I guess the meaning is that the camel isn't going to be satisfied with just
its nose, but I wondered if that is indeed the case.
Lewis
2017-04-21 00:01:39 UTC
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Post by Mario Nicoletti
What does it mean to "never let a camel get its nose into your tent"?
Well, once the camel sees how nice the inside of the tent is, she will
want to come all the way into the tent. And she is a large animal, and
awkward. And her knees bend the wrong way around. And she's thinking
about maths all the time.

No one wants a camel in their tent, so best to keep the nose out.
Post by Mario Nicoletti
I was told, verbally, that it's an old Arab proverb.
Can't be, it's not in Arabic!
Post by Mario Nicoletti
I guess the meaning is that the camel isn't going to be satisfied with just
its nose, but I wondered if that is indeed the case.
Yes.

<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camel%27s_nose>
--
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of it." - Mark Twain
Hen Hanna
2017-04-21 00:25:41 UTC
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Post by Lewis
Post by Mario Nicoletti
What does it mean to "never let a camel get its nose into your tent"?
Well, once the camel sees how nice the inside of the tent is, she will
want to come all the way into the tent. And she is a large animal, and
awkward. And her knees bend the wrong way around. And she's thinking
about maths all the time.
I don't get the part about "thinking about maths all the time."


A new British Army Captain was assigned to a recon company in a remote post in the desert. During his first inspection, he noticed a camel
hitched up behind the mess tent.

He asked the First Sergeant why the camel is kept there. "Well, sir," was the nervous reply, "as you know, there are 250 men here and no women. And sir, sometimes the men have ...m-m-m.... urges. That's why we have the camel, sir."

The Captain said, "I can't say that I condone this, but I understand about urges, so the camel can stay."

About a month later, the Captain started having a real problem with his own urges. Crazy with passion, he asked the First Sergeant to bring the camel to his tent. .............
Peter Moylan
2017-04-21 01:19:01 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Lewis
Post by Mario Nicoletti
What does it mean to "never let a camel get its nose into your tent"?
Well, once the camel sees how nice the inside of the tent is, she will
want to come all the way into the tent. And she is a large animal, and
awkward. And her knees bend the wrong way around. And she's thinking
about maths all the time.
I don't get the part about "thinking about maths all the time."
IIRC it's the camel in "Pyramids", by Pterry Pratchett.
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Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Richard Heathfield
2017-04-21 02:32:02 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Lewis
Post by Mario Nicoletti
What does it mean to "never let a camel get its nose into your tent"?
Well, once the camel sees how nice the inside of the tent is, she will
want to come all the way into the tent. And she is a large animal, and
awkward. And her knees bend the wrong way around. And she's thinking
about maths all the time.
I don't get the part about "thinking about maths all the time."
IIRC it's the camel in "Pyramids", by Pterry Pratchett.
YRC.
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Charles Bishop
2017-04-21 04:00:01 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
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Post by Mario Nicoletti
What does it mean to "never let a camel get its nose into your tent"?
Well, once the camel sees how nice the inside of the tent is, she will
want to come all the way into the tent. And she is a large animal, and
awkward. And her knees bend the wrong way around. And she's thinking
about maths all the time.
I don't get the part about "thinking about maths all the time."
IIRC it's the camel in "Pyramids", by Pterry Pratchett.
"You Bastard"?

charles, or another one?
--
charles
Peter Moylan
2017-04-21 06:13:05 UTC
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Post by Mario Nicoletti
What does it mean to "never let a camel get its nose into your tent"?
Well, once the camel sees how nice the inside of the tent is, she will
want to come all the way into the tent. And she is a large animal, and
awkward. And her knees bend the wrong way around. And she's thinking
about maths all the time.
I don't get the part about "thinking about maths all the time."
IIRC it's the camel in "Pyramids", by Pterry Pratchett.
"You Bastard"?
Yes, that sounds right.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
b***@aol.com
2017-04-28 01:27:13 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Lewis
Post by Mario Nicoletti
What does it mean to "never let a camel get its nose into your tent"?
Well, once the camel sees how nice the inside of the tent is, she will
want to come all the way into the tent. And she is a large animal, and
awkward. And her knees bend the wrong way around. And she's thinking
about maths all the time.
I don't get the part about "thinking about maths all the time."
IIRC it's the camel in "Pyramids", by Pterry Pratchett.
Could it also be that the camel has "la bosse des maths"?
Post by Peter Moylan
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Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
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Peter Moylan
2017-04-28 03:20:31 UTC
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What does it mean to "never let a camel get its nose into your tent"?
Well, once the camel sees how nice the inside of the tent is, she will
want to come all the way into the tent. And she is a large animal, and
awkward. And her knees bend the wrong way around. And she's thinking
about maths all the time.
I don't get the part about "thinking about maths all the time."
IIRC it's the camel in "Pyramids", by Pterry Pratchett.
Could it also be that the camel has "la bosse des maths"?
Although I can guess what you mean, I don't think we have a comparable
expression in English.
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Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Peter Moylan
2017-04-28 03:49:53 UTC
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Post by Mario Nicoletti
What does it mean to "never let a camel get its nose into your tent"?
Well, once the camel sees how nice the inside of the tent is, she will
want to come all the way into the tent. And she is a large animal, and
awkward. And her knees bend the wrong way around. And she's thinking
about maths all the time.
I don't get the part about "thinking about maths all the time."
IIRC it's the camel in "Pyramids", by Pterry Pratchett.
Could it also be that the camel has "la bosse des maths"?
Although I can guess what you mean, I don't think we have a comparable
expression in English.
That was slightly ungracious. Sorry. I should make it clear that I did
appreciate the joke.

Also, I now have a nagging feeling that there might be something
comparable in English. Certainly we don't use "hump" in that sense, but
it's just possible that someone might talk of someone else having "an
artistic bump".

It's also possible that I'm being led astray by the word "bent".
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Katy Jennison
2017-04-28 06:46:18 UTC
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Post by Mario Nicoletti
What does it mean to "never let a camel get its nose into your tent"?
Well, once the camel sees how nice the inside of the tent is, she will
want to come all the way into the tent. And she is a large animal, and
awkward. And her knees bend the wrong way around. And she's thinking
about maths all the time.
I don't get the part about "thinking about maths all the time."
IIRC it's the camel in "Pyramids", by Pterry Pratchett.
Could it also be that the camel has "la bosse des maths"?
Although I can guess what you mean, I don't think we have a comparable
expression in English.
That was slightly ungracious. Sorry. I should make it clear that I did
appreciate the joke.
Also, I now have a nagging feeling that there might be something
comparable in English. Certainly we don't use "hump" in that sense, but
it's just possible that someone might talk of someone else having "an
artistic bump".
Phrenology, innit.
--
Katy Jennison
Peter Moylan
2017-04-28 06:56:11 UTC
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Post by Mario Nicoletti
What does it mean to "never let a camel get its nose into your tent"?
Well, once the camel sees how nice the inside of the tent is, she will
want to come all the way into the tent. And she is a large animal, and
awkward. And her knees bend the wrong way around. And she's thinking
about maths all the time.
I don't get the part about "thinking about maths all the time."
IIRC it's the camel in "Pyramids", by Pterry Pratchett.
Could it also be that the camel has "la bosse des maths"?
Although I can guess what you mean, I don't think we have a comparable
expression in English.
That was slightly ungracious. Sorry. I should make it clear that I did
appreciate the joke.
Also, I now have a nagging feeling that there might be something
comparable in English. Certainly we don't use "hump" in that sense, but
it's just possible that someone might talk of someone else having "an
artistic bump".
Phrenology, innit.
Possibly kampourology, in the case of camels.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Lewis
2017-04-28 11:10:47 UTC
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What does it mean to "never let a camel get its nose into your tent"?
Well, once the camel sees how nice the inside of the tent is, she will
want to come all the way into the tent. And she is a large animal, and
awkward. And her knees bend the wrong way around. And she's thinking
about maths all the time.
I don't get the part about "thinking about maths all the time."
IIRC it's the camel in "Pyramids", by Pterry Pratchett.
Could it also be that the camel has "la bosse des maths"?
Although I can guess what you mean, I don't think we have a comparable
expression in English.
That was slightly ungracious. Sorry. I should make it clear that I did
appreciate the joke.
Also, I now have a nagging feeling that there might be something
comparable in English. Certainly we don't use "hump" in that sense, but
it's just possible that someone might talk of someone else having "an
artistic bump".
Phrenology, innit.
Possibly kampourology, in the case of camels.
That would have to be caseOfCamels.
--
The difference between science fiction and fantasy in this world is not any of
the elaborate rules that you hear. The difference is simply this: Science
Fiction has rivets, Fantasy has trees. -Orson Scott Card
Peter Moylan
2017-04-28 15:28:18 UTC
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What does it mean to "never let a camel get its nose into your tent"?
Well, once the camel sees how nice the inside of the tent is, she will
want to come all the way into the tent. And she is a large animal, and
awkward. And her knees bend the wrong way around. And she's thinking
about maths all the time.
I don't get the part about "thinking about maths all the time."
IIRC it's the camel in "Pyramids", by Pterry Pratchett.
Could it also be that the camel has "la bosse des maths"?
Although I can guess what you mean, I don't think we have a comparable
expression in English.
That was slightly ungracious. Sorry. I should make it clear that I did
appreciate the joke.
Also, I now have a nagging feeling that there might be something
comparable in English. Certainly we don't use "hump" in that sense, but
it's just possible that someone might talk of someone else having "an
artistic bump".
Phrenology, innit.
Possibly kampourology, in the case of camels.
That would have to be caseOfCamels.
Thank you. Perfectly correct. Although as a Modula-2 programmer I would
write CaseOfCamels. Your version is, as I understand it, more popular
with C++ and D- programmers, where D-==Java.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Yusuf B Gursey
2017-04-28 19:32:18 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Lewis
Post by Mario Nicoletti
What does it mean to "never let a camel get its nose into your tent"?
Well, once the camel sees how nice the inside of the tent is, she will
want to come all the way into the tent. And she is a large animal, and
awkward. And her knees bend the wrong way around. And she's thinking
about maths all the time.
I don't get the part about "thinking about maths all the time."
IIRC it's the camel in "Pyramids", by Pterry Pratchett.
No camels in Egypt when the pyramids were built.
Post by Peter Moylan
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Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
s***@gmail.com
2017-04-28 19:59:34 UTC
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Post by Yusuf B Gursey
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Post by Lewis
Post by Mario Nicoletti
What does it mean to "never let a camel get its nose into your tent"?
Well, once the camel sees how nice the inside of the tent is, she will
want to come all the way into the tent. And she is a large animal, and
awkward. And her knees bend the wrong way around. And she's thinking
about maths all the time.
I don't get the part about "thinking about maths all the time."
IIRC it's the camel in "Pyramids", by Pterry Pratchett.
No camels in Egypt when the pyramids were built.
I'm not sure this was an attempt at historically accurate fiction.

/dps "I don't remember turtles in Egyptian cosmology, either"
Peter T. Daniels
2017-04-28 21:45:32 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
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Post by Mario Nicoletti
What does it mean to "never let a camel get its nose into your tent"?
Well, once the camel sees how nice the inside of the tent is, she will
want to come all the way into the tent. And she is a large animal, and
awkward. And her knees bend the wrong way around. And she's thinking
about maths all the time.
I don't get the part about "thinking about maths all the time."
IIRC it's the camel in "Pyramids", by Pterry Pratchett.
No camels in Egypt when the pyramids were built.
I'm not sure this was an attempt at historically accurate fiction.
/dps "I don't remember turtles in Egyptian cosmology, either"
Maybe they didn't go all the way down.
Snidely
2017-04-29 09:39:26 UTC
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What does it mean to "never let a camel get its nose into your tent"?
Well, once the camel sees how nice the inside of the tent is, she will
want to come all the way into the tent. And she is a large animal, and
awkward. And her knees bend the wrong way around. And she's thinking
about maths all the time.
I don't get the part about "thinking about maths all the time."
IIRC it's the camel in "Pyramids", by Pterry Pratchett.
No camels in Egypt when the pyramids were built.
I'm not sure this was an attempt at historically accurate fiction.
/dps "I don't remember turtles in Egyptian cosmology, either"
Maybe they didn't go all the way down.
That would explain it.

/dps
--
Killing a mouse was hardly a Nobel Prize-worthy exercise, and Lawrence
went apopleptic when he learned a lousy rodent had peed away all his
precious heavy water.
_The Disappearing Spoon_, Sam Kean
Peter Moylan
2017-04-29 02:32:39 UTC
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What does it mean to "never let a camel get its nose into your tent"?
Well, once the camel sees how nice the inside of the tent is, she will
want to come all the way into the tent. And she is a large animal, and
awkward. And her knees bend the wrong way around. And she's thinking
about maths all the time.
I don't get the part about "thinking about maths all the time."
IIRC it's the camel in "Pyramids", by Pterry Pratchett.
No camels in Egypt when the pyramids were built.
Luckily for Pratchett's reputation, the novel was set in an imaginary
country.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
CDB
2017-04-29 13:33:55 UTC
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Post by Yusuf B Gursey
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Post by Mario Nicoletti
What does it mean to "never let a camel get its nose into
your tent"?
Well, once the camel sees how nice the inside of the tent is,
she will want to come all the way into the tent. And she is a
large animal, and awkward. And her knees bend the wrong way
around. And she's thinking about maths all the time.
I don't get the part about "thinking about maths all the time."
IIRC it's the camel in "Pyramids", by Pterry Pratchett.
No camels in Egypt when the pyramids were built.
The Discworld books are engaging satires set on
another world. A great deal of their history is ours remembered wrong,
or made up entirely, for comic purposes.
Lewis
2017-04-29 20:50:33 UTC
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What does it mean to "never let a camel get its nose into your tent"?
Well, once the camel sees how nice the inside of the tent is, she will
want to come all the way into the tent. And she is a large animal, and
awkward. And her knees bend the wrong way around. And she's thinking
about maths all the time.
I don't get the part about "thinking about maths all the time."
IIRC it's the camel in "Pyramids", by Pterry Pratchett.
No camels in Egypt when the pyramids were built.
That's OK, the camel in Pyramids isn't in Egypt.
--
'Long Live The Changing Things To A More Equitable State While Retaining
Due Respect For The Traditions Of Our Forebears And Of Course Not
Harming The August Personage Of The Emperor Endeavour!' --Interesting
Times
Richard Heathfield
2017-05-13 07:10:32 UTC
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What does it mean to "never let a camel get its nose into your tent"?
Well, once the camel sees how nice the inside of the tent is, she will
want to come all the way into the tent. And she is a large animal, and
awkward. And her knees bend the wrong way around. And she's thinking
about maths all the time.
I don't get the part about "thinking about maths all the time."
IIRC it's the camel in "Pyramids", by Pterry Pratchett.
No camels in Egypt when the pyramids were built.
The pyramids (and camels) in question were in the Kingdom of Djelibeybi,
not Egypt. You're thinking of the wrong pyramids. (Right shape, though.)
--
Richard Heathfield
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Tony Cooper
2017-04-21 01:44:04 UTC
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On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 17:25:41 -0700 (PDT), Hen Hanna
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Lewis
Post by Mario Nicoletti
What does it mean to "never let a camel get its nose into your tent"?
Well, once the camel sees how nice the inside of the tent is, she will
want to come all the way into the tent. And she is a large animal, and
awkward. And her knees bend the wrong way around. And she's thinking
about maths all the time.
I don't get the part about "thinking about maths all the time."
A new British Army Captain was assigned to a recon company in a remote post in the desert. During his first inspection, he noticed a camel
hitched up behind the mess tent.
He asked the First Sergeant why the camel is kept there. "Well, sir," was the nervous reply, "as you know, there are 250 men here and no women. And sir, sometimes the men have ...m-m-m.... urges. That's why we have the camel, sir."
The Captain said, "I can't say that I condone this, but I understand about urges, so the camel can stay."
About a month later, the Captain started having a real problem with his own urges. Crazy with passion, he asked the First Sergeant to bring the camel to his tent. .............
That's one of the better "shaggy dog stories" when presented properly,
and you've ruined it.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Lewis
2017-04-21 10:38:04 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Lewis
Post by Mario Nicoletti
What does it mean to "never let a camel get its nose into your tent"?
Well, once the camel sees how nice the inside of the tent is, she will
want to come all the way into the tent. And she is a large animal, and
awkward. And her knees bend the wrong way around. And she's thinking
about maths all the time.
I don't get the part about "thinking about maths all the time."
It's a reference to a Discworld book.

<https://wiki.lspace.org/mediawiki/Category:Camels>
--
Didn't pay my exorcism bill, got repossessed.
Mario Nicoletti
2017-04-21 03:57:18 UTC
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Post by Lewis
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camel%27s_nose>
That says it's Arabian, not Arab (is that the same thing?).

Camel's nose
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The camel's nose is a metaphor for a situation where the permitting of a
small, seemingly innocuous act will open the door for larger, clearly
undesirable actions.

U.S. Senator Barry Goldwater used the metaphor in expressing his opposition
to the National Defense Education Act in 1958:[1]

This bill and the foregoing remarks of the majority remind me of an old
Arabian proverb: "If the camel once gets his nose in the tent, his body
will soon follow." If adopted, the legislation will mark the inception of
aid, supervision, and ultimately control of education in this country by
the federal authorities.[2]

According to Geoffrey Nunberg, the image entered the English language in
the middle of the 19th century.[3] An early example is a fable printed in
1858 in which an Arab miller allows a camel to stick its nose into his
bedroom, then other parts of its body, until the camel is entirely inside
and refuses to leave.[4] Lydia Sigourney wrote another version, a widely
reprinted poem for children, in which the camel enters a shop because the
workman does not forbid it at any stage.[5]

The 1858 example above says, "The Arabs repeat a fable", and Sigourney says
in a footnote, "To illustrate the danger of the first approach of evil
habit, the Arabs have a proverb, 'Beware of the camel's nose.'" However,
Nunberg could not find an Arab source for the saying and suspected it was a
Victorian invention.[3]

An early citation with a tent is "The camel in the Arabian tale begged and
received permission to insert his nose into the desert tent."[6] By 1878,
the expression was familiar enough that part of the story could be left
unstated. "It is the humble petition of the camel, who only asks that he
may put his nose into the traveler's tent. It is so pitiful, so modest,
that we must needs relent and grant it."[7]

A 1909 essay by John B. West, founder of the West legal classification
system, used the metaphor to describe the difficulty of trying to insert an
otherwise innocuous set of facts into a rigid legal system:

three excellent digesters [] spent an entire day in disagreeing as to
whether seal fishery cases should be classified under the topic 'Fish' or
that of 'Game' .... It is the old story of the camel's head in the tent.
What seems at first a plausible pretext for forcing some novel case or new
principle into a topic or subdivision to which it does not naturally
belong, leads to hopeless confusion.[8]

In a 1915 book of fables by Horace Scudder, the story titled The Arab and
His Camel ends with the moral: "It is a wise rule to resist the beginnings
of evil."[9]

The phrase was used in Reed v. King (193 CA Rptr. 130 - 1983):[citation
needed] "The paramount argument against an affirmative conclusion is it
permits the camel's nose of unrestrained irrationality admission to the
tent. If such an 'irrational' consideration is permitted as a basis of
rescission the stability of all conveyances will be seriously undermined."
The case in question involved a plaintiff suing because the defendant sold
a house without telling them that the house's previous inhabitants had been
brutally murdered 10 years earlier.
GordonD
2017-04-21 08:29:06 UTC
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Post by Mario Nicoletti
Post by Lewis
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camel%27s_nose>
That says it's Arabian, not Arab (is that the same thing?).
Camel's nose
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The camel's nose is a metaphor for a situation where the permitting of a
small, seemingly innocuous act will open the door for larger, clearly
undesirable actions.
Like letting Donald Trump run a company.
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
Mario Nicoletti
2017-04-21 14:03:46 UTC
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Post by GordonD
Like letting Donald Trump run a company.
There has to be a rule, somewhere, whose maxim states that eventually a
Usenet thread, when there is nothing left, will dissolve into a political
diatribe against whomever is the currently hated person in charge.
Peter T. Daniels
2017-04-21 14:42:12 UTC
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Post by Mario Nicoletti
Post by GordonD
Like letting Donald Trump run a company.
There has to be a rule, somewhere, whose maxim states that eventually a
Usenet thread, when there is nothing left, will dissolve into a political
diatribe against whomever is the currently hated person in charge.
ObAUE: whoever

Whither and whence is this thread crossposted by non-GGers, and why?
Janet
2017-04-21 14:28:51 UTC
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In article <***@mid.individual.net>, ***@btinternet.com
says...
Post by GordonD
Post by Mario Nicoletti
Post by Lewis
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camel%27s_nose>
That says it's Arabian, not Arab (is that the same thing?).
Camel's nose
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The camel's nose is a metaphor for a situation where the permitting of a
small, seemingly innocuous act will open the door for larger, clearly
undesirable actions.
Like letting Donald Trump run a company.
Or a country

Janet
Yusuf B Gursey
2017-04-23 22:11:01 UTC
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Post by Mario Nicoletti
Post by Lewis
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camel%27s_nose>
That says it's Arabian, not Arab (is that the same thing?).
Nearly all Arabians are Arabs, but there is a minority
of speakers of Modern South Arabian languahes (Mehric
languages) mostly in southern Yemen and Oman along
with Persian speakers in the Gulf states. But not all
Arabs are in Arabia, which is usually identified with
the Arabian Peninsula. Most Arabs now reside outside
of Arabia.
Post by Mario Nicoletti
Camel's nose
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The camel's nose is a metaphor for a situation where the permitting of a
small, seemingly innocuous act will open the door for larger, clearly
undesirable actions.
U.S. Senator Barry Goldwater used the metaphor in expressing his opposition
to the National Defense Education Act in 1958:[1]
This bill and the foregoing remarks of the majority remind me of an old
Arabian proverb: "If the camel once gets his nose in the tent, his body
will soon follow." If adopted, the legislation will mark the inception of
aid, supervision, and ultimately control of education in this country by
the federal authorities.[2]
According to Geoffrey Nunberg, the image entered the English language in
the middle of the 19th century.[3] An early example is a fable printed in
1858 in which an Arab miller allows a camel to stick its nose into his
bedroom, then other parts of its body, until the camel is entirely inside
and refuses to leave.[4] Lydia Sigourney wrote another version, a widely
reprinted poem for children, in which the camel enters a shop because the
workman does not forbid it at any stage.[5]
The 1858 example above says, "The Arabs repeat a fable", and Sigourney says
in a footnote, "To illustrate the danger of the first approach of evil
habit, the Arabs have a proverb, 'Beware of the camel's nose.'" However,
Nunberg could not find an Arab source for the saying and suspected it was a
Victorian invention.[3]
An early citation with a tent is "The camel in the Arabian tale begged and
received permission to insert his nose into the desert tent."[6] By 1878,
the expression was familiar enough that part of the story could be left
unstated. "It is the humble petition of the camel, who only asks that he
may put his nose into the traveler's tent. It is so pitiful, so modest,
that we must needs relent and grant it."[7]
A 1909 essay by John B. West, founder of the West legal classification
system, used the metaphor to describe the difficulty of trying to insert an
three excellent digesters [] spent an entire day in disagreeing as to
whether seal fishery cases should be classified under the topic 'Fish' or
that of 'Game' .... It is the old story of the camel's head in the tent.
What seems at first a plausible pretext for forcing some novel case or new
principle into a topic or subdivision to which it does not naturally
belong, leads to hopeless confusion.[8]
In a 1915 book of fables by Horace Scudder, the story titled The Arab and
His Camel ends with the moral: "It is a wise rule to resist the beginnings
of evil."[9]
The phrase was used in Reed v. King (193 CA Rptr. 130 - 1983):[citation
needed] "The paramount argument against an affirmative conclusion is it
permits the camel's nose of unrestrained irrationality admission to the
tent. If such an 'irrational' consideration is permitted as a basis of
rescission the stability of all conveyances will be seriously undermined."
The case in question involved a plaintiff suing because the defendant sold
a house without telling them that the house's previous inhabitants had been
brutally murdered 10 years earlier.
Peter T. Daniels
2017-04-24 03:07:14 UTC
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Post by Yusuf B Gursey
Post by Mario Nicoletti
Post by Lewis
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camel%27s_nose>
That says it's Arabian, not Arab (is that the same thing?).
Nearly all Arabians are Arabs, but there is a minority
of speakers of Modern South Arabian languahes (Mehric
languages) mostly in southern Yemen and Oman along
with Persian speakers in the Gulf states. But not all
Arabs are in Arabia, which is usually identified with
the Arabian Peninsula. Most Arabs now reside outside
of Arabia.
Are you equating language with "race"? Are Omanis and Yemenis not Arabs?
Yusuf B Gursey
2017-04-28 19:29:52 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Yusuf B Gursey
Post by Mario Nicoletti
Post by Lewis
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camel%27s_nose>
That says it's Arabian, not Arab (is that the same thing?).
Nearly all Arabians are Arabs, but there is a minority
of speakers of Modern South Arabian languahes (Mehric
languages) mostly in southern Yemen and Oman along
with Persian speakers in the Gulf states. But not all
Arabs are in Arabia, which is usually identified with
the Arabian Peninsula. Most Arabs now reside outside
of Arabia.
Are you equating language with "race"? Are Omanis and Yemenis not Arabs?
Most are Arabs. But part of the indegenious population of
these countries do not speak Arabic as their native
language, and those may or may not consider themselves
as Arabs.

Most Arabs confuse these closely related languages
with an extinct (with some quibble) language called
Himyari which was spoken in Yemen in the centuries
before Islam (which had supplanted as a spoken but
not written language yet another Semitic language,
Sabaic, which is completely extinct). Himyari was
quite similar to Classical Arabic and coudl be
understood with some difficulty by Arabs. It was
frequently classified as a divergent dialect of
Arabic, but it had its own grammar and its own
script. It survived into the late Middle Ages
and descriptions of it and its script were recorded
at that time. The dialect of the Northern Yemeni
highlands called Razihi (native: Razihit) is
essentially neo-Himyari with admixture of
Arabic (in Standard and dialect form). But its
speakers are considered Arabs (who speak a
divergent dialect)

The linguistic and ethnic situation of
Pre-Islamic Arabia was certainly more
diverse than today, and as a someone who
studies it ina scholarly manner, I certainly
distinguish Arabs and Arabians.
Dingbat
2017-04-21 01:00:33 UTC
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Post by Mario Nicoletti
What does it mean to "never let a camel get its nose into your tent"?
I was told, verbally, that it's an old Arab proverb.
I guess the meaning is that the camel isn't going to be satisfied with just
its nose, but I wondered if that is indeed the case.
There's the idiom 'winning by a nose'. Perhaps there should also be 'losing by a nose', with reference to that proverbial camel's nose.
Horace LaBadie
2017-04-21 01:18:47 UTC
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Post by Mario Nicoletti
What does it mean to "never let a camel get its nose into your tent"?
I was told, verbally, that it's an old Arab proverb.
I guess the meaning is that the camel isn't going to be satisfied with just
its nose, but I wondered if that is indeed the case.
It's the thin edge of the wedge.
Rich Ulrich
2017-04-21 03:28:37 UTC
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On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 21:18:47 -0400, Horace LaBadie
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Mario Nicoletti
What does it mean to "never let a camel get its nose into your tent"?
I was told, verbally, that it's an old Arab proverb.
I guess the meaning is that the camel isn't going to be satisfied with just
its nose, but I wondered if that is indeed the case.
It's the thin edge of the wedge.
The first step on a slippery slope.
--
Rich Ulrich
Mario Nicoletti
2017-04-21 03:57:15 UTC
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