Discussion:
question for (militant) atheists
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Peter T. Daniels
2017-07-16 21:12:43 UTC
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Do atheists refuse to purchase insurance policies, or abide by laws, that mention
"acts of God"?
grabber
2017-07-16 21:20:02 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Do atheists refuse to purchase insurance policies, or abide by laws, that mention
"acts of God"?
Since the relevant definition of "act of God" has nothing to do with any
god, why would they?
the Omrud
2017-07-16 21:59:53 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Do atheists refuse to purchase insurance policies, or abide by laws, that mention
"acts of God"?
Nope. Similarly, I don't refuse to sing choral works which the composer
thought were divinely inspired.
--
David
David Kleinecke
2017-07-16 23:18:20 UTC
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Post by the Omrud
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Do atheists refuse to purchase insurance policies, or abide by laws, that mention
"acts of God"?
Nope. Similarly, I don't refuse to sing choral works which the composer
thought were divinely inspired.
The only militant atheist I know (embittered ex-Catholic) doesn't
read things like insurance policies. But I suggested he might be
insuring against acts of God which, according to him, would be
literally impossible and he just laughed.
a***@gmail.com
2017-07-17 00:31:11 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Do atheists refuse to purchase insurance policies, or abide by laws, that mention
"acts of God"?
Are atheists supposed not to buy and sell stuff just because it says 'In
God We Trust' on the banknote?

What are polytheists supposed to do? Should there insurance policies for them
which say 'acts of Gods'?

What if an atheist does something because someone has cast a spell on them?

Respectfully,
Navi.
Lewis
2017-07-17 00:28:50 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Do atheists refuse to purchase insurance policies, or abide by laws, that mention
"acts of God"?
Are atheists supposed not to buy and sell stuff just because it says 'In
God We Trust' on the banknote?
And "Act of God" is a legal phrase that carries no religiosity at
all. War is "an act of god", last I checked.
--
Do Alaska and Hawaii have Interstate Highways?
Dingbat
2017-07-17 01:49:13 UTC
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Post by Lewis
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Do atheists refuse to purchase insurance policies, or abide by laws, that
mention "acts of God"?
Are atheists supposed not to buy and sell stuff just because it says 'In
God We Trust' on the banknote?
And "Act of God" is a legal phrase that carries no religiosity at
all. War is "an act of god", last I checked.
War is an act of Congress. Click on this link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_Powers_Clause

Jericho's walls falling down when shofars were blown was an act By God, as per the story.
http://www.shofar.co/jerichoshofar

Act Of God, in insurance policies: An accident or event resulting from natural causes, without human intervention or agency, and one that could not have been prevented by reasonable foresight or care—for example, floods, lightning, earthquake, or storms.
https://www.irmi.com/online/insurance-glossary/terms/a/act-of-god.aspx
s***@gowanhill.com
2017-07-17 09:06:29 UTC
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Post by Dingbat
War is an act of Congress.
Actually it's a Royal Prerogative over here.

Owain
Jack Campin
2017-07-17 00:50:14 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Do atheists refuse to purchase insurance policies, or abide
by laws, that mention "acts of God"?
Are atheists supposed not to buy and sell stuff just because
it says 'In God We Trust' on the banknote?
What are polytheists supposed to do? Should there insurance
policies for them which say 'acts of Gods'?
What if an atheist does something because someone has cast
a spell on them?
A similar question occurred to me after going to a folk camp in
rural Romania that was organized from Hungary by a group of
townies. I had some idea what I was getting into, most of the
others didn't. Result was that about 10% of the participants
were flattened by diarrhoea. Dr John Snow could have told them
why, but the locals were firmly agreed on the explanation: it
was the evil eye. Ever since I have wondered what a British
insurance company would make of a travel policy claim for that.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
e m a i l : j a c k @ c a m p i n . m e . u k
Jack Campin, 11 Third Street, Newtongrange, Midlothian EH22 4PU, Scotland
mobile 07895 860 060 <http://www.campin.me.uk> Twitter: JackCampin
a***@gmail.com
2017-07-17 01:11:38 UTC
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Post by Jack Campin
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Do atheists refuse to purchase insurance policies, or abide
by laws, that mention "acts of God"?
Are atheists supposed not to buy and sell stuff just because
it says 'In God We Trust' on the banknote?
What are polytheists supposed to do? Should there insurance
policies for them which say 'acts of Gods'?
What if an atheist does something because someone has cast
a spell on them?
A similar question occurred to me after going to a folk camp in
rural Romania that was organized from Hungary by a group of
townies. I had some idea what I was getting into, most of the
others didn't. Result was that about 10% of the participants
were flattened by diarrhoea. Dr John Snow could have told them
why, but the locals were firmly agreed on the explanation: it
was the evil eye. Ever since I have wondered what a British
insurance company would make of a travel policy claim for that.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Jack Campin, 11 Third Street, Newtongrange, Midlothian EH22 4PU, Scotland
mobile 07895 860 060 <http://www.campin.me.uk> Twitter: JackCampin
I know an agnostic who is of two minds about getting an insurance policy.

Respectfully,
Navi.
GordonD
2017-07-17 11:29:24 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Do atheists refuse to purchase insurance policies, or abide by
laws, that mention "acts of God"?
Are atheists supposed not to buy and sell stuff just because it
says 'In God We Trust' on the banknote? What are polytheists
supposed to do? Should there insurance policies for them which say
'acts of Gods'? What if an atheist does something because someone
has cast a spell on them?
A similar question occurred to me after going to a folk camp in rural
Romania that was organized from Hungary by a group of townies. I had
some idea what I was getting into, most of the others didn't. Result
was that about 10% of the participants were flattened by diarrhoea.
Dr John Snow could have told them why, but the locals were firmly
agreed on the explanation: it was the evil eye. Ever since I have
wondered what a British insurance company would make of a travel
policy claim for that.
In the past few days insurance companies have started clamping down on
claims for holiday illness as so many people are submitting fraudulent ones.
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
Cheryl
2017-07-17 11:44:29 UTC
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Post by GordonD
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Do atheists refuse to purchase insurance policies, or abide by
laws, that mention "acts of God"?
Are atheists supposed not to buy and sell stuff just because it
says 'In God We Trust' on the banknote? What are polytheists
supposed to do? Should there insurance policies for them which say
'acts of Gods'? What if an atheist does something because someone
has cast a spell on them?
A similar question occurred to me after going to a folk camp in rural
Romania that was organized from Hungary by a group of townies. I had
some idea what I was getting into, most of the others didn't. Result
was that about 10% of the participants were flattened by diarrhoea.
Dr John Snow could have told them why, but the locals were firmly
agreed on the explanation: it was the evil eye. Ever since I have
wondered what a British insurance company would make of a travel
policy claim for that.
In the past few days insurance companies have started clamping down on
claims for holiday illness as so many people are submitting fraudulent ones.
I saw an article on that. The example cited was of someone who
apparently hadn't contacted the tour's local rep, hadn't gotten medical
care, and on the feedback form, hadn't mentioned any health problems,
but after coming home said his holiday had been ruined by illness.

I suppose it's like the large number of people who claim to have been on
a bus that was in an accident.
--
Cheryl
Paul Carmichael
2017-07-17 12:00:35 UTC
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Post by GordonD
In the past few days insurance companies have started clamping down on
claims for holiday illness as so many people are submitting fraudulent ones.
UK tourists are being persuaded to reclaim the entire cost of their holiday in Spain by
saying they got food poisoning at the hotel. They are actually killing off businesses on
the Costa del Sol. Evil legal people. Should be strung up. Along with the people that go
along with it.
--
Paul.

https://paulc.es/
https://asetrad.org
Charles Bishop
2017-07-17 13:25:03 UTC
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Post by GordonD
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Do atheists refuse to purchase insurance policies, or abide by
laws, that mention "acts of God"?
Are atheists supposed not to buy and sell stuff just because it
says 'In God We Trust' on the banknote? What are polytheists
supposed to do? Should there insurance policies for them which say
'acts of Gods'? What if an atheist does something because someone
has cast a spell on them?
A similar question occurred to me after going to a folk camp in rural
Romania that was organized from Hungary by a group of townies. I had
some idea what I was getting into, most of the others didn't. Result
was that about 10% of the participants were flattened by diarrhoea.
Dr John Snow could have told them why, but the locals were firmly
agreed on the explanation: it was the evil eye. Ever since I have
wondered what a British insurance company would make of a travel
policy claim for that.
In the past few days insurance companies have started clamping down on
claims for holiday illness as so many people are submitting fraudulent ones.
What are claims for holiday illness?

This is happening within the last few /days/?
--
charles
s***@gowanhill.com
2017-07-17 09:10:21 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Do atheists refuse to purchase insurance policies, or abide by laws,
that mention "acts of God"?
No. I don't believe in aliens either, but if a flying saucer lands in my garden I still want General Amalgamated Fire And Life to pay for new turf.

Owain
Richard Tobin
2017-07-17 10:00:00 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Do atheists refuse to purchase insurance policies, or abide by laws,
that mention "acts of God"?
There's no consistency among atheists. It's not a religion.

-- Richard
Peter T. Daniels
2017-07-17 11:45:54 UTC
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Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Do atheists refuse to purchase insurance policies, or abide by laws,
that mention "acts of God"?
There's no consistency among atheists. It's not a religion.
It _is_ a religion. There is no more possibility of knowing that no god exists as there
is of knowing that God / a god exists.

But that doesn't bear on the question.
Richard Tobin
2017-07-17 12:26:27 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Do atheists refuse to purchase insurance policies, or abide by laws,
that mention "acts of God"?
There's no consistency among atheists. It's not a religion.
It _is_ a religion. There is no more possibility of knowing that no god
exists as there is of knowing that God / a god exists.
Supposing that were true, it wouldn't make it a religion.

-- Richard
John Dunlop
2017-07-17 12:36:40 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Richard Tobin
There's no consistency among atheists. It's not a religion.
It _is_ a religion. There is no more possibility of knowing that no
god exists as there is of knowing that God / a god exists.
We've done this before. Dictionaries record more than one sense of
"atheism": one is the belief that no god exists; another is the absence
of belief one way or the other. Several people here have in the past
insisted it only has the second sense. You appear to be assuming it only
has the first. Once you straighten out who means what, you might find
there isn't much disagreement.
--
John
q***@yahoo.com
2017-07-17 13:13:03 UTC
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On Mon, 17 Jul 2017 04:45:54 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Do atheists refuse to purchase insurance policies, or abide by laws,
that mention "acts of God"?
There's no consistency among atheists. It's not a religion.
It _is_ a religion. There is no more possibility of knowing that no god exists as there
is of knowing that God / a god exists.
Of course gods exist, in great profusion. The important thing is to
remember what they are, without exception.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
But that doesn't bear on the question.
Which is rather silly to start with.
--
John
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