Discussion:
remember back
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a***@gmail.com
2017-12-01 21:59:10 UTC
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1) I remember back going there.
2) I remember back to going there.

3) I remember back to when I was four.

Are these grammatical?
Are they idiomatic?

If yes, then how do '1' and '2' differ from: 'I remember going there.'?

And does '3' mean that that is as far back as my memory goes?

Gratefully,
Navi.
s***@gmail.com
2017-12-01 22:53:26 UTC
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1) I remember back going there.
2) I remember back to going there.
3) I remember back to when I was four.
Are these grammatical?
Are they idiomatic
I wouldn't use #1, and not so much #2 either.
A similar form, more tense, would replace them:

"I am remembering back to going there."
Post by a***@gmail.com
If yes, then how do '1' and '2' differ from: 'I remember going there.'?
Style. More nostalgic-sounding.
Post by a***@gmail.com
And does '3' mean that that is as far back as my memory goes?
Only if that was the context that was set up.
In bare use, it would mean [to me] "my memory goes /at least/ that far back".

/dps
Katy Jennison
2017-12-01 22:58:07 UTC
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1) I remember back going there.
2) I remember back to going there.
3) I remember back to when I was four.
Are these grammatical?
Are they idiomatic?
If yes, then how do '1' and '2' differ from: 'I remember going there.'?
And does '3' mean that that is as far back as my memory goes?
1) doesn't work at all.
2) doesn't work much better; I'm struggling to invent a context.

3) is OK, assuming it's part of a context in which, for instance, it's
followed by "and my teddy bear was eaten by next door's dog"; or in
which someone else say "I can't remember anything before my sixth
birthday party" and you reply "Oh, I remember back to when I was four."
--
Katy Jennison
DavidW
2017-12-02 00:41:22 UTC
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1) I remember back going there.
2) I remember back to going there.
3) I remember back to when I was four.
By definition, remembering can only be "back".
Peter Moylan
2017-12-02 01:02:23 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
1) I remember back going there.
2) I remember back to going there.
3) I remember back to when I was four.
By definition, remembering can only be "back".
'It's a poor sort of memory that only works backwards,' the Queen remarked.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Peter T. Daniels
2017-12-02 04:00:13 UTC
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1) I remember back going there.
2) I remember back to going there.
3) I remember back to when I was four.
Are these grammatical?
Are they idiomatic?
If yes, then how do '1' and '2' differ from: 'I remember going there.'?
And does '3' mean that that is as far back as my memory goes?
(1) and (2) mean nothing. (3) is perfectly normal. (3) means you remember
everything that has happened since you were four. It says nothing about what
you do or do not remember from when you were three.

So now you're trolling dictionaries (elsethread) and inventing impossible uses.
a***@gmail.com
2017-12-02 06:22:01 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
1) I remember back going there.
2) I remember back to going there.
3) I remember back to when I was four.
Are these grammatical?
Are they idiomatic?
If yes, then how do '1' and '2' differ from: 'I remember going there.'?
And does '3' mean that that is as far back as my memory goes?
(1) and (2) mean nothing. (3) is perfectly normal. (3) means you remember
everything that has happened since you were four. It says nothing about what
you do or do not remember from when you were three.
So now you're trolling dictionaries (elsethread) and inventing impossible uses.
Thank you all very much,

No, I just came across 'remember back' somewhere. The meaning was not entirely
clear to me, so I looked 'remember' up in the dictionary.

As for 'remember back', I just tried to figure out what it meant using those
examples.

A word bares its meaning only in the company of other words.

Gratefully,
Navi.
s***@gmail.com
2017-12-03 06:42:59 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) I remember back going there.
2) I remember back to going there.
3) I remember back to when I was four.
Are these grammatical?
Are they idiomatic?
If yes, then how do '1' and '2' differ from: 'I remember going there.'?
And does '3' mean that that is as far back as my memory goes?
(1) and (2) mean nothing. (3) is perfectly normal. (3) means you remember
everything that has happened since you were four. It says nothing about what
you do or do not remember from when you were three.
So now you're trolling dictionaries (elsethread) and inventing impossible uses.
Thank you all very much,
No, I just came across 'remember back' somewhere. The meaning was not entirely
clear to me, so I looked 'remember' up in the dictionary.
perhaps you meant " so I looked 'remember' in the up dictionary"
Post by a***@gmail.com
As for 'remember back', I just tried to figure out what it meant using those
examples.
A word bares its meaning only in the company of other words.
Gratefully,
Navi.
Oh, okay, I'll play nice. In English, "look up" is normally a unit
that stays together, as in "so I looked up 'remember' in the dictionary"

I think German is much more into always having prepositional-prefixes
always appear at the end of the sentence, except where it appears
as an infinitive.

/dps
Peter Moylan
2017-12-03 06:54:22 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
No, I just came across 'remember back' somewhere. The meaning was not entirely
clear to me, so I looked 'remember' up in the dictionary.
perhaps you meant " so I looked 'remember' in the up dictionary"
[...]
Post by s***@gmail.com
Oh, okay, I'll play nice. In English, "look up" is normally a unit
that stays together, as in "so I looked up 'remember' in the dictionary"
I think German is much more into always having prepositional-prefixes
always appear at the end of the sentence, except where it appears
as an infinitive.
Perhaps this is regional, but I haven't looked it up. (Looked up it?
Nah, definitely wrong.)

To my mind "I looked 'remember' up in the dictionary" is a little less
common than "I looked up 'remember' in the dictionary", but both are
acceptable.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
s***@gmail.com
2017-12-04 19:55:15 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by s***@gmail.com
Post by a***@gmail.com
No, I just came across 'remember back' somewhere. The meaning was not entirely
clear to me, so I looked 'remember' up in the dictionary.
perhaps you meant " so I looked 'remember' in the up dictionary"
[...]
Post by s***@gmail.com
Oh, okay, I'll play nice. In English, "look up" is normally a unit
that stays together, as in "so I looked up 'remember' in the dictionary"
I think German is much more into always having prepositional-prefixes
always appear at the end of the sentence, except where it appears
as an infinitive.
Perhaps this is regional, but I haven't looked it up. (Looked up it?
Nah, definitely wrong.)
You've got an auxillary/modal ("have") in there.
Post by Peter Moylan
To my mind "I looked 'remember' up in the dictionary" is a little less
common than "I looked up 'remember' in the dictionary", but both are
acceptable.
I can see it being a result of mid-speech edit, but yeccch.

/dps

GordonD
2017-12-02 14:46:56 UTC
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1) I remember back going there.
2) I remember back to going there.
3) I remember back to when I was four.
Are these grammatical?
Are they idiomatic?
If yes, then how do '1' and '2' differ from: 'I remember going there.'?
In 1 and 2 you are remembering an action, so 'back' doesn't work. In 3
you are remembering a point in time, so 'back' does work and sounds
natural.
Post by a***@gmail.com
And does '3' mean that that is as far back as my memory goes?
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
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