Discussion:
Should a translated text (of an utterance) be in quotes?
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occam
2018-06-13 06:27:26 UTC
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There is a BBC news story today about Germany recalling contaminated eggs:

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-44452399

The paragraph that caught my attention:

" The residue [fipronil] was above the permitted EU level of 0.005mg
per kg, but it was "well below a rate that would constitute a risk to
health", they said (in German). The highest test showed a level of
0.019mg/kg. "

My question refers to the quote, with the added "they said (in German)".
It is clear that the original sentence was spoken in German, which then
someone at the BBC translated into English. Are the quotes justifiable,
given that these translated words are not those uttered in German?

Should quotes be lost in translation?
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-06-13 06:45:08 UTC
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Post by occam
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-44452399
" The residue [fipronil] was above the permitted EU level of 0.005mg
per kg, but it was "well below a rate that would constitute a risk to
health", they said (in German). The highest test showed a level of
0.019mg/kg. "
My question refers to the quote, with the added "they said (in German)".
It is clear that the original sentence was spoken in German, which then
someone at the BBC translated into English. Are the quotes justifiable,
given that these translated words are not those uttered in German?
Should quotes be lost in translation?
It's one of those questions where you can imagine sensible arguments on
both sides. I would omit the quotes.
--
athel
Dingbat
2018-06-13 08:29:39 UTC
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Post by occam
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-44452399
" The residue [fipronil] was above the permitted EU level of 0.005mg
per kg, but it was "well below a rate that would constitute a risk to
health", they said (in German). The highest test showed a level of
0.019mg/kg. "
My question refers to the quote, with the added "they said (in German)".
It is clear that the original sentence was spoken in German, which then
someone at the BBC translated into English. Are the quotes justifiable,
given that these translated words are not those uttered in German?
Should quotes be lost in translation?
After a colon, are quote marks necessary? This too is a translation from
German, preserving some of the original by saying "will top" rather than
"tops":

Dr Michael Kerkloh, President & CEO, Munich Airport and ACI EUROPE President: “Our future goal is to guarantee that our dynamic traffic increase will not influence passenger comfort, nor a seamless travel experience at Munich Airport – even at the point when our passenger volume will top the 50 million mark. Increasing quantity and guaranteeing quality will be our mission for the coming years.” Copyright: Flughafen München
http://www.airport-business.com/2017/10/munich-aiming-enter-european-champions-league-airports/
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-06-13 10:09:11 UTC
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Post by occam
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-44452399
" The residue [fipronil] was above the permitted EU level of 0.005mg
per kg, but it was "well below a rate that would constitute a risk to
health", they said (in German). The highest test showed a level of
0.019mg/kg. "
My question refers to the quote, with the added "they said (in German)".
It is clear that the original sentence was spoken in German, which then
someone at the BBC translated into English. Are the quotes justifiable,
given that these translated words are not those uttered in German?
Should quotes be lost in translation?
Surely they are still required to separate what was said/written in the
report and what is the reporters own interpolation? It would probably
be easier all round to use indirect speech, of course, but having chosen
to quote external sources, albeit in translation, I'm not sure that there is
any choice but to use conventional indicators.
Paul Carmichael
2018-06-13 14:23:18 UTC
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Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by occam
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-44452399
" The residue [fipronil] was above the permitted EU level of 0.005mg
per kg, but it was "well below a rate that would constitute a risk to
health", they said (in German). The highest test showed a level of
0.019mg/kg. "
My question refers to the quote, with the added "they said (in German)".
It is clear that the original sentence was spoken in German, which then
someone at the BBC translated into English. Are the quotes justifiable,
given that these translated words are not those uttered in German?
Should quotes be lost in translation?
Surely they are still required to separate what was said/written in the
report and what is the reporters own interpolation? It would probably
be easier all round to use indirect speech, of course, but having chosen
to quote external sources, albeit in translation, I'm not sure that there is
any choice but to use conventional indicators.
Exactly. Preferibly with different quotes to avoid the clash. Mixture of single and double
quotes and of course here in Europe we have the «» quotes.

But as you say, if the direct quote isn't strictly necessary, dump it.
--
Paul.

https://paulc.es/
https://asetrad.org
Pierre Jelenc
2018-06-13 19:56:02 UTC
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Post by occam
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-44452399
[...]
Post by occam
My question refers to the quote, with the added "they said (in German)".
It is clear that the original sentence was spoken in German, which then
someone at the BBC translated into English. Are the quotes justifiable,
given that these translated words are not those uttered in German?
It does not refer to the translated utterance per se; in standard BBC web
site usage, it means that the target of the link associated with the
sentence in bold font --it was "well below a rate that would constitute a
risk to health", they said (in German)-- is a web page in German. They
always do that, regardless of whether there is quoted speech or not.

Pierre
--
Pierre Jelenc
The Gigometer www.gigometer.com
The NYC Beer Guide www.nycbeer.org
Mark Brader
2018-06-15 00:42:58 UTC
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Post by occam
" The residue [fipronil] was above the permitted EU level of 0.005mg
per kg, but it was "well below a rate that would constitute a risk to
health", they said (in German). The highest test showed a level of
0.019mg/kg. "
My question refers to the quote, with the added "they said (in German)".
It is clear that the original sentence was spoken in German, which then
someone at the BBC translated into English. Are the quotes justifiable...
Yes.
--
Mark Brader | "We didn't just track down that bug,
Toronto | we left evidence of its extermination
***@vex.net | as a warning to other bugs" --Dan Lyke
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