Discussion:
Being private vs. being prudish?
(too old to reply)
l***@yahoo.com
2018-05-08 21:50:06 UTC
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I HOPE this is only an issue between teens, for the most part. That is, hardly any adults, I hope, accuse strangers - or even their friends - of being prudes for, say, not wanting to talk about their sex lives or lack thereof.

Anyway, it occurred to me that you might say the difference between "private" and "prudish" is as follows: private people simply want the right to close their bedroom doors, but the prudes won't let them.

When you're an adult addressing teens, however, you have to follow that up by explaining that it is absolutely not fair to accuse your S.O. of being a prude just because he/she refuses to have sex with you, because disappointment is just a part of life, and EVERYONE has the right to that level of privacy, even those who keep trying to destroy others' privacy. As in, two wrongs don't make a right.

Thoughts?



Lenona.
David Kleinecke
2018-05-09 00:47:24 UTC
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Post by l***@yahoo.com
I HOPE this is only an issue between teens, for the most part. That is, hardly any adults, I hope, accuse strangers - or even their friends - of being prudes for, say, not wanting to talk about their sex lives or lack thereof.
Anyway, it occurred to me that you might say the difference between "private" and "prudish" is as follows: private people simply want the right to close their bedroom doors, but the prudes won't let them.
When you're an adult addressing teens, however, you have to follow that up by explaining that it is absolutely not fair to accuse your S.O. of being a prude just because he/she refuses to have sex with you, because disappointment is just a part of life, and EVERYONE has the right to that level of privacy, even those who keep trying to destroy others' privacy. As in, two wrongs don't make a right.
Thoughts?
Live as though you were the role model for all humanity
Harrison Hill
2018-05-09 06:01:55 UTC
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Post by l***@yahoo.com
I HOPE this is only an issue between teens, for the most part. That is, hardly any adults, I hope, accuse strangers - or even their friends - of being prudes for, say, not wanting to talk about their sex lives or lack thereof.
Anyway, it occurred to me that you might say the difference between "private" and "prudish" is as follows: private people simply want the right to close their bedroom doors, but the prudes won't let them.
When you're an adult addressing teens, however, you have to follow that up by explaining that it is absolutely not fair to accuse your S.O. of being a prude just because he/she refuses to have sex with you, because disappointment is just a part of life, and EVERYONE has the right to that level of privacy, even those who keep trying to destroy others' privacy. As in, two wrongs don't make a right.
Thoughts?
S.O.? Second Officer? Sexual Other?

Prudishness and privacy are not closely related. "Prudishness" is an
absence of sexual desire; or being morbidly overburdened with
sexual hang-ups. "Private" has its sexual opposite in "open" or
"exhibitionist".
Dingbat
2018-05-09 09:03:31 UTC
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Post by Harrison Hill
Post by l***@yahoo.com
I HOPE this is only an issue between teens, for the most part. That is, hardly any adults, I hope, accuse strangers - or even their friends - of being prudes for, say, not wanting to talk about their sex lives or lack thereof.
Anyway, it occurred to me that you might say the difference between "private" and "prudish" is as follows: private people simply want the right to close their bedroom doors, but the prudes won't let them.
When you're an adult addressing teens, however, you have to follow that up by explaining that it is absolutely not fair to accuse your S.O. of being a prude just because he/she refuses to have sex with you, because disappointment is just a part of life, and EVERYONE has the right to that level of privacy, even those who keep trying to destroy others' privacy. As in, two wrongs don't make a right.
Thoughts?
S.O.? Second Officer? Sexual Other?
Significant Other
Post by Harrison Hill
Prudishness and privacy are not closely related. "Prudishness" is an
absence of sexual desire; or being morbidly overburdened with
sexual hang-ups. "Private" has its sexual opposite in "open" or
"exhibitionist".
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-05-09 09:05:54 UTC
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Post by Harrison Hill
Post by l***@yahoo.com
I HOPE this is only an issue between teens, for the most part. That is,
hardly any adults, I hope, accuse strangers - or even their friends -
of being prudes for, say, not wanting to talk about their sex lives or
lack thereof.
Anyway, it occurred to me that you might say the difference between
"private" and "prudish" is as follows: private people simply want the
right to close their bedroom doors, but the prudes won't let them.
When you're an adult addressing teens, however, you have to follow that
up by explaining that it is absolutely not fair to accuse your S.O. of
being a prude just because he/she refuses to have sex with you, because
disappointment is just a part of life, and EVERYONE has the right to
that level of privacy, even those who keep trying to destroy others'
privacy. As in, two wrongs don't make a right.
Thoughts?
S.O.? Second Officer? Sexual Other?
Prudishness and privacy are not closely related. "Prudishness" is an
absence of sexual desire;
Nonsense
Post by Harrison Hill
or being morbidly overburdened with
sexual hang-ups.
Maybe not nonsense, but not very accurate either.
Post by Harrison Hill
"Private" has its sexual opposite in "open" or
"exhibitionist".
--
athel
l***@yahoo.com
2018-05-09 15:45:01 UTC
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Post by Harrison Hill
Prudishness and privacy are not closely related. "Prudishness" is an
absence of sexual desire; or being morbidly overburdened with
sexual hang-ups.
I beg to differ. If you're squeamish about nudity as an adult, no one is forcing you to go to art museums or any place where there might be naked statues. One could call that the mark of a private person. Staying at home does not interfere with anyone's freedom.

But...that's not the same as making it difficult for OTHER people to view the art whenever they please. THAT'S prudery.

Remember John Ashcroft and the curtains?

https://www.google.com/search?ei=PxLzWuKCI4PX5gLIwahw&q=ashcroft+%22Spirit+of+Justice%22&oq=ashcroft+%22Spirit+of+Justice%22&gs_l=psy-ab.3..0i22i30k1.1932.2428.0.2802.3.3.0.0.0.0.66.186.3.3.0....0...1c.1.64.psy-ab..0.3.186...0j0i67k1.0.mwhz2FGg54M


Also, here's an outrageous true story most people likely don't know about.

From a Leigh W. Rutledge book:

"On a late spring afternoon in 1933, a U.S. Customs agent in New York City peered into a recent shipment of art books from Europe and clucked his tongue in dismay. The books — which had been shipped from Italy — contained oversized, full-color depictions of male and female nudes. The bulging muscles of the males, the Amazonian quality of the women, the livid colors, the almost unbearably intense rendering of human flesh: all of it meant only one thing in the customs agent's mind — pornography — and he ordered the shipment to be seized and held. A few days later, a very embarrassed U.S. Treasury Department relinquished the books and apologized to the Italian government. It turned out that the assistant customs inspector on the dock that day had never heard of Michelangelo, and the Treasury Department wanted the world to know that art books of Michelangelo's Last Judgment were not considered pornography in the United States."

A bit more on that - unfortunately, you have to subscribe to read the whole articles):

https://www.nytimes.com/1933/02/15/archives/customs-censors-bar-vatican-art-photos-of-renowned-sistine-chapel.html

https://www.nytimes.com/1933/02/19/archives/in-the-galleries-varied-exhibitions.html


Lenona.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-05-09 16:01:46 UTC
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Post by l***@yahoo.com
Post by Harrison Hill
Prudishness and privacy are not closely related. "Prudishness" is an
absence of sexual desire; or being morbidly overburdened with
sexual hang-ups.
I beg to differ.
Quite right too, but it's only Harrison Hill. Many of his ideas about
English are so bizarre that you can safely ignore most of them.
Post by l***@yahoo.com
If you're squeamish about nudity as an adult, no one is forcing you to
go to art museums or any place where there might be naked statues. One
could call that the mark of a private person. Staying at home does not
interfere with anyone's freedom.
But...that's not the same as making it difficult for OTHER people to
view the art whenever they please. THAT'S prudery.
Remember John Ashcroft and the curtains?
https://www.google.com/search?ei=PxLzWuKCI4PX5gLIwahw&q=ashcroft+%22Spirit+of+Justice%22&oq=ashcroft+%22Spirit+of+Justice%22&gs_l=psy-ab.3..0i22i30k1.1932.2428.0.2802.3.3.0.0.0.0.66.186.3.3.0....0...1c.1.64.psy-ab..0.3.186...0j0i67k1.0.mwhz2FGg54M
Maybe you should use tinyurl for that. I can't access it as it stands.

Well, actually I can, but it was a lot of trouble. Try

https://tinyurl.com/y7dskubm
Post by l***@yahoo.com
Also, here's an outrageous true story most people likely don't know about.
Thanks for repeating it, but I think you're mistaken in thinking that
most people don't know about it. I wouldn't have been able to give all
the details, but I was familiar with the general idea.
Post by l***@yahoo.com
"On a late spring afternoon in 1933, a U.S. Customs agent in New York
City peered into a recent shipment of art books from Europe and clucked
his tongue in dismay.
[ Good stuff snipped ]
Post by l***@yahoo.com
https://www.nytimes.com/1933/02/15/archives/customs-censors-bar-vatican-art-photos-of-renowned-sistine-chapel.html
https://www.nytimes.com/1933/02/19/archives/in-the-galleries-varied-exhibitions.html
Lenona.
--
athel
l***@yahoo.com
2018-05-09 16:07:00 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by l***@yahoo.com
Also, here's an outrageous true story most people likely don't know about.
Thanks for repeating it, but I think you're mistaken in thinking that
most people don't know about it. I wouldn't have been able to give all
the details, but I was familiar with the general idea.
Well, most people under 50, anyway?


Lenona.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-05-09 16:17:09 UTC
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Post by l***@yahoo.com
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by l***@yahoo.com
Also, here's an outrageous true story most people likely don't know about.
Thanks for repeating it, but I think you're mistaken in thinking that
most people don't know about it. I wouldn't have been able to give all
the details, but I was familiar with the general idea.
Well, most people under 50, anyway?
Probably!

Anyway, the story of John Ashcroft reminded me of the 2010 film "Pièce
montée" with Jean-Pierre Marielle, Danielle Darrieux and others. The
mother of the future bride was shocked at the sight of St Agatha's
sliced off breast in the church where the marriage was to take place.
The priest said that there was nothing he could do about that as the
church was dedicated to St Agatha, and that's how she is often
represented. When the wedding ceremony started one saw that the bride's
parents had sneaked in and covered the offending object with a piece of
cloth.
--
athel
the Omrud
2018-05-09 16:23:32 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Anyway, the story of John Ashcroft reminded me of the 2010 film "Pièce
montée" with Jean-Pierre Marielle, Danielle Darrieux and others. The
mother of the future bride was shocked at the sight of St Agatha's
sliced off breast in the church where the marriage was to take place.
The priest said that there was nothing he could do about that as the
church was dedicated to St Agatha, and that's how she is often
represented. When the wedding ceremony started one saw that the bride's
parents had sneaked in and covered the offending object with a piece of
cloth.
Er, I assume it was an image of St Agatha's breast, rather than her
actual breast?

She always looks so content and satisfied, and not screaming in agony at
all. Funny people, these Christians.

I see she's also the patron saint of bellfounders, due to the shape of
her severed breasts. Weird.
--
David
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-05-09 16:28:45 UTC
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Post by the Omrud
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Anyway, the story of John Ashcroft reminded me of the 2010 film "Pièce
montée" with Jean-Pierre Marielle, Danielle Darrieux and others. The
mother of the future bride was shocked at the sight of St Agatha's
sliced off breast in the church where the marriage was to take place.
The priest said that there was nothing he could do about that as the
church was dedicated to St Agatha, and that's how she is often
represented. When the wedding ceremony started one saw that the bride's
parents had sneaked in and covered the offending object with a piece of
cloth.
Er, I assume it was an image of St Agatha's breast, rather than her
actual breast?
As I recall it was piece of sculpture of the breast in question on a
plate. Maybe both breasts, I don't remember.
Post by the Omrud
She always looks so content and satisfied, and not screaming in agony at all.
I've often thought that -- not just about St Agatha.
Post by the Omrud
Funny people, these Christians.
I see she's also the patron saint of bellfounders, due to the shape of
her severed breasts. Weird.
--
athel
the Omrud
2018-05-09 16:58:23 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by the Omrud
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Anyway, the story of John Ashcroft reminded me of the 2010 film
"Pièce montée" with Jean-Pierre Marielle, Danielle Darrieux and
others. The mother of the future bride was shocked at the sight of St
Agatha's sliced off breast in the church where the marriage was to
take place. The priest said that there was nothing he could do about
that as the church was dedicated to St Agatha, and that's how she is
often represented. When the wedding ceremony started one saw that the
bride's parents had sneaked in and covered the offending object with
a piece of cloth.
Er, I assume it was an image of St Agatha's breast, rather than her
actual breast?
As I recall it was piece of sculpture of the breast in question on a
plate. Maybe both breasts, I don't remember.
Post by the Omrud
She always looks so content and satisfied, and not screaming in agony at all.
I've often thought that -- not just about St Agatha.
St Sebastian is another who comes to mind.
--
David
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-05-09 17:13:05 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by the Omrud
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by the Omrud
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Anyway, the story of John Ashcroft reminded me of the 2010 film "Pièce
montée" with Jean-Pierre Marielle, Danielle Darrieux and others. The
mother of the future bride was shocked at the sight of St Agatha's
sliced off breast in the church where the marriage was to take place.
The priest said that there was nothing he could do about that as the
church was dedicated to St Agatha, and that's how she is often
represented. When the wedding ceremony started one saw that the bride's
parents had sneaked in and covered the offending object with a piece of
cloth.
Er, I assume it was an image of St Agatha's breast, rather than her
actual breast?
As I recall it was piece of sculpture of the breast in question on a
plate. Maybe both breasts, I don't remember.
Post by the Omrud
She always looks so content and satisfied, and not screaming in agony at all.
I've often thought that -- not just about St Agatha.
St Sebastian is another who comes to mind.
Yes indeed. He doesn't seem to bothered much about all those arrows. A
bit like Wound Man, who was not a martyr:

Loading Image...
--
athel
Janet
2018-05-09 20:10:55 UTC
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"Prudishness" is an absence of sexual desire
No, it isn't.
or being morbidly overburdened with
sexual hang-ups.
Not that either.

Janet.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-05-09 22:51:11 UTC
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Post by Janet
"Prudishness" is an absence of sexual desire
No, it isn't.
or being morbidly overburdened with
sexual hang-ups.
Not that either.
Janet.
Agreed.
This is how I've always understood "prudish":
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/prudish

Having or revealing a tendency to be easily shocked by matters
relating to sex or nudity; excessively concerned with sexual
propriety.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Harrison Hill
2018-05-10 06:51:40 UTC
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Post by Janet
"Prudishness" is an absence of sexual desire
No, it isn't.
or being morbidly overburdened with
sexual hang-ups.
Not that either.
Janet.
Well I've gone back to my 1970s COD, and that has - prude: "Woman of
extreme (esp affected) propriety in conduct or speech".

I take "prudish" to belong to men as well - I consider myself quite
prudish - and to cover the whole gamut from "frigidness" to
"nymphomania/exhibitionism". Athel's examples are hilariously out
of date.

A prude wouldn't undress on a nudist beach, and she would avoid the
stripper at a hen night. But there might be reasons other than prudery
for doing that: bodily embarrassment, fear of compromising pictures.

The opposite of "prudery" I'd reckon to be (sic) "uninhibitedness".
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-05-10 07:01:35 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Janet
"Prudishness" is an absence of sexual desire
No, it isn't.
or being morbidly overburdened with
sexual hang-ups.
Not that either.
Janet.
Well I've gone back to my 1970s COD, and that has - prude: "Woman of
extreme (esp affected) propriety in conduct or speech".
And you think that's the same as "an absence of sexual desire"?
Post by Harrison Hill
I take "prudish" to belong to men as well - I consider myself quite
prudish
You have "an absence of sexual desire"? That seems to me to be your
problem, not mine, and anyway irrelevant to the discussion.
Post by Harrison Hill
- and to cover the whole gamut from "frigidness" to
"nymphomania/exhibitionism". Athel's examples are hilariously out
of date.
Which examples do you have in mind? I don't remember giving any
examples to illustrate "prudish", and looking through the thread
doesn't reveal any. Has anyone agreed with your nonsensical
definitions? Does it ever occur to you to reexamine your statements
when you can't find anyone to agree withg them?
Post by Harrison Hill
A prude wouldn't undress on a nudist beach, and she would avoid the
stripper at a hen night. But there might be reasons other than prudery
for doing that: bodily embarrassment, fear of compromising pictures.
The opposite of "prudery" I'd reckon to be (sic) "uninhibitedness".
--
athel
Harrison Hill
2018-05-10 07:24:38 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Janet
"Prudishness" is an absence of sexual desire
No, it isn't.
or being morbidly overburdened with
sexual hang-ups.
Not that either.
Janet.
Well I've gone back to my 1970s COD, and that has - prude: "Woman of
extreme (esp affected) propriety in conduct or speech".
And you think that's the same as "an absence of sexual desire"?
Post by Harrison Hill
I take "prudish" to belong to men as well - I consider myself quite
prudish
You have "an absence of sexual desire"? That seems to me to be your
problem, not mine, and anyway irrelevant to the discussion.
Post by Harrison Hill
- and to cover the whole gamut from "frigidness" to
"nymphomania/exhibitionism". Athel's examples are hilariously out
of date.
Which examples do you have in mind? I don't remember giving any
examples to illustrate "prudish", and looking through the thread
doesn't reveal any. Has anyone agreed with your nonsensical
definitions? Does it ever occur to you to reexamine your statements
when you can't find anyone to agree withg them?
re-examine.

"Prude" is everyday English, and I don't need a foreign correspondent
(or Janet for that matter) to tell me how to speak my own language.
The Urban Dictionary has:

Prudacity
Pruda Cuda
Prudatory
Prudeasso
Prude Bitch
prudebitchyness
prude drinker
Prude-Dude
prudefemme
prude film
Prude Flirt
prudefriend
prude-hoe
prude-in-public
Prude Mafia
Prude Man-Whore
prude monster
pruden
Prude nation
Prude Oil
prude princess
prude shaming
Prude shield
prude-slut
Prude stamp

...and many more. I suggest you re-acquaint yourself with the
language you claim to speak.












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Top definition








Prude nation

America. Because it was founded by prudes. Check your history books. The puritans. They thought that sex was dirty and anything that brought any pleasure was a sin. They same with this generation. Of course they will say that they don't think sex is dirty but there actions speak louder than there words. Antilove ect. They will say that sex is okay when your married but for them it's like having to go to the bathroom. Also they bully teens and treat them like it's a crime to be young. curfews ect. Just they way there parents generation did.

We live in prude nation.

#cock block squad#antilove law#usl#cock block patrol#prude.

by Deep blue 2012 March 14, 2010







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Prudeasso
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Prude Mafia
Prude Man-Whore
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prude shaming
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Prude stamp

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Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-05-10 08:06:00 UTC
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Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Janet
"Prudishness" is an absence of sexual desire
No, it isn't.
or being morbidly overburdened with
sexual hang-ups.
Not that either.
Janet.
Well I've gone back to my 1970s COD, and that has - prude: "Woman of
extreme (esp affected) propriety in conduct or speech".
And you think that's the same as "an absence of sexual desire"?
Post by Harrison Hill
I take "prudish" to belong to men as well - I consider myself quite
prudish
You have "an absence of sexual desire"? That seems to me to be your>
problem, not mine, and anyway irrelevant to the discussion.
Post by Harrison Hill
- and to cover the whole gamut from "frigidness" to
"nymphomania/exhibitionism". Athel's examples are hilariously out
of date.
Which examples do you have in mind? I don't remember giving any>
examples to illustrate "prudish", and looking through the thread>
doesn't reveal any. Has anyone agreed with your nonsensical>
definitions? Does it ever occur to you to reexamine your statements>
when you can't find anyone to agree withg them?
re-examine.
"Prude" is everyday English, and I don't need a foreign correspondent
(or Janet for that matter) to tell me how to speak my own language.
[ a torrent of Harrisonian claptrap, none of which supports your
claim that it means "an absence of sexual desire" ]

I note that you don't tell us which examples brought you to a state of
uncontrollable hilarity.
--
athel
Harrison Hill
2018-05-10 13:50:01 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Janet
"Prudishness" is an absence of sexual desire
No, it isn't.
or being morbidly overburdened with
sexual hang-ups.
Not that either.
Janet.
Well I've gone back to my 1970s COD, and that has - prude: "Woman of
extreme (esp affected) propriety in conduct or speech".
And you think that's the same as "an absence of sexual desire"?
Post by Harrison Hill
I take "prudish" to belong to men as well - I consider myself quite
prudish
You have "an absence of sexual desire"? That seems to me to be your>
problem, not mine, and anyway irrelevant to the discussion.
Post by Harrison Hill
- and to cover the whole gamut from "frigidness" to
"nymphomania/exhibitionism". Athel's examples are hilariously out
of date.
Which examples do you have in mind? I don't remember giving any>
examples to illustrate "prudish", and looking through the thread>
doesn't reveal any. Has anyone agreed with your nonsensical>
definitions? Does it ever occur to you to reexamine your statements>
when you can't find anyone to agree withg them?
re-examine.
"Prude" is everyday English, and I don't need a foreign correspondent
(or Janet for that matter) to tell me how to speak my own language.
[ a torrent of Harrisonian claptrap, none of which supports your
claim that it means "an absence of sexual desire" ]
I note that you don't tell us which examples brought you to a state of
uncontrollable hilarity.
The Urban Dictionary: Top definition: "prude"

One who is reluctant in engaging in any sexual activities.

"Kyle's such a prude, he won't even go past first base!"

<https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=prude>

"Reluctant in", is not a phrase I'd use. Your silly, out-of-date ideas about
prudishness, I'd put down to too much Bronte, Austen and Eliot. An Amazon saint
and a Michalangelo, for your "hilarious" examples.
Harrison Hill
2018-05-10 13:53:15 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Janet
"Prudishness" is an absence of sexual desire
No, it isn't.
or being morbidly overburdened with
sexual hang-ups.
Not that either.
Janet.
Well I've gone back to my 1970s COD, and that has - prude: "Woman of
extreme (esp affected) propriety in conduct or speech".
And you think that's the same as "an absence of sexual desire"?
Post by Harrison Hill
I take "prudish" to belong to men as well - I consider myself quite
prudish
You have "an absence of sexual desire"? That seems to me to be your>
problem, not mine, and anyway irrelevant to the discussion.
Post by Harrison Hill
- and to cover the whole gamut from "frigidness" to
"nymphomania/exhibitionism". Athel's examples are hilariously out
of date.
Which examples do you have in mind? I don't remember giving any>
examples to illustrate "prudish", and looking through the thread>
doesn't reveal any. Has anyone agreed with your nonsensical>
definitions? Does it ever occur to you to reexamine your statements>
when you can't find anyone to agree withg them?
re-examine.
"Prude" is everyday English, and I don't need a foreign correspondent
(or Janet for that matter) to tell me how to speak my own language.
[ a torrent of Harrisonian claptrap, none of which supports your
claim that it means "an absence of sexual desire" ]
I note that you don't tell us which examples brought you to a state of
uncontrollable hilarity.
The Urban Dictionary: Top definition: "prude"
One who is reluctant in engaging in any sexual activities.
"Kyle's such a prude, he won't even go past first base!"
<https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=prude>
"Reluctant in", is not a phrase I'd use. Your silly, out-of-date ideas about
prudishness, I'd put down to too much Bronte, Austen and Eliot. An Amazon saint
and a Michalangelo, for your "hilarious" examples.
Michelangelo.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-05-10 14:13:45 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Janet
"Prudishness" is an absence of sexual desire
No, it isn't.
or being morbidly overburdened with
sexual hang-ups.
Not that either.
Janet.
Well I've gone back to my 1970s COD, and that has - prude: "Woman of
extreme (esp affected) propriety in conduct or speech".
And you think that's the same as "an absence of sexual desire"?
Post by Harrison Hill
I take "prudish" to belong to men as well - I consider myself quite
prudish
You have "an absence of sexual desire"? That seems to me to be your>
problem, not mine, and anyway irrelevant to the discussion.
Post by Harrison Hill
- and to cover the whole gamut from "frigidness" to
"nymphomania/exhibitionism". Athel's examples are hilariously out
of date.
Which examples do you have in mind? I don't remember giving any>
examples to illustrate "prudish", and looking through the thread>
doesn't reveal any. Has anyone agreed with your nonsensical>
definitions? Does it ever occur to you to reexamine your statements>
when you can't find anyone to agree withg them?
re-examine.
"Prude" is everyday English, and I don't need a foreign correspondent
(or Janet for that matter) to tell me how to speak my own language.
[ a torrent of Harrisonian claptrap, none of which supports your
claim that it means "an absence of sexual desire" ]
I note that you don't tell us which examples brought you to a state of
uncontrollable hilarity.
The Urban Dictionary: Top definition: "prude"
One who is reluctant in engaging in any sexual activities.
"Kyle's such a prude, he won't even go past first base!"
<https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=prude>
"Reluctant in", is not a phrase I'd use.
Nor would I. Why mention it?
Post by Harrison Hill
Your silly, out-of-date ideas about
prudishness, I'd put down to too much Bronte, Austen and Eliot. An Amazon saint
and a Michalangelo, for your "hilarious" examples.
It seems that you need to brush up on your reading comprehension as
well as your understanding of what words mean. I didn't mention those
as examples of what I thought "prudish" meant, but as follow-ups to
Lenona's "outrageous true story".
Post by Harrison Hill
prudish
ˈpruːdɪʃ/
adjective
1. having or revealing a tendency to be easily shocked by matters
relating to sex or nudity; excessively concerned with sexual
propriety."the prudish moral climate of the late 19th century"
excessively proper or modest in speech, conduct, dress, etc. 2.
characteristic of a prude. Origin ofprudish.
Prudish definition: If you describe someone as prudish , you mean that
they are too easily shocked by things... | Meaning, pronunciation,
translations and ...
Prudish behavior is also called priggish, prim, prissy, puritanical,
and straight-laced. Others usually think prudish people should lighten
up.
prud·ish Pronunciationproo-dish –adjective 1. excessively proper or
modest in speech, conduct, dress, etc. 2. characteristic of a prude.
—Related forms ...
I don't consider myself prudish but I do think the sex scenes in the
film were a bit excessive. prudishly. adverb uk /ˈpruː.dɪʃ.li/ us
/ˈpruː.dɪʃ.li/ ...
The definition of prudish is overly proper or too modest. Someone who
is very proper and cannot stand hearing any sexual reference, this is
an example of ...
I have deleted the entries that don't include anything resembling a definition.

All of them agree with what Janet and I think "prudish" means. There is
no hint of what you and your mother think it means.
--
athel
Harrison Hill
2018-05-10 14:37:42 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Janet
"Prudishness" is an absence of sexual desire
No, it isn't.
or being morbidly overburdened with
sexual hang-ups.
Not that either.
Janet.
Well I've gone back to my 1970s COD, and that has - prude: "Woman of
extreme (esp affected) propriety in conduct or speech".
And you think that's the same as "an absence of sexual desire"?
Post by Harrison Hill
I take "prudish" to belong to men as well - I consider myself quite
prudish
You have "an absence of sexual desire"? That seems to me to be your>
problem, not mine, and anyway irrelevant to the discussion.
Post by Harrison Hill
- and to cover the whole gamut from "frigidness" to
"nymphomania/exhibitionism". Athel's examples are hilariously out
of date.
Which examples do you have in mind? I don't remember giving any>
examples to illustrate "prudish", and looking through the thread>
doesn't reveal any. Has anyone agreed with your nonsensical>
definitions? Does it ever occur to you to reexamine your statements>
when you can't find anyone to agree withg them?
re-examine.
"Prude" is everyday English, and I don't need a foreign correspondent
(or Janet for that matter) to tell me how to speak my own language.
[ a torrent of Harrisonian claptrap, none of which supports your
claim that it means "an absence of sexual desire" ]
I note that you don't tell us which examples brought you to a state of
uncontrollable hilarity.
The Urban Dictionary: Top definition: "prude"
One who is reluctant in engaging in any sexual activities.
"Kyle's such a prude, he won't even go past first base!"
<https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=prude>
"Reluctant in", is not a phrase I'd use.
Nor would I. Why mention it?
Post by Harrison Hill
Your silly, out-of-date ideas about
prudishness, I'd put down to too much Bronte, Austen and Eliot. An Amazon saint
and a Michalangelo, for your "hilarious" examples.
It seems that you need to brush up on your reading comprehension as
well as your understanding of what words mean. I didn't mention those
as examples of what I thought "prudish" meant, but as follow-ups to
Lenona's "outrageous true story".
Post by Harrison Hill
prudish
ˈpruːdɪʃ/
adjective
1. having or revealing a tendency to be easily shocked by matters
relating to sex or nudity; excessively concerned with sexual
propriety."the prudish moral climate of the late 19th century"
excessively proper or modest in speech, conduct, dress, etc. 2.
characteristic of a prude. Origin ofprudish.
Prudish definition: If you describe someone as prudish , you mean that
they are too easily shocked by things... | Meaning, pronunciation,
translations and ...
Prudish behavior is also called priggish, prim, prissy, puritanical,
and straight-laced. Others usually think prudish people should lighten
up.
prud·ish Pronunciationproo-dish –adjective 1. excessively proper or
modest in speech, conduct, dress, etc. 2. characteristic of a prude.
—Related forms ...
I don't consider myself prudish but I do think the sex scenes in the
film were a bit excessive. prudishly. adverb uk /ˈpruː.dɪʃ.li/ us
/ˈpruː.dɪʃ.li/ ...
The definition of prudish is overly proper or too modest. Someone who
is very proper and cannot stand hearing any sexual reference, this is
an example of ...
I have deleted the entries that don't include anything resembling a definition.
All of them agree with what Janet and I think "prudish" means. There is
no hint of what you and your mother think it means.
I don't disagree with any of that. Something can mean ten
closely associated things, but that doesn't preclude an eleventh
closely associated thing being included within its ambit. Sexual
talk in Britain is very loose, and I often overhear young girls
talking very overtly about sex acts.

Do we preserve in aspic Jane Austen's language for the benefit of
ESLs? Or upgrade it to the "real" language that is being spoken
all around us? A mixture of both is perhaps the most useful.

Here are some words for the ESL's to ponder over - from a single
page of my COD:

"Obturate" v.t.
"Obverse" - which side of the coin is the obverse?
"Obvert" v.t.
"Occiput" - where on your head is its occiput?
"Occlude" - weather forecaster jargon.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-05-10 14:49:12 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On 2018-05-10 14:37:42 +0000, Harrison Hill said:

[ ... ]
Post by Harrison Hill
Do we preserve in aspic Jane Austen's language for the benefit of
ESLs?
As you refuse to read Jane Austen's work what do you know about how she wrote?
--
athel
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-05-10 14:20:39 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Janet
"Prudishness" is an absence of sexual desire
No, it isn't.
or being morbidly overburdened with
sexual hang-ups.
Not that either.
Janet.
Well I've gone back to my 1970s COD, and that has - prude: "Woman of
extreme (esp affected) propriety in conduct or speech".
And you think that's the same as "an absence of sexual desire"?
Post by Harrison Hill
I take "prudish" to belong to men as well - I consider myself quite
prudish
You have "an absence of sexual desire"? That seems to me to be your>
problem, not mine, and anyway irrelevant to the discussion.
Post by Harrison Hill
- and to cover the whole gamut from "frigidness" to
"nymphomania/exhibitionism". Athel's examples are hilariously out
of date.
Which examples do you have in mind? I don't remember giving any>
examples to illustrate "prudish", and looking through the thread>
doesn't reveal any. Has anyone agreed with your nonsensical>
definitions? Does it ever occur to you to reexamine your statements>
when you can't find anyone to agree withg them?
re-examine.
"Prude" is everyday English, and I don't need a foreign correspondent
(or Janet for that matter) to tell me how to speak my own language.
[ a torrent of Harrisonian claptrap, none of which supports your
claim that it means "an absence of sexual desire" ]
I note that you don't tell us which examples brought you to a state of
uncontrollable hilarity.
The Urban Dictionary: Top definition: "prude"
One who is reluctant in engaging in any sexual activities.
"Kyle's such a prude, he won't even go past first base!"
<https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=prude>
"Reluctant in", is not a phrase I'd use. Your silly, out-of-date ideas about
prudishness, I'd put down to too much Bronte, Austen and Eliot. An Amazon saint
and a Michalangelo, for your "hilarious" examples.
Ah yes. The Urban Dictionary. That sanctuary of scholarship! I note
that you don't quote the 2nd definition which includes this priceless
piece of English mangling ....

do not confused prudeness with fear.
Harrison Hill
2018-05-10 14:43:59 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Janet
"Prudishness" is an absence of sexual desire
No, it isn't.
or being morbidly overburdened with
sexual hang-ups.
Not that either.
Janet.
Well I've gone back to my 1970s COD, and that has - prude: "Woman of
extreme (esp affected) propriety in conduct or speech".
And you think that's the same as "an absence of sexual desire"?
Post by Harrison Hill
I take "prudish" to belong to men as well - I consider myself quite
prudish
You have "an absence of sexual desire"? That seems to me to be your>
problem, not mine, and anyway irrelevant to the discussion.
Post by Harrison Hill
- and to cover the whole gamut from "frigidness" to
"nymphomania/exhibitionism". Athel's examples are hilariously out
of date.
Which examples do you have in mind? I don't remember giving any>
examples to illustrate "prudish", and looking through the thread>
doesn't reveal any. Has anyone agreed with your nonsensical>
definitions? Does it ever occur to you to reexamine your statements>
when you can't find anyone to agree withg them?
re-examine.
"Prude" is everyday English, and I don't need a foreign correspondent
(or Janet for that matter) to tell me how to speak my own language.
[ a torrent of Harrisonian claptrap, none of which supports your
claim that it means "an absence of sexual desire" ]
I note that you don't tell us which examples brought you to a state of
uncontrollable hilarity.
The Urban Dictionary: Top definition: "prude"
One who is reluctant in engaging in any sexual activities.
"Kyle's such a prude, he won't even go past first base!"
<https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=prude>
"Reluctant in", is not a phrase I'd use. Your silly, out-of-date ideas about
prudishness, I'd put down to too much Bronte, Austen and Eliot. An Amazon saint
and a Michalangelo, for your "hilarious" examples.
Ah yes. The Urban Dictionary. That sanctuary of scholarship! I note
that you don't quote the 2nd definition which includes this priceless
piece of English mangling ....
do not confused prudeness with fear.
"Now learn too late,
How few sometimes may know, when thousands err."

My favourite Milton quote is this:

"The invention all admired, and each how he
To be the inventor missed, so easy it seemed
Once found, which yet unfound most would have thought
Impossible".

Perish the thought that that could even be a typo :(
Tony Cooper
2018-05-10 16:02:05 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Thu, 10 May 2018 06:50:01 -0700 (PDT), Harrison Hill
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Janet
"Prudishness" is an absence of sexual desire
No, it isn't.
or being morbidly overburdened with
sexual hang-ups.
Not that either.
Janet.
Well I've gone back to my 1970s COD, and that has - prude: "Woman of
extreme (esp affected) propriety in conduct or speech".
And you think that's the same as "an absence of sexual desire"?
Post by Harrison Hill
I take "prudish" to belong to men as well - I consider myself quite
prudish
You have "an absence of sexual desire"? That seems to me to be your>
problem, not mine, and anyway irrelevant to the discussion.
Post by Harrison Hill
- and to cover the whole gamut from "frigidness" to
"nymphomania/exhibitionism". Athel's examples are hilariously out
of date.
Which examples do you have in mind? I don't remember giving any>
examples to illustrate "prudish", and looking through the thread>
doesn't reveal any. Has anyone agreed with your nonsensical>
definitions? Does it ever occur to you to reexamine your statements>
when you can't find anyone to agree withg them?
re-examine.
"Prude" is everyday English, and I don't need a foreign correspondent
(or Janet for that matter) to tell me how to speak my own language.
[ a torrent of Harrisonian claptrap, none of which supports your
claim that it means "an absence of sexual desire" ]
I note that you don't tell us which examples brought you to a state of
uncontrollable hilarity.
The Urban Dictionary: Top definition: "prude"
One who is reluctant in engaging in any sexual activities.
"Kyle's such a prude, he won't even go past first base!"
<https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=prude>
This does nothing more than prove the unreliability of the Urban
Dictionary as a source of generally used definitions. It is the
equivalent of the Sword person writing a book on proper behavior.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-05-10 16:08:05 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tony Cooper
On Thu, 10 May 2018 06:50:01 -0700 (PDT), Harrison Hill
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Janet
"Prudishness" is an absence of sexual desire
No, it isn't.
or being morbidly overburdened with
sexual hang-ups.
Not that either.
Janet.
Well I've gone back to my 1970s COD, and that has - prude: "Woman of
extreme (esp affected) propriety in conduct or speech".
And you think that's the same as "an absence of sexual desire"?
Post by Harrison Hill
I take "prudish" to belong to men as well - I consider myself quite
prudish
You have "an absence of sexual desire"? That seems to me to be your>
problem, not mine, and anyway irrelevant to the discussion.
Post by Harrison Hill
- and to cover the whole gamut from "frigidness" to
"nymphomania/exhibitionism". Athel's examples are hilariously out
of date.
Which examples do you have in mind? I don't remember giving any>
examples to illustrate "prudish", and looking through the thread>
doesn't reveal any. Has anyone agreed with your nonsensical>
definitions? Does it ever occur to you to reexamine your statements>
when you can't find anyone to agree withg them?
re-examine.
"Prude" is everyday English, and I don't need a foreign correspondent
(or Janet for that matter) to tell me how to speak my own language.
[ a torrent of Harrisonian claptrap, none of which supports your
claim that it means "an absence of sexual desire" ]
I note that you don't tell us which examples brought you to a state of
uncontrollable hilarity.
The Urban Dictionary: Top definition: "prude"
One who is reluctant in engaging in any sexual activities.
"Kyle's such a prude, he won't even go past first base!"
<https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=prude>
This does nothing more than prove the unreliability of the Urban
Dictionary as a source of generally used definitions. It is the
equivalent of the Sword person writing a book on proper behavior.
Yes. I was surprised that even Hen Harrison was so out of touch with
reality that he would think of citing the Urban Dictionary.
--
athel
Quinn C
2018-05-10 17:24:34 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Harrison Hill
"Prude" is everyday English, and I don't need a foreign correspondent
(or Janet for that matter) to tell me how to speak my own language.
[ a torrent of Harrisonian claptrap, none of which supports your
claim that it means "an absence of sexual desire" ]
I note that you don't tell us which examples brought you to a state of
uncontrollable hilarity.
The Urban Dictionary: Top definition: "prude"
One who is reluctant in engaging in any sexual activities.
"Kyle's such a prude, he won't even go past first base!"
<https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=prude>
I would consider that a bad usage - misleading and usually used as an
aggressive shaming tactics, but I have encountered it often enough. It
still has nothing to do with "absence of sexual desire".
--
If you kill one person, you go to jail; if you kill 20, you go
to an institution for the insane; if you kill 20,000, you get
political asylum. -- Reed Brody, special counsel
for prosecutions at Human Rights Watch
Janet
2018-05-10 14:04:40 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Janet
"Prudishness" is an absence of sexual desire
No, it isn't.
or being morbidly overburdened with
sexual hang-ups.
Not that either.
Janet.
Well I've gone back to my 1970s COD, and that has - prude: "Woman of
extreme (esp affected) propriety in conduct or speech".
And you think that's the same as "an absence of sexual desire"?
Post by Harrison Hill
I take "prudish" to belong to men as well - I consider myself quite
prudish
You have "an absence of sexual desire"? That seems to me to be your
problem, not mine, and anyway irrelevant to the discussion.
Post by Harrison Hill
- and to cover the whole gamut from "frigidness" to
"nymphomania/exhibitionism". Athel's examples are hilariously out
of date.
Which examples do you have in mind? I don't remember giving any
examples to illustrate "prudish", and looking through the thread
doesn't reveal any. Has anyone agreed with your nonsensical
definitions? Does it ever occur to you to reexamine your statements
when you can't find anyone to agree withg them?
re-examine.
"Prude" is everyday English,
Nobody disagrees.

Correcting wrong definitions of "prudishness" by a native speaker, is
for the benefit of ESL posters, not yourself.


and I don't need a foreign correspondent
Post by Harrison Hill
(or Janet for that matter) to tell me how to speak my own language.
Your mother failed, I wouldn't waste my breath.

Janet
Reinhold {Rey} Aman
2018-05-10 16:43:34 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Janet
Correcting wrong definitions of "prudishness"
by a native speaker, is for the benefit of
ESL posters, not yourself.
ObAUE: Nice comma.
--
~~~ Reinhold {Rey} Aman ~~~
CDB
2018-05-10 20:52:34 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Janet
"Prudishness" is an absence of sexual desire
No, it isn't.
or being morbidly overburdened with sexual hang-ups.
Not that either.
"Woman of extreme (esp affected) propriety in conduct or
speech".
And you think that's the same as "an absence of sexual desire"?
I take "prudish" to belong to men as well - I consider myself
quite prudish
You have "an absence of sexual desire"? That seems to me to be your
problem, not mine, and anyway irrelevant to the discussion.
- and to cover the whole gamut from "frigidness" to
"nymphomania/exhibitionism". Athel's examples are hilariously out
of date.
Which examples do you have in mind? I don't remember giving any
examples to illustrate "prudish", and looking through the thread
doesn't reveal any. Has anyone agreed with your nonsensical
definitions? Does it ever occur to you to reexamine your statements
when you can't find anyone to agree withg them?
re-examine.
"Prude" is everyday English, and I don't need a foreign correspondent
(or Janet for that matter) to tell me how to speak my own language.
[there is no unwelcome attention]
l***@yahoo.com
2018-05-12 14:15:18 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by CDB
[there is no unwelcome attention]
Please tell me you're joking.

As I mentioned elsewhere, any 10-year-old boy pretty much understands, when told, that unwanted sex is disgusting AND seriously illegal, but at 15, it's too easy for him to start thinking: "Wait a minute - any fool knows there no such thing as unwanted sex! Thus, a woman can't possibly ALWAYS have the legal right to say no! The laws are nothing but stupid, bogus, and anti-male! Why should I take them seriously?"

This, of course, is why parents and teachers have to ask heterosexual boys, over and over: "Well, how would you feel if a man you trusted attacked you and ignored your screams of 'no'?"

To put it another way, any 10-year-old already knows that drunk driving is wrong and illegal. So why don't we consider it a stupid waste of time and money for schools to make teens sit through lectures on drunk driving - or lectures on the pressure to drink illegally in the first place? Because teens are very different from 10-year-olds - and most adults understand that! I can't understand why so many adults refuse to acknowledge that it's the same thing when it comes to sex.



Lenona.
CDB
2018-05-12 19:05:31 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by l***@yahoo.com
Post by CDB
[there is no unwelcome attention]
Please tell me you're joking.
As I mentioned elsewhere, any 10-year-old boy pretty much
understands, when told, that unwanted sex is disgusting AND
seriously illegal, but at 15, it's too easy for him to start
thinking: "Wait a minute - any fool knows there no such thing as
unwanted sex! Thus, a woman can't possibly ALWAYS have the legal
right to say no! The laws are nothing but stupid, bogus, and
anti-male! Why should I take them seriously?"
This, of course, is why parents and teachers have to ask
heterosexual boys, over and over: "Well, how would you feel if a man
you trusted attacked you and ignored your screams of 'no'?"
To put it another way, any 10-year-old already knows that drunk
driving is wrong and illegal. So why don't we consider it a stupid
waste of time and money for schools to make teens sit through
lectures on drunk driving - or lectures on the pressure to drink
illegally in the first place? Because teens are very different from
10-year-olds - and most adults understand that! I can't understand
why so many adults refuse to acknowledge that it's the same thing
when it comes to sex.
I don't recall writing any of the things you object to above. The
subject you raise is current and interesting, and has been broached
here a few times. It is also so complicated and (currently) fraught
with emotion that a Usenet thread can only scratch at its surface.

Try to read context with more attention. Here is a little of the
context of the line you objected to, context that you snipped:

**************************************************
[HH:]
"Prude" is everyday English, and I don't need a foreign correspondent
(or Janet for that matter) to tell me how to speak my own language.
The Urban Dictionary has:

[CDB:]
[there is no unwelcome attention]
**************************************************
I was commenting on Harrison's extended citation (which I snipped in
public-spirited reproof) of definitions from The Urban Dictionary (qv)
to support his point. The UD is very occasionally a useful resource,
but mostly a bad joke. Harrison is not the most widely-respected
contributor here, having some trollish habits* like silly provocation
for the sake of attention, and the line you objected to was a comment on
what he had posted, or the tiny remnant of it that I had preserved.
_______________________________________
*I should add that my attitude towards HH has grown more tolerant since
I noticed that most of his sometimes-annoying posts are aimed at
English usage. Not that I'll ever tell him.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-05-13 06:37:07 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by CDB
Post by l***@yahoo.com
Post by CDB
[there is no unwelcome attention]
Please tell me you're joking.
As I mentioned elsewhere, any 10-year-old boy pretty much understands,
when told, that unwanted sex is disgusting AND
seriously illegal, but at 15, it's too easy for him to start
thinking: "Wait a minute - any fool knows there no such thing as
unwanted sex! Thus, a woman can't possibly ALWAYS have the legal
right to say no! The laws are nothing but stupid, bogus, and
anti-male! Why should I take them seriously?"
This, of course, is why parents and teachers have to ask
heterosexual boys, over and over: "Well, how would you feel if a man
you trusted attacked you and ignored your screams of 'no'?"
To put it another way, any 10-year-old already knows that drunk driving
is wrong and illegal. So why don't we consider it a stupid waste of
time and money for schools to make teens sit through lectures on drunk
driving - or lectures on the pressure to drink illegally in the first
place? Because teens are very different from 10-year-olds - and most
adults understand that! I can't understand why so many adults refuse to
acknowledge that it's the same thing when it comes to sex.
I don't recall writing any of the things you object to above. The
subject you raise is current and interesting, and has been broached
here a few times. It is also so complicated and (currently) fraught
with emotion that a Usenet thread can only scratch at its surface.
Try to read context with more attention. Here is a little of the
**************************************************
[HH:]
"Prude" is everyday English, and I don't need a foreign correspondent
(or Janet for that matter) to tell me how to speak my own language.
[CDB:]
[there is no unwelcome attention]
**************************************************
I was commenting on Harrison's extended citation (which I snipped in
public-spirited reproof) of definitions from The Urban Dictionary (qv)
to support his point. The UD is very occasionally a useful resource,
but mostly a bad joke. Harrison is not the most widely-respected
contributor here, having some trollish habits* like silly provocation
for the sake of attention, and the line you objected to was a comment on
what he had posted, or the tiny remnant of it that I had preserved.
_______________________________________
*I should add that my attitude towards HH has grown more tolerant since
I noticed that most of his sometimes-annoying posts are aimed at
English usage. Not that I'll ever tell him.
I'm glad you clarified that. When you made your post I found it a bit
strange and didn't really know what you meant, but I certainly didn't
interpret it the way Lenona did -- that never occurred to me.
--
athel
l***@yahoo.com
2018-06-14 21:34:33 UTC
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Post by l***@yahoo.com
I HOPE this is only an issue between teens, for the most part. That is, hardly any adults, I hope, accuse strangers - or even their friends - of being prudes for, say, not wanting to talk about their sex lives or lack thereof.
Anyway, it occurred to me that you might say the difference between "private" and "prudish" is as follows: private people simply want the right to close their bedroom doors, but the prudes won't let them.
When you're an adult addressing teens, however, you have to follow that up by explaining that it is absolutely not fair to accuse your S.O. of being a prude just because he/she refuses to have sex with you, because disappointment is just a part of life, and EVERYONE has the right to that level of privacy, even those who keep trying to destroy others' privacy. As in, two wrongs don't make a right.
There are two letters to Ask Amy today that touch on privacy rights:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/ask-amy-girl-pressed-for-nude-photo-should-wear-t-shirt-instead/2018/06/13/fbb84f0a-6796-11e8-9e38-24e693b38637_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.5f01a2153a6f

Check out the comments, too - great!

I thought the 9:28 AM anecdote from ThisBrigid was pretty memorable. (It helps to put the comments in order of "most liked.")

And:

WonderfulWorld
9:59 AM EDT

"I remember telling my daughter that the only reason someone calls you a 'prude' is to make you prove you aren't. Don't fall for it."


Check out BlueRose at 12:58 pm, Rentian at 9:05 am, and SnappyCat at 8:55 am, too...

And while Amy didn't mention this, one of the biggest problems for teen girls - and women - is that having sex can truly muddle their brains, emotions, judgment, AND make them more vulnerable to manipulation. Maybe that happens to boys as well, but I wonder how often, percentage-wise.


Lenona.

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