Discussion:
fubbed off or fobbed off?
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Dingbat
2017-04-19 07:00:10 UTC
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I think it's fubbed in Shakespeare.

... Davis, an old Whitehall hand, refused to be fobbed off ...

IOW, Davis refused to take 'no' for an answer.

... from a Guardian article last year:
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/shortcuts/2016/aug/22/who-lives-no-9-downing-street-brexit
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-04-19 07:18:59 UTC
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Post by Dingbat
I think it's fubbed in Shakespeare.
Yes, but it's "fobbed" in modern British English. Many words have
changed their spelling, meaning (I don't suppose Davis meant "fucked"
in your example), pronunciation etc. since Shakespeare's day. What's
special about this example?
Post by Dingbat
... Davis, an old Whitehall hand, refused to be fobbed off ...
IOW, Davis refused to take 'no' for an answer.
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/shortcuts/2016/aug/22/who-lives-no-9-downing-street-brexit
--
athel
Peter Moylan
2017-04-19 07:33:36 UTC
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Post by Dingbat
I think it's fubbed in Shakespeare.
... Davis, an old Whitehall hand, refused to be fobbed off ...
IOW, Davis refused to take 'no' for an answer.
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/shortcuts/2016/aug/22/who-lives-no-9-downing-street-brexit
I've never encountered "fubbed", but Urban Dictionary says that it's
used (without "off") in Facebook to mean "snubbed" [*]. Dictionary.com
says that "fub" means "fob", and seems to say that it was in use from
1605 to 1615, but I might be misunderstanding the graphical timeline.

As nearly as I can tell, Shakespeare used "fubbed off" only in one play
(Henry IV Part 2). And he used it before 1605, which dictionary.com
apparently doesn't know.

"Fobbed off", on the other hand, is alive and well today.

[*] Do dictionaries pick up what is written in Facebook? If so, they'll
find many worse misspellings than that.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-04-19 09:55:11 UTC
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On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 17:33:36 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Dingbat
I think it's fubbed in Shakespeare.
... Davis, an old Whitehall hand, refused to be fobbed off ...
IOW, Davis refused to take 'no' for an answer.
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/shortcuts/2016/aug/22/who-lives-no-9-downing-street-brexit
I've never encountered "fubbed", but Urban Dictionary says that it's
used (without "off") in Facebook to mean "snubbed" [*]. Dictionary.com
says that "fub" means "fob", and seems to say that it was in use from
1605 to 1615, but I might be misunderstanding the graphical timeline.
As nearly as I can tell, Shakespeare used "fubbed off" only in one play
(Henry IV Part 2). And he used it before 1605, which dictionary.com
apparently doesn't know.
"Fobbed off", on the other hand, is alive and well today.
[*] Do dictionaries pick up what is written in Facebook? If so, they'll
find many worse misspellings than that.
OED:

fob, v.1

Forms: Also 15–16 fub, fobb(e. See also fop v.

1. trans. To cheat, deceive, delude, trick, impose upon, ‘take in’;
also with up. Also, to fob (a person) of or out of (something).
colloq.

1583 R. Greene Mamillia i. f. 28v, I will not..fobbe you with
fayre wordes, and foule deedes.
1593 Tell-Trothes New-yeares Gift (1876) 25 He..would fobbe him
vppe with a thousand vntruthes.
a1643 W. Cartwright Ordinary (1651) iv. iv. 71, I won't be
fubb'd ensure your self.
1731 H. Fielding Genuine Grub-St. Opera i. v. 18 While every one
else he is fobbing, Do'st think he'll be honest to thee.
<more "fob"s>

2. <obsolete sense>

3. to fob off
a. To put off deceitfully; to attempt to satisfy with an excuse or
pretence; to baffle, cajole; to put off (a person) with (something
of inferior quality or something less than he has been led to
expect).
1600 Shakespeare Henry IV, Pt. 2 ii. i. 34, I haue..bin fubd
off, and fubd off..from this day to that day.
1602 S. Rowlands Greenes Ghost 8 Fubbing them off with these
slender wasted blacke pots.
1650 A. Cowley Guardian v. vii. sig. F, I must not be fob'd off
thus about my daughter.
....

It seems that is started life with an "o", was then used with a "u", and
reverted to the original "o".
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
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