Discussion:
Words you can never remember
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James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-13 13:41:50 UTC
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Is it just me, or do others have trouble remembering certain words? I can never remember the word for:
flea
fibre glass
conservatory
If I'm trying to use one in a sentence, I pause for 5-10 seconds trying to think of it.
--
She was as easy as the Daily Star crossword.
Peter Young
2017-04-13 16:30:55 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Is it just me, or do others have trouble remembering certain words? I
flea
fibre glass
conservatory
If I'm trying to use one in a sentence, I pause for 5-10 seconds trying to think of it.
I have no idea how old you are, but this 77-year-old has a lot of that
trouble.

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Ir)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-13 16:49:41 UTC
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Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Is it just me, or do others have trouble remembering certain words? I
flea
fibre glass
conservatory
If I'm trying to use one in a sentence, I pause for 5-10 seconds trying to think of it.
I have no idea how old you are, but this 77-year-old has a lot of that
trouble.
The strange thing is it's always the same words with me. And I'm 41. Could be the booze.
--
A highway patrolman pulled alongside a speeding car on the freeway. Glancing at the car, he was astounded to see that the blonde behind the wheel was knitting!
Realizing that she was oblivious to his flashing lights and siren, the trooper cranked down his window, turned on his bullhorn and yelled, "PULL OVER!"
"NO!" the blonde yelled back, "IT'S A SCARF!"
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-04-13 17:26:27 UTC
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Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Is it just me, or do others have trouble remembering certain words? I
flea
fibre glass
conservatory
If I'm trying to use one in a sentence, I pause for 5-10 seconds trying to think of it.
I have no idea how old you are,
About ten, I think, based on his posts.
Post by Peter Young
but this 77-year-old has a lot of that
trouble.
I have some trouble with words, more and more trouble with people's
names and placenames. (I just turned 74).
--
athel
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-13 17:38:12 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Is it just me, or do others have trouble remembering certain words? I
flea
fibre glass
conservatory
If I'm trying to use one in a sentence, I pause for 5-10 seconds trying to think of it.
I have no idea how old you are,
About ten, I think, based on his posts.
PKB!
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Young
but this 77-year-old has a lot of that
trouble.
I have some trouble with words, more and more trouble with people's
names and placenames. (I just turned 74).
I used to remember my colleague as Jack Russell instead of John Russell.
--
"The hands that help are better far than lips that pray." - Robert Ingersoll (1833-1899)
Peter Young
2017-04-13 18:04:32 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Is it just me, or do others have trouble remembering certain words? I
flea
fibre glass
conservatory
If I'm trying to use one in a sentence, I pause for 5-10 seconds trying to think of it.
I have no idea how old you are,
About ten, I think, based on his posts.
<grin>
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Young
but this 77-year-old has a lot of that
trouble.
I have some trouble with words, more and more trouble with people's
names and placenames. (I just turned 74).
I've always had problems remembering peoples' names, but not
place-names. What's new is that I sometimes can't recall perfectly
ordinary words. They always come back to me after a few moments,
though.

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Ir)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Peter Moylan
2017-04-14 02:55:34 UTC
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Post by Peter Young
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Is it just me, or do others have trouble remembering certain words? I
flea
fibre glass
conservatory
If I'm trying to use one in a sentence, I pause for 5-10 seconds
trying to think of it.
I have no idea how old you are,
About ten, I think, based on his posts.
<grin>
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Young
but this 77-year-old has a lot of that
trouble.
I have some trouble with words, more and more trouble with people's
names and placenames. (I just turned 74).
I've always had problems remembering peoples' names, but not
place-names. What's new is that I sometimes can't recall perfectly
ordinary words. They always come back to me after a few moments,
though.
I'm only 69, but I'm starting to have trouble with the daily crossword.
I read the clue and think "I know that word", but the word won't pop to
the surface. I have to move on and come back to that one later.

It doesn't seem to happen as much with non-cryptic crosswords, but that
might be because they're easier.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-14 15:20:28 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Young
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Is it just me, or do others have trouble remembering certain words? I
flea
fibre glass
conservatory
If I'm trying to use one in a sentence, I pause for 5-10 seconds
trying to think of it.
I have no idea how old you are,
About ten, I think, based on his posts.
<grin>
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Young
but this 77-year-old has a lot of that
trouble.
I have some trouble with words, more and more trouble with people's
names and placenames. (I just turned 74).
I've always had problems remembering peoples' names, but not
place-names. What's new is that I sometimes can't recall perfectly
ordinary words. They always come back to me after a few moments,
though.
I'm only 69, but I'm starting to have trouble with the daily crossword.
I read the clue and think "I know that word", but the word won't pop to
the surface. I have to move on and come back to that one later.
It doesn't seem to happen as much with non-cryptic crosswords, but that
might be because they're easier.
When I'm trying to remember a word (or usually a name), I try to think of it beginning with A, then B, etc. It seems to be more likely to find the word if I'm only looking in a 26th of my memory.
--
7 wheelchair athletes have been banned from the Paralympics after they tested positive for WD40.
The Peeler
2017-04-14 22:21:53 UTC
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On Fri, 14 Apr 2017 16:20:28 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
When I'm trying to remember a word (or usually a name), I try to think of
it beginning with A, then B, etc. It seems to be more likely to find the
word if I'm only looking in a 26th of my memory.
Thanks for letting us look into the workings of your sociopathic "mind",
Birdbrain!

BTW, how about some quoteworthy stuff today again? I know you can do it!
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) "intellect" on
display:
"People who feel the need to emphasise words are lacking in their
genitalia."
MID: <***@red.lan>
Peter Moylan
2017-04-15 14:47:19 UTC
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Post by The Peeler
On Fri, 14 Apr 2017 16:20:28 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
When I'm trying to remember a word (or usually a name), I try to think of
it beginning with A, then B, etc. It seems to be more likely to find the
word if I'm only looking in a 26th of my memory.
Thanks for letting us look into the workings of your sociopathic "mind",
Birdbrain!
BTW, how about some quoteworthy stuff today again? I know you can do it!
I can't resist thinking of a "Wizard of Id" sequence where the wizard
accidentally changed the king into a chicken, The castle guards then had
to accept "Buck buck mackaw" as a valid password.

That is not to suggest that our very own Buck Buck Mackauw will ever
find its way out of our killfiles.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
The Peeler
2017-04-15 16:36:03 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by The Peeler
Thanks for letting us look into the workings of your sociopathic "mind",
Birdbrain!
BTW, how about some quoteworthy stuff today again? I know you can do it!
I can't resist thinking of a "Wizard of Id" sequence where the wizard
accidentally changed the king into a chicken, The castle guards then had
to accept "Buck buck mackaw" as a valid password.
That is not to suggest that our very own Buck Buck Mackauw will ever
find its way out of our killfiles.
Wow, how erudite! <BG>
RH Draney
2017-04-15 02:10:24 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
When I'm trying to remember a word (or usually a name), I try to think
of it beginning with A, then B, etc. It seems to be more likely to find
the word if I'm only looking in a 26th of my memory.
That's fine until you have an experience like my mother once did...we
were driving around Las Cruces trying to find some business, and Mom
kept saying "I know the street name starts with a P"...after a good long
stretch of this, we passed a sign saying "Lohman Avenue" and she shouted
"that's it!"...

We never stopped teasing her about "P as in Lohman" after that....r
Dingbat
2017-04-15 07:24:36 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
When I'm trying to remember a word (or usually a name), I try to think
of it beginning with A, then B, etc. It seems to be more likely to find
the word if I'm only looking in a 26th of my memory.
That's fine until you have an experience like my mother once did...we
were driving around Las Cruces trying to find some business, and Mom
kept saying "I know the street name starts with a P"...after a good long
stretch of this, we passed a sign saying "Lohman Avenue" and she shouted
"that's it!"...
We never stopped teasing her about "P as in Lohman" after that....r
Work the pronunciation of Plow backward through the Great Vowel Shift and you get Ploh.

Plow is Pflug in German though, and German Lohman has nothing to do with plows:
https://www.houseofnames.com/lohman-family-crest
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-04-15 11:35:52 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
When I'm trying to remember a word (or usually a name), I try to think
of it beginning with A, then B, etc. It seems to be more likely to find
the word if I'm only looking in a 26th of my memory.
That's fine until you have an experience like my mother once did...we
were driving around Las Cruces trying to find some business, and Mom
kept saying "I know the street name starts with a P"...after a good long
stretch of this, we passed a sign saying "Lohman Avenue" and she shouted
"that's it!"...
We never stopped teasing her about "P as in Lohman" after that....r
Well.... If you invert the L and slide the o up and left to join it you
some sort of P.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-15 23:46:59 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by RH Draney
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
When I'm trying to remember a word (or usually a name), I try to think
of it beginning with A, then B, etc. It seems to be more likely to find
the word if I'm only looking in a 26th of my memory.
That's fine until you have an experience like my mother once did...we
were driving around Las Cruces trying to find some business, and Mom
kept saying "I know the street name starts with a P"...after a good long
stretch of this, we passed a sign saying "Lohman Avenue" and she shouted
"that's it!"...
We never stopped teasing her about "P as in Lohman" after that....r
Well.... If you invert the L and slide the o up and left to join it you
some sort of P.
I keep doing that sort of stuff with car reg plates. It's amazing how many look like the word "slow" when you're stuck behind them. In fact m'colleague had a car with a reg something like SL907WRE, which I read as "slower". I overtook her on several occasions on the way to work. She was quite alarmed the time I did it on a humpback bridge and left the ground.
--
Alfred Hitchcock didn't have a belly button.
The Peeler
2017-04-15 23:53:36 UTC
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On Sun, 16 Apr 2017 00:46:59 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Well.... If you invert the L and slide the o up and left to join it you
some sort of P.
I keep doing that sort of stuff with car reg plates. It's amazing how
many look like the word "slow" when you're stuck behind them. In fact
m'colleague had a car with a reg something like SL907WRE, which I read as
"slower". I overtook her on several occasions on the way to work. She
was quite alarmed the time I did it on a humpback bridge and left the
ground.
Yes, that's our resident sociopath as we know him. <BG>
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) "deep thinking":
"Do you play musical instruments like that? No. Why would I want several
notes instead of one? That would be like playing the piano with parkinsons
disease."
MID: <***@red.lan>
Richard Bollard
2017-04-19 05:44:45 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
When I'm trying to remember a word (or usually a name), I try to think
of it beginning with A, then B, etc. It seems to be more likely to find
the word if I'm only looking in a 26th of my memory.
That's fine until you have an experience like my mother once did...we
were driving around Las Cruces trying to find some business, and Mom
kept saying "I know the street name starts with a P"...after a good long
stretch of this, we passed a sign saying "Lohman Avenue" and she shouted
"that's it!"...
We never stopped teasing her about "P as in Lohman" after that....r
Plugh!
--
Richard Bollard
Canberra Australia

To email, I'm at AMT not spAMT.
J. J. Lodder
2017-04-15 09:22:01 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Young
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Is it just me, or do others have trouble remembering certain words? I
flea
fibre glass
conservatory
If I'm trying to use one in a sentence, I pause for 5-10 seconds
trying to think of it.
I have no idea how old you are,
About ten, I think, based on his posts.
<grin>
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Young
but this 77-year-old has a lot of that
trouble.
I have some trouble with words, more and more trouble with people's
names and placenames. (I just turned 74).
I've always had problems remembering peoples' names, but not
place-names. What's new is that I sometimes can't recall perfectly
ordinary words. They always come back to me after a few moments,
though.
I'm only 69, but I'm starting to have trouble with the daily crossword.
I read the clue and think "I know that word", but the word won't pop to
the surface. I have to move on and come back to that one later.
It doesn't seem to happen as much with non-cryptic crosswords, but that
might be because they're easier.
I have tested this by grepping a dictionary
in cases where two or three letters are already known.
There are always many more words than I could possibly think of.
(and it is only a small spell-check dictionary,
so there are many more)

So I think it is an illusion that you can possibly think of them all,
or just a sizable fraction of them.
(despite knowing them all passively)
Human memory isn't built that way.
Being 69 has nothing to do with it,

Jan
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-15 23:48:48 UTC
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Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Young
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Is it just me, or do others have trouble remembering certain words? I
flea
fibre glass
conservatory
If I'm trying to use one in a sentence, I pause for 5-10 seconds
trying to think of it.
I have no idea how old you are,
About ten, I think, based on his posts.
<grin>
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Young
but this 77-year-old has a lot of that
trouble.
I have some trouble with words, more and more trouble with people's
names and placenames. (I just turned 74).
I've always had problems remembering peoples' names, but not
place-names. What's new is that I sometimes can't recall perfectly
ordinary words. They always come back to me after a few moments,
though.
I'm only 69, but I'm starting to have trouble with the daily crossword.
I read the clue and think "I know that word", but the word won't pop to
the surface. I have to move on and come back to that one later.
It doesn't seem to happen as much with non-cryptic crosswords, but that
might be because they're easier.
I have tested this by grepping a dictionary
in cases where two or three letters are already known.
There are always many more words than I could possibly think of.
(and it is only a small spell-check dictionary,
so there are many more)
So I think it is an illusion that you can possibly think of them all,
or just a sizable fraction of them.
(despite knowing them all passively)
Human memory isn't built that way.
Being 69 has nothing to do with it,
Human brains are shit. My graphics card is currently doing the Collatz Conjecture at 320 trillion calculations per second. Probably take me at least 10 seconds to do one.
--
I think car alarms should be set to explode after two minutes.
That way, we either take out a car thief, or deprive a noise-polluting jerk of his wheels.
The Peeler
2017-04-15 23:56:01 UTC
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On Sun, 16 Apr 2017 00:48:48 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by J. J. Lodder
So I think it is an illusion that you can possibly think of them all,
or just a sizable fraction of them.
(despite knowing them all passively)
Human memory isn't built that way.
Being 69 has nothing to do with it,
Human brains are shit.
There's no doubt that YOURS is, Birdbrain!
--
Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson") about himself:
"My IQ is superiour to that of most people".
"I am inferior in some ways but superior in other ways".
"I admit I should not have been born".
(Courtesy of Mr Pounder)
Charles Bishop
2017-04-13 20:27:14 UTC
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Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Is it just me, or do others have trouble remembering certain words? I
flea
fibre glass
conservatory
If I'm trying to use one in a sentence, I pause for 5-10 seconds trying to think of it.
I have no idea how old you are, but this 77-year-old has a lot of that
trouble.
Peter.
Mine seem to be mostly nouns. I haven't noticed myself not recalling
verbs, or adjectives and the like. I wonder if nouns are special somehow.
--
charles
Peter Young
2017-04-13 20:46:07 UTC
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Post by Charles Bishop
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Is it just me, or do others have trouble remembering certain words? I
flea
fibre glass
conservatory
If I'm trying to use one in a sentence, I pause for 5-10 seconds trying to think of it.
I have no idea how old you are, but this 77-year-old has a lot of that
trouble.
Peter.
Mine seem to be mostly nouns. I haven't noticed myself not recalling
verbs, or adjectives and the like. I wonder if nouns are special somehow.
Now I came to think about it, it is nouns that I can't recall. Why?

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Ir)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-13 21:02:27 UTC
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Post by Peter Young
Post by Charles Bishop
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Is it just me, or do others have trouble remembering certain words? I
flea
fibre glass
conservatory
If I'm trying to use one in a sentence, I pause for 5-10 seconds
trying to think of it.
I have no idea how old you are, but this 77-year-old has a lot of that
trouble.
Peter.
Mine seem to be mostly nouns. I haven't noticed myself not recalling
verbs, or adjectives and the like. I wonder if nouns are special somehow.
Now I came to think about it, it is nouns that I can't recall. Why?
They're used less.
--
"Take off lid and push up bottom." (From a stick deodorant label)
Peter Young
2017-04-13 21:22:40 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by Charles Bishop
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Is it just me, or do others have trouble remembering certain words? I
flea
fibre glass
conservatory
If I'm trying to use one in a sentence, I pause for 5-10 seconds
trying to think of it.
I have no idea how old you are, but this 77-year-old has a lot of that
trouble.
Peter.
Mine seem to be mostly nouns. I haven't noticed myself not recalling
verbs, or adjectives and the like. I wonder if nouns are special somehow.
Now I came to think about it, it is nouns that I can't recall. Why?
They're used less.
Are they?

OT: From the tag-line:

"Take off lid and push up bottom." (From a stick deodorant label)

From some label that a colleague told be about many years ago, I
forget what the product was, "Take off top and stand in hot water".

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Ir)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-13 21:33:04 UTC
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Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by Charles Bishop
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Is it just me, or do others have trouble remembering certain words? I
flea
fibre glass
conservatory
If I'm trying to use one in a sentence, I pause for 5-10 seconds
trying to think of it.
I have no idea how old you are, but this 77-year-old has a lot of that
trouble.
Peter.
Mine seem to be mostly nouns. I haven't noticed myself not recalling
verbs, or adjectives and the like. I wonder if nouns are special somehow.
Now I came to think about it, it is nouns that I can't recall. Why?
They're used less.
Are they?
Yes. Fast car, fast plane, fast train.
Post by Peter Young
"Take off lid and push up bottom." (From a stick deodorant label)
From some label that a colleague told be about many years ago, I
forget what the product was, "Take off top and stand in hot water".
"6PCS Precision Screwdriver Set. Not to be inserted into penis."

Loading Image...
--
The best parliament is a well-hung one?
b***@aol.com
2017-04-14 05:17:45 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by Charles Bishop
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Is it just me, or do others have trouble remembering certain words? I
flea
fibre glass
conservatory
If I'm trying to use one in a sentence, I pause for 5-10 seconds
trying to think of it.
I have no idea how old you are, but this 77-year-old has a lot of that
trouble.
Peter.
Mine seem to be mostly nouns. I haven't noticed myself not recalling
verbs, or adjectives and the like. I wonder if nouns are special somehow.
Now I came to think about it, it is nouns that I can't recall. Why?
They're used less.
Are they?
Yes. Fast car, fast plane, fast train.
But fast car, expensive car, red car.

Besides, a noun can be used without an adjective, but an adjective
can't be used without a noun, which seems to challenge your
assertion.
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
"Take off lid and push up bottom." (From a stick deodorant label)
From some label that a colleague told be about many years ago, I
forget what the product was, "Take off top and stand in hot water".
"6PCS Precision Screwdriver Set. Not to be inserted into penis."
http://www.myconfinedspace.com/wp-content/uploads/2006/11/screwdriver-not-for-penis.jpg
--
The best parliament is a well-hung one?
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-14 15:19:28 UTC
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Le jeudi 13 avril 2017 23:33:11 UTC+2, James Wilkinson Sword a =E9crit=
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Is it just me, or do others have trouble remembering certain w=
ords? I
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
flea
fibre glass
conservatory
If I'm trying to use one in a sentence, I pause for 5-10 secon=
ds
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
trying to think of it.
I have no idea how old you are, but this 77-year-old has a lot =
of that
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
trouble.
Peter.
Mine seem to be mostly nouns. I haven't noticed myself not recal=
ling
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
verbs, or adjectives and the like. I wonder if nouns are special=
somehow.
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Now I came to think about it, it is nouns that I can't recall. Wh=
y?
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
They're used less.
Are they?
Yes. Fast car, fast plane, fast train.
But fast car, expensive car, red car.
But fast expensive and red are used for other nouns too.

And you could have just written "Ferrari".
Besides, a noun can be used without an adjective, but an adjective
can't be used without a noun, which seems to challenge your
assertion.
Can but isn't often.

-- =

"Do you like Kipling?"
"I don't know, I've never kippled."
b***@aol.com
2017-04-14 17:51:55 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by Charles Bishop
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Is it just me, or do others have trouble remembering certain words? I
flea
fibre glass
conservatory
If I'm trying to use one in a sentence, I pause for 5-10 seconds
trying to think of it.
I have no idea how old you are, but this 77-year-old has a lot of that
trouble.
Peter.
Mine seem to be mostly nouns. I haven't noticed myself not recalling
verbs, or adjectives and the like. I wonder if nouns are special somehow.
Now I came to think about it, it is nouns that I can't recall. Why?
They're used less.
Are they?
Yes. Fast car, fast plane, fast train.
But fast car, expensive car, red car.
But fast expensive and red are used for other nouns too.
And car, plane and train are used with other adjectives.
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
And you could have just written "Ferrari".
Right, good point!
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by b***@aol.com
Besides, a noun can be used without an adjective, but an adjective
can't be used without a noun, which seems to challenge your
assertion.
Can but isn't often.
--
"Do you like Kipling?"
"I don't know, I've never kippled."
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-14 18:03:23 UTC
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Le vendredi 14 avril 2017 17:19:36 UTC+2, James Wilkinson Sword a =E9c=
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Le jeudi 13 avril 2017 23:33:11 UTC+2, James Wilkinson Sword a =E9c=
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Is it just me, or do others have trouble remembering certai=
n words? I
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
flea
fibre glass
conservatory
If I'm trying to use one in a sentence, I pause for 5-10 se=
conds
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
trying to think of it.
I have no idea how old you are, but this 77-year-old has a l=
ot of that
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
trouble.
Peter.
Mine seem to be mostly nouns. I haven't noticed myself not re=
calling
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
verbs, or adjectives and the like. I wonder if nouns are spec=
ial somehow.
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Now I came to think about it, it is nouns that I can't recall.=
Why?
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
They're used less.
Are they?
Yes. Fast car, fast plane, fast train.
But fast car, expensive car, red car.
But fast expensive and red are used for other nouns too.
And car, plane and train are used with other adjectives.
I wonder if there's a total somewhere? Google will have that informatio=
n, but short of manually entering every noun and adjective, or making a =
program to do so, I'm not sure how to go about it.
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
And you could have just written "Ferrari".
Right, good point!
Actually there's another adjective required for that - unreliable. Or I=
talian, they mean the same thing.

-- =

Bad or missing mouse. Spank the cat [Y/N]?
b***@aol.com
2017-04-14 18:26:49 UTC
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Post by b***@aol.com
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by Charles Bishop
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Is it just me, or do others have trouble remembering certain words? I
flea
fibre glass
conservatory
If I'm trying to use one in a sentence, I pause for 5-10 seconds
trying to think of it.
I have no idea how old you are, but this 77-year-old has a lot of that
trouble.
Peter.
Mine seem to be mostly nouns. I haven't noticed myself not recalling
verbs, or adjectives and the like. I wonder if nouns are special somehow.
Now I came to think about it, it is nouns that I can't recall. Why?
They're used less.
Are they?
Yes. Fast car, fast plane, fast train.
But fast car, expensive car, red car.
But fast expensive and red are used for other nouns too.
And car, plane and train are used with other adjectives.
I wonder if there's a total somewhere? Google will have that information, but short of manually entering every noun and adjective, or making a program to do so, I'm not sure how to go about it.
I checked that and found

"66235 noun
21316 adjective"

here: https://www.quora.com/Are-there-more-nouns-or-adjectives
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
And you could have just written "Ferrari".
Right, good point!
Actually there's another adjective required for that - unreliable. Or Italian, they mean the same thing.
--
Bad or missing mouse. Spank the cat [Y/N]?
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-14 18:42:40 UTC
Reply
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Le vendredi 14 avril 2017 20:03:25 UTC+2, James Wilkinson Sword a =E9c=
Le vendredi 14 avril 2017 17:19:36 UTC+2, James Wilkinson Sword a =E9=
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Le jeudi 13 avril 2017 23:33:11 UTC+2, James Wilkinson Sword a =E9=
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Is it just me, or do others have trouble remembering cer=
tain words? I
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
flea
fibre glass
conservatory
If I'm trying to use one in a sentence, I pause for 5-10=
seconds
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
trying to think of it.
I have no idea how old you are, but this 77-year-old has =
a lot of that
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
trouble.
Peter.
Mine seem to be mostly nouns. I haven't noticed myself not=
recalling
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
verbs, or adjectives and the like. I wonder if nouns are s=
pecial somehow.
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Now I came to think about it, it is nouns that I can't reca=
ll. Why?
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
They're used less.
Are they?
Yes. Fast car, fast plane, fast train.
But fast car, expensive car, red car.
But fast expensive and red are used for other nouns too.
And car, plane and train are used with other adjectives.
I wonder if there's a total somewhere? Google will have that informa=
tion, but short of manually entering every noun and adjective, or making=
a program to do so, I'm not sure how to go about it.
I checked that and found
"66235 noun
21316 adjective"
here: https://www.quora.com/Are-there-more-nouns-or-adjectives
Firstly, that's counting how many there are, not how often they're used.=

Secondly, something is amiss. "Adverb" is listed twice.


-- =

The combined weight of all the ants on Earth is about the same as the co=
mbined weight of humans.
b***@aol.com
2017-04-14 19:04:54 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by Charles Bishop
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Is it just me, or do others have trouble remembering certain words? I
flea
fibre glass
conservatory
If I'm trying to use one in a sentence, I pause for 5-10 seconds
trying to think of it.
I have no idea how old you are, but this 77-year-old has a lot of that
trouble.
Peter.
Mine seem to be mostly nouns. I haven't noticed myself not recalling
verbs, or adjectives and the like. I wonder if nouns are special somehow.
Now I came to think about it, it is nouns that I can't recall. Why?
They're used less.
Are they?
Yes. Fast car, fast plane, fast train.
But fast car, expensive car, red car.
But fast expensive and red are used for other nouns too.
And car, plane and train are used with other adjectives.
I wonder if there's a total somewhere? Google will have that information, but short of manually entering every noun and adjective, or making a program to do so, I'm not sure how to go about it.
I checked that and found
"66235 noun
21316 adjective"
here: https://www.quora.com/Are-there-more-nouns-or-adjectives
Firstly, that's counting how many there are, not how often they're used.
True, but it still provides an indication, assuming an equal average probability of being used for every noun and every adjective. (That would result in adjectives being used approximately three times more than nouns.)
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Secondly, something is amiss. "Adverb" is listed twice.
Odd indeed!
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
--
The combined weight of all the ants on Earth is about the same as the combined weight of humans.
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-14 19:30:39 UTC
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Le vendredi 14 avril 2017 20:43:50 UTC+2, James Wilkinson Sword a =E9c=
Le vendredi 14 avril 2017 20:03:25 UTC+2, James Wilkinson Sword a =E9=
Le vendredi 14 avril 2017 17:19:36 UTC+2, James Wilkinson Sword =
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Le jeudi 13 avril 2017 23:33:11 UTC+2, James Wilkinson Sword =
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Is it just me, or do others have trouble remembering =
certain words? I
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
flea
fibre glass
conservatory
If I'm trying to use one in a sentence, I pause for 5=
-10 seconds
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
trying to think of it.
I have no idea how old you are, but this 77-year-old h=
as a lot of that
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
trouble.
Peter.
Mine seem to be mostly nouns. I haven't noticed myself =
not recalling
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
verbs, or adjectives and the like. I wonder if nouns ar=
e special somehow.
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Now I came to think about it, it is nouns that I can't r=
ecall. Why?
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
They're used less.
Are they?
Yes. Fast car, fast plane, fast train.
But fast car, expensive car, red car.
But fast expensive and red are used for other nouns too.
And car, plane and train are used with other adjectives.
I wonder if there's a total somewhere? Google will have that info=
rmation, but short of manually entering every noun and adjective, or mak=
ing a program to do so, I'm not sure how to go about it.
I checked that and found
"66235 noun
21316 adjective"
here: https://www.quora.com/Are-there-more-nouns-or-adjectives
Firstly, that's counting how many there are, not how often they're us=
ed.
True, but it still provides an indication, assuming an equal average p=
robability of being used for every noun and every adjective. (That would=
result in adjectives being used approximately three times more than nou=
ns.)

Other way round surely?

-- =

"Smoking is one of the leading causes of statistics." - Fletcher Knebel
The Peeler
2017-04-14 22:21:35 UTC
Reply
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On Fri, 14 Apr 2017 20:30:39 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by b***@aol.com
True, but it still provides an indication, assuming an equal average
probability of being used for every noun and every adjective. (That
would result in adjectives being used approximately three times more
than nouns.)
Other way round surely?
Ah, another dumbassed Google grouper and even AOL user who is dumb enough to
engage in a "discussion" with you, the resident idiot of all the UK groups,
eh, Birdbrain? LOL
--
More details from Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sociopathic
"life":
"The cat pissed all over my mattress. I just sprayed the mattress with a can
of cheap Asda air freshener and it was fine".
(Courtesy of Mr Pounder)
Richard Tobin
2017-04-15 09:37:56 UTC
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In article <58f14b98$0$29038$b1db1813$***@news.astraweb.com>,
The Peeler <***@TheRevd.invalid> wrote:
[...]

Oh great. A troll groupie.

-- Richard
The Peeler
2017-04-15 10:23:54 UTC
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Post by Richard Tobin
Oh great. A troll groupie.
Oh, darn, yet another smartass! <tsk>
Peter Moylan
2017-04-15 14:50:45 UTC
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Post by Richard Tobin
[...]
Oh great. A troll groupie.
Just plonk him, as you have done with the original troll.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Richard Tobin
2017-04-15 15:22:21 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Richard Tobin
[...]
Oh great. A troll groupie.
Just plonk him, as you have done with the original troll.
I have.

-- Richard
The Peeler
2017-04-15 16:35:44 UTC
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Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Peter Moylan
Just plonk him, as you have done with the original troll.
I have.
-- Richard
He has! LMAO!
Richard Heathfield
2017-04-16 07:39:33 UTC
Reply
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Post by Richard Tobin
[...]
Oh great. A troll groupie.
And now I can't get a slightly different image out of my head: that of
the troll roadie.

He and his colleagues arrive some time ahead of the troll itself. Their
job is to prepare the ground, make sure there's enough lichen in the
dressing-room, check the acoustics, and - in extreme cases - build the
actual bridge.
--
Richard Heathfield
Email: rjh at cpax dot org dot uk
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Sig line 4 vacant - apply within
The Peeler
2017-04-14 22:24:35 UTC
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On Fri, 14 Apr 2017 20:30:39 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by b***@aol.com
True, but it still provides an indication, assuming an equal average
probability of being used for every noun and every adjective. (That
would result in adjectives being used approximately three times more
than nouns.)
Other way round surely?
Surely? Sociopathically surely again, sociopath? <BG>
--
More details from Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sociopathic
"life":
"I have seriously considered poisoning my father"
(Courtesy of Mr Pounder)
b***@aol.com
2017-04-14 22:34:46 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by Charles Bishop
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Is it just me, or do others have trouble remembering certain words? I
flea
fibre glass
conservatory
If I'm trying to use one in a sentence, I pause for 5-10 seconds
trying to think of it.
I have no idea how old you are, but this 77-year-old has a lot of that
trouble.
Peter.
Mine seem to be mostly nouns. I haven't noticed myself not recalling
verbs, or adjectives and the like. I wonder if nouns are special somehow.
Now I came to think about it, it is nouns that I can't recall. Why?
They're used less.
Are they?
Yes. Fast car, fast plane, fast train.
But fast car, expensive car, red car.
But fast expensive and red are used for other nouns too.
And car, plane and train are used with other adjectives.
I wonder if there's a total somewhere? Google will have that information, but short of manually entering every noun and adjective, or making a program to do so, I'm not sure how to go about it.
I checked that and found
"66235 noun
21316 adjective"
here: https://www.quora.com/Are-there-more-nouns-or-adjectives
Firstly, that's counting how many there are, not how often they're used.
True, but it still provides an indication, assuming an equal average probability of being used for every noun and every adjective. (That would result in adjectives being used approximately three times more than nouns.)
Other way round surely?
Yes, my mistake.
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
--
"Smoking is one of the leading causes of statistics." - Fletcher Knebel
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-14 22:39:28 UTC
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Le vendredi 14 avril 2017 21:30:41 UTC+2, James Wilkinson Sword a =E9c=
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Le vendredi 14 avril 2017 20:43:50 UTC+2, James Wilkinson Sword a =E9=
Le vendredi 14 avril 2017 20:03:25 UTC+2, James Wilkinson Sword =
Le vendredi 14 avril 2017 17:19:36 UTC+2, James Wilkinson Swo=
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Le jeudi 13 avril 2017 23:33:11 UTC+2, James Wilkinson Swo=
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
On Thu, 13 Apr 2017 21:46:07 +0100, Peter Young <pnyou=
,
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Is it just me, or do others have trouble rememberi=
ng certain words? I
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
flea
fibre glass
conservatory
If I'm trying to use one in a sentence, I pause fo=
r 5-10 seconds
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
trying to think of it.
I have no idea how old you are, but this 77-year-ol=
d has a lot of that
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
trouble.
Peter.
Mine seem to be mostly nouns. I haven't noticed myse=
lf not recalling
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
verbs, or adjectives and the like. I wonder if nouns=
are special somehow.
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Now I came to think about it, it is nouns that I can'=
t recall. Why?
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
They're used less.
Are they?
Yes. Fast car, fast plane, fast train.
But fast car, expensive car, red car.
But fast expensive and red are used for other nouns too.
And car, plane and train are used with other adjectives.
I wonder if there's a total somewhere? Google will have that i=
nformation, but short of manually entering every noun and adjective, or =
making a program to do so, I'm not sure how to go about it.
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
I checked that and found
"66235 noun
21316 adjective"
here: https://www.quora.com/Are-there-more-nouns-or-adjectives
Firstly, that's counting how many there are, not how often they're=
used.
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
True, but it still provides an indication, assuming an equal averag=
e probability of being used for every noun and every adjective. (That wo=
uld result in adjectives being used approximately three times more than =
nouns.)
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Other way round surely?
Yes, my mistake.
I'm not so sure about your assumption: "an equal average probability of =
being used for every noun and every adjective".

-- =

A young blonde girl goes to the doctor for a physical. The doctor puts h=
is stethoscope up to the girl's chest and says, "Big breaths."
The girl replies, "Yeth and I'm not even thickthteen."
The Peeler
2017-04-14 23:04:30 UTC
Reply
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On Fri, 14 Apr 2017 23:39:28 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by b***@aol.com
Yes, my mistake.
I'm not so sure about your assumption
OTOH, you sociopathic misfit are ALWAYS more than hundred percent sure about
your delusional assumptions, eh, Birdbrain! <BG>
--
Another example of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sociopathic
"intellect":
"If my opinion was incorrect, I wouldn't hold that opinion."
MID: <***@red.lan>
b***@aol.com
2017-04-14 23:16:40 UTC
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Post by b***@aol.com
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by Charles Bishop
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Is it just me, or do others have trouble remembering certain words? I
flea
fibre glass
conservatory
If I'm trying to use one in a sentence, I pause for 5-10 seconds
trying to think of it.
I have no idea how old you are, but this 77-year-old has a lot of that
trouble.
Peter.
Mine seem to be mostly nouns. I haven't noticed myself not recalling
verbs, or adjectives and the like. I wonder if nouns are special somehow.
Now I came to think about it, it is nouns that I can't recall. Why?
They're used less.
Are they?
Yes. Fast car, fast plane, fast train.
But fast car, expensive car, red car.
But fast expensive and red are used for other nouns too.
And car, plane and train are used with other adjectives.
I wonder if there's a total somewhere? Google will have that information, but short of manually entering every noun and adjective, or making a program to do so, I'm not sure how to go about it.
I checked that and found
"66235 noun
21316 adjective"
here: https://www.quora.com/Are-there-more-nouns-or-adjectives
Firstly, that's counting how many there are, not how often they're used.
True, but it still provides an indication, assuming an equal average probability of being used for every noun and every adjective. (That would result in adjectives being used approximately three times more than nouns.)
Other way round surely?
Yes, my mistake.
I'm not so sure about your assumption: "an equal average probability of being used for every noun and every adjective".
The idea is that there are as many common and uncommon nouns as there are common and uncommon adjectives, so that, on average, each noun and each adjective should be used as frequently. Consequently, since there are apparently three times as many nouns as there are adjectives, the former must altogether be used three times as much as the latter. But such reasoning may be simplistic and I may be missing something important.
--
A young blonde girl goes to the doctor for a physical. The doctor puts his stethoscope up to the girl's chest and says, "Big breaths."
The girl replies, "Yeth and I'm not even thickthteen."
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-14 23:34:32 UTC
Reply
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Le samedi 15 avril 2017 00:39:30 UTC+2, James Wilkinson Sword a =E9cri=
Le vendredi 14 avril 2017 21:30:41 UTC+2, James Wilkinson Sword a =E9=
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Le vendredi 14 avril 2017 20:43:50 UTC+2, James Wilkinson Sword =
Le vendredi 14 avril 2017 20:03:25 UTC+2, James Wilkinson Swo=
Le vendredi 14 avril 2017 17:19:36 UTC+2, James Wilkinson =
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Le jeudi 13 avril 2017 23:33:11 UTC+2, James Wilkinson =
On Thu, 13 Apr 2017 22:22:40 +0100, Peter Young <pnyou=
Post by Peter Young
On Thu, 13 Apr 2017 21:46:07 +0100, Peter Young <pn=
uk>,
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
On 13 Apr 2017 "James Wilkinson Sword" <imvalid=
Is it just me, or do others have trouble rememb=
ering certain words? I
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
flea
fibre glass
conservatory
If I'm trying to use one in a sentence, I pause=
for 5-10 seconds
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
trying to think of it.
I have no idea how old you are, but this 77-year=
-old has a lot of that
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
trouble.
Peter.
Mine seem to be mostly nouns. I haven't noticed m=
yself not recalling
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
verbs, or adjectives and the like. I wonder if no=
uns are special somehow.
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Now I came to think about it, it is nouns that I c=
an't recall. Why?
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
They're used less.
Are they?
Yes. Fast car, fast plane, fast train.
But fast car, expensive car, red car.
But fast expensive and red are used for other nouns too.
And car, plane and train are used with other adjectives.
I wonder if there's a total somewhere? Google will have tha=
t information, but short of manually entering every noun and adjective, =
or making a program to do so, I'm not sure how to go about it.
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
I checked that and found
"66235 noun
21316 adjective"
here: https://www.quora.com/Are-there-more-nouns-or-adjective=
s
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Firstly, that's counting how many there are, not how often they=
're used.
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
True, but it still provides an indication, assuming an equal ave=
rage probability of being used for every noun and every adjective. (That=
would result in adjectives being used approximately three times more th=
an nouns.)
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Other way round surely?
Yes, my mistake.
I'm not so sure about your assumption: "an equal average probability =
of being used for every noun and every adjective".
The idea is that there are as many common and uncommon nouns as there =
are common and uncommon adjectives, so that, on average, each noun and e=
ach adjective should be used as frequently. Consequently, since there ar=
e apparently three times as many nouns as there are adjectives, the form=
er must altogether be used three times as much as the latter. But such r=
easoning may be simplistic and I may be missing something important.

Agreed on the last part.

-- =

Reality is only an illusion that occurs due to a lack of alcohol.
The Peeler
2017-04-14 23:44:39 UTC
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On Sat, 15 Apr 2017 00:34:32 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by b***@aol.com
such reasoning may be simplistic and I may be missing something
important.
Agreed on the last part.
Stop insulting people by agreeing with them, Birdbrain!
--
Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson") about himself:
"My IQ is superiour to that of most people".
"I am inferior in some ways but superior in other ways".
"I admit I should not have been born".
(Courtesy of Mr Pounder)
The Peeler
2017-04-14 22:20:49 UTC
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On Fri, 14 Apr 2017 19:42:40 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by b***@aol.com
here: https://www.quora.com/Are-there-more-nouns-or-adjectives
Firstly, that's counting how many there are, not how often they're used.
Secondly, something is amiss. "Adverb" is listed twice.
There's ALWAYS something amiss when an idiot like you opens his stupid gob,
Birdbrain!
--
Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson") about himself:
"I can sleep outside in a temperature of -20C wearing only shorts".
"I once took a dump behind some bushes and slid down a hill to wipe my
arse".
(Courtesy of Mr Pounder)
The Peeler
2017-04-14 22:20:41 UTC
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On Fri, 14 Apr 2017 19:03:23 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Actually there's another adjective required for that - unreliable. Or
Italian, they mean the same thing.
There's only one word required to describe you, Birdbrain: idiot!
--
Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson") on women:
"Women are inferior".
"Crying is unnecessary and pathetic. So is screaming. Why do women
scream when they're frightened? Perhaps they realise they're
inferior and are calling for the nearest man"?
(Courtesy of Mr Pounder)
The Peeler
2017-04-14 22:20:35 UTC
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On Fri, 14 Apr 2017 16:19:28 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by b***@aol.com
Besides, a noun can be used without an adjective, but an adjective
can't be used without a noun, which seems to challenge your
assertion.
Can but isn't often.
I see, there's still a group that hasn't wised up to the fact with what kind
of an idiot they are dealing, Birdbrain. I gotta change that!
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) deep "thinking":
"I don't wear underwear, but boxers are more comfortable than briefs. Why
would you want it clamped in?"
MID: <***@red.lan>
David Kleinecke
2017-04-14 16:29:09 UTC
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Post by b***@aol.com
But fast car, expensive car, red car.
Besides, a noun can be used without an adjective, but an adjective
can't be used without a noun, which seems to challenge your
assertion.
My car is not red.
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-14 16:31:08 UTC
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Post by David Kleinecke
Post by b***@aol.com
But fast car, expensive car, red car.
Besides, a noun can be used without an adjective, but an adjective
can't be used without a noun, which seems to challenge your
assertion.
My car is not red.
Why on earth did you do that?
--
For the really paranoid who want to destroy data there's nothing like taking the lid off the disk drive and rearranging the sectors with a hammer.
David Kleinecke
2017-04-14 16:40:56 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by b***@aol.com
But fast car, expensive car, red car.
Besides, a noun can be used without an adjective, but an adjective
can't be used without a noun, which seems to challenge your
assertion.
My car is not red.
Why on earth did you do that?
--
For the really paranoid who want to destroy data there's nothing like taking the lid off the disk drive and rearranging the sectors with a hammer.
Read what I was replying to.
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-14 16:48:11 UTC
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Post by David Kleinecke
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by b***@aol.com
But fast car, expensive car, red car.
Besides, a noun can be used without an adjective, but an adjective
can't be used without a noun, which seems to challenge your
assertion.
My car is not red.
Why on earth did you do that?
Read what I was replying to.
I thought you were being literal.

Car is a noun, you used a noun. Red refers to the car, even though it's not right next to it.
--
Every time I sink ten pints, I turn into a woman. I start talking bollocks and can't drive.
The Peeler
2017-04-14 22:22:02 UTC
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On Fri, 14 Apr 2017 17:48:11 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by David Kleinecke
Read what I was replying to.
I thought
THERE's the snag again, Birdbrain!
--
More from Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sociopathic world:
"I get pissed off when I have to find tomatoes with the vegetables instead
of the fruit."
MID: <***@red.lan>
The Peeler
2017-04-14 22:21:58 UTC
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On Fri, 14 Apr 2017 17:31:08 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by b***@aol.com
Besides, a noun can be used without an adjective, but an adjective
can't be used without a noun, which seems to challenge your
assertion.
My car is not red.
Why on earth did you do that?
Take a guess, Birdbrain!
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) strange sociopathic
world:
"Is it illegal to kill someone who's already dead? Say you shot someone and
confirmed he died. Then I shot him. Would I get done for murder too?"
MID: <***@red.lan>
John Varela
2017-04-14 17:26:23 UTC
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On Fri, 14 Apr 2017 16:29:09 UTC, David Kleinecke
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by b***@aol.com
But fast car, expensive car, red car.
Besides, a noun can be used without an adjective, but an adjective
can't be used without a noun, which seems to challenge your
assertion.
My car is not red.
You're still modifying a noun there. Try: His car is not red. No
noun.
--
John Varela
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-14 17:29:46 UTC
Reply
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Post by John Varela
On Fri, 14 Apr 2017 16:29:09 UTC, David Kleinecke
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by b***@aol.com
But fast car, expensive car, red car.
Besides, a noun can be used without an adjective, but an adjective
can't be used without a noun, which seems to challenge your
assertion.
My car is not red.
You're still modifying a noun there. Try: His car is not red. No
noun.
Eh? You still have the car noun there. In fact your sentence is identical apart from changing "my" to "his".
--
The world's largest fruit are giant pumpkins. The world record is 1061lbs (481.3 kg).
The Peeler
2017-04-14 22:22:21 UTC
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On Fri, 14 Apr 2017 18:29:46 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by John Varela
Post by David Kleinecke
My car is not red.
You're still modifying a noun there. Try: His car is not red. No
noun.
Eh? You still have the car noun there. In fact your sentence is
identical apart from changing "my" to "his".
Check this, Birdbrain: You are retarded! No noun!
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sociopathic "wisdom":
"The only way to ruin someone's life is to kill them, or render them
disabled."
MID: <***@red.lan>
RH Draney
2017-04-14 05:56:50 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
"6PCS Precision Screwdriver Set. Not to be inserted into penis."
http://www.myconfinedspace.com/wp-content/uploads/2006/11/screwdriver-not-for-penis.jpg
On the other hand:

Loading Image...

....r
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-14 15:18:27 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
"6PCS Precision Screwdriver Set. Not to be inserted into penis."
http://www.myconfinedspace.com/wp-content/uploads/2006/11/screwdriver-not-for-penis.jpg
http://web.newsguy.com/dadoctah/images/prickpunch.jpg
Probably a good advertising ploy.
--
"Do you like Kipling?"
"I don't know, I've never kippled."
The Peeler
2017-04-14 22:20:26 UTC
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On Fri, 14 Apr 2017 16:18:27 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Probably a good advertising ploy.
Certainly you sick attention whore trolling again.
--
More details from Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sociopathic
"mind":
"If I wanted you to stab me with a knife and kill me, you should not
get into trouble for it".
"I would kill my sister if I thought I'd get away with it".
"I'm not what most people think of as human".
(Courtesy of Mr Pounder)
Joe Fineman
2017-04-14 21:18:52 UTC
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Post by Peter Young
From some label that a colleague told be about many years ago, I
forget what the product was, "Take off top and stand in hot water".
Quite a while ago, someone is supposed to have asked an etiquette
columnist "Is it good manner to break your bread or roll in your
soup?".
--
--- Joe Fineman ***@verizon.net

||: The man with an experience is never at the mercy of a man :||
||: with an argument. :||
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-14 22:50:57 UTC
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Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Peter Young
From some label that a colleague told be about many years ago, I
forget what the product was, "Take off top and stand in hot water".
Quite a while ago, someone is supposed to have asked an etiquette
columnist "Is it good manner to break your bread or roll in your
soup?".
Seems perfect English to me. What's wrong with it?
--
I bought a vacuum cleaner six months ago and so far all it's been doing is gathering dust.
The Peeler
2017-04-14 23:11:11 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
On Fri, 14 Apr 2017 23:50:57 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Joe Fineman
Quite a while ago, someone is supposed to have asked an etiquette
columnist "Is it good manner to break your bread or roll in your
soup?".
Seems perfect English to me. What's wrong with it?
Inciting an idiot like you to spout his notorious bullshit that's what's
wrong with it, Birdbrain!
--
More details from Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sociopathic
"mind":
"If I wanted you to stab me with a knife and kill me, you should not
get into trouble for it".
"I would kill my sister if I thought I'd get away with it".
"I'm not what most people think of as human".
(Courtesy of Mr Pounder)
Peter Young
2017-04-15 06:34:30 UTC
Reply
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Peter Young
From some label that a colleague told be about many years ago, I
forget what the product was, "Take off top and stand in hot water".
Quite a while ago, someone is supposed to have asked an etiquette
columnist "Is it good manner to break your bread or roll in your
soup?".
Seems perfect English to me. What's wrong with it?
How often do you roll in your soup?

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Ir)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-15 09:03:11 UTC
Reply
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Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Peter Young
From some label that a colleague told be about many years ago, I
forget what the product was, "Take off top and stand in hot water".
Quite a while ago, someone is supposed to have asked an etiquette
columnist "Is it good manner to break your bread or roll in your
soup?".
Seems perfect English to me. What's wrong with it?
How often do you roll in your soup?
My brain automatically joins the roll to the correct half of the sentence. Surely only a computer program would misunderstand.

[To the group as a whole]
Is Peter Young a bot?
--
A blonde was playing Trivial Pursuit one night. It was her turn. She rolled the dice and she Landed on Science & Nature.
Her question was "If you are in a vacuum and someone calls your name, can you hear it?"
She thought for a time and then asked, "Is it on or off?"
Peter Young
2017-04-15 09:24:03 UTC
Reply
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Peter Young
From some label that a colleague told be about many years ago, I
forget what the product was, "Take off top and stand in hot water".
Quite a while ago, someone is supposed to have asked an etiquette
columnist "Is it good manner to break your bread or roll in your
soup?".
Seems perfect English to me. What's wrong with it?
How often do you roll in your soup?
My brain automatically joins the roll to the correct half of the
sentence. Surely only a computer program would misunderstand.
[To the group as a whole]
Is Peter Young a bot?
Is James Wilkinson Sword a troll?

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Ir)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-15 23:49:20 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Peter Young
From some label that a colleague told be about many years ago, I
forget what the product was, "Take off top and stand in hot water".
Quite a while ago, someone is supposed to have asked an etiquette
columnist "Is it good manner to break your bread or roll in your
soup?".
Seems perfect English to me. What's wrong with it?
How often do you roll in your soup?
My brain automatically joins the roll to the correct half of the
sentence. Surely only a computer program would misunderstand.
[To the group as a whole]
Is Peter Young a bot?
Is James Wilkinson Sword a troll?
Only if your meaning of troll is "disagrees with Peter Young".
--
Trading standards have removed the gollywog from Robinsons marmalade jars,
not due to racism but because Niggers were using the labels as bus passes!
The Peeler
2017-04-15 23:55:09 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
On Sun, 16 Apr 2017 00:49:20 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Is James Wilkinson Sword a troll?
Only if your meaning of troll is "disagrees with Peter Young".
Nope, but if the troll quacks and behaves like a troll, you fucked up sick
troll!
--
Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) displaying his intellect:
"Someone as rich as you should know how to use an apostrophe correctly."
MID: <***@red.lan>
Quinn C
2017-04-19 18:42:43 UTC
Reply
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Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Peter Young
From some label that a colleague told be about many years ago, I
forget what the product was, "Take off top and stand in hot water".
Quite a while ago, someone is supposed to have asked an etiquette
columnist "Is it good manner to break your bread or roll in your
soup?".
Seems perfect English to me. What's wrong with it?
How often do you roll in your soup?
My brain automatically joins the roll to the correct half of the
sentence. Surely only a computer program would misunderstand.
[To the group as a whole]
Is Peter Young a bot?
Is James Wilkinson Sword a troll?
Is the pope Catholic?
--
Was den Juengeren fehlt, sind keine Botschaften, es ist der Sinn
fuer Zusammenhaenge. [Young people aren't short of messages, but
of a sense for interconnections.]
-- Helen Feng im Zeit-Interview
The Peeler
2017-04-15 09:35:02 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
On Sat, 15 Apr 2017 10:03:11 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
How often do you roll in your soup?
My brain
Make that your "birdbrain", Birdbrain!
--
Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson") on women:
"Women are inferior".
"Crying is unnecessary and pathetic. So is screaming. Why do women
scream when they're frightened? Perhaps they realise they're
inferior and are calling for the nearest man"?
(Courtesy of Mr Pounder)
charles
2017-04-15 12:19:19 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Peter Young
From some label that a colleague told be about many years ago, I
forget what the product was, "Take off top and stand in hot water".
Quite a while ago, someone is supposed to have asked an etiquette
columnist "Is it good manner to break your bread or roll in your
soup?".
Seems perfect English to me. What's wrong with it?
How often do you roll in your soup?
My brain automatically joins the roll to the correct half of the
sentence. Surely only a computer program would misunderstand.
[To the group as a whole]
Is Peter Young a bot?
I don't think so; I've met him and he seemed quite human.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
Peter Young
2017-04-15 15:05:52 UTC
Reply
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Post by charles
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Peter Young
From some label that a colleague told be about many years ago, I
forget what the product was, "Take off top and stand in hot water".
Quite a while ago, someone is supposed to have asked an etiquette
columnist "Is it good manner to break your bread or roll in your
soup?".
Seems perfect English to me. What's wrong with it?
How often do you roll in your soup?
My brain automatically joins the roll to the correct half of the
sentence. Surely only a computer program would misunderstand.
[To the group as a whole]
Is Peter Young a bot?
I don't think so; I've met him and he seemed quite human.
Thanks, Charles.

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Ir)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
LFS
2017-04-15 16:57:12 UTC
Reply
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Post by charles
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Peter Young
From some label that a colleague told be about many years ago, I
forget what the product was, "Take off top and stand in hot water".
Quite a while ago, someone is supposed to have asked an etiquette
columnist "Is it good manner to break your bread or roll in your
soup?".
Seems perfect English to me. What's wrong with it?
How often do you roll in your soup?
My brain automatically joins the roll to the correct half of the
sentence. Surely only a computer program would misunderstand.
[To the group as a whole]
Is Peter Young a bot?
I don't think so; I've met him and he seemed quite human.
+1. (I first read that as "boy" and wondered how to comment...)
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Katy Jennison
2017-04-15 17:07:52 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by charles
On Sat, 15 Apr 2017 07:34:30 +0100, Peter Young
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Peter Young
From some label that a colleague told be about many years ago, I
forget what the product was, "Take off top and stand in hot water".
Quite a while ago, someone is supposed to have asked an etiquette
columnist "Is it good manner to break your bread or roll in your
soup?".
Seems perfect English to me. What's wrong with it?
How often do you roll in your soup?
My brain automatically joins the roll to the correct half of the
sentence. Surely only a computer program would misunderstand.
[To the group as a whole]
Is Peter Young a bot?
I don't think so; I've met him and he seemed quite human.
+1. (I first read that as "boy" and wondered how to comment...)
A jolly nice old boy, perhaps. (I've met him too, and I mean that as a
compliment!)
--
Katy Jennison
Peter Young
2017-04-15 17:28:04 UTC
Reply
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Post by Katy Jennison
Post by LFS
Post by charles
On Sat, 15 Apr 2017 07:34:30 +0100, Peter Young
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Peter Young
From some label that a colleague told be about many years ago, I
forget what the product was, "Take off top and stand in hot water".
Quite a while ago, someone is supposed to have asked an etiquette
columnist "Is it good manner to break your bread or roll in your
soup?".
Seems perfect English to me. What's wrong with it?
How often do you roll in your soup?
My brain automatically joins the roll to the correct half of the
sentence. Surely only a computer program would misunderstand.
[To the group as a whole]
Is Peter Young a bot?
I don't think so; I've met him and he seemed quite human.
+1. (I first read that as "boy" and wondered how to comment...)
A jolly nice old boy, perhaps. (I've met him too, and I mean that as a
compliment!)
<blush>

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Ir)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-18 20:53:23 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
Post by LFS
Post by charles
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Young
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Peter Young
From some label that a colleague told be about many years ago, I
forget what the product was, "Take off top and stand in hot water".
Quite a while ago, someone is supposed to have asked an etiquette
columnist "Is it good manner to break your bread or roll in your
soup?".
Seems perfect English to me. What's wrong with it?
How often do you roll in your soup?
My brain automatically joins the roll to the correct half of the
sentence. Surely only a computer program would misunderstand.
[To the group as a whole]
Is Peter Young a bot?
I don't think so; I've met him and he seemed quite human.
+1. (I first read that as "boy" and wondered how to comment...)
I can think of several possibilities, some of which are not complimentary.
--
Peter is listening to "Aerosmith - Living on the edge"
The Peeler
2017-04-18 21:05:20 UTC
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On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 21:53:23 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
I can think
Hahahahahaaa!!! Poor deluded idiot!
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) "deep thinking":
"I consider the Irish to be one of the stupidest people on the planet."
MID: <***@red.lan>
Joe Fineman
2017-04-16 00:41:04 UTC
Reply
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Joe Fineman
Quite a while ago, someone is supposed to have asked an etiquette
columnist "Is it good manner[s] to break your bread or roll in your
soup?".
Seems perfect English to me. What's wrong with it?
Nothing wrong with the English, but the invitation to read "roll" as a
verb tickled some people.
--
--- Joe Fineman ***@verizon.net

||: It's amazing how much mature wisdom resembles being too :||
||: tired. :||
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-16 15:49:05 UTC
Reply
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Post by Joe Fineman
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Joe Fineman
Quite a while ago, someone is supposed to have asked an etiquette
columnist "Is it good manner[s] to break your bread or roll in your
soup?".
Seems perfect English to me. What's wrong with it?
Nothing wrong with the English, but the invitation to read "roll" as a
verb tickled some people.
Might make a Monty Python sketch I guess.
--
A highway patrolman pulled alongside a speeding car on the freeway. Glancing at the car, he was astounded to see that the blonde behind the wheel was knitting!
Realizing that she was oblivious to his flashing lights and siren, the trooper cranked down his window, turned on his bullhorn and yelled, "PULL OVER!"
"NO!" the blonde yelled back, "IT'S A SCARF!"
The Peeler
2017-04-16 17:33:08 UTC
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On Sun, 16 Apr 2017 16:49:05 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Joe Fineman
Nothing wrong with the English, but the invitation to read "roll" as a
verb tickled some people.
Might make a Monty Python sketch I guess.
Most of your idiotic, insipid lines would, Birdbrain!
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) pathological "mind"
revealed:
"I am actually considering crashing deliberately into one of my neighbours.
Three times he's stopped on the wrong side of the road, directly in front of
me, then reversed into his drive. I had to brake hard to avoid a head on
collision. Next time I'll glance at the camera to make sure it's rolling
and carry on."
Message-ID: <***@red.lan>
HVS
2017-04-14 23:04:24 UTC
Reply
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Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Peter Young
From some label that a colleague told be about many years ago, I
forget what the product was, "Take off top and stand in hot
water".
Post by Joe Fineman
Quite a while ago, someone is supposed to have asked an etiquette
columnist "Is it good manner to break your bread or roll in your
soup?".
The commercials told me to "Drink Canada Dry".

I failed, but God knows I tried.
--
Cheers, Harvey
CanE (30 years) & BrE (34 years),
indiscriminately mixed
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-14 23:34:58 UTC
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Post by Peter Young
Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Peter Young
From some label that a colleague told be about many years ago, I
forget what the product was, "Take off top and stand in hot
water".
Post by Joe Fineman
Quite a while ago, someone is supposed to have asked an etiquette
columnist "Is it good manner to break your bread or roll in your
soup?".
The commercials told me to "Drink Canada Dry".
I failed, but God knows I tried.
ROFL! Added to random sig list.
--
The most ejaculatory orgasms ever recorded in 1 hour for a boy is 16.
The Peeler
2017-04-14 23:46:11 UTC
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On Sat, 15 Apr 2017 00:34:58 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by HVS
The commercials told me to "Drink Canada Dry".
I failed, but God knows I tried.
ROFL! Added to random sig list.
Not as funny as my random "quotations" list of the endless bullshit you keep
spouting, sociopath! <BG>
--
Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) displaying his intellect:
"Someone as rich as you should know how to use an apostrophe correctly."
MID: <***@red.lan>
RH Draney
2017-04-15 02:14:00 UTC
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Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Peter Young
From some label that a colleague told be about many years ago, I
forget what the product was, "Take off top and stand in hot water".
Quite a while ago, someone is supposed to have asked an etiquette
columnist "Is it good manner to break your bread or roll in your
soup?".
My grandfather, speaking to my little brother who wouldn't eat his
vegetables, circa 1967:

"I want you to eat every carrot and pea on your plate"

....r
Peter Young
2017-04-15 06:36:40 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Peter Young
From some label that a colleague told be about many years ago, I
forget what the product was, "Take off top and stand in hot water".
Quite a while ago, someone is supposed to have asked an etiquette
columnist "Is it good manner to break your bread or roll in your
soup?".
My grandfather, speaking to my little brother who wouldn't eat his
"I want you to eat every carrot and pea on your plate"
There was an old music hall song that contained the line "She sits
among the cabbages and peas". On po-faced theatre manager objected to
this, so the line was changed to "She sits among the cabbages and
leeks".

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Ir)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Peter Moylan
2017-04-15 15:00:10 UTC
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Post by Peter Young
There was an old music hall song that contained the line "She sits
among the cabbages and peas". On po-faced theatre manager objected to
this, so the line was changed to "She sits among the cabbages and
leeks".
My sister Jean's always eating beans
My little brother leeks
I just saw Ma Law lick
A piece of garlic
Everybody ducks when she speaks.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-18 12:58:51 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Young
There was an old music hall song that contained the line "She sits
among the cabbages and peas". On po-faced theatre manager objected to
this, so the line was changed to "She sits among the cabbages and
leeks".
My sister Jean's always eating beans
My little brother leeks
I just saw Ma Law lick
A piece of garlic
Everybody ducks when she speaks.
Doesn't flow properly.
--
Tip of the day: Do not fart in the bath while you have the runs.
The Peeler
2017-04-18 15:21:01 UTC
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On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 13:58:51 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter Moylan
My sister Jean's always eating beans
My little brother leeks
I just saw Ma Law lick
A piece of garlic
Everybody ducks when she speaks.
Doesn't flow properly.
It flows better than your entire miserable "life" as a dole and welfare
whore, Birdbrain!
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sociopathic "wisdom":
"No ginger is ever sexy. They are faulty people, like albinos. Put them
all in the sun and watch them burn!"
MID: <***@red.lan>
Joe Fineman
2017-04-14 21:16:14 UTC
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Post by Peter Young
Now I came to think about it, it is nouns that I can't recall. Why?
The very damnedest things turn out to have their own blood supply. I
myself (age 79) have had trouble retrieving proper nouns for a long
time; now it is spreading to abstract common nouns. I have read of a
man who, after a stroke, lost *all* his nouns (if you asked him his
name, he answered "Can't say"), and of another who had lost just the
words for hand tools (in the kitchen, he could say "That's a washing
machine" but not "That's an eggbeater").
--
--- Joe Fineman ***@verizon.net

||: We don't know what we don't know. :||
Katy Jennison
2017-04-14 21:31:06 UTC
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Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Peter Young
Now I came to think about it, it is nouns that I can't recall. Why?
The very damnedest things turn out to have their own blood supply. I
myself (age 79) have had trouble retrieving proper nouns for a long
time; now it is spreading to abstract common nouns. I have read of a
man who, after a stroke, lost *all* his nouns (if you asked him his
name, he answered "Can't say"), and of another who had lost just the
words for hand tools (in the kitchen, he could say "That's a washing
machine" but not "That's an eggbeater").
After my father had a mild stroke in his late 80s, he knew what category
of word he needed but frequently selected the wrong one from within it
-- "his" for "hers", "up" for "down", "socks" for "shoes". He
recovered, but it was entertaining for us as we worked out what he meant.
--
Katy Jennison
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-14 22:45:16 UTC
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Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Peter Young
Now I came to think about it, it is nouns that I can't recall. Why?
The very damnedest things turn out to have their own blood supply. I
myself (age 79) have had trouble retrieving proper nouns for a long
time; now it is spreading to abstract common nouns. I have read of a
man who, after a stroke, lost *all* his nouns (if you asked him his
name, he answered "Can't say"), and of another who had lost just the
words for hand tools (in the kitchen, he could say "That's a washing
machine" but not "That's an eggbeater").
After my father had a mild stroke in his late 80s, he knew what category
of word he needed but frequently selected the wrong one from within it
-- "his" for "hers", "up" for "down", "socks" for "shoes". He
recovered, but it was entertaining for us as we worked out what he meant.
I guess all strokes aren't the same. I know someone who's had a stroke, and it affects his memory of any event that occurred after the stroke. He can be having a conversation and start repeating himself. He doesn't realise he's just told you about it. But he hasn't forgotten anything from before the stroke, including words.
--
Tell a man that there are 400 billion stars and he'll believe you. Tell him a bench has wet paint and he has to touch it.
The Peeler
2017-04-14 23:06:46 UTC
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On Fri, 14 Apr 2017 23:45:16 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Katy Jennison
After my father had a mild stroke in his late 80s, he knew what category
of word he needed but frequently selected the wrong one from within it
-- "his" for "hers", "up" for "down", "socks" for "shoes". He
recovered, but it was entertaining for us as we worked out what he meant.
I guess all strokes aren't the same. I know someone who's had a stroke,
and it affects his memory of any event that occurred after the stroke.
He can be having a conversation and start repeating himself.
He still couldn't possibly sound as idiotic as you, Birdbrain!
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) pathological "mind"
revealed:
"I am actually considering crashing deliberately into one of my neighbours.
Three times he's stopped on the wrong side of the road, directly in front of
me, then reversed into his drive. I had to brake hard to avoid a head on
collision. Next time I'll glance at the camera to make sure it's rolling
and carry on."
Message-ID: <***@red.lan>
Quinn C
2017-04-19 18:39:41 UTC
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Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Peter Young
Now I came to think about it, it is nouns that I can't recall. Why?
The very damnedest things turn out to have their own blood supply.
Primed by "damnedest", I at first read "bloody supply".
--
The Eskimoes had fifty-two names for snow because it was
important to them, there ought to be as many for love.
-- Margaret Atwood, Surfacing (novel), p.106
occam
2017-04-13 18:13:30 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Is it just me, or do others have trouble remembering certain words? I
flea
fibre glass
conservatory
If I'm trying to use one in a sentence, I pause for 5-10 seconds trying to think of it.
Yes, it happens to me also. The particular one I keep forgetting is ...
no, its gone.
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-13 18:20:11 UTC
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Post by occam
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Is it just me, or do others have trouble remembering certain words? I
flea
fibre glass
conservatory
If I'm trying to use one in a sentence, I pause for 5-10 seconds trying to think of it.
Yes, it happens to me also. The particular one I keep forgetting is ...
no, its gone.
I remember it just after I say I've forgotten it, just like I remember where I put the X when I've just asked "have you seen my X?"
--
More people in the UK are injured by standing on upturned mains plugs than by electric shocks.
m***@gmail.com
2017-04-14 12:36:56 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Is it just me, or do others have trouble remembering certain words?
In my headlong rush to create Artificial Intelligence, I
can't afford spending too much time remembering things.
When I was in the U.S. Army in Germany as a nuclear weapons
specialist, I would get in trouble by forgetting my rank.
Me: "PFC Murray reports for pay, Sir!"
Lt. Stachel with a lifer frown on his face:
"Aren't you a Spec Four now, Murray? Didn't
you get promoted?"
Me: "Sorry, Sir! I forgot my rank."
Be that as it may, there are words I read quite often
but I can never remember what they mean:
- Manichean (anybody know what it means, and how to remember it?);
- bespoke (adjective) -- why is it so popular? What's mean?
If you would like to see my AI design for words in the brain,
http://medium.com/p/12c25b2570b2 -- How Strong AI recognizes an image.

Arthur
--
http://ai.neocities.org/perlmind.txt
http://strawberryperl.com
http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=307824.307853
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B007ZI66FS -- The Art of the Meme
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-14 15:17:42 UTC
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Post by m***@gmail.com
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Is it just me, or do others have trouble remembering certain words?
In my headlong rush to create Artificial Intelligence, I
can't afford spending too much time remembering things.
When I was in the U.S. Army in Germany as a nuclear weapons
specialist, I would get in trouble by forgetting my rank.
I hope you didn't forget key things made of nuclear....
Post by m***@gmail.com
Me: "PFC Murray reports for pay, Sir!"
"Aren't you a Spec Four now, Murray? Didn't
you get promoted?"
Me: "Sorry, Sir! I forgot my rank."
Did you ever call anyone else the wrong rank? I've heard they get very upset if you call them less than they are.
Post by m***@gmail.com
Be that as it may, there are words I read quite often
- Manichean (anybody know what it means, and how to remember it?);
- bespoke (adjective) -- why is it so popular? What's mean?
I only remember the meanings of words I hear at least twice a month. Everything else requires a dictionary.
Post by m***@gmail.com
If you would like to see my AI design for words in the brain,
http://medium.com/p/12c25b2570b2 -- How Strong AI recognizes an image.
Interesting. Did you code an AI program on the Amiga? Is it powerful enough for such things?
9887275846101264836999892256959688159205600101655256375678
The Peeler
2017-04-14 22:20:05 UTC
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On Fri, 14 Apr 2017 16:17:42 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
I only remember the meanings of words I hear at least twice a month.
Everything else requires a dictionary.
Yes, that's because of your birdbrain, Birdbrain!
--
More from Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) strange sociopathic
world:
"Having read the utter bullshit about dying if you fall in a freezing lake
for 15 minutes, I've tried it on many occasions. It takes 30 minutes to
even get chattering teeth, an hour to shiver nicely, and 2 hours to shiver
hard."
MID: <***@red.lan>
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