Discussion:
What do you call a pie server?
(too old to reply)
micky
2018-05-12 01:27:19 UTC
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What do you call the thing with a handle and a flat triangular body used
to serve a piece of pie? TIA
--
Please say where you live, or what
area's English you are asking about.
So your question or answer makes sense.
. .
I have lived all my life in the USA,
Western Pa. Indianapolis, Chicago,
Brooklyn, Baltimore.
Jack
2018-05-12 01:50:38 UTC
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Post by micky
What do you call the thing with a handle and a flat triangular body used
to serve a piece of pie? TIA
A search on 'pie spatula' gets:

" A cake and pie server, also called a cake shovel, pie knife, crépe
spade, pie-getter or pie lifter,"...

https://tinyurl.com/ycxkxgns
--
John
micky
2018-05-12 03:49:51 UTC
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In alt.usage.english, on Fri, 11 May 2018 20:50:38 -0500, Jack
Post by Jack
Post by micky
What do you call the thing with a handle and a flat triangular body used
to serve a piece of pie? TIA
" A cake and pie server, also called a cake shovel, pie knife, crépe
spade, pie-getter or pie lifter,"...
Thanks. I don't know any of these words. No wonder I couldn't remember
the word.

I guess no one I knew ever called it by name.

I do know "spatula" but I think of that as something else.
Post by Jack
https://tinyurl.com/ycxkxgns
--
Please say where you live, or what
area's English you are asking about.
So your question or answer makes sense.
. .
I have lived all my life in the USA,
Western Pa. Indianapolis, Chicago,
Brooklyn, Baltimore.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-05-12 10:27:02 UTC
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Post by Jack
Post by micky
What do you call the thing with a handle and a flat triangular body used
to serve a piece of pie? TIA
" A cake and pie server, also called a cake shovel, pie knife, crépe
spade, pie-getter or pie lifter,"...
https://tinyurl.com/ycxkxgns
I, in the UK, learnt of such a thing as a "cake slice" or "pie slice".
It is a utensil for lifting a triangular slice of cake or pie.
They are also called "cake servers" or "pie srvers".

Here are two cake slices:
https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B003KKNL4O

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B003YM5D9E

This is a set of "cake/pie servers":
https://www.amazon.co.uk/RayPard-Stainless-Server-Finished-Serrated/dp/B01N18H2PA

One edge of the triangle is serrated so that it can be used as a knife
to cut a slice of cake/pie before using it to lift the slice.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-05-12 16:07:44 UTC
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On Sat, 12 May 2018 11:27:02 +0100, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Jack
Post by micky
What do you call the thing with a handle and a flat triangular body used
to serve a piece of pie? TIA
" A cake and pie server, also called a cake shovel, pie knife, crépe
spade, pie-getter or pie lifter,"...
https://tinyurl.com/ycxkxgns
I, in the UK, learnt of such a thing as a "cake slice" or "pie slice".
It is a utensil for lifting a triangular slice of cake or pie.
They are also called "cake servers" or "pie srvers".
https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B003KKNL4O
https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B003YM5D9E
I have a "cake slice with a "slider". The slider pushes the cake off the
implement.
The one shown here is plastic, mine is all metal:
Loading Image...
Lifting a cut slice of cake, or whatever, from a plate with the full
cake/whatever on it:
Loading Image...
Putting it an another plate by pushing it off the implement using the
slider:
Loading Image...

From: "Cake Dozer Cake slice - With slider"
https://www.madeindesign.co.uk/prod-cake-dozer-cake-slice-with-slider-by-pa-design-refpa659-jaune.html
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Peter Young
2018-05-12 17:33:09 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sat, 12 May 2018 11:27:02 +0100, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Jack
Post by micky
What do you call the thing with a handle and a flat triangular body used
to serve a piece of pie? TIA
" A cake and pie server, also called a cake shovel, pie knife, crépe
spade, pie-getter or pie lifter,"...
https://tinyurl.com/ycxkxgns
I, in the UK, learnt of such a thing as a "cake slice" or "pie slice".
It is a utensil for lifting a triangular slice of cake or pie.
They are also called "cake servers" or "pie srvers".
ISTR that in Swedish that's a tortspade. I can't get my head round ASCII
IPA, but maybe one of our Scandinavian-speaking friends can indicate the
pronunciation?

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Pt)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
musika
2018-05-12 18:24:53 UTC
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Post by Peter Young
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
I, in the UK, learnt of such a thing as a "cake slice" or "pie
slice". It is a utensil for lifting a triangular slice of cake or
pie. They are also called "cake servers" or "pie srvers".
ISTR that in Swedish that's a tortspade. I can't get my head round
ASCII IPA, but maybe one of our Scandinavian-speaking friends can
indicate the pronunciation?
Spelt tårtspade

<https://forvo.com/search/t%c3%a5rtspade/>
--
Ray
UK
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-05-15 10:47:54 UTC
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On Sat, 12 May 2018 17:07:44 +0100, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sat, 12 May 2018 11:27:02 +0100, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Jack
Post by micky
What do you call the thing with a handle and a flat triangular body used
to serve a piece of pie? TIA
" A cake and pie server, also called a cake shovel, pie knife, crépe
spade, pie-getter or pie lifter,"...
https://tinyurl.com/ycxkxgns
I, in the UK, learnt of such a thing as a "cake slice" or "pie slice".
It is a utensil for lifting a triangular slice of cake or pie.
They are also called "cake servers" or "pie srvers".
https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B003KKNL4O
https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B003YM5D9E
I have a "cake slice with a "slider". The slider pushes the cake off the
implement.
This is it:
Loading Image...
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-05-15 11:03:43 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sat, 12 May 2018 17:07:44 +0100, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sat, 12 May 2018 11:27:02 +0100, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Jack
Post by micky
What do you call the thing with a handle and a flat triangular body used
to serve a piece of pie? TIA
" A cake and pie server, also called a cake shovel, pie knife, crépe
spade, pie-getter or pie lifter,"...
https://tinyurl.com/ycxkxgns
I, in the UK, learnt of such a thing as a "cake slice" or "pie slice".
It is a utensil for lifting a triangular slice of cake or pie.
They are also called "cake servers" or "pie srvers".
https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B003KKNL4O
https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B003YM5D9E
I have a "cake slice with a "slider". The slider pushes the cake off the
implement.
http://www.peterduncanson.net/temp/Cake%20slice%20with%20pusher.jpg
Ooh! There's posh!
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-05-15 14:07:15 UTC
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On Tue, 15 May 2018 04:03:43 -0700 (PDT), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sat, 12 May 2018 17:07:44 +0100, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sat, 12 May 2018 11:27:02 +0100, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Jack
Post by micky
What do you call the thing with a handle and a flat triangular body used
to serve a piece of pie? TIA
" A cake and pie server, also called a cake shovel, pie knife, crépe
spade, pie-getter or pie lifter,"...
https://tinyurl.com/ycxkxgns
I, in the UK, learnt of such a thing as a "cake slice" or "pie slice".
It is a utensil for lifting a triangular slice of cake or pie.
They are also called "cake servers" or "pie srvers".
https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B003KKNL4O
https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B003YM5D9E
I have a "cake slice with a "slider". The slider pushes the cake off the
implement.
http://www.peterduncanson.net/temp/Cake%20slice%20with%20pusher.jpg
Ooh! There's posh!
I don't know where it came from. I think I inherited it from my late
wife. She might have got it from her mother.

Similarly of uncertain origin is this two-tine fork for impaling a lump
of something to move it and a "pusher" to push it off the tines into the
required place.
Loading Image...
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
musika
2018-05-15 16:06:06 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Similarly of uncertain origin is this two-tine fork for impaling a lump
of something to move it and a "pusher" to push it off the tines into the
required place.
http://www.peterduncanson.net/temp/Fork%20with%20pusher.jpg
That's a pickled-onion fork.
--
Ray
UK
Sam Plusnet
2018-05-16 22:14:15 UTC
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Post by musika
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Similarly of uncertain origin is this two-tine fork for impaling a lump
of something to move it and a "pusher" to push it off the tines into the
required place.
http://www.peterduncanson.net/temp/Fork%20with%20pusher.jpg
That's a pickled-onion fork.
Yes.

Just as Peter inherited his elegant cake slice mit pusher, we inherited
our pickled-onion fork.
--
Sam Plusnet
Janet
2018-05-15 16:18:09 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Tue, 15 May 2018 04:03:43 -0700 (PDT), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sat, 12 May 2018 17:07:44 +0100, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sat, 12 May 2018 11:27:02 +0100, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Jack
Post by micky
What do you call the thing with a handle and a flat triangular body used
to serve a piece of pie? TIA
" A cake and pie server, also called a cake shovel, pie knife, crépe
spade, pie-getter or pie lifter,"...
https://tinyurl.com/ycxkxgns
I, in the UK, learnt of such a thing as a "cake slice" or "pie slice".
It is a utensil for lifting a triangular slice of cake or pie.
They are also called "cake servers" or "pie srvers".
https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B003KKNL4O
https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B003YM5D9E
I have a "cake slice with a "slider". The slider pushes the cake off the
implement.
http://www.peterduncanson.net/temp/Cake%20slice%20with%20pusher.jpg
Ooh! There's posh!
I don't know where it came from. I think I inherited it from my late
wife. She might have got it from her mother.
Similarly of uncertain origin is this two-tine fork for impaling a lump
of something to move it and a "pusher" to push it off the tines into the
required place.
http://www.peterduncanson.net/temp/Fork%20with%20pusher.jpg
That's a pickle fork, used to impale a gherkin or a pickled onion to
get it out of the jar, then release it.

Janet.

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Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-05-15 16:51:38 UTC
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Post by Janet
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Tue, 15 May 2018 04:03:43 -0700 (PDT), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sat, 12 May 2018 17:07:44 +0100, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sat, 12 May 2018 11:27:02 +0100, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Jack
Post by micky
What do you call the thing with a handle and a flat triangular body used
to serve a piece of pie? TIA
" A cake and pie server, also called a cake shovel, pie knife, crépe
spade, pie-getter or pie lifter,"...
https://tinyurl.com/ycxkxgns
I, in the UK, learnt of such a thing as a "cake slice" or "pie slice".
It is a utensil for lifting a triangular slice of cake or pie.
They are also called "cake servers" or "pie srvers".
https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B003KKNL4O
https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B003YM5D9E
I have a "cake slice with a "slider". The slider pushes the cake off the
implement.
http://www.peterduncanson.net/temp/Cake%20slice%20with%20pusher.jpg
Ooh! There's posh!
I don't know where it came from. I think I inherited it from my late
wife. She might have got it from her mother.
Similarly of uncertain origin is this two-tine fork for impaling a lump
of something to move it and a "pusher" to push it off the tines into the
required place.
http://www.peterduncanson.net/temp/Fork%20with%20pusher.jpg
That's a pickle fork, used to impale a gherkin or a pickled onion to
get it out of the jar, then release it.
Janet.
Thank you! I assumed there was a name for such a thing, but I don't
recall ever meeting it.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Paul Wolff
2018-05-15 22:09:09 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Janet
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Tue, 15 May 2018 04:03:43 -0700 (PDT), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sat, 12 May 2018 17:07:44 +0100, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
I have a "cake slice with a "slider". The slider pushes the cake off the
implement.
http://www.peterduncanson.net/temp/Cake%20slice%20with%20pusher.jpg
Ooh! There's posh!
I don't know where it came from. I think I inherited it from my late
wife. She might have got it from her mother.
Similarly of uncertain origin is this two-tine fork for impaling a lump
of something to move it and a "pusher" to push it off the tines into the
required place.
http://www.peterduncanson.net/temp/Fork%20with%20pusher.jpg
That's a pickle fork, used to impale a gherkin or a pickled onion to
get it out of the jar, then release it.
Thank you! I assumed there was a name for such a thing, but I don't
recall ever meeting it.
Useful for spearing olives in jars too.
--
Paul
Garrett Wollman
2018-05-13 02:32:55 UTC
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Post by Jack
Post by micky
What do you call the thing with a handle and a flat triangular body used
to serve a piece of pie? TIA
" A cake and pie server, also called a cake shovel, pie knife, crépe
spade, pie-getter or pie lifter,"...
"Pie taker" is another collocation that I would recognize, but I don't
think I would use myself.

-GAWollman
--
Garrett A. Wollman | "Act to avoid constraining the future; if you can,
***@bimajority.org| act to remove constraint from the future. This is
Opinions not shared by| a thing you can do, are able to do, to do together."
my employers. | - Graydon Saunders, _A Succession of Bad Days_ (2015)
Paul Carmichael
2018-05-12 16:17:51 UTC
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Post by micky
What do you call the thing with a handle and a flat triangular body used
to serve a piece of pie? TIA
A trowel.
--
Paul.

https://paulc.es/
https://asetrad.org
Peter Moylan
2018-05-13 14:59:10 UTC
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Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by micky
What do you call the thing with a handle and a flat triangular body
used to serve a piece of pie? TIA
A trowel.
That is indeed what I would use when gardening, but I suspect that my
friends would be offended by cake served with a trowel.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Paul Carmichael
2018-05-15 15:55:13 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by micky
What do you call the thing with a handle and a flat triangular body
used to serve a piece of pie?  TIA
A trowel.
That is indeed what I would use when gardening
No, that's a dibber. A trowel is for laying bricks.
--
Paul.

https://paulc.es/
https://asetrad.org
Richard Tobin
2018-05-15 15:58:55 UTC
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Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Paul Carmichael
A trowel.
That is indeed what I would use when gardening
No, that's a dibber. A trowel is for laying bricks.
No, there are trowels for gardening too. See for example

https://www.screwfix.com/c/outdoor-gardening/garden-trowels/cat2630002

I think a dibber is something different.

-- Richard
the Omrud
2018-05-15 16:59:24 UTC
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Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Paul Carmichael
A trowel.
That is indeed what I would use when gardening
No, that's a dibber. A trowel is for laying bricks.
No, there are trowels for gardening too. See for example
https://www.screwfix.com/c/outdoor-gardening/garden-trowels/cat2630002
I think a dibber is something different.
A dibber is a tapered stick which you use to make a hole for planting
into. This is the one somebody bought me a few years ago:

https://shop.nationaltrust.org.uk/wooden-dibber/p8850
--
David

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Paul Carmichael
2018-05-15 18:19:09 UTC
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Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Paul Carmichael
A trowel.
That is indeed what I would use when gardening
No, that's a dibber. A trowel is for laying bricks.
No, there are trowels for gardening too.  See for example
https://www.screwfix.com/c/outdoor-gardening/garden-trowels/cat2630002
I think a dibber is something different.
A dibber is a tapered stick which you use to make a hole for planting into.  This is the
Ah well, you see, I've always dibbed with a "garden trowel", so have always called it a
dibber. Just like my dad and his dad before him.
--
Paul.

https://paulc.es/
https://asetrad.org
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-15 20:22:49 UTC
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Post by the Omrud
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Paul Carmichael
A trowel.
That is indeed what I would use when gardening
No, that's a dibber. A trowel is for laying bricks.
No, there are trowels for gardening too. See for example
https://www.screwfix.com/c/outdoor-gardening/garden-trowels/cat2630002
I think a dibber is something different.
A dibber is a tapered stick which you use to make a hole for planting
https://shop.nationaltrust.org.uk/wooden-dibber/p8850
I think anthropologists call it a "dibble stick." It's used in one of the
earliest forms of proto-agriculture, apparently attested among some
peoples when they were first encountered.
Ross
2018-05-15 20:38:22 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by the Omrud
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Paul Carmichael
A trowel.
That is indeed what I would use when gardening
No, that's a dibber. A trowel is for laying bricks.
No, there are trowels for gardening too. See for example
https://www.screwfix.com/c/outdoor-gardening/garden-trowels/cat2630002
I think a dibber is something different.
A dibber is a tapered stick which you use to make a hole for planting
https://shop.nationaltrust.org.uk/wooden-dibber/p8850
I think anthropologists call it a "dibble stick." It's used in one of the
earliest forms of proto-agriculture, apparently attested among some
peoples when they were first encountered.
And since. See "planting stick", e.g. among the Tzeltal of Chiapas,
Mexico, as described by Berlin et al. (1974).
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-05-15 17:09:41 UTC
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Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Paul Carmichael
A trowel.
That is indeed what I would use when gardening
No, that's a dibber. A trowel is for laying bricks.
No, there are trowels for gardening too. See for example
https://www.screwfix.com/c/outdoor-gardening/garden-trowels/cat2630002
I think a dibber is something different.
-- Richard
Yes.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dibber

A dibber or dibble or dibbler is a pointed wooden stick[1] for
making holes in the ground so that seeds, seedlings or small bulbs
can be planted. Dibbers come in a variety of designs including the
straight dibber, T-handled dibber, trowel dibber, and L-shaped
dibber.
....
Trowel dibber
This dibber combines the features of a dibber and a trowel[2]. It is
usually forged from aluminum or other lightweight material. One end
is for dibbing, and the other end is shaped like a trowel.

[1] Where "wooden" can also be metal or plastic.

[2] That is a gardener's trowel, not a builder's trowel.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trowel
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Peter Moylan
2018-05-16 01:06:11 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Paul Carmichael
A trowel.
That is indeed what I would use when gardening
No, that's a dibber. A trowel is for laying bricks.
No, there are trowels for gardening too. See for example
https://www.screwfix.com/c/outdoor-gardening/garden-trowels/cat2630002
I think a dibber is something different.
-- Richard
Yes.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dibber
A dibber or dibble or dibbler is a pointed wooden stick[1] for
making holes in the ground so that seeds, seedlings or small bulbs
can be planted. Dibbers come in a variety of designs including the
straight dibber, T-handled dibber, trowel dibber, and L-shaped
dibber.
I'd never known there was a tool for doing that. I use a spade for
serious turning of the soil, a garden fork for loosening up a small
area, but I just use a finger for making the planting hole.

That's for seeds. If a bigger hole is needed, as when transplanting from
a pot, I still use my hands for most of the work.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Janet
2018-05-16 12:32:52 UTC
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In article <pdg066$dsk$***@dont-email.me>, ***@pmoylan.org.invalid
says...
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Paul Carmichael
A trowel.
That is indeed what I would use when gardening
No, that's a dibber. A trowel is for laying bricks.
No, there are trowels for gardening too. See for example
https://www.screwfix.com/c/outdoor-gardening/garden-trowels/cat2630002
I think a dibber is something different.
-- Richard
Yes.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dibber
A dibber or dibble or dibbler is a pointed wooden stick[1] for
making holes in the ground so that seeds, seedlings or small bulbs
can be planted. Dibbers come in a variety of designs including the
straight dibber, T-handled dibber, trowel dibber, and L-shaped
dibber.
I'd never known there was a tool for doing that. I use a spade for
serious turning of the soil, a garden fork for loosening up a small
area, but I just use a finger for making the planting hole.
Only Gollum has a finger long enough to make a planting hole for leeks.

Janet
Post by Peter Moylan
That's for seeds. If a bigger hole is needed, as when transplanting from
a pot, I still use my hands for most of the work.
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Richard Tobin
2018-05-16 13:14:31 UTC
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Post by Janet
Post by Peter Moylan
I'd never known there was a tool for doing that. I use a spade for
serious turning of the soil, a garden fork for loosening up a small
area, but I just use a finger for making the planting hole.
Only Gollum has a finger long enough to make a planting hole for leeks.
Also ET.

-- Richard
RH Draney
2018-05-16 15:42:57 UTC
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Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Janet
Post by Peter Moylan
I'd never known there was a tool for doing that. I use a spade for
serious turning of the soil, a garden fork for loosening up a small
area, but I just use a finger for making the planting hole.
Only Gollum has a finger long enough to make a planting hole for leeks.
Also ET.
And Nosferatu....r
Sam Plusnet
2018-05-16 22:16:39 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Janet
Post by Peter Moylan
I'd never known there was a tool for doing that. I use a spade for
serious turning of the soil, a garden fork for loosening up a small
area, but I just use a finger for making the planting hole.
Only Gollum has a finger long enough to make a planting hole for leeks.
Also ET.
And Nosferatu....r
<This space reserved for a Trump remark>
--
Sam Plusnet
Quinn C
2018-05-16 18:01:56 UTC
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Post by Janet
says...
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Paul Carmichael
A trowel.
That is indeed what I would use when gardening
No, that's a dibber. A trowel is for laying bricks.
No, there are trowels for gardening too. See for example
https://www.screwfix.com/c/outdoor-gardening/garden-trowels/cat2630002
I think a dibber is something different.
-- Richard
Yes.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dibber
A dibber or dibble or dibbler is a pointed wooden stick[1] for
making holes in the ground so that seeds, seedlings or small bulbs
can be planted. Dibbers come in a variety of designs including the
straight dibber, T-handled dibber, trowel dibber, and L-shaped
dibber.
I'd never known there was a tool for doing that. I use a spade for
serious turning of the soil, a garden fork for loosening up a small
area, but I just use a finger for making the planting hole.
Only Gollum has a finger long enough to make a planting hole for leeks.
Or asparagus. But I think what you usually do is raise the soil after
planting them.
--
... English-speaking people have managed to get along a good many
centuries with the present supply of pronouns; ... It is so old and
venerable an argument ... it's equivalent was used when gas, railways
and steamboats were proposed. -- Findlay (OH) Jeffersonian (1875)
David Kleinecke
2018-05-15 18:59:56 UTC
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Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Paul Carmichael
A trowel.
That is indeed what I would use when gardening
No, that's a dibber. A trowel is for laying bricks.
No, there are trowels for gardening too. See for example
https://www.screwfix.com/c/outdoor-gardening/garden-trowels/cat2630002
I think a dibber is something different.
-- Richard
Archeologists also use trowels. But maybe archeology is a
branch of gardening.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-15 20:32:42 UTC
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Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Paul Carmichael
A trowel.
That is indeed what I would use when gardening
No, that's a dibber. A trowel is for laying bricks.
No, there are trowels for gardening too. See for example
https://www.screwfix.com/c/outdoor-gardening/garden-trowels/cat2630002
I think a dibber is something different.
Archeologists also use trowels. But maybe archeology is a
branch of gardening.
The ones who grow their own relics aren't archeologists.
Sam Plusnet
2018-05-16 22:18:32 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Paul Carmichael
A trowel.
That is indeed what I would use when gardening
No, that's a dibber. A trowel is for laying bricks.
No, there are trowels for gardening too. See for example
https://www.screwfix.com/c/outdoor-gardening/garden-trowels/cat2630002
I think a dibber is something different.
Archeologists also use trowels. But maybe archeology is a
branch of gardening.
The ones who grow their own relics aren't archeologists.
Piltdown Man?
--
Sam Plusnet
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-17 03:31:47 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Paul Carmichael
A trowel.
That is indeed what I would use when gardening
No, that's a dibber. A trowel is for laying bricks.
No, there are trowels for gardening too. See for example
https://www.screwfix.com/c/outdoor-gardening/garden-trowels/cat2630002
I think a dibber is something different.
Archeologists also use trowels. But maybe archeology is a
branch of gardening.
The ones who grow their own relics aren't archeologists.
Piltdown Man?
That was rather a while ago!

Though I suppose you might have mentioled Mr Mellaart, though apparently everyone
in the field knew that what he was coming up with didn't need to be looked at.
Sam Plusnet
2018-05-16 22:18:09 UTC
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Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Paul Carmichael
A trowel.
That is indeed what I would use when gardening
No, that's a dibber. A trowel is for laying bricks.
No, there are trowels for gardening too. See for example
https://www.screwfix.com/c/outdoor-gardening/garden-trowels/cat2630002
I think a dibber is something different.
-- Richard
Archeologists also use trowels. But maybe archeology is a
branch of gardening.
I think they use a brick-layer's trowel - or possibly a pointing trowel.
--
Sam Plusnet
David Kleinecke
2018-05-17 03:03:00 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Paul Carmichael
A trowel.
That is indeed what I would use when gardening
No, that's a dibber. A trowel is for laying bricks.
No, there are trowels for gardening too. See for example
https://www.screwfix.com/c/outdoor-gardening/garden-trowels/cat2630002
I think a dibber is something different.
-- Richard
Archeologists also use trowels. But maybe archeology is a
branch of gardening.
I think they use a brick-layer's trowel - or possibly a pointing trowel.
When I was doing archeology I made good use of a brick-
layer's hammer. It makes a good small pick for hard earth.
Other archeologist's tools include ear syringes and dental
picks.

Doing archeology on California Indian sites has no glamor
whatsoever - it's an exercise in pure technique. I once
spent half a day digging up a duck skeleton together with
net that was used to take it and the stone weights on the
net.
Quinn C
2018-05-15 17:28:49 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by micky
What do you call the thing with a handle and a flat triangular body
used to serve a piece of pie? TIA
A trowel.
That is indeed what I would use when gardening, but I suspect that my
friends would be offended by cake served with a trowel.
I was about to suggest that your masonic friends might be offended by
your use of their iconic implement in the garden, but I see that the
word is indeed used for a gardening implement as well. I've always
called it a shovel, but that doesn't seem universal in German either.
It seems that part of the issue is that they used to look more like
trowels in the past, but have evolved to be much more shovel-shaped
these days.
--
Democracy means government by the uneducated,
while aristocracy means government by the badly educated.
-- G. K. Chesterton
Madhu
2018-05-16 02:41:58 UTC
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Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter Moylan
That is indeed what I would use when gardening, but I suspect that my
friends would be offended by cake served with a trowel.
I was about to suggest that your masonic friends might be offended by
your use of their iconic implement in the garden, but I see that the
word is indeed used for a gardening implement as well. I've always
called it a shovel, but that doesn't seem universal in German either.
It seems that part of the issue is that they used to look more like
trowels in the past, but have evolved to be much more shovel-shaped
these days.
I think this [masonic implement] was also the "paddle upon they weapon"
(as the KJV translates it) referred to in Deuteronomy 23:12-13.
Quinn C
2018-05-16 23:04:10 UTC
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Post by Madhu
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter Moylan
That is indeed what I would use when gardening, but I suspect that my
friends would be offended by cake served with a trowel.
I was about to suggest that your masonic friends might be offended by
your use of their iconic implement in the garden, but I see that the
word is indeed used for a gardening implement as well. I've always
called it a shovel, but that doesn't seem universal in German either.
It seems that part of the issue is that they used to look more like
trowels in the past, but have evolved to be much more shovel-shaped
these days.
I think this [masonic implement] was also the "paddle upon they weapon"
(as the KJV translates it) referred to in Deuteronomy 23:12-13.
Checking, I was first presented with the New International Version,
which specifies (if that word applies) "something to dig with". Other
newer versions have a "stick". All the German versions I checked said
"shovel". That suggests to me that we really don't know.
--
Who would know aught of art must learn and then take his ease.
Kerr-Mudd,John
2018-05-15 11:33:52 UTC
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Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by micky
What do you call the thing with a handle and a flat triangular body used
to serve a piece of pie? TIA
A trowel.
Remove plaster before use?
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
occam
2018-05-12 18:40:25 UTC
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Post by micky
--
Please say where you live, or what
area's English you are asking about.
So your question or answer makes sense.
. .
I have lived all my life in the USA,
Western Pa. Indianapolis, Chicago,
Brooklyn, Baltimore.
Er... how does that add to understanding your question?

P.S. The answer to your question is 'a waitress'.
Whiskers
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
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Post by micky
What do you call the thing with a handle and a flat triangular body used
to serve a piece of pie? TIA
The generic term in my BrE is 'cake slice', which could be
hyphenated. The utensils are more widely useful than their
nomenclature might suggest.
--
^^^^^^^^^^
Whiskers
~~~~~~~~~~


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://usenet.sinaapp.com/
charles
2018-05-15 09:23:25 UTC
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Post by micky
What do you call the thing with a handle and a flat triangular body used
to serve a piece of pie? TIA
Hre it's a "cake slice"
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Colonel Edmund J. Burke
2018-05-16 13:41:11 UTC
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A waitress?
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