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Election coverage irony
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Peter T. Daniels
2016-11-08 14:39:45 UTC
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The three major broadcast networks have scheduled their coverage from 7 pm to 2 am,
and PBS (Public Broadcasting) from 8 pm to 1 am.

Fox, however, has allocated only two hours, from 8 to 10 pm. Mr. Murdoch's
people seem to know it will all be over as soon as results from the Eastern
Time "swing states," Florida and Ohio and maybe North Carolina, are in (some
add New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Michigan to that category).
Mack A. Damia
2016-11-08 16:41:27 UTC
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On Tue, 8 Nov 2016 06:39:45 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The three major broadcast networks have scheduled their coverage from 7 pm to 2 am,
and PBS (Public Broadcasting) from 8 pm to 1 am.
Fox, however, has allocated only two hours, from 8 to 10 pm. Mr. Murdoch's
people seem to know it will all be over as soon as results from the Eastern
Time "swing states," Florida and Ohio and maybe North Carolina, are in (some
add New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Michigan to that category).
Michaela on CNN was just interviewing a young woman outside of a
polling place who said she was still undecided.

You can't make this stuff up.
Cheryl
2016-11-08 16:49:10 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
On Tue, 8 Nov 2016 06:39:45 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The three major broadcast networks have scheduled their coverage from 7 pm to 2 am,
and PBS (Public Broadcasting) from 8 pm to 1 am.
Fox, however, has allocated only two hours, from 8 to 10 pm. Mr. Murdoch's
people seem to know it will all be over as soon as results from the Eastern
Time "swing states," Florida and Ohio and maybe North Carolina, are in (some
add New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Michigan to that category).
Michaela on CNN was just interviewing a young woman outside of a
polling place who said she was still undecided.
You can't make this stuff up.
Well, I've said I wasn't decided when I really was and either didn't
want to get into a debate with the other person, or thought my opinions
were none of their business.
--
Cheryl
Mack A. Damia
2016-11-08 16:55:01 UTC
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Post by Cheryl
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Tue, 8 Nov 2016 06:39:45 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The three major broadcast networks have scheduled their coverage from 7 pm to 2 am,
and PBS (Public Broadcasting) from 8 pm to 1 am.
Fox, however, has allocated only two hours, from 8 to 10 pm. Mr. Murdoch's
people seem to know it will all be over as soon as results from the Eastern
Time "swing states," Florida and Ohio and maybe North Carolina, are in (some
add New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Michigan to that category).
Michaela on CNN was just interviewing a young woman outside of a
polling place who said she was still undecided.
You can't make this stuff up.
Well, I've said I wasn't decided when I really was and either didn't
want to get into a debate with the other person, or thought my opinions
were none of their business.
Okay, but this was a news interview. Time is precious. The
interviewer/reporter is not going to let anybody wander - although the
woman did give her reasons:

Her husband was voting for Clinton, but her brother was voting for
Trump, so she could not make up her mind.
GordonD
2016-11-08 17:19:37 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Cheryl
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Tue, 8 Nov 2016 06:39:45 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The three major broadcast networks have scheduled their
coverage from 7 pm to 2 am, and PBS (Public Broadcasting) from
8 pm to 1 am.
Fox, however, has allocated only two hours, from 8 to 10 pm.
Mr. Murdoch's people seem to know it will all be over as soon
as results from the Eastern Time "swing states," Florida and
Ohio and maybe North Carolina, are in (some add New Hampshire,
Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Michigan to that category).
Michaela on CNN was just interviewing a young woman outside of a
polling place who said she was still undecided.
You can't make this stuff up.
Well, I've said I wasn't decided when I really was and either
didn't want to get into a debate with the other person, or thought
my opinions were none of their business.
Okay, but this was a news interview. Time is precious. The
interviewer/reporter is not going to let anybody wander - although
Her husband was voting for Clinton, but her brother was voting for
Trump, so she could not make up her mind.
A question about the election process. It's been stated here in the UK
that both major candidates are so unpopular that many people might vote
for a third one (whose name escapes me for now). What happens if he
picks up enough votes so he wins a couple of states and neither Clinton
nor Trump get to the magic 270 electoral college votes? Does the
candidate with the higher number become President or do they need an
outright majority? What if - God forbid - he picks up just the right
states so that it ends up a tie between Clinton and Trump? Given that
there's an even number of electoral college votes, is this a possibility
in a normal year?
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
Don Phillipson
2016-11-08 17:47:42 UTC
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Post by GordonD
A question about the election process. It's been stated here in the UK
that both major candidates are so unpopular that many people might vote
for a third one (whose name escapes me for now). What happens if he
picks up enough votes so he wins a couple of states and neither Clinton
nor Trump get to the magic 270 electoral college votes? Does the
candidate with the higher number become President or do they need an
outright majority? What if - God forbid - he picks up just the right
states so that it ends up a tie between Clinton and Trump? Given that
there's an even number of electoral college votes, is this a possibility
in a normal year?
American constitutional lawyers could no doubt answer briefly. Earlier
electoral disputes seem to be decided by law courts, as the US
Supreme Court finally arbitrated on Florida's method of counting
votes with "hanging chads" etc. The US Constitution also provides
in certain cases for tie-breaker decisions, as by the Speaker of the
House of Representatives.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
Horace LaBadie
2016-11-08 17:59:49 UTC
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Post by Don Phillipson
Post by GordonD
A question about the election process. It's been stated here in the UK
that both major candidates are so unpopular that many people might vote
for a third one (whose name escapes me for now). What happens if he
picks up enough votes so he wins a couple of states and neither Clinton
nor Trump get to the magic 270 electoral college votes? Does the
candidate with the higher number become President or do they need an
outright majority? What if - God forbid - he picks up just the right
states so that it ends up a tie between Clinton and Trump? Given that
there's an even number of electoral college votes, is this a possibility
in a normal year?
American constitutional lawyers could no doubt answer briefly. Earlier
electoral disputes seem to be decided by law courts, as the US
Supreme Court finally arbitrated on Florida's method of counting
votes with "hanging chads" etc. The US Constitution also provides
in certain cases for tie-breaker decisions, as by the Speaker of the
House of Representatives.
The full House of Representatives decides when there is no candidate
with a majority in the Electoral College. John Quincey Adams was elected
by decision of the House in the 1824 election.
Mack A. Damia
2016-11-08 17:59:47 UTC
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Post by GordonD
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Cheryl
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Tue, 8 Nov 2016 06:39:45 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The three major broadcast networks have scheduled their
coverage from 7 pm to 2 am, and PBS (Public Broadcasting) from
8 pm to 1 am.
Fox, however, has allocated only two hours, from 8 to 10 pm.
Mr. Murdoch's people seem to know it will all be over as soon
as results from the Eastern Time "swing states," Florida and
Ohio and maybe North Carolina, are in (some add New Hampshire,
Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Michigan to that category).
Michaela on CNN was just interviewing a young woman outside of a
polling place who said she was still undecided.
You can't make this stuff up.
Well, I've said I wasn't decided when I really was and either
didn't want to get into a debate with the other person, or thought
my opinions were none of their business.
Okay, but this was a news interview. Time is precious. The
interviewer/reporter is not going to let anybody wander - although
Her husband was voting for Clinton, but her brother was voting for
Trump, so she could not make up her mind.
A question about the election process. It's been stated here in the UK
that both major candidates are so unpopular that many people might vote
for a third one (whose name escapes me for now). What happens if he
picks up enough votes so he wins a couple of states and neither Clinton
nor Trump get to the magic 270 electoral college votes? Does the
candidate with the higher number become President or do they need an
outright majority? What if - God forbid - he picks up just the right
states so that it ends up a tie between Clinton and Trump? Given that
there's an even number of electoral college votes, is this a possibility
in a normal year?
It has never happened, so we don't really know.

A third party candidate would have to win electoral college votes to
be taken seriously, and it doesn't appear as if any of them in this
election have enough support. History is bereft of examples where
these candidates have succeeded in making an impact.

http://graphics.wsj.com/third-party-candidate-impact/
Garrett Wollman
2016-11-08 18:01:46 UTC
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Post by GordonD
A question about the election process. It's been stated here in the UK
that both major candidates are so unpopular that many people might vote
for a third one (whose name escapes me for now).
Or a fourth, or a fifth, or ....

None of these candidates will receive any electors, except perhaps for
Evan McMullin who has an outside chance of winning Utah.
Post by GordonD
What happens if he picks up enough votes so he wins a couple of
states and neither Clinton nor Trump get to the magic 270 electoral
college votes?
If no presidential candidate receives a majority of electoral votes,
the President will be chosen by the House of Representatives -- but
with each state's House delegation having a single vote. So in
essence that would elect Trump.

If no vice-presidential candidate receives a majority of electoral
votes, the Vice-President (who is ex officio President of the Senate)
will be chosen by the Senate by majority vote from the top two
candidates, so it would be either Pence or Kaine depending on the
composition of the new Senate. (The new Congress takes office on
January 3, two weeks before the presidential inauguration.)

-GAWollman
--
Garrett A. Wollman | What intellectual phenomenon can be older, or more oft
***@bimajority.org| repeated, than the story of a large research program
Opinions not shared by| that impaled itself upon a false central assumption
my employers. | accepted by all practitioners? - S.J. Gould, 1993
Peter T. Daniels
2016-11-08 19:38:59 UTC
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Post by GordonD
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Cheryl
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Tue, 8 Nov 2016 06:39:45 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The three major broadcast networks have scheduled their
coverage from 7 pm to 2 am, and PBS (Public Broadcasting) from
8 pm to 1 am.
Fox, however, has allocated only two hours, from 8 to 10 pm.
Mr. Murdoch's people seem to know it will all be over as soon
as results from the Eastern Time "swing states," Florida and
Ohio and maybe North Carolina, are in (some add New Hampshire,
Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Michigan to that category).
Michaela on CNN was just interviewing a young woman outside of a
polling place who said she was still undecided.
You can't make this stuff up.
Well, I've said I wasn't decided when I really was and either
didn't want to get into a debate with the other person, or thought
my opinions were none of their business.
Okay, but this was a news interview. Time is precious. The
interviewer/reporter is not going to let anybody wander - although
Her husband was voting for Clinton, but her brother was voting for
Trump, so she could not make up her mind.
A question about the election process. It's been stated here in the UK
that both major candidates are so unpopular that many people might vote
for a third one (whose name escapes me for now). What happens if he
picks up enough votes so he wins a couple of states and neither Clinton
nor Trump get to the magic 270 electoral college votes? Does the
candidate with the higher number become President or do they need an
outright majority? What if - God forbid - he picks up just the right
states so that it ends up a tie between Clinton and Trump? Given that
there's an even number of electoral college votes, is this a possibility
in a normal year?
There are three "serious" third-party candidates, Libertarian doofus
Gary Johnson, Green Party nonentity Doctor Jill Stein, and independent
Evan McDonnell (or something like that), who wasn't on the ballot in NJ.
For a short time it looked like he was leading in Utah, but Trump
seems to have regained his lead there.

The last time a third-party candidate won any states and hence
Electoral College votes was George Wallace in 1968, but Nixon still
had a majority of the 538). Not even Ross Perot in '92 and '96
carried any states, but he did keep Clinton from getting a majority
of the popular vote.

The winner has to get an absolute majority of Electoral votes,
i.e. 270. If no candidate reaches 270, the House of Representatives chooses
the President with each state getting one vote. The last time that happened
was 1824, and it was the closest we came to a true electoral crisis.
Tony Cooper
2016-11-08 17:15:47 UTC
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On Tue, 08 Nov 2016 08:41:27 -0800, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Tue, 8 Nov 2016 06:39:45 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The three major broadcast networks have scheduled their coverage from 7 pm to 2 am,
and PBS (Public Broadcasting) from 8 pm to 1 am.
Fox, however, has allocated only two hours, from 8 to 10 pm. Mr. Murdoch's
people seem to know it will all be over as soon as results from the Eastern
Time "swing states," Florida and Ohio and maybe North Carolina, are in (some
add New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Michigan to that category).
Michaela on CNN was just interviewing a young woman outside of a
polling place who said she was still undecided.
You can't make this stuff up.
My prediction:

Loading Image...
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Mack A. Damia
2016-11-08 17:50:31 UTC
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On Tue, 08 Nov 2016 12:15:47 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
On Tue, 08 Nov 2016 08:41:27 -0800, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Tue, 8 Nov 2016 06:39:45 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The three major broadcast networks have scheduled their coverage from 7 pm to 2 am,
and PBS (Public Broadcasting) from 8 pm to 1 am.
Fox, however, has allocated only two hours, from 8 to 10 pm. Mr. Murdoch's
people seem to know it will all be over as soon as results from the Eastern
Time "swing states," Florida and Ohio and maybe North Carolina, are in (some
add New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Michigan to that category).
Michaela on CNN was just interviewing a young woman outside of a
polling place who said she was still undecided.
You can't make this stuff up.
https://photos.smugmug.com/Current/i-kkxqmLq/0/X2/2016-10-29-7-X2.jpg
New Voter Category for Future Elections:

Already recognized:

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Women
College educated men
College educated women
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s***@gowanhill.com
2016-11-08 17:24:42 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
Michaela on CNN was just interviewing a young woman outside of a
polling place who said she was still undecided.
Was this on the way out?

In the UK you're not supposed to talk to people on the way in in case you influence their vote.

Owain
Don Phillipson
2016-11-08 17:49:03 UTC
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Post by s***@gowanhill.com
Post by Mack A. Damia
Michaela on CNN was just interviewing a young woman outside of a
polling place who said she was still undecided.
Was this on the way out?
In the UK you're not supposed to talk to people on the way in in case you
influence their vote.
But you can interview voters after they have voted, and
report what they say.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
Mack A. Damia
2016-11-08 17:54:12 UTC
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Post by s***@gowanhill.com
Post by Mack A. Damia
Michaela on CNN was just interviewing a young woman outside of a
polling place who said she was still undecided.
Was this on the way out?
If she was undecided, I am fairly certain that she had not voted.
Post by s***@gowanhill.com
In the UK you're not supposed to talk to people on the way in in case you influence their vote.
Depending on state law, I think there are some that say you cannot
engage (electioneer) a person within a certain number of feet of the
polling place. Don't quote me on this as it is a state thing.
Rich Ulrich
2016-11-08 16:46:28 UTC
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On Tue, 8 Nov 2016 06:39:45 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The three major broadcast networks have scheduled their coverage from 7 pm to 2 am,
and PBS (Public Broadcasting) from 8 pm to 1 am.
Fox, however, has allocated only two hours, from 8 to 10 pm. Mr. Murdoch's
people seem to know it will all be over as soon as results from the Eastern
Time "swing states," Florida and Ohio and maybe North Carolina, are in (some
add New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Michigan to that category).
Comey's prank cost the Democrats their (slim) chance of taking over
the House. Will it have also cost them the Senate? Some of us are
interested.
--
Rich Ulrich
Mack A. Damia
2016-11-08 16:48:52 UTC
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On Tue, 08 Nov 2016 11:46:28 -0500, Rich Ulrich
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Tue, 8 Nov 2016 06:39:45 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The three major broadcast networks have scheduled their coverage from 7 pm to 2 am,
and PBS (Public Broadcasting) from 8 pm to 1 am.
Fox, however, has allocated only two hours, from 8 to 10 pm. Mr. Murdoch's
people seem to know it will all be over as soon as results from the Eastern
Time "swing states," Florida and Ohio and maybe North Carolina, are in (some
add New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Michigan to that category).
Comey's prank cost the Democrats their (slim) chance of taking over
the House. Will it have also cost them the Senate? Some of us are
interested.
I heard Todd and Williams of MSNBC discussing this very thing last
night. Todd thinks it will cost them the Senate; Williams doesn't
know.
Peter T. Daniels
2016-11-08 19:30:06 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
On Tue, 08 Nov 2016 11:46:28 -0500, Rich Ulrich
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Tue, 8 Nov 2016 06:39:45 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The three major broadcast networks have scheduled their coverage from 7 pm to 2 am,
and PBS (Public Broadcasting) from 8 pm to 1 am.
Fox, however, has allocated only two hours, from 8 to 10 pm. Mr. Murdoch's
people seem to know it will all be over as soon as results from the Eastern
Time "swing states," Florida and Ohio and maybe North Carolina, are in (some
add New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Michigan to that category).
Comey's prank cost the Democrats their (slim) chance of taking over
the House. Will it have also cost them the Senate? Some of us are
interested.
I heard Todd and Williams of MSNBC discussing this very thing last
night. Todd thinks it will cost them the Senate; Williams doesn't
know.
Chuck Todd loves Trump. He doesn't care about policies, only
about (1) ratings and (2) horserace. This week on MtP he showed
one poll result with Trump 1% ahead of Clinton and said "Trump is
ahead." In a different state he showed Clinton 1% ahead of Trump
and said "too close to call."

I think maybe they do show margin of error when they put up poll
results, but too small to read and they certainly never mention them.

Changing the segment's name from "Nerdscreen" to "Data Download"
didn't endear him any more to those interested in facts.
Peter T. Daniels
2016-11-08 19:25:46 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
On Tue, 8 Nov 2016 06:39:45 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The three major broadcast networks have scheduled their coverage from 7 pm to 2 am,
and PBS (Public Broadcasting) from 8 pm to 1 am.
Fox, however, has allocated only two hours, from 8 to 10 pm. Mr. Murdoch's
people seem to know it will all be over as soon as results from the Eastern
Time "swing states," Florida and Ohio and maybe North Carolina, are in (some
add New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Michigan to that category).
Comey's prank cost the Democrats their (slim) chance of taking over
the House. Will it have also cost them the Senate? Some of us are
interested.
They _certainly_ don't want to know about _that_ at Fox. NYS seems
likely to flip as many as 5 House seats, and NJ 1.

Either the NBC or the CBS stats guy showed Sunday morning that a
50-50 Senate is very likely (Tim Kaine doesn't want to always be
going off to funerals anyway -- that can be Bill's job), with a
possible 52-48. And Chuck Schumer will be an LBJ-style Majority Leader.
Mack A. Damia
2016-11-08 19:33:57 UTC
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On Tue, 8 Nov 2016 06:39:45 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The three major broadcast networks have scheduled their coverage from 7 pm to 2 am,
and PBS (Public Broadcasting) from 8 pm to 1 am.
Fox, however, has allocated only two hours, from 8 to 10 pm. Mr. Murdoch's
people seem to know it will all be over as soon as results from the Eastern
Time "swing states," Florida and Ohio and maybe North Carolina, are in (some
add New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Michigan to that category).
With relief in sight from this intense campaign, it may only get
worse.

Trump has filed a law suit in Nevada to disenfranchise voters - mostly
Hispanics, I think, and now I just read about Republicans challenging
voter machines in Lebanon, PA,*** of all places. Look for a law suit
there.

If he challenges states where he will obviously lose, then he makes a
case for not conceding the election.

It could turn out to be a blood bath.

*** Home of the original hoefty.
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