Discussion:
What does BTC for Bitcoin Mean?
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bohso
2018-05-07 17:46:24 UTC
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Is BTC (for Bitcoin) an acronym or just a 3-letter symbol that sounds like Bitcoin? If not an acronym and just an approximate sound, what do you call that term in English?
bert
2018-05-07 18:08:19 UTC
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Post by bohso
Is BTC (for Bitcoin) an acronym or just a 3-letter symbol
that sounds like Bitcoin? If not an acronym and just an
approximate sound, what do you call that term in English?
It's an abbreviation, like GBP (Great Britain Pound) or USD
(United States Dollar). It doesn't have to be pronounceable.
--
Whiskers
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
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Post by bert
Post by bohso
Is BTC (for Bitcoin) an acronym or just a 3-letter symbol
that sounds like Bitcoin? If not an acronym and just an
approximate sound, what do you call that term in English?
It's an abbreviation, like GBP (Great Britain Pound) or USD
(United States Dollar). It doesn't have to be pronounceable.
Not (yet) an official ISO currency code; that could end up being
XBT in practice, but BTC is widely used already.
<https://www.iso.org/iso-4217-currency-codes.html>
<https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Bitcoin_symbol>

The term 'three letter abbreviation' or TLA is often used to refer
to such things collectively.
--
^^^^^^^^^^
Whiskers
~~~~~~~~~~


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://usenet.sinaapp.com/
soup
2018-05-07 19:26:42 UTC
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Post by bert
Post by bohso
Is BTC (for Bitcoin) an acronym or just a 3-letter symbol
that sounds like Bitcoin? If not an acronym and just an
approximate sound, what do you call that term in English?
It's an abbreviation, like GBP (Great Britain Pound) or USD
(United States Dollar). It doesn't have to be pronounceable.
Well yes, but those (GBP USD) could more properly be called
initialisatisms (a subset of abbreviations).

If it is pronounceable and a new word (Radar, Sonar, Nasa ...) then it
is an acronym
Garrett Wollman
2018-05-07 21:34:36 UTC
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Post by soup
Post by bert
It's an abbreviation, like GBP (Great Britain Pound) or USD
(United States Dollar). It doesn't have to be pronounceable.
Well yes, but those (GBP USD) could more properly be called
initialisatisms (a subset of abbreviations).
ISO 4217 currency codes would be more appropriately called "codes" or
"symbols". Especially since ISO 4217 incorporates ISO 3166-1 alpha-2
codes, many of which are not initialisms or even abbreviations.

-GAWollman
--
Garrett A. Wollman | "Act to avoid constraining the future; if you can,
***@bimajority.org| act to remove constraint from the future. This is
Opinions not shared by| a thing you can do, are able to do, to do together."
my employers. | - Graydon Saunders, _A Succession of Bad Days_ (2015)
RH Draney
2018-05-07 21:59:07 UTC
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Post by bert
Post by bohso
Is BTC (for Bitcoin) an acronym or just a 3-letter symbol
that sounds like Bitcoin? If not an acronym and just an
approximate sound, what do you call that term in English?
It's an abbreviation, like GBP (Great Britain Pound) or USD
(United States Dollar). It doesn't have to be pronounceable.
I thought the abbreviation for Great Britain Pound was UKL....r
occam
2018-05-08 12:14:12 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by bert
Post by bohso
Is BTC (for Bitcoin) an acronym or just a 3-letter symbol
that sounds like Bitcoin?  If not an acronym and just an
approximate sound, what do you call that term in English?
It's an abbreviation, like GBP (Great Britain Pound) or USD
(United States Dollar).  It doesn't have to be pronounceable.
I thought the abbreviation for Great Britain Pound was UKL....r
Both are used, but UKL less and less. (The origin of the 'L' is '£', the
pound sign. )
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-05-08 14:34:54 UTC
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Post by occam
Post by RH Draney
Post by bert
Post by bohso
Is BTC (for Bitcoin) an acronym or just a 3-letter symbol
that sounds like Bitcoin?  If not an acronym and just an
approximate sound, what do you call that term in English?
It's an abbreviation, like GBP (Great Britain Pound) or USD
(United States Dollar).  It doesn't have to be pronounceable.
I thought the abbreviation for Great Britain Pound was UKL....r
Both are used, but UKL less and less. (The origin of the 'L' is '£', the
pound sign. )
The other way round, Shirley!
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-08 16:05:17 UTC
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Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by occam
Post by RH Draney
Post by bert
Post by bohso
Is BTC (for Bitcoin) an acronym or just a 3-letter symbol
that sounds like Bitcoin?  If not an acronym and just an
approximate sound, what do you call that term in English?
It's an abbreviation, like GBP (Great Britain Pound) or USD
(United States Dollar).  It doesn't have to be pronounceable.
I thought the abbreviation for Great Britain Pound was UKL....r
Both are used, but UKL less and less. (The origin of the 'L' is '£', the
pound sign. )
The other way round, Shirley!
The origin of £ is a medieval contraction of "libra," but the origin of L
in the initialism is indeed £.
RH Draney
2018-05-08 17:09:24 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by occam
Post by RH Draney
I thought the abbreviation for Great Britain Pound was UKL....r
Both are used, but UKL less and less. (The origin of the 'L' is '£', the
pound sign. )
The other way round, Shirley!
The origin of £ is a medieval contraction of "libra," but the origin of L
in the initialism is indeed £.
And back when we had typewriters that worked by slapping bits of ink
onto paper with metal hammers, we were taught to create the £ symbol by
overstriking L with f...(those in countries where the typewriters had
dedicated keys for this symbol were doubtless given similar instructions
for building the $ glyph)....r
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-08 17:22:19 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by occam
Post by RH Draney
I thought the abbreviation for Great Britain Pound was UKL....r
Both are used, but UKL less and less. (The origin of the 'L' is '£', the
pound sign. )
The other way round, Shirley!
The origin of £ is a medieval contraction of "libra," but the origin of L
in the initialism is indeed £.
And back when we had typewriters that worked by slapping bits of ink
onto paper with metal hammers, we were taught to create the £ symbol by
overstriking L with f...(those in countries where the typewriters had
dedicated keys for this symbol were doubtless given similar instructions
for building the $ glyph)....r
I would do L and - . L and f would make for a weirdly thick vertical. S
with slash makes a less presentable $ than c with slash does a cents-sign.
RH Draney
2018-05-09 06:30:46 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by RH Draney
And back when we had typewriters that worked by slapping bits of ink
onto paper with metal hammers, we were taught to create the £ symbol by
overstriking L with f...(those in countries where the typewriters had
dedicated keys for this symbol were doubtless given similar instructions
for building the $ glyph)....r
I would do L and - . L and f would make for a weirdly thick vertical. S
with slash makes a less presentable $ than c with slash does a cents-sign.
We had a key for $, and another for ¢ (the latter was on the shifted
numeral six)....r
Lewis
2018-05-09 14:21:27 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by RH Draney
And back when we had typewriters that worked by slapping bits of ink
onto paper with metal hammers, we were taught to create the £ symbol by
overstriking L with f...(those in countries where the typewriters had
dedicated keys for this symbol were doubtless given similar instructions
for building the $ glyph)....r
I would do L and - . L and f would make for a weirdly thick vertical. S
with slash makes a less presentable $ than c with slash does a cents-sign.
We had a key for $, and another for ¢ (the latter was on the shifted
numeral six)....r
My father had several typewriters and one had no $ or ¢, nor did it have
a 1 key, you were supposed to use the l. It did have a 'half-space" so
you could type a ¢ by typing a lowercase c, half-space back and type an
l. Same for the $. I can't remember where ! was.

I think, though I am trying to go back to being 5yo or so, that this
was a smaller than normal manual typewriter, and had quite a few missing
keys that were found on other typewriters.

It was the typewriter I used initially when I started typing (again,
about the age of 5) but I quickly moved to another one that had a shorter
travel on the keys, but was still a manual.

I never learned to type properly, as my father was a vicious two finger
type (he was very fast for using two finger). I did manage to learn
some bit of technique and settled on a sort of modified touch-typing
method that produces results, when I am copying text, of 50-60wmp,
which I consider plenty fast.

When i am writing, I type much slower, and most my writing is code which
is slower still, so increasing my speed has never been a realistic goal
as the biggest hindrance is deciding what I am going to type, and not
how fast my fingers can type it.

When i am tying something of some importance, I will select all the text
and have the computer read it aloud to me, which helps me catch most all
the errors the spill chunker doesn't find.

Oh, I just remembered, the typewriter above didn't have a ! either, you
had to type a . and then backspace (full backspace) and type a ' above
it.
--
Look, that's why there's rules, understand? So that you *think* before
you break 'em.
RH Draney
2018-05-09 23:17:33 UTC
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Post by Lewis
Oh, I just remembered, the typewriter above didn't have a ! either, you
had to type a . and then backspace (full backspace) and type a ' above
it.
And for the obelus ÷, hyphen plus colon...I think we were also supposed
to use hyphen plus slash for a plus sign, though that produced a truly
deranged representation of the character....r
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-05-08 17:25:50 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by occam
Post by RH Draney
I thought the abbreviation for Great Britain Pound was UKL....r
Both are used, but UKL less and less. (The origin of the 'L' is '£', the
pound sign. )
The other way round, Shirley!
The origin of £ is a medieval contraction of "libra," but the origin of L
in the initialism is indeed £.
And back when we had typewriters that worked by slapping bits of ink
onto paper with metal hammers, we were taught to create the £ symbol by
overstriking L with f...(those in countries where the typewriters had
dedicated keys for this symbol were doubtless given similar
instructions for building the $ glyph)....r
I had a £ on my typewriter, but I didn't have a script F for the
faraday, so when I needed one I turned the paper upside down and
carefully positioned it so that the £ would come where I wanted it.
--
athel
occam
2018-05-09 07:37:29 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by RH Draney
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by occam
Post by RH Draney
I thought the abbreviation for Great Britain Pound was UKL....r
Both are used, but UKL less and less. (The origin of the 'L' is '£', the
pound sign. )
The other way round, Shirley!
The origin of £ is a medieval contraction of "libra," but the origin of L
in the initialism is indeed £.
And back when we had typewriters that worked by slapping bits of ink
onto paper with metal hammers, we were taught to create the £ symbol
by overstriking L with f...(those in countries where the typewriters
had dedicated keys for this symbol were doubtless given similar
instructions for building the $ glyph)....r
I had a £ on my typewriter, but I didn't have a script F for the
faraday, so when I needed one I turned the paper upside down and
carefully positioned it so that the £ would come where I wanted it.
I was also brought up with a '£' as fixture of the typewriter key set.
It just occurred to me that the euro symbol (€) is probably one of the
first modern currencies to miss out on the typewriter era.
Peter Moylan
2018-05-09 02:35:15 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by occam
Post by RH Draney
Post by bert
Post by bohso
Is BTC (for Bitcoin) an acronym or just a 3-letter symbol
that sounds like Bitcoin? If not an acronym and just an
approximate sound, what do you call that term in English?
It's an abbreviation, like GBP (Great Britain Pound) or USD
(United States Dollar). It doesn't have to be
pronounceable.
I thought the abbreviation for Great Britain Pound was
UKL....r
Both are used, but UKL less and less. (The origin of the 'L' is
'£', the pound sign. )
The other way round, Shirley!
The origin of £ is a medieval contraction of "libra," but the origin
of L in the initialism is indeed £.
Not only mediaeval. "Lsd" is still the modern abbreviation for "pounds,
shillings, and pence".

But thanks for reminding me of a word I was trying to extract from my
brain. Recently I was thinking of the strange way a new word was
created, but I couldn't recall the specific word. That word is
"medireview". Apparently the word has appeared in genuine academic
papers, by authors who were under the impression that it is a real
English word.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-09 03:29:03 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by occam
Post by RH Draney
Post by bert
Post by bohso
Is BTC (for Bitcoin) an acronym or just a 3-letter symbol
that sounds like Bitcoin? If not an acronym and just an
approximate sound, what do you call that term in English?
It's an abbreviation, like GBP (Great Britain Pound) or USD
(United States Dollar). It doesn't have to be
pronounceable.
I thought the abbreviation for Great Britain Pound was
UKL....r
Both are used, but UKL less and less. (The origin of the 'L' is
'£', the pound sign. )
The other way round, Shirley!
The origin of £ is a medieval contraction of "libra," but the origin
of L in the initialism is indeed £.
Not only mediaeval. "Lsd" is still the modern abbreviation for "pounds,
shillings, and pence".
Well, if you can find someone who calls the biggest of those a "libra" --
you may be in Finland.

(Where they have a regular Latin radio broadcast.)
Post by Peter Moylan
But thanks for reminding me of a word I was trying to extract from my
brain. Recently I was thinking of the strange way a new word was
created, but I couldn't recall the specific word. That word is
"medireview". Apparently the word has appeared in genuine academic
papers, by authors who were under the impression that it is a real
English word.
Sounds medievil.

I'm still puzzling over your assertion that you've never been in a library.

(You said you've never been in the stacks. Anywhere that books are on (tall)
rows of shelves is the stacks.)
Peter Moylan
2018-05-09 08:07:40 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
I'm still puzzling over your assertion that you've never been in a library.
(You said you've never been in the stacks. Anywhere that books are on
(tall) rows of shelves is the stacks.)
Apparently I'm using the wrong term. Could someone remind me of the name
of that part of the library that holds the books that are only
accessible by the librarians?
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Mark Brader
2018-05-09 08:16:46 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Apparently I'm using the wrong term. Could someone remind me of the name
of that part of the library that holds the books that are only
accessible by the librarians?
"Stacks" or "closed stacks".

See e.g.:

http://www.torontopubliclibrary.ca/using-the-library/borrowing-materials/stack-requests.jsp

http://history.denverlibrary.org/news/catalog-speak-what-do-you-mean-"closed-stacks"
--
Mark Brader | "Follow my posts and choose the opposite
***@vex.net | of what I use. That generally works here."
Toronto | --Tony Cooper

My text in this article is in the public domain.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-09 12:43:21 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
I'm still puzzling over your assertion that you've never been in a library.
(You said you've never been in the stacks. Anywhere that books are on
(tall) rows of shelves is the stacks.)
Apparently I'm using the wrong term. Could someone remind me of the name
of that part of the library that holds the books that are only
accessible by the librarians?
"Closed stacks."

You can browse the "open stacks."
Jerry Friedman
2018-05-09 19:09:02 UTC
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On Tuesday, May 8, 2018 at 8:35:19 PM UTC-6, Peter Moylan wrote:
...
Post by Peter Moylan
But thanks for reminding me of a word I was trying to extract from my
brain. Recently I was thinking of the strange way a new word was
created, but I couldn't recall the specific word. That word is
"medireview". Apparently the word has appeared in genuine academic
papers, by authors who were under the impression that it is a real
English word.
What are they under the impression that it means?
--
Jerry Friedman
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-09 19:27:33 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter Moylan
But thanks for reminding me of a word I was trying to extract from my
brain. Recently I was thinking of the strange way a new word was
created, but I couldn't recall the specific word. That word is
"medireview". Apparently the word has appeared in genuine academic
papers, by authors who were under the impression that it is a real
English word.
What are they under the impression that it means?
They like looking at medires?
Mark Brader
2018-05-09 21:35:55 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter Moylan
But thanks for reminding me of a word I was trying to extract from my
brain. Recently I was thinking of the strange way a new word was
created, but I couldn't recall the specific word. That word is
"medireview". Apparently the word has appeared in genuine academic
papers...
This I believe.
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter Moylan
by authors who were under the impression that it is a real
English word.
This I doubt.
Post by Jerry Friedman
What are they under the impression that it means?
Well, here's the story:

http://revealingerrors.com/medireview
--
Mark Brader | "It's not in the slightest bit harder to write Fortran
Toronto | or Basic programs in C++ or Smalltalk than it is
***@vex.net | to write them in C or Pascal." -- Peter da Silva

My text in this article is in the public domain.
Peter Moylan
2018-05-10 02:43:24 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
Post by Peter Moylan
But thanks for reminding me of a word I was trying to extract
from my brain. Recently I was thinking of the strange way a new
word was created, but I couldn't recall the specific word. That
word is "medireview". Apparently the word has appeared in
genuine academic papers...
This I believe.
Post by Peter Moylan
by authors who were under the impression that it is a real
English word.
This I doubt.
The authors I'm thinking of were not native speakers of English. I have
seen examples where the authors clearly thought that "medireview" meant
what the rest of us would call "medi(a)eval". Unfortunately I can no
longer find the references.

The article you pointed to gives an example from an Indian newspaper.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Jerry Friedman
2018-05-10 18:37:35 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Peter Moylan
But thanks for reminding me of a word I was trying to extract
from my brain. Recently I was thinking of the strange way a new
word was created, but I couldn't recall the specific word. That
word is "medireview". Apparently the word has appeared in
genuine academic papers...
This I believe.
Post by Peter Moylan
by authors who were under the impression that it is a real
English word.
This I doubt.
The authors I'm thinking of were not native speakers of English. I have
seen examples where the authors clearly thought that "medireview" meant
what the rest of us would call "medi(a)eval". Unfortunately I can no
longer find the references.
...

Huh. It would be nice if they were joking.
--
Jerry Friedman
occam
2018-05-09 20:35:40 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by occam
Post by RH Draney
Post by bert
Post by bohso
Is BTC (for Bitcoin) an acronym or just a 3-letter symbol
that sounds like Bitcoin?  If not an acronym and just an
approximate sound, what do you call that term in English?
It's an abbreviation, like GBP (Great Britain Pound) or USD
(United States Dollar).  It doesn't have to be
pronounceable.
I thought the abbreviation for Great Britain Pound was
UKL....r
Both are used, but UKL less and less. (The origin of the 'L' is
'£', the pound sign. )
The other way round, Shirley!
The origin of £ is a medieval contraction of "libra," but the origin
of L in the initialism is indeed £.
Not only mediaeval. "Lsd" is still the modern abbreviation for "pounds,
shillings, and pence".
Your 'modern' is clearly less modern than mine. LSD always takes me to
Lysergic Acid Diethylamide (psychedelic drug). I will never know where
that would take me...
RH Draney
2018-05-09 23:18:54 UTC
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Post by occam
Post by Peter Moylan
Not only mediaeval. "Lsd" is still the modern abbreviation for "pounds,
shillings, and pence".
Your 'modern' is clearly less modern than mine. LSD always takes me to
Lysergic Acid Diethylamide (psychedelic drug). I will never know where
that would take me...
Around these parts, it's likely to lead to "did you mean LDS?"...r
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-05-10 06:32:36 UTC
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Post by occam
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by occam
Post by RH Draney
Post by bert
Post by bohso
Is BTC (for Bitcoin) an acronym or just a 3-letter symbol
that sounds like Bitcoin?  If not an acronym and just an
approximate sound, what do you call that term in English?
It's an abbreviation, like GBP (Great Britain Pound) or USD
(United States Dollar).  It doesn't have to be
pronounceable.
I thought the abbreviation for Great Britain Pound was
UKL....r
Both are used, but UKL less and less. (The origin of the 'L' is
'£', the pound sign. )
The other way round, Shirley!
The origin of £ is a medieval contraction of "libra," but the origin
of L in the initialism is indeed £.
Not only mediaeval. "Lsd" is still the modern abbreviation for "pounds,
shillings, and pence".
Your 'modern' is clearly less modern than mine. LSD always takes me to
Lysergic Acid Diethylamide (psychedelic drug). I will never know where
that would take me...
OK, but your parenthesis makes it clear that you weren't confident that
everyone would know what lysergic acid diethylamide is.

Its psychedelic properties were discovered after the Swiss chemist
Albert Hofmann ingested some by accident. He was quite surprised.
--
athel
CDB
2018-05-10 20:52:57 UTC
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Post by occam
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by occam
Post by RH Draney
Post by bert
Post by bohso
Is BTC (for Bitcoin) an acronym or just a 3-letter
symbol that sounds like Bitcoin? If not an acronym and
just an approximate sound, what do you call that term
in English?
It's an abbreviation, like GBP (Great Britain Pound) or
USD (United States Dollar). It doesn't have to be
pronounceable.
I thought the abbreviation for Great Britain Pound was
UKL....r
Both are used, but UKL less and less. (The origin of the 'L'
is '£', the pound sign. )
The other way round, Shirley!
The origin of £ is a medieval contraction of "libra," but the
origin of L in the initialism is indeed £.
Not only mediaeval. "Lsd" is still the modern abbreviation for
"pounds, shillings, and pence".
Your 'modern' is clearly less modern than mine. LSD always takes me
to Lysergic Acid Diethylamide (psychedelic drug). I will never know
where that would take me...
Hold out for psilocybin if you can. A dear friend laid two hits on me
back in the '70s, and I found it a very pleasant experience. Just a
dose or two: traditional users say that peyote, which they use too, can
be taken every week or so but that too much psilocybe will drive you insane.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-05-07 19:00:34 UTC
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Post by bohso
Is BTC (for Bitcoin) an acronym or just a 3-letter symbol that sounds like Bitcoin? If not an acronym and just an approximate sound, what do you call that term in English?
It is an abbreviation. All currencies have an official three letter
abbreviation.

As described here:
https://www.easymarkets.com/eu/learn-centre/discover-trading/currency-acronyms-and-abbreviations/

Currency Acronyms and Abbreviations

Countries around the world have their own currency and traders learn
to quickly recognize those currencies by their three-letter acronym
or abbreviation.

The two letters at the start refer to the name of the country and
the third is the currency. E.g. AUD is the Australian Dollar. This
is based on the ISO international standard – 4217. The table below
is to assist you when you trade to quickly recognise the currencies.

https://www.xe.com/iso4217.php

Currency codes are composed of a country's two-character Internet
country code plus a third character denoting the currency unit. For
example, the Canadian Dollar code (CAD) is made up of Canada's
Internet code ("CA") plus a currency designator ("D").

"BTC" for "Bitcoin" is a three letter abbreviation but it doesn't fit
that pattern. BT is the country code for Bhutan, but I don't think
anyone is likely to interpret BTC as Bhutan Coin!

The actual currency for that country is:
BTN Bhutan Ngultrum
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Garrett Wollman
2018-05-07 19:24:06 UTC
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[quoting https://www.xe.com/iso4217.php:]
Currency codes are composed of a country's two-character Internet
country code plus a third character denoting the currency unit. For
example, the Canadian Dollar code (CAD) is made up of Canada's
Internet code ("CA") plus a currency designator ("D").
Of course, it's not an "Internet code" -- there's not such thing --
but the ISO 3166-1 alpha-2 country code, or in some cases a
two-character which is reserved (but not officially assigned) by ISO
3166-1's maintainers for entities that don't qualify to be listed as
"countries", such as "EU" (for the European Union) or "DG" (for Diego
Garcia).

-GAWollman
--
Garrett A. Wollman | "Act to avoid constraining the future; if you can,
***@bimajority.org| act to remove constraint from the future. This is
Opinions not shared by| a thing you can do, are able to do, to do together."
my employers. | - Graydon Saunders, _A Succession of Bad Days_ (2015)
j***@mdfs.net
2018-05-08 00:59:29 UTC
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Post by Garrett Wollman
Of course, it's not an "Internet code" -- there's not such thing --
Yes, if it was "internet code" (or more properly, country code TLD)
then it would be UKP not GBP.

jgh
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-08 02:34:35 UTC
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Post by j***@mdfs.net
Post by Garrett Wollman
Of course, it's not an "Internet code" -- there's not such thing --
Yes, if it was "internet code" (or more properly, country code TLD)
then it would be UKP not GBP.
Don't bring Farage into it.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-05-08 09:21:50 UTC
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Post by j***@mdfs.net
Post by Garrett Wollman
Of course, it's not an "Internet code" -- there's not such thing --
Yes, if it was "internet code" (or more properly, country code TLD)
then it would be UKP not GBP.
jgh
The TLD .gb is allocated to the UK but not currently used
(see below at **).

There is a very close connection between official country codes used in
the three-letter currency codes and the country codes used in TLDs.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_4217

ISO 4217 is a standard first published by International Organization
for Standardization in 1978, which delineates currency designators,
country codes (alpha and numeric),
....
The first two letters of the code are the two letters of the
ISO 3166-1 alpha-2 country codes (which are also used as the basis
for national top-level domains on the Internet) and the third is
usually the initial of the currency itself.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_3166-1_alpha-2

ISO 3166-1 alpha-2 codes are two-letter country codes defined in
ISO 3166-1, part of the ISO 3166 standard published by the
International Organization for Standardization (ISO), to represent
countries, dependent territories, and special areas of geographical
interest. They are the most widely used of the country codes
published by ISO (the others being alpha-3 and numeric), and are
used most prominently for the Internet's country code top-level
domains (with a few exceptions).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Country_code_top-level_domain

A country code top-level domain (ccTLD) is an Internet top-level
domain generally used or reserved for a country, sovereign state, or
dependent territory identified with a country code.

All ASCII ccTLD identifiers are two letters long, and all two-letter
top-level domains are ccTLDs. In 2010, the Internet Assigned Numbers
Authority (IANA) began implementing internationalized country code
top-level domains, consisting of language-native characters when
displayed in an end-user application. Creation and delegation of
ccTLDs is described in RFC 1591, corresponding to ISO 3166-1 alpha-2
country codes.
....
** uk (United Kingdom): The ISO 3166-1 code for the United Kingdom is
GB. However, the JANET network had already selected uk as a
top-level identifier for its pre-existing Name Registration Scheme,
and this was incorporated into the DNS root. gb was assigned with
the intention of a transition, but this never occurred and the use
of uk is now entrenched.

The currency code BTC is not unique in not being
<two-letter country code><initial of currency name>.
EUR for the Euro is not EU for the European Union followed by the
initial of the currency name. To fit that pattern it would be EUE.
EUR is simply an abbreviation of Euro.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Garrett Wollman
2018-05-08 14:58:11 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
The currency code BTC is not unique in not being
<two-letter country code><initial of currency name>.
In the last three decades, maybe less, this idea of having
three-letter codes for *everything* has escaped into popular usage.
Formerly confined to people dealing with computer systems like travel
agents and securities brokers, now we see them everywhere.

I suspect the travel industry is to "blame". Flight booking made the
transition from "something you have use a travel agent to do" to
"something you frequently do for yourself online" in the early-to-mid
1990s, at a time when IATA airport codes were the only thing going.
People were already somewhat familiar with the IATA codes if they
traveled at all, from their use on baggage tags, but it was the 1990s
when ordinary people started keying them in themselves, because they
didn't want to spend an extra 5% commission to have an agent book
their flights. This incentivized cities and airports to invest in
branding and marketing initiatives around their IATA codes.
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
EUR for the Euro is not EU for the European Union followed by the
initial of the currency name. To fit that pattern it would be EUE.
That's not really the pattern of ISO 4217. However, the ISO 4217
maintenance agency did request the ISO 3166 maintenance agency reserve
the code "EU". The letter added by ISO 4217 is arbitrary, even though
it often does coincide with the first letter of some Latin-alphabet
representation of some name of the currency. You can see this more
clearly in the cases where a country has revalued its currency: the
"new" and "old" units will have different symbols even if the name is
the same. Also consider the countries whose national language does
not use the Latin alphabet -- see, for example,
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yuan_(currency)>.

(That's actually a great example for another reason: the ISO 4217
symbol for the currency of the PRC is "CNY", but "yuan" is just a
unit, and the actual currency is "renminbi", which is frequently
rendered as the Latin three-letterism "RMB". In Taiwan, on the other
hand, the currency is the New Taiwan dollar, usually symbolized "NT$",
but the ISO 4217 symbol is "TWD". Thus pattern is repeated with most
of the other "dollar" currencies, where a dollar sign is used in the
press and in edited text generally, with some sort of national
signifier, and the ISO 4217 symbol is relegated to the finance
industry -- "A[us]$", "C[an]$", "NZ$", "US$", etc., or sometimes with
the dollar sign written first.)

-GAWollman
--
Garrett A. Wollman | "Act to avoid constraining the future; if you can,
***@bimajority.org| act to remove constraint from the future. This is
Opinions not shared by| a thing you can do, are able to do, to do together."
my employers. | - Graydon Saunders, _A Succession of Bad Days_ (2015)
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-08 16:07:50 UTC
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Post by Garrett Wollman
People were already somewhat familiar with the IATA codes if they
traveled at all, from their use on baggage tags, but it was the 1990s
when ordinary people started keying them in themselves, because they
didn't want to spend an extra 5% commission to have an agent book
their flights.
? When I was doing it, the agent was not paid by the customer, but by the
airline.

It was the cheapness of the airline, ending the payment to travel agents,
that caused the agents to have to charge the customers, leading to the
demise of the travel agent industry.
Garrett Wollman
2018-05-08 18:28:23 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Garrett Wollman
People were already somewhat familiar with the IATA codes if they
traveled at all, from their use on baggage tags, but it was the 1990s
when ordinary people started keying them in themselves, because they
didn't want to spend an extra 5% commission to have an agent book
their flights.
? When I was doing it, the agent was not paid by the customer, but by the
airline.
And where do you think that money came from? The airlines weren't
paying commissions to travel agents out of their own capital, I assure
you.

-GAWollman
--
Garrett A. Wollman | "Act to avoid constraining the future; if you can,
***@bimajority.org| act to remove constraint from the future. This is
Opinions not shared by| a thing you can do, are able to do, to do together."
my employers. | - Graydon Saunders, _A Succession of Bad Days_ (2015)
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-08 20:49:03 UTC
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Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Garrett Wollman
People were already somewhat familiar with the IATA codes if they
traveled at all, from their use on baggage tags, but it was the 1990s
when ordinary people started keying them in themselves, because they
didn't want to spend an extra 5% commission to have an agent book
their flights.
? When I was doing it, the agent was not paid by the customer, but by the
airline.
And where do you think that money came from? The airlines weren't
paying commissions to travel agents out of their own capital, I assure
you.
Airfares were strictly controlled. They couldn't compete on price, until
that arch-capitalist Jimmy Carter put Fred Kahn in charge of the Civil
Aeronautics Board in 1977 and he championed deregulation. He had been
Professor of Economics and Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at
Cornell, but more importantly he was the comedian of the Savoyards, and
when his appointment was announced, *Time* ran a picture of him lying dead
on the stage as Jack Point in full jester's costume.
Jerry Friedman
2018-05-08 18:03:54 UTC
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Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
The currency code BTC is not unique in not being
<two-letter country code><initial of currency name>.
In the last three decades, maybe less, this idea of having
three-letter codes for *everything* has escaped into popular usage.
Formerly confined to people dealing with computer systems like travel
agents and securities brokers, now we see them everywhere.
I suspect the travel industry is to "blame". Flight booking made the
transition from "something you have use a travel agent to do" to
"something you frequently do for yourself online" in the early-to-mid
1990s, at a time when IATA airport codes were the only thing going.
People were already somewhat familiar with the IATA codes if they
traveled at all, from their use on baggage tags, but it was the 1990s
when ordinary people started keying them in themselves, because they
didn't want to spend an extra 5% commission to have an agent book
their flights.
I must have been unusual.
Post by Garrett Wollman
This incentivized cities and airports to invest in
branding and marketing initiatives around their IATA codes.
...

Though that was just part of what looks like a steady linear trend
starting in the '70s, for two very well-known airport codes. (I don't
know what happened with ORD.)

https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=LAX%2CORD%2CLGA&year_start=1860&year_end=2008&corpus=17&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t1%3B%2CLAX%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2CORD%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2CLGA%3B%2Cc0

https://bit.ly/2I2Wccg

I can't resist quoting Ursula Le Guin, from /Always Coming Home/, to
show how widespread she thought "LAX" was in 1985.

"They [the people of her post-apocalyptic tribe] lacked drive, that
great urge to get done which powers us, sending us forward, ever
forward ever faster, reducing San Francisco of the slow settlers to
Frisco and Chicago of the even slower natives to Chi and the town of
the mission of our lady of the angels becomes Los Angeles, but that
takes too long so it becomes L.A., but jets go faster than we do so we
use their language and call it LAX, because what we want is to move
on quick, to go fast, get through, be done, done with everything. To
get it over with, that’s what we want."

(I don't know what happened to "Porciuncula".)

Along with the airport codes, government agencies and TV networks and
non-baseball sports leagues were early adopters.
--
Jerry Friedman
David Kleinecke
2018-05-08 18:54:07 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
The currency code BTC is not unique in not being
<two-letter country code><initial of currency name>.
In the last three decades, maybe less, this idea of having
three-letter codes for *everything* has escaped into popular usage.
Formerly confined to people dealing with computer systems like travel
agents and securities brokers, now we see them everywhere.
I suspect the travel industry is to "blame". Flight booking made the
transition from "something you have use a travel agent to do" to
"something you frequently do for yourself online" in the early-to-mid
1990s, at a time when IATA airport codes were the only thing going.
People were already somewhat familiar with the IATA codes if they
traveled at all, from their use on baggage tags, but it was the 1990s
when ordinary people started keying them in themselves, because they
didn't want to spend an extra 5% commission to have an agent book
their flights.
I must have been unusual.
Post by Garrett Wollman
This incentivized cities and airports to invest in
branding and marketing initiatives around their IATA codes.
...
Though that was just part of what looks like a steady linear trend
starting in the '70s, for two very well-known airport codes. (I don't
know what happened with ORD.)
https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=LAX%2CORD%2CLGA&year_start=1860&year_end=2008&corpus=17&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t1%3B%2CLAX%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2CORD%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2CLGA%3B%2Cc0
https://bit.ly/2I2Wccg
I can't resist quoting Ursula Le Guin, from /Always Coming Home/, to
show how widespread she thought "LAX" was in 1985.
"They [the people of her post-apocalyptic tribe] lacked drive, that
great urge to get done which powers us, sending us forward, ever
forward ever faster, reducing San Francisco of the slow settlers to
Frisco and Chicago of the even slower natives to Chi and the town of
the mission of our lady of the angels becomes Los Angeles, but that
takes too long so it becomes L.A., but jets go faster than we do so we
use their language and call it LAX, because what we want is to move
on quick, to go fast, get through, be done, done with everything. To
get it over with, that’s what we want."
(I don't know what happened to "Porciuncula".)
Along with the airport codes, government agencies and TV networks and
non-baseball sports leagues were early adopters.
I worked for a company in 1970's that used a three letter
code for all their employees. They used your actual initials
if they could but otherwise they assigned one. Not a very
large company and the scheme worked well. Doesn't scale.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-05-09 11:34:33 UTC
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Post by David Kleinecke
[ … ]
I worked for a company in 1970's that used a three letter
code for all their employees. They used your actual initials
if they could but otherwise they assigned one. Not a very
large company and the scheme worked well. Doesn't scale.
All the usual amino acids have three-letter symbols, but many people
prefer a one-letter code that is far more opaque. Anyone who cares
knows what Asp is, but what on earth is D?
--
athel
Mark Brader
2018-05-08 19:17:25 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Garrett Wollman
In the last three decades, maybe less, this idea of having
three-letter codes for *everything* has escaped into popular usage.
Formerly confined to people dealing with computer systems like travel
agents and securities brokers, now we see them everywhere.
I suspect the travel industry is to "blame"...
Along with the airport codes, government agencies and TV networks and
non-baseball sports leagues were early adopters.
But those are generally 3-letter *sets of initials*, not codes. You
won't find anything like YYZ among them.

On the other hand, you *will* find arbitary codes used in another
thing Garrett knows well -- the naming of radio and TV stations in
North America. In recent decades many of them have chosen other forms
of publicly used name, but into about the 1970s it was very standard
to identify them by their call letters, or by their call letters in
conjunction with a frequency or channel number.

Admittedly, call letters are more often 4 letters, or 4 plus a suffix
(CFTO-TV), than 3 letters.
--
Mark Brader "MSB is an accepted explanation for men's
Toronto misbehaviors. ... Just blame it on MSB
***@vex.net and everyone nods their heads." -- "TJ"

My text in this article is in the public domain.
Garrett Wollman
2018-05-08 19:40:49 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
On the other hand, you *will* find arbitary codes used in another
thing Garrett knows well -- the naming of radio and TV stations in
North America. In recent decades many of them have chosen other forms
of publicly used name, but into about the 1970s it was very standard
to identify them by their call letters, or by their call letters in
conjunction with a frequency or channel number.
Admittedly, call letters are more often 4 letters, or 4 plus a suffix
(CFTO-TV), than 3 letters.
Canada may have been a bit ahead of the trend here, although not by
very much. Mexico is weirder, because their stations rarely brand
with a call sign, but they have to identify *twice* every hour (the US
went to hourly in the mid-1970s, and Canada I think only requires full
identification once a day these days).

This year marks the 70th anniversary of television broadcasting in
most of the US (outside New York, Chicago, Washington, San Francisco,
and Los Angeles). I'm doubtful that local broadcast television as we
understand it will survive much more than another decade. (Last year
was the 65th anniversary of television broadcasting in Canada.) Radio
probably has a less-dim future, because there's less competition for
out-of-home entertainment.

-GAWollman
--
Garrett A. Wollman | "Act to avoid constraining the future; if you can,
***@bimajority.org| act to remove constraint from the future. This is
Opinions not shared by| a thing you can do, are able to do, to do together."
my employers. | - Graydon Saunders, _A Succession of Bad Days_ (2015)
Jerry Friedman
2018-05-08 19:46:30 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Garrett Wollman
In the last three decades, maybe less, this idea of having
three-letter codes for *everything* has escaped into popular usage.
Formerly confined to people dealing with computer systems like travel
agents and securities brokers, now we see them everywhere.
I suspect the travel industry is to "blame"...
Along with the airport codes, government agencies and TV networks and
non-baseball sports leagues were early adopters.
But those are generally 3-letter *sets of initials*, not codes. You
won't find anything like YYZ among them.
But most of the "three-letter codes for *everything*" that Garrett
was talking about are sets of initials.
Post by Mark Brader
On the other hand, you *will* find arbitary codes used in another
thing Garrett knows well -- the naming of radio and TV stations in
North America. In recent decades many of them have chosen other forms
of publicly used name, but into about the 1970s it was very standard
to identify them by their call letters, or by their call letters in
conjunction with a frequency or channel number.
Admittedly, call letters are more often 4 letters, or 4 plus a suffix
(CFTO-TV), than 3 letters.
Some of the four-letter ones are often shortened to three letters,
though, since the first letter was obvious. Well, I can think of
"MMS" in Cleveland, so there must be others.
--
Jerry Friedman
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-08 20:55:35 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
On the other hand, you *will* find arbitary codes used in another
thing Garrett knows well -- the naming of radio and TV stations in
North America. In recent decades many of them have chosen other forms
of publicly used name, but into about the 1970s it was very standard
to identify them by their call letters, or by their call letters in
conjunction with a frequency or channel number.
Admittedly, call letters are more often 4 letters, or 4 plus a suffix
(CFTO-TV), than 3 letters.
Chicago had WGN, owned by the Tribune Corp., World's Greatest Newspaper
WFLD, owned by Field Enterprises
WLS, owned by Sears, World's Largest Store

New York has the flagship stations WABC, WCBS, WNBC, so didn't go in for
other semantics. Likewise KABC, KCBS, KNBC in L.A. Curiously, WNPR is in Hartford, Connecticut.

Pittsburgh's KDKA may have stood for something -- named before the W/K
split at the Mississippi had been devised.

WGY in Schenectady, NY, was owned by General Electric. Why not WGE?
Peter Moylan
2018-05-09 02:55:24 UTC
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On the other hand, you*will* find arbitary codes used in another
thing Garrett knows well -- the naming of radio and TV stations in
North America. In recent decades many of them have chosen other
forms of publicly used name, but into about the 1970s it was very
standard to identify them by their call letters, or by their call
letters in conjunction with a frequency or channel number.
As an interesting example of how well re-branding works, I've noticed
that the general public here refers to radio and TV stations by their
old names. For example, the Newcastle radio station that calls itself
NX-FM seems to be called 2NX by almost everyone. (Under the old rules,
an Australian commercial radio call sign always started with a digit
that identified the state.)

As a better example, the Newcastle TV station that was originally called
NBN 3 was eventually caught up in an amalgamation headed by the company
that ran Channel 9 in the capital cities. Following the move to digital
television, it can be found on Channel 81. The identifier used by the
station itself is "Nine Newcastle". The heading on the program listings
in newspapers is "NBN". But, to most Newcastle residents, it's called
"Channel 3". That's despite the fact that pressing 3 on the remote
control now brings up an entirely different station.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Peter Moylan
2018-05-09 03:01:56 UTC
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But, to most Newcastle residents, it's called "Channel 3". That's
despite the fact that pressing 3 on the remote control now brings up
an entirely different station.
ObThreadDrift (but it's possible that I've told this story before):

The company that used to broadcast on Channel 7, before all the numbers
were changed, is called "Prime".

When my youngest two children were in primary school, I used to try to
supplement their education at meal times. Once, for a reason I've now
forgotten, the number 7 came up in conversation. I said "Seven is a
prime number. Did you know that?" My daughter answered "Yes".

I thought that that was a bit advanced for her age, so I asked her how
she knew. Her answer "When I press 7 on the remote control, it says
'Prime' on the screen."
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Mark Brader
2018-05-09 03:16:38 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
The company that used to broadcast on Channel 7, before all the numbers
were changed, is called "Prime".
The channel that used to be "Prime" here was a cable channel, not
broadcast. On Rogers Toronto in analog days it was channel 54.
I think it later got renamed to "DTour".
Post by Peter Moylan
When my youngest two children were in primary school, I used to try to
supplement their education at meal times. Once, for a reason I've now
forgotten, the number 7 came up in conversation. I said "Seven is a
prime number. Did you know that?" My daughter answered "Yes".
I thought that that was a bit advanced for her age, so I asked her how
she knew. Her answer "When I press 7 on the remote control, it says
'Prime' on the screen."
Definitely no comment.
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "Rarely is the question asked:
***@vex.net | 'Is our children learning?'" --George W. Bush
RH Draney
2018-05-09 06:36:13 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
When my youngest two children were in primary school, I used to try to
supplement their education at meal times. Once, for a reason I've now
forgotten, the number 7 came up in conversation. I said "Seven is a
prime number. Did you know that?" My daughter answered "Yes".
I thought that that was a bit advanced for her age, so I asked her how
she knew. Her answer "When I press 7 on the remote control, it says
'Prime' on the screen."
No matter how you get it, the right answer is always acceptable....

Simplifying fractions made easy:
Loading Image...

....r
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-08 20:59:44 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Though that was just part of what looks like a steady linear trend
starting in the '70s, for two very well-known airport codes. (I don't
know what happened with ORD.)
Not sure what the question is; O'Hare was Orchard Field until it was
renamed for a WWII flying ace (there's a very big memorial plaque in
one of the terminals, along with either his plane or a replica of his
plane). In those days, I guess, they didn't change the sigla with the
name, as when IDW became JFK.
Jerry Friedman
2018-05-09 13:06:55 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
Though that was just part of what looks like a steady linear trend
starting in the '70s, for two very well-known airport codes. (I don't
know what happened with ORD.)
Not sure what the question is;
Here's that link again.

https://bit.ly/2I2Wccg
Post by Peter T. Daniels
O'Hare was Orchard Field
I did not know that.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
until it was
renamed for a WWII flying ace (there's a very big memorial plaque in
one of the terminals, along with either his plane or a replica of his
plane). In those days, I guess, they didn't change the sigla with the
name, as when IDW became JFK.
I also didn't know "sigla" was an English word. I only knew Spanish
"siglas".
--
Jerry Friedman
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-09 13:14:08 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
Though that was just part of what looks like a steady linear trend
starting in the '70s, for two very well-known airport codes. (I don't
know what happened with ORD.)
Not sure what the question is;
Here's that link again.
https://bit.ly/2I2Wccg
Post by Peter T. Daniels
O'Hare was Orchard Field
I did not know that.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
until it was
renamed for a WWII flying ace (there's a very big memorial plaque in
one of the terminals, along with either his plane or a replica of his
plane). In those days, I guess, they didn't change the sigla with the
name, as when IDW became JFK.
I also didn't know "sigla" was an English word. I only knew Spanish
"siglas".
The squiggler doesn't think it is, either, but philologists couldn't get
along without it.
b***@shaw.ca
2018-05-09 18:42:32 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
Though that was just part of what looks like a steady linear trend
starting in the '70s, for two very well-known airport codes. (I don't
know what happened with ORD.)
Not sure what the question is;
Here's that link again.
https://bit.ly/2I2Wccg
Post by Peter T. Daniels
O'Hare was Orchard Field
I did not know that.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
until it was
renamed for a WWII flying ace (there's a very big memorial plaque in
one of the terminals, along with either his plane or a replica of his
plane). In those days, I guess, they didn't change the sigla with the
name, as when IDW became JFK.
I also didn't know "sigla" was an English word. I only knew Spanish
"siglas".
My Scrabble dictionary knows it. It says the singular is "siglum"
and "sigla" is the plural. So no siglas, please.

bill
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-05-09 18:47:51 UTC
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Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
Though that was just part of what looks like a steady linear trend
starting in the '70s, for two very well-known airport codes. (I don't
know what happened with ORD.)
Not sure what the question is;
Here's that link again.
https://bit.ly/2I2Wccg
Post by Peter T. Daniels
O'Hare was Orchard Field
I did not know that.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
until it was
renamed for a WWII flying ace (there's a very big memorial plaque in
one of the terminals, along with either his plane or a replica of his
plane). In those days, I guess, they didn't change the sigla with the
name, as when IDW became JFK.
I also didn't know "sigla" was an English word. I only knew Spanish
"siglas".
My Scrabble dictionary knows it. It says the singular is "siglum"
and "sigla" is the plural. So no siglas, please.
The sentence in which "sigla" appeared carried no implication that it
was singular.
--
athel
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-09 19:24:03 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
Though that was just part of what looks like a steady linear trend
starting in the '70s, for two very well-known airport codes. (I don't
know what happened with ORD.)
Not sure what the question is;
Here's that link again.
https://bit.ly/2I2Wccg
Post by Peter T. Daniels
O'Hare was Orchard Field
I did not know that.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
until it was
renamed for a WWII flying ace (there's a very big memorial plaque in
one of the terminals, along with either his plane or a replica of his
plane). In those days, I guess, they didn't change the sigla with the
name, as when IDW became JFK.
I also didn't know "sigla" was an English word. I only knew Spanish
"siglas".
My Scrabble dictionary knows it. It says the singular is "siglum"
and "sigla" is the plural. So no siglas, please.
The sentence in which "sigla" appeared carried no implication that it
was singular.
Maybe "they didn't change the sigla with the names" would have been more
consistent, but wouldn't that imply that one airport could have more than
one name to change?

When the Florida space facility was renamed the Kennedy Space Center, they
also renamed Cape Canaveral as Cape Kennedy, but it's gone back to Cape
Canaveral now.
Jerry Friedman
2018-05-09 19:33:28 UTC
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...
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter T. Daniels
O'Hare was Orchard Field
I did not know that.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
until it was
renamed for a WWII flying ace (there's a very big memorial plaque in
one of the terminals, along with either his plane or a replica of his
plane). In those days, I guess, they didn't change the sigla with the
name, as when IDW became JFK.
I also didn't know "sigla" was an English word. I only knew Spanish
"siglas".
My Scrabble dictionary knows it. It says the singular is "siglum"
and "sigla" is the plural. So no siglas, please.
Bueno, pero si siglas, por favor.
--
Jerry Friedman
CDB
2018-05-09 19:41:37 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
Though that was just part of what looks like a steady linear
trend starting in the '70s, for two very well-known airport
codes. (I don't know what happened with ORD.)
Not sure what the question is;
Here's that link again.
https://bit.ly/2I2Wccg
Post by Peter T. Daniels
O'Hare was Orchard Field
I did not know that.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
until it was renamed for a WWII flying ace (there's a very big
memorial plaque in one of the terminals, along with either his
plane or a replica of his plane). In those days, I guess, they
didn't change the sigla with the name, as when IDW became JFK.
I also didn't know "sigla" was an English word. I only knew Spanish
"siglas".
New to me too. For others who may not have met it: it's "siglum", one
of those Latin neuters that end up feminine in daughter languages like
Spanish. Peter used the Latin plural to mean "letters" (since that's
what they are in this case).

Siglum: "A letter (especially an initial) or other symbol used to denote
a word in a book, especially to refer to a particular text."

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/us/siglum
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-09 21:05:40 UTC
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Post by CDB
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
Though that was just part of what looks like a steady linear
trend starting in the '70s, for two very well-known airport
codes. (I don't know what happened with ORD.)
Not sure what the question is;
Here's that link again.
https://bit.ly/2I2Wccg
Post by Peter T. Daniels
O'Hare was Orchard Field
I did not know that.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
until it was renamed for a WWII flying ace (there's a very big
memorial plaque in one of the terminals, along with either his
plane or a replica of his plane). In those days, I guess, they
didn't change the sigla with the name, as when IDW became JFK.
I also didn't know "sigla" was an English word. I only knew Spanish
"siglas".
New to me too. For others who may not have met it: it's "siglum", one
of those Latin neuters that end up feminine in daughter languages like
Spanish. Peter used the Latin plural to mean "letters" (since that's
what they are in this case).
No, each airport has a three-letter siglum.
Post by CDB
Siglum: "A letter (especially an initial) or other symbol used to denote
a word in a book, especially to refer to a particular text."
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/us/siglum
CDB
2018-05-10 20:53:22 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by CDB
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
Though that was just part of what looks like a steady linear
trend starting in the '70s, for two very well-known airport
codes. (I don't know what happened with ORD.)
Not sure what the question is;
Here's that link again.
https://bit.ly/2I2Wccg
Post by Peter T. Daniels
O'Hare was Orchard Field
I did not know that.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
until it was renamed for a WWII flying ace (there's a very big
memorial plaque in one of the terminals, along with either his
plane or a replica of his plane). In those days, I guess, they
didn't change the sigla with the name, as when IDW became
JFK.
I also didn't know "sigla" was an English word. I only knew
Spanish "siglas".
New to me too. For others who may not have met it: it's "siglum",
one of those Latin neuters that end up feminine in daughter
languages like Spanish. Peter used the Latin plural to mean
"letters" (since that's what they are in this case).
No, each airport has a three-letter siglum.
The OOD defines it (below) as a singular letter or other symbol.

And in conclusion I wish to observe that you can't really tell in
standard English whether I meant plural "letters" or plural "groups of
letters". "It isn't IDW any more: they've dropped those sigla, those
... letterses."
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by CDB
Siglum: "A letter (especially an initial) or other symbol used to
denote a word in a book, especially to refer to a particular
text."
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/us/siglum
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-05-10 22:03:29 UTC
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On Thursday, 10 May 2018 21:53:38 UTC+1, CDB wrote:
: they've dropped those ...
Post by CDB
... letterses."
Ah. That'll be the e coli scare!
Mark Brader
2018-05-08 19:10:50 UTC
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Post by Garrett Wollman
In the last three decades, maybe less, this idea of having
three-letter codes for *everything* has escaped into popular usage.
Formerly confined to people dealing with computer systems like travel
agents and securities brokers, now we see them everywhere.
Agred.
Post by Garrett Wollman
I suspect the travel industry is to "blame". Flight booking made the
transition from "something you have use a travel agent to do" to
"something you frequently do for yourself online" in the early-to-mid
1990s...
Huh? What happened to phoning the airline?
--
Mark Brader "I can say nothing at this point."
Toronto "Well, you were wrong."
***@vex.net -- Monty Python's Flying Circus
Garrett Wollman
2018-05-08 19:30:12 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
[I wrote:]
I suspect the travel industry is to "blame". Flight booking made the
transition from "something you have use a travel agent to do" to
"something you frequently do for yourself online" in the early-to-mid
1990s...
Huh? What happened to phoning the airline?
Those who lived in a country that could support more than two airlines
probably wanted a travel agent to search fares and schedules in
various reservation systems. Very frequent travelers on an
established schedule (or those in smaller cities with no choice of
airlines) might have called the airline reservation desk -- but even
then, probably giving city or airport names rather than IATA codes.
You might have requested a reservation on the flight from Boston to
Shannon[1] or La Guardia to Washington National, and left the
three-letter codes to the people writing features for the in-flight
magazine.

Even at this rather large institution, we still use travel agents,
though most of us probably do the booking unassisted. I *think* if I
wanted to, I could ask the agency to do the leg work, but given my
particular preferences it's faster for me to pick the flights myself.
We still get charged the agency fee; I suppose they could still assist
if I had an emergency change of plans.

-GAWollman

[1] I wasn't totally sure that there still was such a flight, with
most service now going to Dublin, but I checked and there still is a
very expensive direct flight.
--
Garrett A. Wollman | "Act to avoid constraining the future; if you can,
***@bimajority.org| act to remove constraint from the future. This is
Opinions not shared by| a thing you can do, are able to do, to do together."
my employers. | - Graydon Saunders, _A Succession of Bad Days_ (2015)
Jerry Friedman
2018-05-08 19:40:36 UTC
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Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by Mark Brader
[I wrote:]
I suspect the travel industry is to "blame". Flight booking made the
transition from "something you have use a travel agent to do" to
"something you frequently do for yourself online" in the early-to-mid
1990s...
Huh? What happened to phoning the airline?
Those who lived in a country that could support more than two airlines
probably wanted a travel agent to search fares and schedules in
various reservation systems.
I always called the airlines, and there were more than two going to
Cleveland from New York or Philadelphia or Chicago.
Post by Garrett Wollman
Very frequent travelers on an
established schedule (or those in smaller cities with no choice of
airlines) might have called the airline reservation desk -- but even
then, probably giving city or airport names rather than IATA codes.
You might have requested a reservation on the flight from Boston to
Shannon[1] or La Guardia to Washington National, and left the
three-letter codes to the people writing features for the in-flight
magazine.
That's what I've always done. These days I leave the three-letter codes
to the Web page, which might count as a travel agent.
--
Jerry Friedman
Tak To
2018-05-10 20:14:47 UTC
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Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
The currency code BTC is not unique in not being
<two-letter country code><initial of currency name>.
In the last three decades, maybe less, this idea of having
three-letter codes for *everything* has escaped into popular usage.
Formerly confined to people dealing with computer systems like travel
agents and securities brokers, now we see them everywhere.
I suspect the travel industry is to "blame". Flight booking made the
transition from "something you have use a travel agent to do" to
"something you frequently do for yourself online" in the early-to-mid
1990s, at a time when IATA airport codes were the only thing going.
People were already somewhat familiar with the IATA codes if they
traveled at all, from their use on baggage tags, but it was the 1990s
when ordinary people started keying them in themselves, because they
didn't want to spend an extra 5% commission to have an agent book
their flights. This incentivized cities and airports to invest in
branding and marketing initiatives around their IATA codes.
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
EUR for the Euro is not EU for the European Union followed by the
initial of the currency name. To fit that pattern it would be EUE.
That's not really the pattern of ISO 4217. However, the ISO 4217
maintenance agency did request the ISO 3166 maintenance agency reserve
the code "EU". The letter added by ISO 4217 is arbitrary, even though
it often does coincide with the first letter of some Latin-alphabet
representation of some name of the currency. You can see this more
clearly in the cases where a country has revalued its currency: the
"new" and "old" units will have different symbols even if the name is
the same. Also consider the countries whose national language does
not use the Latin alphabet -- see, for example,
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yuan_(currency)>.
(That's actually a great example for another reason: the ISO 4217
symbol for the currency of the PRC is "CNY", but "yuan" is just a
unit, and the actual currency is "renminbi", which is frequently
rendered as the Latin three-letterism "RMB".
Yes, the ISO 4217 does not distinguish currency symbols used
in specifying the currency itself vs those used in specifying
an amount in that currency -- cf "Celsius" vs "degree Celsius".
Post by Garrett Wollman
In Taiwan, on the other
hand, the currency is the New Taiwan dollar, usually symbolized "NT$",
but the ISO 4217 symbol is "TWD". Thus pattern is repeated with most
of the other "dollar" currencies, where a dollar sign is used in the
press and in edited text generally, with some sort of national
signifier, and the ISO 4217 symbol is relegated to the finance
industry -- "A[us]$", "C[an]$", "NZ$", "US$", etc., or sometimes with
the dollar sign written first.)
Many currency-units has their own Unicode symbols but few of these
are used outside of their respective geographical areas. One of
the most common is the "yen sign" ¥(U+00A5) which is used for both
the Japanese yen and the Chinese yuan.
--
Tak
----------------------------------------------------------------+-----
Tak To ***@alum.mit.eduxx
--------------------------------------------------------------------^^
[taode takto ~{LU5B~}] NB: trim the xx to get my real email addr
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-07 19:17:42 UTC
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Post by bohso
Is BTC (for Bitcoin) an acronym or just a 3-letter symbol that sounds like Bitcoin? If not an acronym and just an approximate sound, what do you call that term in English?
If you pronounce it bee-tee-see, then it's an initialism.
b***@gmail.com
2018-05-09 18:44:19 UTC
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Post by bohso
Is BTC (for Bitcoin) an acronym or just a 3-letter symbol that sounds like Bitcoin? If not an acronym and just an approximate sound, what do you call that term in English?
Does anybody want to venture a guess what the real "work" is that "miners" perform and what it's for, and which continues to generate not only its own alpha and beta, but also it's mysterious persistence and value as thrice a product, service, and currency?
Whiskers
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
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Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by bohso
Is BTC (for Bitcoin) an acronym or just a 3-letter symbol that sounds like Bitcoin? If not an acronym and just an approximate sound, what do you call that term in English?
Does anybody want to venture a guess what the real "work" is that "miners" perform and what it's for, and which continues to generate not only its own alpha and beta, but also it's mysterious persistence and value as thrice a product, service, and currency?
Aren't they finding new big prime numbers, which could be of use
to people trying to make or break secret cyphers? They're also
burning electricity of course, which has to mean a profit for
someone.
--
^^^^^^^^^^
Whiskers
~~~~~~~~~~


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
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Garrett Wollman
2018-05-10 00:42:48 UTC
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In article <***@mid.individual.net>,
Whiskers <***@operamail.com> wrote:

[bitcoin miners]
Post by Whiskers
Aren't they finding new big prime numbers, which could be of use
to people trying to make or break secret cyphers?
Nope. They are literally generating random numbers until they find
one that results in a string of zero bits when a cryptographic hash
function is applied. Absolutely, utterly useless make-work, performed
solely to prove that you can do it. And even as useless make-work
goes, most of it is wasted, because all of the miners are doing this
energy-wasting search all of the time, but only the "work" of the
first one to find the right random number counts for anything -- all
the rest are discarded. It is monumentally stupid.

-GAWollman
--
Garrett A. Wollman | "Act to avoid constraining the future; if you can,
***@bimajority.org| act to remove constraint from the future. This is
Opinions not shared by| a thing you can do, are able to do, to do together."
my employers. | - Graydon Saunders, _A Succession of Bad Days_ (2015)
Whiskers
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
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Post by Garrett Wollman
[bitcoin miners]
Post by Whiskers
Aren't they finding new big prime numbers, which could be of use
to people trying to make or break secret cyphers?
Nope. They are literally generating random numbers until they find
one that results in a string of zero bits when a cryptographic hash
function is applied. Absolutely, utterly useless make-work, performed
solely to prove that you can do it. And even as useless make-work
goes, most of it is wasted, because all of the miners are doing this
energy-wasting search all of the time, but only the "work" of the
first one to find the right random number counts for anything -- all
the rest are discarded. It is monumentally stupid.
-GAWollman
The whole concept of 'money' is pretty daft nowadays, if you look
too closely.
--
^^^^^^^^^^
Whiskers
~~~~~~~~~~


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
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b***@gmail.com
2018-05-12 04:57:23 UTC
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Post by Whiskers
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by bohso
Is BTC (for Bitcoin) an acronym or just a 3-letter symbol that sounds like Bitcoin? If not an acronym and just an approximate sound, what do you call that term in English?
Does anybody want to venture a guess what the real "work" is that "miners" perform and what it's for, and which continues to generate not only its own alpha and beta, but also it's mysterious persistence and value as thrice a product, service, and currency?
Aren't they finding new big prime numbers, which could be of use
to people trying to make or break secret cyphers? They're also
burning electricity of course, which has to mean a profit for
someone.
--
^^^^^^^^^^
Whiskers
~~~~~~~~~~
----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://usenet.sinaapp.com/
EXACTLY! —— That's what I think too. So if every successfully mined original "block" represents a solved cipher, who exactly owns the solutions, and can a miner see the solutions or not, and are these ciphered solutions then effectively keys to passwords and usernames? —— or is it more complicated than that?
b***@gmail.com
2018-05-12 19:33:30 UTC
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Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Whiskers
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by bohso
Is BTC (for Bitcoin) an acronym or just a 3-letter symbol that sounds like Bitcoin? If not an acronym and just an approximate sound, what do you call that term in English?
Does anybody want to venture a guess what the real "work" is that "miners" perform and what it's for, and which continues to generate not only its own alpha and beta, but also it's mysterious persistence and value as thrice a product, service, and currency?
Aren't they finding new big prime numbers, which could be of use
to people trying to make or break secret cyphers? They're also
burning electricity of course, which has to mean a profit for
someone.
--
^^^^^^^^^^
Whiskers
~~~~~~~~~~
----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://usenet.sinaapp.com/
EXACTLY! —— That's what I think too. So if every successfully mined original "block" represents a solved cipher, who exactly owns the solutions, and can a miner see the solutions or not, and are these ciphered solutions then effectively keys to passwords and usernames? —— or is it more complicated than that?
Btw have you seen this ad for investing in professionally-managed crpto currency markets?



But why wouldn't they address this application end of the minging process?

And wouldn't successful outcomes to mining be considered potential or real threats to corporate and nationally security?

Anybody? Or perhaps anybody who knows or cares, please direct me to another user group perhaps?

Thank you.

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