Discussion:
Interviewee's [consent form] for an article ? ---- ( No Off-Topic chatter ! )
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Hen Hanna
2018-07-04 19:12:05 UTC
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( No Off-Topic chatter ! )


Let's say a reputable writer decided to do an article on a forgotten person for NYTimes Magazine.

The "forgotten person" likes the idea, but he wants to make sure that the final article is going to be favorable to him.

Would he (the subject of the article) typically do this by a promise from the writer?

Or (Since the article i'm reading appeared in the NYTimes Magazine)

I'm guessing that the writer had to get a signed consent form before the article got publshed.

Please comment. ( No Off-Topic chatter ! ) HH
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-04 20:12:59 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
Let's say a reputable writer decided to do an article on a forgotten person for NYTimes Magazine.
The "forgotten person" likes the idea, but he wants to make sure that the final article is going to be favorable to him.
Would he (the subject of the article) typically do this by a promise from the writer?
That would be the surest way to get the article killed.
Post by Hen Hanna
Or (Since the article i'm reading appeared in the NYTimes Magazine)
I'm guessing that the writer had to get a signed consent form before the article got publshed.
Not if the subject is a "public person."

Articles are published all the time about people who would have preferred
that they hadn't been.
Hen Hanna
2018-07-06 20:38:26 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Hen Hanna
Let's say a reputable writer decided to do an article on a forgotten person for NYTimes Magazine.
The "forgotten person" likes the idea, but he wants to make sure that the final article is going to be favorable to him.
Would he (the subject of the article) typically do this by a promise from the writer?
That would be the surest way to get the article killed.
I've no idea what you mean.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Hen Hanna
Or (Since the article i'm reading appeared in the NYTimes Magazine)
I'm guessing that the writer had to get a signed consent form before the article got publshed.
Not if the subject is a "public person."
Articles are published all the time about people who would have preferred
that they hadn't been.
The NYTimes Magazine article i have in mind
(see ( full ) link below) was essentially a "puffer" piece.

(which you wouldn't be able to sense unless
you're an avid Joyce fan)

So i'm curious how it (the article) came to be so one-sided.


The Strange Case of the Missing Joyce Scholar - The New York Times

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/12/magazine/the-strange-case-of-the-missing-joyce-scholar.html


reading the article, I got the distinct impression that
the writer is a big fan (student) of the famous writer ... HH
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-06 20:45:45 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Hen Hanna
Let's say a reputable writer decided to do an article on a forgotten person for NYTimes Magazine.
The "forgotten person" likes the idea, but he wants to make sure that the final article is going to be favorable to him.
Would he (the subject of the article) typically do this by a promise from the writer?
That would be the surest way to get the article killed.
I've no idea what you mean.
Articles are not subject to approval by their subjects.
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Hen Hanna
Or (Since the article i'm reading appeared in the NYTimes Magazine)
I'm guessing that the writer had to get a signed consent form before the article got publshed.
Not if the subject is a "public person."
Articles are published all the time about people who would have preferred
that they hadn't been.
The NYTimes Magazine article i have in mind
(see ( full ) link below) was essentially a "puffer" piece.
(which you wouldn't be able to sense unless
you're an avid Joyce fan)
So i'm curious how it (the article) came to be so one-sided.
The Strange Case of the Missing Joyce Scholar - The New York Times
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/12/magazine/the-strange-case-of-the-missing-joyce-scholar.html
reading the article, I got the distinct impression that
the writer is a big fan (student) of the famous writer ... HH
Hen Hanna
2018-07-06 21:16:52 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Hen Hanna
Let's say a reputable writer decided to do an article on a forgotten person for NYTimes Magazine.
The "forgotten person" likes the idea, but he wants to make sure that the final article is going to be favorable to him.
Would he (the subject of the article) typically do this by a promise from the writer?
That would be the surest way to get the article killed.
I've no idea what you mean.
Articles are not subject to approval by their subjects.
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Hen Hanna
Or (Since the article i'm reading appeared in the NYTimes Magazine)
I'm guessing that the writer had to get a signed consent form before the article got publshed.
Not if the subject is a "public person."
Articles are published all the time about people who would have preferred
that they hadn't been.
The NYTimes Magazine article i have in mind
(see ( full ) link below) was essentially a "puffer" piece.
(which you wouldn't be able to sense unless
you're an avid Joyce fan)
So i'm curious how it (the article) came to be so one-sided.
The Strange Case of the Missing Joyce Scholar - The New York Times
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/12/magazine/the-strange-case-of-the-missing-joyce-scholar.html
reading the article, I got the distinct impression that
the writer is a big fan (student) of the famous writer ... HH
Esp. when the entire article is on one person, based on an interview of that person, I can imagine NYTimes requiring a signed consent form before the article gets published.


a sample [consent form] I found on the 'Net includes:
_______________________

Final Consent Form
[Name of the project]
Dear Participant:

This form gives us final authorization to use material from your interview in [name of the project]. A draft of these materials should have been presented to you for your review, correction, or modification. You may grant use rights for this draft “as is,” or with the modifications you specify, if any. See “Conditions” at the bottom of the form

I, _________________________________________________, hereby grant the right to use information from recordings and or notes taken in interviews of me, to [your name or the institution], and as presented to me as a draft copy. I understand that the interview records will be kept by the interviewer and the project, and that the information contained in the interviews may be used in materials to be made available to the general public.


_______ By initialing here, I also agree to be identified by name in the project and related materials.


_______ By initialing here, I also agree to be identified by photograph in the project and related materials.


____________________________________________ Date:__________________________
Signature of Interviewee

____________________________________________ Date:__________________________
Signature of Interviewer


..........
..........
..........
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-06 21:49:07 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Hen Hanna
Let's say a reputable writer decided to do an article on a forgotten person for NYTimes Magazine.
The "forgotten person" likes the idea, but he wants to make sure that the final article is going to be favorable to him.
Would he (the subject of the article) typically do this by a promise from the writer?
That would be the surest way to get the article killed.
I've no idea what you mean.
Articles are not subject to approval by their subjects.
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Hen Hanna
Or (Since the article i'm reading appeared in the NYTimes Magazine)
I'm guessing that the writer had to get a signed consent form before the article got publshed.
Not if the subject is a "public person."
Articles are published all the time about people who would have preferred
that they hadn't been.
The NYTimes Magazine article i have in mind
(see ( full ) link below) was essentially a "puffer" piece.
(which you wouldn't be able to sense unless
you're an avid Joyce fan)
So i'm curious how it (the article) came to be so one-sided.
The Strange Case of the Missing Joyce Scholar - The New York Times
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/12/magazine/the-strange-case-of-the-missing-joyce-scholar.html
reading the article, I got the distinct impression that
the writer is a big fan (student) of the famous writer ... HH
Esp. when the entire article is on one person, based on an interview of that person, I can imagine NYTimes requiring a signed consent form before the article gets published.
_______________________
Final Consent Form
[Name of the project]
This form gives us final authorization to use material from your interview in [name of the project]. A draft of these materials should have been presented to you for your review, correction, or modification. You may grant use rights for this draft “as is,” or with the modifications you specify, if any. See “Conditions” at the bottom of the form
I, _________________________________________________, hereby grant the right to use information from recordings and or notes taken in interviews of me, to [your name or the institution], and as presented to me as a draft copy. I understand that the interview records will be kept by the interviewer and the project, and that the information contained in the interviews may be used in materials to be made available to the general public.
_______ By initialing here, I also agree to be identified by name in the project and related materials.
_______ By initialing here, I also agree to be identified by photograph in the project and related materials.
____________________________________________ Date:__________________________
Signature of Interviewee
____________________________________________ Date:__________________________
Signature of Interviewer
..........
..........
..........
What in the above suggests that it pertains to an article?

Have you not heard of the First Amendment?
Don P
2018-07-06 23:16:11 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
_______________________
Final Consent Form
[Name of the project]
This form gives us final authorization to use material from your interview in [name of the project]. A draft of these materials should have been presented to you for your review . .
Under Anglosaxon law, the author of any text owns its copyright in
perpetuity (or for life + 50 years). This consent form (snipped) allows
another person to use the textual material for his own purposes, i.e. is
a legal document guaranteeing that the author will not claim his
copyright has been infringed. (Without this document, the author might
later sue for breach of copyright, especially if the text had not been
published.) This consent form does not authorize the interviewer to
interview his subject.

(I worked for some years collecting "oral histories" from retired
scientists, some of whom felt restricted by wartime security
prohibitions. After verifying (and occasionally correcting) handwritten
summaries of the recordings, all interviewees signed a form permitting
the (unpublished) interviews to be used by historians for scholarly
purposes without restriction (except for a single interviewee who
demanded prior approval by security authorities of the proposed use.)
This also immunised the interviewer and his employer from later charges
of malice, breach of confidence, etc.--unlikely in this domain, but
there were lawyers at head office . . . )
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-07-07 06:19:17 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Hen Hanna
Let's say a reputable writer decided to do an article on a forgotten
person for NYTimes Magazine.
The "forgotten person" likes the idea, but he wants to make sure that
the final article is going to be favorable to him.
Would he (the subject of the article) typically do this by a promise
from the writer?
That would be the surest way to get the article killed.
I've no idea what you mean.
Articles are not subject to approval by their subjects.
Nor are articles sent to Usenet groups subject to restrictions by the
person who starts the thread. "( No Off-Topic chatter ! )" is not
only weirdly spaced (no surprise there) but is also meaningless. If
people want to send off-topic chatter there is nothing to stop them.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Hen Hanna
Or (Since the article i'm reading appeared in the NYTimes Magazine)
I'm guessing that the writer had to get a signed consent form before
the article got publshed.
Not if the subject is a "public person."
Articles are published all the time about people who would have preferred
that they hadn't been.
--
athel
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-07 12:55:09 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Hen Hanna
Let's say a reputable writer decided to do an article on a forgotten
person for NYTimes Magazine.
The "forgotten person" likes the idea, but he wants to make sure that
the final article is going to be favorable to him.
Would he (the subject of the article) typically do this by a promise
from the writer?
That would be the surest way to get the article killed.
I've no idea what you mean.
Articles are not subject to approval by their subjects.
Nor are articles sent to Usenet groups subject to restrictions by the
person who starts the thread. "( No Off-Topic chatter ! )" is not
only weirdly spaced (no surprise there) but is also meaningless. If
people want to send off-topic chatter there is nothing to stop them.
Indeed, such an admonishment encourages them to do so.

Any feelings on "admonishment" vs. "admonition"?
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Hen Hanna
Or (Since the article i'm reading appeared in the NYTimes Magazine)
I'm guessing that the writer had to get a signed consent form before
the article got publshed.
Not if the subject is a "public person."
Articles are published all the time about people who would have preferred
that they hadn't been.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-07-07 13:33:53 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Hen Hanna
Let's say a reputable writer decided to do an article on a forgotten
person for NYTimes Magazine.
The "forgotten person" likes the idea, but he wants to make sure that
the final article is going to be favorable to him.
Would he (the subject of the article) typically do this by a promise
from the writer?
That would be the surest way to get the article killed.
I've no idea what you mean.
Articles are not subject to approval by their subjects.
Nor are articles sent to Usenet groups subject to restrictions by the
person who starts the thread. "( No Off-Topic chatter ! )" is not
only weirdly spaced (no surprise there) but is also meaningless. If
people want to send off-topic chatter there is nothing to stop them.
Indeed, such an admonishment encourages them to do so.
Indeed. Unfortunately (for Hen Hanna) I couldn't think of anything
off-topic to say in this thread. Otherwise the admonishment would have
been a stimulus.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Any feelings on "admonishment" vs. "admonition"?
I prefer "admonishment".
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Hen Hanna
Or (Since the article i'm reading appeared in the NYTimes Magazine)
I'm guessing that the writer had to get a signed consent form before
the article got publshed.
Not if the subject is a "public person."
Articles are published all the time about people who would have preferred
that they hadn't been.
--
athel
Jerry Friedman
2018-07-07 14:45:12 UTC
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...
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Nor are articles sent to Usenet groups subject to restrictions by the
person who starts the thread. "( No   Off-Topic chatter ! )" is not
only weirdly spaced (no surprise there) but is also meaningless. If
people want to send off-topic chatter there is nothing to stop them.
Indeed, such an admonishment encourages them to do so.
Indeed. Unfortunately (for Hen Hanna) I couldn't think of anything
off-topic to say in this thread. Otherwise the admonishment would have
been a stimulus.
Harvey started a Govende.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Any feelings on "admonishment" vs. "admonition"?
I prefer "admonishment".
I prefer "admonition", and I note your preference with astonition.
--
Jerry Friedman
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-07-07 14:48:59 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
...
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Nor are articles sent to Usenet groups subject to restrictions by the
person who starts the thread. "( No   Off-Topic chatter ! )" is not
only weirdly spaced (no surprise there) but is also meaningless. If
people want to send off-topic chatter there is nothing to stop them.
Indeed, such an admonishment encourages them to do so.
Indeed. Unfortunately (for Hen Hanna) I couldn't think of anything
off-topic to say in this thread. Otherwise the admonishment would have
been a stimulus.
Harvey started a Govende.
Yes. I saw it, but I couldn't think of a witty answer (I'm not too good
at govendes).
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Any feelings on "admonishment" vs. "admonition"?
I prefer "admonishment".
I prefer "admonition", and I note your preference with astonition.
Well, I don't actually use either word myself.
--
athel
Jerry Friedman
2018-07-06 22:05:27 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
( No Off-Topic chatter ! )
Let's say a reputable writer decided to do an article on a forgotten person for NYTimes Magazine.
The "forgotten person" likes the idea, but he wants to make sure that the final article is going to be favorable to him.
Would he (the subject of the article) typically do this by a promise from the writer?
Or (Since the article i'm reading appeared in the NYTimes Magazine)
I'm guessing that the writer had to get a signed consent form before the article got publshed.
In the magazine I used to write for, which was put out by Los Alamos
National Laboratory, people interviewed approved our edited versions of
the interviews. Readers understood that we were showing off the
research at the Lab, not doing investigative journalism. We didn't use
consent forms.

In real journalism, an interview with a public figure will be with the
understanding that everything is fair game unless it's clearly stated to
be off the record. In a profile of a forgotten person such as you're
talking about, the reporter probably intends from the start to make the
person look good. However, I believe it would be unethical to make a
promise, and I'd be astonished if there were a consent form. (Subject
to correction from those here who know about real journalism.)

Sad to say, there are rumors that some reporters will treat public
figures favorably in return for continued "access" to interview them or
get information from them. President Trump is so low that he openly
refuses to give interviews to news organizations whose coverage of him
he doesn't like.
Post by Hen Hanna
Please comment. ( No Off-Topic chatter ! ) HH
Better as "(No off-topic chatter!)"
--
Jerry Friedman
Hen Hanna
2018-07-06 22:18:35 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Hen Hanna
( No Off-Topic chatter ! )
Let's say a reputable writer decided to do an article on a forgotten person for NYTimes Magazine.
The "forgotten person" likes the idea, but he wants to make sure that the final article is going to be favorable to him.
Would he (the subject of the article) typically do this by a promise from the writer?
Or (Since the article i'm reading appeared in the NYTimes Magazine)
I'm guessing that the writer had to get a signed consent form before the article got publshed.
In the magazine I used to write for, which was put out by Los Alamos
National Laboratory, people interviewed approved our edited versions of
the interviews. Readers understood that we were showing off the
research at the Lab, not doing investigative journalism. We didn't use
consent forms.
In real journalism, an interview with a public figure will be with the
understanding that everything is fair game unless it's clearly stated to
be off the record. In a profile of a forgotten person such as you're
talking about, the reporter probably intends from the start to make the
person look good. However, I believe it would be unethical to make a
promise, and I'd be astonished if there were a consent form. (Subject
to correction from those here who know about real journalism.)
Sad to say, there are rumors that some reporters will treat public
figures favorably in return for continued "access" to interview them or
get information from them.
it's not sad at all... It's true everywhere.


PTD-ish [Have you not heard of the First Amendment?] -type rubbish
(exhortations) (essentially, Off-Topic exhortations) from PTD were sadly common in Sci.Lang, but are fortunately now rare.

I'd think that the best AI-systems today can come up with better responses than the PTD-ish exhortations.

HH
HVS
2018-07-06 23:12:23 UTC
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On Fri, 6 Jul 2018 16:05:27 -0600, Jerry Friedman
Post by Hen Hanna
( No Off-Topic chatter ! )
This is Usenet - where you don't get to set any rules - so fuck off.

What's a Hanna?
Snidely
2018-07-08 08:21:02 UTC
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Post by HVS
Post by Hen Hanna
( No Off-Topic chatter ! )
This is Usenet - where you don't get to set any rules - so fuck off.
What's a Hanna?
There was a carwash brand in Oregon ... what's a brush off?

/dps
--
Who, me? And what lacuna?
CDB
2018-07-08 11:20:02 UTC
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Post by Snidely
Post by HVS
Post by Hen Hanna
( No Off-Topic chatter ! )
This is Usenet - where you don't get to set any rules - so fuck off.
What's a Hanna?
There was a carwash brand in Oregon ... what's a brush off?
It comes before sponge and press. What's a gentleman?
Snidely
2018-07-09 10:23:47 UTC
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Post by CDB
Post by Snidely
Post by HVS
Post by Hen Hanna
( No Off-Topic chatter ! )
This is Usenet - where you don't get to set any rules - so fuck off.
What's a Hanna?
There was a carwash brand in Oregon ... what's a brush off?
It comes before sponge and press. What's a gentleman?
a man's citrus. What's a juicer?

/dps
--
Rule #0: Don't be on fire.
In case of fire, exit the building before tweeting about it.
(Sighting reported by Adam F)
Mark Brader
2018-07-09 19:25:54 UTC
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Post by Snidely
Post by CDB
Post by Snidely
Post by HVS
What's a Hanna?
There was a carwash brand in Oregon ... what's a brush off?
It comes before sponge and press. What's a gentleman?
a man's citrus. What's a juicer?
Ask a rabbi, sir. What's a madam?
--
Mark Brader, Toronto "Ken doesn't spell very well. Fortunately,
***@vex.net he has other virtues." -- Dennis Ritchie
CDB
2018-07-10 11:40:28 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
Post by Snidely
Post by CDB
Post by Snidely
Post by HVS
What's a Hanna?
There was a carwash brand in Oregon ... what's a brush off?
It comes before sponge and press. What's a gentleman?
a man's citrus. What's a juicer?
Ask a rabbi, sir. What's a madam?
A palindrome with no name. What's for desert?
Jerry Friedman
2018-07-10 12:45:41 UTC
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Post by Snidely
Post by HVS
What's a Hanna?
There was a carwash brand in Oregon ... what's a brush off?
It comes before sponge and press.  What's a gentleman?
a man's citrus.   What's a juicer?
Ask a rabbi, sir.  What's a madam?
A palindrome with no name.  What's for desert?
Pecan Sandies. What's a Sawney?
--
Jerry Friedman
RH Draney
2018-07-10 13:50:52 UTC
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Post by Snidely
Post by HVS
What's a Hanna?
There was a carwash brand in Oregon ... what's a brush off?
It comes before sponge and press.  What's a gentleman?
a man's citrus.   What's a juicer?
Ask a rabbi, sir.  What's a madam?
A palindrome with no name.  What's for desert?
Pecan Sandies.  What's a Sawney?
Something you weigh down upon...what's Yazoo?...r
Mack A. Damia
2018-07-10 14:35:56 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
Post by RH Draney
Post by Snidely
Post by HVS
What's a Hanna?
There was a carwash brand in Oregon ... what's a brush off?
It comes before sponge and press.  What's a gentleman?
a man's citrus.   What's a juicer?
Ask a rabbi, sir.  What's a madam?
A palindrome with no name.  What's for desert?
Pecan Sandies.  What's a Sawney?
Something you weigh down upon...what's Yazoo?...r
The orifice between ya cheeks.

What's Mail Pouch?
David Kleinecke
2018-07-10 16:56:11 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by RH Draney
Post by Snidely
Post by HVS
What's a Hanna?
There was a carwash brand in Oregon ... what's a brush off?
It comes before sponge and press.  What's a gentleman?
a man's citrus.   What's a juicer?
Ask a rabbi, sir.  What's a madam?
A palindrome with no name.  What's for desert?
Pecan Sandies.  What's a Sawney?
Something you weigh down upon...what's Yazoo?...r
The orifice between ya cheeks.
What's Mail Pouch?
Something a male kangaroo don't got.

Whats's a wombat?
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-10 21:50:45 UTC
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Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by RH Draney
Post by Snidely
Post by HVS
What's a Hanna?
There was a carwash brand in Oregon ... what's a brush off?
It comes before sponge and press.  What's a gentleman?
a man's citrus.   What's a juicer?
Ask a rabbi, sir.  What's a madam?
A palindrome with no name.  What's for desert?
Pecan Sandies.  What's a Sawney?
Something you weigh down upon...what's Yazoo?...r
The orifice between ya cheeks.
What's Mail Pouch?
Something a male kangaroo don't got.
Whats's a wombat?
Oh, a ways below the stomach. What's a kookaburra?
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-07-10 23:09:37 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by RH Draney
Post by Snidely
Post by HVS
What's a Hanna?
There was a carwash brand in Oregon ... what's a brush off?
It comes before sponge and press.  What's a gentleman?
a man's citrus.   What's a juicer?
Ask a rabbi, sir.  What's a madam?
A palindrome with no name.  What's for desert?
Pecan Sandies.  What's a Sawney?
Something you weigh down upon...what's Yazoo?...r
The orifice between ya cheeks.
What's Mail Pouch?
Something a male kangaroo don't got.
Whats's a wombat?
Oh, a ways below the stomach. What's a kookaburra?
Where ovens nest! What's a tandoor?
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-11 03:17:59 UTC
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Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by RH Draney
Post by Snidely
Post by HVS
What's a Hanna?
There was a carwash brand in Oregon ... what's a brush off?
It comes before sponge and press.  What's a gentleman?
a man's citrus.   What's a juicer?
Ask a rabbi, sir.  What's a madam?
A palindrome with no name.  What's for desert?
Pecan Sandies.  What's a Sawney?
Something you weigh down upon...what's Yazoo?...r
The orifice between ya cheeks.
What's Mail Pouch?
Something a male kangaroo don't got.
Whats's a wombat?
Oh, a ways below the stomach. What's a kookaburra?
Where ovens nest! What's a tandoor?
Most of them, if they're still made of wood. What's a Franklin stove?
Mark Brader
2018-07-11 18:33:34 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by RH Draney
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by CDB
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Snidely
Post by CDB
Post by Snidely
Post by HVS
What's a Hanna?
There was a carwash brand in Oregon ... what's a brush off?
It comes before sponge and press. What's a gentleman?
a man's citrus. What's a juicer?
Ask a rabbi, sir. What's a madam?
A palindrome with no name. What's for desert?
Pecan Sandies. What's a Sawney?
Something you weigh down upon...what's Yazoo?...r
The orifice between ya cheeks.
What's Mail Pouch?
Something a male kangaroo don't got.
Whats's a wombat?
Oh, a ways below the stomach. What's a kookaburra?
Where ovens nest! What's a tandoor?
Most of them, if they're still made of wood. What's a Franklin stove?
One that costs $100 US. What's four in binary?
--
Mark Brader | "...having compressed some 300 million years into
Toronto | two paragraphs, I have left out some details."
***@vex.net | -- Roger Gary

My text in this article is in the public domain.
Mack A. Damia
2018-07-11 20:15:18 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by RH Draney
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by CDB
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Snidely
Post by CDB
Post by Snidely
Post by HVS
What's a Hanna?
There was a carwash brand in Oregon ... what's a brush off?
It comes before sponge and press. What's a gentleman?
a man's citrus. What's a juicer?
Ask a rabbi, sir. What's a madam?
A palindrome with no name. What's for desert?
Pecan Sandies. What's a Sawney?
Something you weigh down upon...what's Yazoo?...r
The orifice between ya cheeks.
What's Mail Pouch?
Something a male kangaroo don't got.
Whats's a wombat?
Oh, a ways below the stomach. What's a kookaburra?
Where ovens nest! What's a tandoor?
Most of them, if they're still made of wood. What's a Franklin stove?
One that costs $100 US. What's four in binary?
X. What marks the spot?

Madhu
2018-07-08 08:23:17 UTC
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Post by HVS
What's a Hanna?
One of two wives of a certain man of Ramathaimzophim of mount Ephraim.
What is an ephod
Tony Cooper
2018-07-06 23:30:25 UTC
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On Fri, 6 Jul 2018 16:05:27 -0600, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Hen Hanna
( No Off-Topic chatter ! )
Let's say a reputable writer decided to do an article on a forgotten person for NYTimes Magazine.
The "forgotten person" likes the idea, but he wants to make sure that the final article is going to be favorable to him.
Would he (the subject of the article) typically do this by a promise from the writer?
Or (Since the article i'm reading appeared in the NYTimes Magazine)
I'm guessing that the writer had to get a signed consent form before the article got publshed.
In the magazine I used to write for, which was put out by Los Alamos
National Laboratory, people interviewed approved our edited versions of
the interviews. Readers understood that we were showing off the
research at the Lab, not doing investigative journalism. We didn't use
consent forms.
In real journalism, an interview with a public figure will be with the
understanding that everything is fair game unless it's clearly stated to
be off the record. In a profile of a forgotten person such as you're
talking about, the reporter probably intends from the start to make the
person look good. However, I believe it would be unethical to make a
promise, and I'd be astonished if there were a consent form. (Subject
to correction from those here who know about real journalism.)
Sad to say, there are rumors that some reporters will treat public
figures favorably in return for continued "access" to interview them or
get information from them. President Trump is so low that he openly
refuses to give interviews to news organizations whose coverage of him
he doesn't like.
Melania Trump is doing something similar. She has images up on Getty
Images that can only be used for "positive stories" about her. She's
raked in at least $100,000 for use of those images.

https://petapixel.com/2018/07/05/media-paid-melania-trump-up-to-1m-for-positive-stories-only-photos/

On the original subject, some interviewees demand article approval
right. This allows them to read and amend the article before
publication. That, in essence, is a form of consent.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Hen Hanna
2018-07-06 23:39:24 UTC
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Post by HVS
On Fri, 6 Jul 2018 16:05:27 -0600, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Hen Hanna
( No Off-Topic chatter ! )
Let's say a reputable writer decided to do an article on a forgotten person for NYTimes Magazine.
The "forgotten person" likes the idea, but he wants to make sure that the final article is going to be favorable to him.
Would he (the subject of the article) typically do this by a promise from the writer?
Or (Since the article i'm reading appeared in the NYTimes Magazine)
I'm guessing that the writer had to get a signed consent form before the article got publshed.
In the magazine I used to write for, which was put out by Los Alamos
National Laboratory, people interviewed approved our edited versions of
the interviews. Readers understood that we were showing off the
research at the Lab, not doing investigative journalism. We didn't use
consent forms.
In real journalism, an interview with a public figure will be with the
understanding that everything is fair game unless it's clearly stated to
be off the record. In a profile of a forgotten person such as you're
talking about, the reporter probably intends from the start to make the
person look good. However, I believe it would be unethical to make a
promise, and I'd be astonished if there were a consent form. (Subject
to correction from those here who know about real journalism.)
Sad to say, there are rumors that some reporters will treat public
figures favorably in return for continued "access" to interview them or
get information from them. President Trump is so low that he openly
refuses to give interviews to news organizations whose coverage of him
he doesn't like.
Melania Trump is doing something similar. She has images up on Getty
Images that can only be used for "positive stories" about her. She's
raked in at least $100,000 for use of those images.
https://petapixel.com/2018/07/05/media-paid-melania-trump-up-to-1m-for-positive-stories-only-photos/
On the original subject, some interviewees demand article approval
right. This allows them to read and amend the article before
publication. That, in essence, is a form of consent.
interesting tidbit about for-positive-stories-only-photos

( if you want to talk about something other than that in the Original Post, pls start a new thread. )


The last time I was interviewed for a magazine article, I got to approve the text of the relevant portion. (the reporter was very polite -- in case they want to quote/use me again. ) HH
Tony Cooper
2018-07-07 01:36:50 UTC
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On Fri, 6 Jul 2018 16:39:24 -0700 (PDT), Hen Hanna
Post by Hen Hanna
( if you want to talk about something other than that in the Original Post, pls start a new thread. )
Admonishments like that, in this group, lead to:

As even the non-Americans in this group know, Wednesday was July
4th...our Independence Day celebrating our break-away from the
YouLots.

It is the bane of all dogs and most cats. Our dog, Beaux, has been in
a perpetual state of terror and agitation. It seems that every
neighbor has been shooting off fireworks* and firecrackers. The
popping, banging, and booming started Sunday night, and continued
full-force Monday through Thursday.

Beaux spends most of his time in the foot well under my desk. Beaux
is a 90-pound Louisiana Catahoula Leopard dog. Our previous dog, a
Cocker Spaniel, chose to spend the Fourth under our bed. Beaux is too
large to fit under the bed.

Sometimes Beaux goes into the downstairs bathroom because it's also
cave-like in having no windows. It's a small, "half-bath", and a dog
that large presents a problem in the space provided. He is not a
moveable dog, either. I have to either piss over him or around him.

*It is illegal, in Florida, to sell or purchase fireworks unless the
fireworks are sold and purchased for the specific use of a) using them
to illuminate a railroad or b) for agricultural use to frighten birds
away from crops. That's actually the way the law reads. No shit.

Around this time of year there are tents set up by fireworks vendors
all over the place. They rent space in a store parking lot and set up
shop. The tents are usually just under the size (footprint) of a
tennis court and crammed with every conceivable type of exploding and
aerial display product. Some of bigger ones send up showers of light
and noise that can be seen from miles away.

How is it possible for a vendor to openly sell an illegal product, you
ask. John Miketa, such a vendor, was arrested in 1999 and challenged
the law. He had customers sign a form that said they were buying the
fireworks for legal purposes (ie: illuminating a railroad or scaring
birds away from their crops). John's defense was that it is not the
vendor's responsibility to ascertain the veracity of the buyer.

State vs Miketa made it up to the 3rd District Court of Appeal where
John won. All of those tent vendors now use similar forms, and it's
as easy to buy fireworks in Florida as it is to buy a quart of milk.

John's defense doesn't exonerate the illegal *user* of fireworks, but
had I been arrested Wednesday night when I set off some fireworks for
my three year-old grandson's enjoyment, my defense would have been "I
am keeping birds and runaway locomotives away from my orange tree.".

I wasn't going to bring any of this up in this group, Hen, but your
admonishment prompted me to bring up the most off-topic subject I
could think of.

P.S. It also irritates me that you write "pls" instead of "please".
If you are going to post in this group, spell out the goddamn word. It
is less effort to add the "e", the "a", and the second "e" than it is
to construct a post with that silly-ass spacing style you use.

Want to try telling me what I can and can't post, again?
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Mark Brader
2018-07-07 05:18:36 UTC
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Beaux is a 90-pound Louisiana Catahoula Leopard dog... He is not a
moveable dog, either. I have to either piss over him or around him.
I know this isn't alt.usage.french, but why is he named in the plural?
Was he too big for the singular to fit?
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "Courtesy, hell. We're programmers not humans."
***@vex.net | -- S. M. Ryan
Tony Cooper
2018-07-07 13:11:15 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
Beaux is a 90-pound Louisiana Catahoula Leopard dog... He is not a
moveable dog, either. I have to either piss over him or around him.
I know this isn't alt.usage.french, but why is he named in the plural?
Was he too big for the singular to fit?
A Cajun-suggesting name was desired, and neither the namers nor the
dog are French speakers/barkers. Both are blissfully unaware of any
confusion caused by the "x".
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Katy Jennison
2018-07-07 13:48:20 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Mark Brader
Beaux is a 90-pound Louisiana Catahoula Leopard dog... He is not a
moveable dog, either. I have to either piss over him or around him.
I know this isn't alt.usage.french, but why is he named in the plural?
Was he too big for the singular to fit?
A Cajun-suggesting name was desired, and neither the namers nor the
dog are French speakers/barkers. Both are blissfully unaware of any
confusion caused by the "x".
My instant query was how it's pronounced. Do you pronounce it 'Bo', or
'Bokes', or something else?
--
Katy Jennison
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-07 13:57:58 UTC
Reply
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Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Mark Brader
Beaux is a 90-pound Louisiana Catahoula Leopard dog... He is not a
moveable dog, either. I have to either piss over him or around him.
I know this isn't alt.usage.french, but why is he named in the plural?
Was he too big for the singular to fit?
A Cajun-suggesting name was desired, and neither the namers nor the
dog are French speakers/barkers. Both are blissfully unaware of any
confusion caused by the "x".
My instant query was how it's pronounced. Do you pronounce it 'Bo', or
'Bokes', or something else?
Or as in Beaux Arts?

Cross-threadly, the Metropolitan Museum's façade is a restrained example
of Beaux Arts architectural style.

obAUE: The squiggler demands the cedilla.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-07-07 14:03:35 UTC
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Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Mark Brader
Beaux is a 90-pound Louisiana Catahoula Leopard dog... He is not a
moveable dog, either. I have to either piss over him or around him.
I know this isn't alt.usage.french, but why is he named in the plural?
Was he too big for the singular to fit?
A Cajun-suggesting name was desired, and neither the namers nor the
dog are French speakers/barkers. Both are blissfully unaware of any
confusion caused by the "x".
My instant query was how it's pronounced. Do you pronounce it 'Bo', or
'Bokes', or something else?
I would tend towards "Bose", as in Bose-Einstein statistics.

<off-topic-chatter> Bill Boaks was famous in the 1950s and 1960s for
contesting unwinnable seats in Parliament as an independent. My parents
knew him in the 1930s. They thought he was pretty weird then (he was in
trouble in the Navy when he ordered removal of a bulkhead that he
thought was impeding movement through a ship), but his long-suffering
wife was quite normal. My mother thought that it was her money that
paid for his hopeless political campaigns. </off-topic-chatter>
--
athel
Jerry Friedman
2018-07-07 14:49:00 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Mark Brader
Beaux is a 90-pound Louisiana Catahoula Leopard dog...  He is not a
moveable dog, either.  I have to either piss over him or around him.
I know this isn't alt.usage.french, but why is he named in the plural?
Was he too big for the singular to fit?
A Cajun-suggesting name was desired, and neither the namers nor the
dog are French speakers/barkers.  Both are blissfully unaware of any
confusion caused by the "x".
My instant query was how it's pronounced.  Do you pronounce it 'Bo',
or 'Bokes', or something else?
I would tend towards "Bose", as in Bose-Einstein statistics.
...

Or as in

Though as a general rule we know
Two strings go to every bow,
Make up your minds that grief 'twill bring
If you've two beaux to every string.
--
Jerry Friedman
Tony Cooper
2018-07-07 14:07:45 UTC
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On Sat, 7 Jul 2018 14:48:20 +0100, Katy Jennison
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Mark Brader
Beaux is a 90-pound Louisiana Catahoula Leopard dog... He is not a
moveable dog, either. I have to either piss over him or around him.
I know this isn't alt.usage.french, but why is he named in the plural?
Was he too big for the singular to fit?
A Cajun-suggesting name was desired, and neither the namers nor the
dog are French speakers/barkers. Both are blissfully unaware of any
confusion caused by the "x".
My instant query was how it's pronounced. Do you pronounce it 'Bo', or
'Bokes', or something else?
Bo.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Lewis
2018-07-07 08:36:04 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
*It is illegal, in Florida, to sell or purchase fireworks unless the
fireworks are sold and purchased for the specific use of a) using them
to illuminate a railroad or b) for agricultural use to frighten birds
away from crops. That's actually the way the law reads. No shit.
That is amusingly "Florida"
Post by Tony Cooper
Want to try telling me what I can and can't post, again?
Tee hee hee.
--
I don't have a solution but I admire the problem.
Peter Moylan
2018-07-07 10:27:24 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
As even the non-Americans in this group know, Wednesday was July
4th...our Independence Day celebrating our break-away from the
YouLots.
It is the bane of all dogs and most cats. Our dog, Beaux, has been
in a perpetual state of terror and agitation. It seems that every
neighbor has been shooting off fireworks* and firecrackers. The
popping, banging, and booming started Sunday night, and continued
full-force Monday through Thursday.
I grew up in a small town. On cracker night a number of dogs would leave
the town, and some of them never came back.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Jerry Friedman
2018-07-07 13:23:07 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Tony Cooper
As even the non-Americans in this group know, Wednesday was July
4th...our Independence Day celebrating our break-away from the
YouLots.
It is the bane of all dogs and most cats.  Our dog, Beaux, has been
in a perpetual state of terror and agitation.  It seems that every
neighbor has been shooting off fireworks* and firecrackers.  The
popping, banging, and booming started Sunday night, and continued
full-force Monday through Thursday.
I grew up in a small town. On cracker night a number of dogs would leave
the town, and some of them never came back.
Every night is cracker night in Florida.
--
Jerry Friedman
Janet
2018-07-07 13:59:56 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
As even the non-Americans in this group know, Wednesday was July
4th...our Independence Day celebrating our break-away from the
YouLots.
It is the bane of all dogs and most cats. Our dog, Beaux, has been
in a perpetual state of terror and agitation.
Our dog is similarly terrified of firework noises every Guy Fawkes
night and New Years Eve but I've found that a pheremone collar reduces
the problem from blind terror to "mild anxiety".

https://www.adaptil.com/uk/Products/ADAPTIL-Calm-On-the-go-Collar

The active agent seems to evaporate quite quickly after the collar is
activated, so IME they can't be saved and re-used on later occasions. I
just buy a new collar for each firework event and put it on him the day
before.

Janet.
Mack A. Damia
2018-07-07 15:31:35 UTC
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On Sat, 7 Jul 2018 20:27:24 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Tony Cooper
As even the non-Americans in this group know, Wednesday was July
4th...our Independence Day celebrating our break-away from the
YouLots.
It is the bane of all dogs and most cats. Our dog, Beaux, has been
in a perpetual state of terror and agitation. It seems that every
neighbor has been shooting off fireworks* and firecrackers. The
popping, banging, and booming started Sunday night, and continued
full-force Monday through Thursday.
I grew up in a small town. On cracker night a number of dogs would leave
the town, and some of them never came back.
Amazing what guys will pay to hear a <*bang*>.

I recall paying 50 cents for a cherry bomb when I was a kid, and that
was big money in those days. Fireworks were illegal in Pennsylvania.

Afterthought after <*bang*>: Why didn't I buy ten candy bars?
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-07-07 15:43:17 UTC
Reply
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Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sat, 7 Jul 2018 20:27:24 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Tony Cooper
As even the non-Americans in this group know, Wednesday was July
4th...our Independence Day celebrating our break-away from the
YouLots.
It is the bane of all dogs and most cats. Our dog, Beaux, has been
in a perpetual state of terror and agitation. It seems that every
neighbor has been shooting off fireworks* and firecrackers. The
popping, banging, and booming started Sunday night, and continued
full-force Monday through Thursday.
I grew up in a small town. On cracker night a number of dogs would leave
the town, and some of them never came back.
Amazing what guys will pay to hear a <*bang*>.
I recall paying 50 cents for a cherry bomb when I was a kid, and that
was big money in those days. Fireworks were illegal in Pennsylvania.
Afterthought after <*bang*>: Why didn't I buy ten candy bars?
I spent a few shillings on rockets when I was about ten. I wasn't at
all happy that my parents wouldn't allow me to light them myself.
--
athel
David Kleinecke
2018-07-07 18:12:48 UTC
Reply
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sat, 7 Jul 2018 20:27:24 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Tony Cooper
As even the non-Americans in this group know, Wednesday was July
4th...our Independence Day celebrating our break-away from the
YouLots.
It is the bane of all dogs and most cats. Our dog, Beaux, has been
in a perpetual state of terror and agitation. It seems that every
neighbor has been shooting off fireworks* and firecrackers. The
popping, banging, and booming started Sunday night, and continued
full-force Monday through Thursday.
I grew up in a small town. On cracker night a number of dogs would leave
the town, and some of them never came back.
Amazing what guys will pay to hear a <*bang*>.
I recall paying 50 cents for a cherry bomb when I was a kid, and that
was big money in those days. Fireworks were illegal in Pennsylvania.
Afterthought after <*bang*>: Why didn't I buy ten candy bars?
I spent a few shillings on rockets when I was about ten. I wasn't at
all happy that my parents wouldn't allow me to light them myself.
Back in my youth we would go to the beach at Pismo on July 4
and explode all kinds of things. So far as I know nobody ever
got hurt - which is surprising. A beach is a pretty good
place to do fireworks
Mack A. Damia
2018-07-07 18:41:37 UTC
Reply
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On Sat, 7 Jul 2018 11:12:48 -0700 (PDT), David Kleinecke
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sat, 7 Jul 2018 20:27:24 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Tony Cooper
As even the non-Americans in this group know, Wednesday was July
4th...our Independence Day celebrating our break-away from the
YouLots.
It is the bane of all dogs and most cats. Our dog, Beaux, has been
in a perpetual state of terror and agitation. It seems that every
neighbor has been shooting off fireworks* and firecrackers. The
popping, banging, and booming started Sunday night, and continued
full-force Monday through Thursday.
I grew up in a small town. On cracker night a number of dogs would leave
the town, and some of them never came back.
Amazing what guys will pay to hear a <*bang*>.
I recall paying 50 cents for a cherry bomb when I was a kid, and that
was big money in those days. Fireworks were illegal in Pennsylvania.
Afterthought after <*bang*>: Why didn't I buy ten candy bars?
I spent a few shillings on rockets when I was about ten. I wasn't at
all happy that my parents wouldn't allow me to light them myself.
Back in my youth we would go to the beach at Pismo on July 4
and explode all kinds of things. So far as I know nobody ever
got hurt - which is surprising. A beach is a pretty good
place to do fireworks.
When I was sixteen years old, my parents took me along with two
friends (remember "Sab"?) to Ocean City, MD, for a week.

I had my driver's license, so the three of us drove to Virginia where
fireworks were legal. "T's Corner" along Route 13.

Sab bought a "Repeater". It looked like a quarter stick of dynamite
on a square wooden base.

He didn't set it off until we got back to the playground in our home
town, and when he did, there was a very weak bang, and we laughed it
off as a dud!

Then all of a sudden, it sounded like the heavens fell. It was loud!
We all started laughing until we heard a police siren, then we ran
like hell.
Snidely
2018-07-08 08:26:46 UTC
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David Kleinecke is guilty of
<114ff837-3ba3-4f86-82c0-***@googlegroups.com> as of 7/7/2018
11:12:48 AM
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sat, 7 Jul 2018 20:27:24 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Tony Cooper
As even the non-Americans in this group know, Wednesday was July
4th...our Independence Day celebrating our break-away from the
YouLots.
It is the bane of all dogs and most cats. Our dog, Beaux, has been
in a perpetual state of terror and agitation. It seems that every
neighbor has been shooting off fireworks* and firecrackers. The
popping, banging, and booming started Sunday night, and continued
full-force Monday through Thursday.
I grew up in a small town. On cracker night a number of dogs would leave
the town, and some of them never came back.
Amazing what guys will pay to hear a <*bang*>.
I recall paying 50 cents for a cherry bomb when I was a kid, and that
was big money in those days. Fireworks were illegal in Pennsylvania.
Afterthought after <*bang*>: Why didn't I buy ten candy bars?
I spent a few shillings on rockets when I was about ten. I wasn't at
all happy that my parents wouldn't allow me to light them myself.
Back in my youth we would go to the beach at Pismo on July 4
and explode all kinds of things. So far as I know nobody ever
got hurt - which is surprising. A beach is a pretty good
place to do fireworks
Yeah, driftwood makes a nice bonfire.

[ObPedantry: it is true that many beaches in California have a lot of
sand but not much driftwood. Not many 40-foot logs come down the Los
Angeles River.]

/dps
--
The presence of this syntax results from the fact that SQLite is really
a Tcl extension that has escaped into the wild.
<http://www.sqlite.org/lang_expr.html>
Peter Moylan
2018-07-08 00:33:27 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
I recall paying 50 cents for a cherry bomb when I was a kid, and
that was big money in those days. Fireworks were illegal in
Pennsylvania.
WIWAL the expensive items were things like rockets, and we couldn't
afford them. The biggest *affordable* item was a penny bunger. It only
cost a penny, but it packed a big enough bang to destroy a letterbox.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Mack A. Damia
2018-07-08 00:38:26 UTC
Reply
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On Sun, 8 Jul 2018 10:33:27 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mack A. Damia
I recall paying 50 cents for a cherry bomb when I was a kid, and
that was big money in those days. Fireworks were illegal in
Pennsylvania.
WIWAL the expensive items were things like rockets, and we couldn't
afford them. The biggest *affordable* item was a penny bunger. It only
cost a penny, but it packed a big enough bang to destroy a letterbox.
I bought the cherry bomb from another kid.

As I mentioned, fireworks were illegal in Pennsylvania when I was a
kid. I think you could buy sparklers, but it was well-known that
fireworks were legal in many of the southern states, so enterprising
kids who had traveled down south would bring back a load and make a
killing sell them to us suckers.
Peter Moylan
2018-07-08 00:56:36 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 8 Jul 2018 10:33:27 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mack A. Damia
I recall paying 50 cents for a cherry bomb when I was a kid, and
that was big money in those days. Fireworks were illegal in
Pennsylvania.
WIWAL the expensive items were things like rockets, and we
couldn't afford them. The biggest *affordable* item was a penny
bunger. It only cost a penny, but it packed a big enough bang to
destroy a letterbox.
I bought the cherry bomb from another kid.
As I mentioned, fireworks were illegal in Pennsylvania when I was a
kid. I think you could buy sparklers, but it was well-known that
fireworks were legal in many of the southern states, so enterprising
kids who had traveled down south would bring back a load and make a
killing sell them to us suckers.
I've temporarily forgotten the title, but there's a book in my
collection about the invention of a device whose radiation causes
gunpowder to explode prematurely. (Set in the US, so the political
implications were explosive.) At some point in the story, someone drove
down to Tennessee to buy fireworks. It sounded strange to me to make an
interstate trip to buy something that's locally unavailable, but I guess
it happens.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Jerry Friedman
2018-07-08 01:58:04 UTC
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...
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mack A. Damia
As I mentioned, fireworks were illegal in Pennsylvania when I was a
kid.  I think you could buy sparklers, but it was well-known that
fireworks were legal in many of the southern states, so enterprising
kids who had traveled down south would bring back a load and make a
killing sell them to us suckers.
I've temporarily forgotten the title, but there's a book in my
collection about the invention of a device whose radiation causes
gunpowder to explode prematurely. (Set in the US, so the political
implications were explosive.) At some point in the story, someone drove
down to Tennessee to buy fireworks. It sounded strange to me to make an
interstate trip to buy something that's locally unavailable, but I guess
it happens.
Definitely. And our states are smaller in area than yours. And the
Fourth of July is just once a year. (I'm assuming the person had no
other reason for the trip.)
--
Jerry Friedman
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-08 03:47:05 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
...
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mack A. Damia
As I mentioned, fireworks were illegal in Pennsylvania when I was a
kid.  I think you could buy sparklers, but it was well-known that
fireworks were legal in many of the southern states, so enterprising
kids who had traveled down south would bring back a load and make a
killing sell them to us suckers.
I've temporarily forgotten the title, but there's a book in my
collection about the invention of a device whose radiation causes
gunpowder to explode prematurely. (Set in the US, so the political
implications were explosive.) At some point in the story, someone drove
down to Tennessee to buy fireworks. It sounded strange to me to make an
interstate trip to buy something that's locally unavailable, but I guess
it happens.
Definitely. And our states are smaller in area than yours. And the
Fourth of July is just once a year. (I'm assuming the person had no
other reason for the trip.)
What's shocking is that N.S.W. is bigger than Texas, and Victoria is
bigger than 39 states.

STATE/TERRITORY % MAINLAND AREA ISLAND AREA TOTAL AREA (sq km)
Western Australia 33.0 2 526 786 3089 2 529 875
Queensland 22.5 1 723 936 6712 1 730 648
Northern Territory 17.5 1 335 742 13 387 1 349 129
South Australia 12.7 978 810 4672 983 482
New South Wales 10.4 800 628 14 800 642
Victoria 3.0 227 010 406 227 416
Tasmania 0.9 64 519 3882 68 401
ACT < 1 2 358 — 2358
Jervis Bay Territory (ACT*) 72 1 73
AUSTRALIA — 7 659 861 32 163 7 692 024

Alaska 1,723,337 1
Texas 695,662 2
California 423,972 3
Montana 380,831 4
New Mexico 314,917 5
Arizona 295,234 6
Nevada 286,380 7
Colorado 269,601 8
Oregon 254,799 9
Wyoming 253,335 10
Michigan 250,487 11
Minnesota 225,163 12

Tasmania comes between South Carolina and West Virginia

District of Columbia 177
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-08 03:13:19 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
I've temporarily forgotten the title, but there's a book in my
collection about the invention of a device whose radiation causes
gunpowder to explode prematurely. (Set in the US, so the political
implications were explosive.) At some point in the story, someone drove
down to Tennessee to buy fireworks. It sounded strange to me to make an
interstate trip to buy something that's locally unavailable, but I guess
it happens.
An "interstate trip" can mean walking one block.

The streets in Indiana adjoining Chicago's Southeast Side are lined with
fireworks stands.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-08 03:22:18 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Moylan
I've temporarily forgotten the title, but there's a book in my
collection about the invention of a device whose radiation causes
gunpowder to explode prematurely. (Set in the US, so the political
implications were explosive.) At some point in the story, someone drove
down to Tennessee to buy fireworks. It sounded strange to me to make an
interstate trip to buy something that's locally unavailable, but I guess
it happens.
An "interstate trip" can mean walking one block.
The streets in Indiana adjoining Chicago's Southeast Side are lined with
fireworks stands.
And Irving Park (Ave.? the eponyms like Ave., St., are not much used and
often don't appear on the street signs, except for Parkway, which has a
legal meaning -- no commercial traffic) west of the city limits, either
in Unincorporated Cook County or in the next village over, is lined with
gun shops.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-08 03:11:26 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mack A. Damia
I recall paying 50 cents for a cherry bomb when I was a kid, and
that was big money in those days. Fireworks were illegal in
Pennsylvania.
WIWAL the expensive items were things like rockets, and we couldn't
afford them. The biggest *affordable* item was a penny bunger. It only
cost a penny, but it packed a big enough bang to destroy a letterbox.
I hope the sales tax on it was high enough to pay for replacing the letter
box and reimbursing all the senders whose mail was destroyed in the explosion.
charles
2018-07-08 09:52:12 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mack A. Damia
I recall paying 50 cents for a cherry bomb when I was a kid, and
that was big money in those days. Fireworks were illegal in
Pennsylvania.
WIWAL the expensive items were things like rockets, and we couldn't
afford them. The biggest *affordable* item was a penny bunger. It only
cost a penny, but it packed a big enough bang to destroy a letterbox.
some years ago, someoen - with a large "banger" destroyed a telephone box
in our village. The boxes are held togetehr by the roof; a big enough bang,
the roof lifts up and the sides all fall outewards. It was never repalced
since mobile phones were just coming onto common use.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
CDB
2018-07-07 15:51:25 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Tony Cooper
As even the non-Americans in this group know, Wednesday was July
4th...our Independence Day celebrating our break-away from the
YouLots.
It is the bane of all dogs and most cats. Our dog, Beaux, has been
in a perpetual state of terror and agitation. It seems that every
neighbor has been shooting off fireworks* and firecrackers. The
popping, banging, and booming started Sunday night, and continued
full-force Monday through Thursday.
I grew up in a small town. On cracker night a number of dogs would
leave the town, and some of them never came back.
It depends how much you want to keep your dog. One of mine was
terrified by loud noises, and on nights of celebration I stopped going
out to see the displays and would sit at home instead, with sixty pounds
of shaking, panting, drooling fur in my lap.

As to the controversy over the pronunciation of "Beaux", I'm pretty sure
that's as in "Robidoux": the "x" is silent.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-07-07 16:07:36 UTC
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Post by CDB
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Tony Cooper
As even the non-Americans in this group know, Wednesday was July
4th...our Independence Day celebrating our break-away from the YouLots.
It is the bane of all dogs and most cats. Our dog, Beaux, has been
in a perpetual state of terror and agitation. It seems that every
neighbor has been shooting off fireworks* and firecrackers. The
popping, banging, and booming started Sunday night, and continued
full-force Monday through Thursday.
I grew up in a small town. On cracker night a number of dogs would
leave the town, and some of them never came back.
It depends how much you want to keep your dog. One of mine was
terrified by loud noises, and on nights of celebration I stopped going
out to see the displays and would sit at home instead, with sixty pounds
of shaking, panting, drooling fur in my lap.
As to the controversy over the pronunciation of "Beaux", I'm pretty sure
that's as in "Robidoux": the "x" is silent.
There is a place in the Luberon called Buoux (a good place to see
dinosaur eggs) in which the x is not silent at all, and the rest of the
pronunciation (apart from the B) is not intuitive at all. Using English
phonetic symbols (because I don't know French ones, though it this case
it doesn't matter much as there aren't any nasal vowels): [bju̟ːks]
--
athel
Hen Hanna
2018-07-07 15:09:49 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 6 Jul 2018 16:39:24 -0700 (PDT), Hen Hanna
interesting tidbit about for-positive-stories-only-photos
Post by Hen Hanna
( if you want to talk about something other than that in the Original Post, pls start a new thread. )
As even the non-Americans in this group know, Wednesday was July
this was more of a reminder than an "Admonishment".

the meaning was:

( Thank you for not engaging in Off-Topic chatter, so far!
and (despite concerns about negative knee-jerk reactions) i'd like to remind ppl
that
if you want to talk about something other than that in the Original Post (like how the Wednes' fireworks' noise made us and our cats and dogs jump), ... pls, pls, PLS... start a new thread. )




The last time I was interviewed for a magazine article, I got to approve the text of the relevant portion. (the reporter was very polite -- in case they want to quote/use me again. ) HH
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-07-07 15:27:30 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
[ … ]
( Thank you for not engaging in Off-Topic chatter, so far!
and (despite concerns about negative knee-jerk reactions) i'd like to remind ppl
that
if you want to talk about something other than that in the Original
Post (like how the Wednes' fireworks' noise made us and our cats and
dogs jump), ... pls, pls, PLS... start a new thread. )
Why? In any case, pls, pls, PLS stop using horrible abbreviations like
ppl, pls and Wednes'. While you're at it, learn how to write "I", and
how to format your utterances correctly.
--
athel
Kerr-Mudd,John
2018-07-07 15:28:07 UTC
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On Sat, 07 Jul 2018 15:27:30 GMT, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
[ 
 ]
( Thank you for not engaging in Off-Topic chatter, so far!
and (despite concerns about negative knee-jerk reactions) i'd like to remind ppl
that
if you want to talk about something other than that in the Original
Post (like how the Wednes' fireworks' noise made us and our cats and
dogs jump), ... pls, pls, PLS... start a new thread. )
Why? In any case, pls, pls, PLS stop using horrible abbreviations like
ppl, pls and Wednes'. While you're at it, learn how to write "I", and
how to format your utterances correctly.
IAWTP. HTH.
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Janet
2018-07-07 17:05:46 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
if you want to talk about something other than that in the Original Post (like how the Wednes'
fireworks' noise made us and our cats and dogs jump), ... pls, pls,
PLS... start a new thread. )

No chance; I haven't signed a consent form so dream on.

Janet
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-07-07 06:26:11 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
Post by HVS
On Fri, 6 Jul 2018 16:05:27 -0600, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Hen Hanna
( No Off-Topic chatter ! )
Let's say a reputable writer decided to do an article on a forgotten
person for NYTimes Magazine.
The "forgotten person" likes the idea, but he wants to make sure that
the final article is going to be favorable to him.
Would he (the subject of the article) typically do this by a promise
from the writer?
Or (Since the article i'm reading appeared in the NYTimes Magazine)
I'm guessing that the writer had to get a signed consent form before
the article got publshed.
In the magazine I used to write for, which was put out by Los Alamos
National Laboratory, people interviewed approved our edited versions of
the interviews. Readers understood that we were showing off the
research at the Lab, not doing investigative journalism. We didn't use
consent forms.
In real journalism, an interview with a public figure will be with the
understanding that everything is fair game unless it's clearly stated to
be off the record. In a profile of a forgotten person such as you're
talking about, the reporter probably intends from the start to make the
person look good. However, I believe it would be unethical to make a
promise, and I'd be astonished if there were a consent form. (Subject
to correction from those here who know about real journalism.)
Sad to say, there are rumors that some reporters will treat public
figures favorably in return for continued "access" to interview them or
get information from them. President Trump is so low that he openly
refuses to give interviews to news organizations whose coverage of him
he doesn't like.
Melania Trump is doing something similar. She has images up on Getty
Images that can only be used for "positive stories" about her. She's
raked in at least $100,000 for use of those images.
https://petapixel.com/2018/07/05/media-paid-melania-trump-up-to-1m-for-positive-stories-only-photos/
On the original subject, some interviewees demand article approval
right. This allows them to read and amend the article before
publication. That, in essence, is a form of consent.
interesting tidbit about for-positive-stories-only-photos
( if you want to talk about something other than that in the Original
Post, pls start a new thread. )
Piss off.
Post by Hen Hanna
The last time I was interviewed for a magazine article, I got to
approve the text of the relevant portion. (the reporter was very
polite -- in case they want to quote/use me again. ) HH
--
athel
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-07-07 06:24:20 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Hen Hanna
( No Off-Topic chatter ! )
Let's say a reputable writer decided to do an article on a forgotten
person for NYTimes Magazine.
The "forgotten person" likes the idea, but he wants to make sure that
the final article is going to be favorable to him.
Would he (the subject of the article) typically do this by a promise from the writer?
Or (Since the article i'm reading appeared in the NYTimes Magazine)
I'm guessing that the writer had to get a signed consent form before
the article got publshed.
In the magazine I used to write for, which was put out by Los Alamos
National Laboratory, people interviewed approved our edited versions of
the interviews. Readers understood that we were showing off the
research at the Lab, not doing investigative journalism. We didn't use
consent forms.
In real journalism, an interview with a public figure will be with the
understanding that everything is fair game unless it's clearly stated
to be off the record. In a profile of a forgotten person such as
you're talking about, the reporter probably intends from the start to
make the person look good. However, I believe it would be unethical to
make a promise, and I'd be astonished if there were a consent form.
(Subject to correction from those here who know about real journalism.)
Sad to say, there are rumors that some reporters will treat public
figures favorably in return for continued "access" to interview them or
get information from them. President Trump is so low that he openly
refuses to give interviews to news organizations whose coverage of him
he doesn't like.
Post by Hen Hanna
Please comment. ( No Off-Topic chatter ! ) HH
Better as "(No off-topic chatter!)"
Better still omitted completely. In the absence of a moderator no one
has the authority to decide what can be posted, least of all a person
who ignores all conventions of English usage in an English-usage group.
--
athel
Peter Moylan
2018-07-07 10:22:46 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Sad to say, there are rumors that some reporters will treat public
figures favorably in return for continued "access" to interview them
or get information from them. President Trump is so low that he
openly refuses to give interviews to news organizations whose
coverage of him he doesn't like.
https://www.sbs.com.au/news/federal-press-gallery-ultimatum-to-nauru

The Australian Prime Minister will be visiting Nauru soon for a Pacific
Islands Forum. In words that look as if they were dictated by the
Australian Liberal Party, Nauru has said that reporters from Australia's
ABC will be banned, because of uncomplimentary reporting on the
conditions in Australia's refugee prison in Nauru.

In an unusual display of solidarity, the Press Gallery has announced
that if ABC reporters don't go, no other Australian reporters will go.
Apparently the press in a couple of other nations have said the same, so
the Forum will have to go ahead with no press coverage.
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Hen Hanna
Please comment. ( No Off-Topic chatter ! ) HH
Better as "(No off-topic chatter!)"
Fair enough. I do appreciate that consent forms are off-topic for AUE,
so I won't comment on that.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
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