Discussion:
What's the equivalent of "no sweat" in UK English?
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Dingbat
2017-12-02 14:01:37 UTC
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What's the equivalent of "no sweat" in UK English?

... or "no worries" or "no problem"
GordonD
2017-12-02 14:48:33 UTC
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Post by Dingbat
What's the equivalent of "no sweat" in UK English?
... or "no worries" or "no problem"
'No problem' is BrEng; 'No worries' seems more AusEng, though it's
catching on here.
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
Peter Moylan
2017-12-03 00:21:00 UTC
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Post by GordonD
Post by Dingbat
What's the equivalent of "no sweat" in UK English?
... or "no worries" or "no problem"
'No problem' is BrEng; 'No worries' seems more AusEng, though it's
catching on here.
Also "no wuckers" in AusE. (Short for "no wuckin furries".)
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Ken Blake
2017-12-03 15:12:56 UTC
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On Sun, 3 Dec 2017 11:21:00 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by GordonD
Post by Dingbat
What's the equivalent of "no sweat" in UK English?
... or "no worries" or "no problem"
'No problem' is BrEng; 'No worries' seems more AusEng, though it's
catching on here.
Also "no wuckers" in AusE. (Short for "no wuckin furries".)
LOL! I like that. I would like to say it myself, but nobody here in
the US
Katy Jennison
2017-12-02 14:55:48 UTC
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Post by Dingbat
What's the equivalent of "no sweat" in UK English?
... or "no worries" or "no problem"
"No problem" is increasingly common here -- irritatingly so when, for
instance, it's said by the wait-person taking one's order in a
restaurant or coffee-shop and when what one's asked for is something
from the regular menu which isn't expected to cause any sort of problem
at all. <mutter, mutter>
--
Katy Jennison
Peter T. Daniels
2017-12-02 23:25:05 UTC
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Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Dingbat
What's the equivalent of "no sweat" in UK English?
... or "no worries" or "no problem"
"No problem" is increasingly common here -- irritatingly so when, for
instance, it's said by the wait-person taking one's order in a
restaurant or coffee-shop and when what one's asked for is something
from the regular menu which isn't expected to cause any sort of problem
at all. <mutter, mutter>
"No problem" is heard increasingly in place of "You're welcome." I wonder if
it'll start appearing in the society of you who say "Thank you" normally
prompts no response at all.
LFS
2017-12-03 07:19:05 UTC
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Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Dingbat
What's the equivalent of "no sweat" in UK English?
... or "no worries" or "no problem"
"No problem" is increasingly common here -- irritatingly so when, for
instance, it's said by the wait-person taking one's order in a
restaurant or coffee-shop and when what one's asked for is something
from the regular menu which isn't expected to cause any sort of problem
at all.  <mutter, mutter>
I was shocked to hear myself say "No probs" recently.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Quinn C
2017-12-05 18:37:27 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Dingbat
What's the equivalent of "no sweat" in UK English?
... or "no worries" or "no problem"
"No problem" is increasingly common here -- irritatingly so when, for
instance, it's said by the wait-person taking one's order in a
restaurant or coffee-shop and when what one's asked for is something
from the regular menu which isn't expected to cause any sort of problem
at all.  <mutter, mutter>
I was shocked to hear myself say "No probs" recently.
That's scary, obvs.
--
It gets hot in Raleigh, but Texas! I don't know why anybody
lives here, honestly.
-- Robert C. Wilson, Vortex (novel), p.220
Colonel Edmund J. Burke
2017-12-03 17:01:34 UTC
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Post by Dingbat
What's the equivalent of "no sweat" in UK English?
... or "no worries" or "no problem"
"No problem" is increasingly common here -- irritatingly so when, for instance, it's said by the wait-person taking one's order in a restaurant or coffee-shop and when what one's asked for is something from the regular menu which isn't expected to cause any sort of problem at all.  <mutter, mutter>
"Care for tea and crumpets, sir?"

"No thanks, limey. I'll have some fuckin' coffee instead... Hot and black, just like I take my women."
jew pedophile Ron Jacobson (jew pedophile Baruch 'Barry' Shein's jew aliash)
2017-12-03 17:41:44 UTC
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On Sun, 3 Dec 2017 09:01:34 -0800, "fake vet Scatboi Colon La Edmund
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Post by Dingbat
What's the equivalent of "no sweat" in UK English?
... or "no worries" or "no problem"
"No problem" is increasingly common here -- irritatingly so when, for instance, it's said by the wait-person taking one's order in a restaurant or coffee-shop and when what one's asked for is something from the regular menu which isn't expected to cause any sort of problem at all.  <mutter, mutter>
"Care for tea and crumpets, sir?"
"No thanks, limey. I'll have some fuckin' coffee instead... Hot and black, just like I take my women."
Ah, you mean these 'hawt' apes of yers, Midnight?
- -

" I don't even have the heart to tell him I've never infested
Arizona."
- Klaun Shittinb'ricks (1940 - ), acknowledging that he lied
from the very beginning, A jew scam, as expected

Iudaei orbem terrarum infestant.
- correct Latin

"Die Juden sind unser Unglück!"
- Heinrich von Treitschke (1834 - 1896)

"First they came for the Socialists, and I did not speak out
because I was not a Socialist. Then they came for the Trade
Unionists, and I did not speak out because I was not a Trade
Unionist. Then they came for the jews, and I did not speak out
because I did not give a shit. Then they came for me and there
wasn't a single commie bastard left to speak for me."
- Martin Niemöller (1892 - 1984)

Fformby-Smythe's Law of zionism:
"The importance of 'Israeel' to any given jew is directly proportional
to the square of the distance between that jew and 'Israeel'."
Colonel Edmund J. Burke
2017-12-03 18:04:16 UTC
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Post by jew pedophile Ron Jacobson (jew pedophile Baruch 'Barry' Shein's jew aliash)
On Sun, 3 Dec 2017 09:01:34 -0800, "fake vet Scatboi Colon La Edmund
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Post by Dingbat
What's the equivalent of "no sweat" in UK English?
... or "no worries" or "no problem"
"No problem" is increasingly common here -- irritatingly so when, for instance, it's said by the wait-person taking one's order in a restaurant or coffee-shop and when what one's asked for is something from the regular menu which isn't expected to cause any sort of problem at all.  <mutter, mutter>
"Care for tea and crumpets, sir?"
"No thanks, limey. I'll have some fuckin' coffee instead... Hot and black, just like I take my women."
Ah, you mean these 'hawt' apes of yers, Midnight?
Speaking of "taking women," how's yer mum's arsehole this morning?
LOL
jew pedophile Ron Jacobson (jew pedophile Baruch 'Barry' Shein's jew aliash)
2017-12-03 19:58:35 UTC
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On Sun, 3 Dec 2017 10:04:16 -0800, "fake vet Scatboi Colon La Edmund
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Post by jew pedophile Ron Jacobson (jew pedophile Baruch 'Barry' Shein's jew aliash)
On Sun, 3 Dec 2017 09:01:34 -0800, "fake vet Scatboi Colon La Edmund
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Post by Dingbat
What's the equivalent of "no sweat" in UK English?
... or "no worries" or "no problem"
"No problem" is increasingly common here -- irritatingly so when, for instance, it's said by the wait-person taking one's order in a restaurant or coffee-shop and when what one's asked for is something from the regular menu which isn't expected to cause any sort of problem at all.  <mutter, mutter>
"Care for tea and crumpets, sir?"
"No thanks, limey. I'll have some fuckin' coffee instead... Hot and black, just like I take my women."
Ah, you mean these 'hawt' apes of yers, Midnight?
Speaking of "taking women," how's yer mum's arsehole this morning?
LOL
How's YERS after being sodomised by niggers all night, KKKoloon?

LOLOK
- -

" I don't even have the heart to tell him I've never infested
Arizona."
- Klaun Shittinb'ricks (1940 - ), acknowledging that he lied
from the very beginning, A jew scam, as expected

Iudaei orbem terrarum infestant.
- correct Latin

"Die Juden sind unser Unglück!"
- Heinrich von Treitschke (1834 - 1896)

"First they came for the Socialists, and I did not speak out
because I was not a Socialist. Then they came for the Trade
Unionists, and I did not speak out because I was not a Trade
Unionist. Then they came for the jews, and I did not speak out
because I did not give a shit. Then they came for me and there
wasn't a single commie bastard left to speak for me."
- Martin Niemöller (1892 - 1984)

Fformby-Smythe's Law of zionism:
"The importance of 'Israeel' to any given jew is directly proportional
to the square of the distance between that jew and 'Israeel'."
Peeler
2017-12-03 21:08:32 UTC
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On Sun, 03 Dec 2017 11:58:35 -0800, serbian bitch Razovic, the resident
psychopath of sci and scj and Usenet's famous sexual cripple, making an ass
of herself as "jew pedophile Ron Jacobson (jew pedophile Baruch 'Barry'
Post by jew pedophile Ron Jacobson (jew pedophile Baruch 'Barry' Shein's jew aliash)
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Speaking of "taking women," how's yer mum's arsehole this morning?
LOL
How's YERS after being sodomised by niggers all night, KKKoloon?
That's how YOU came by your colostomy bag, eh, "Miss Recktum"? <BG>
Post by jew pedophile Ron Jacobson (jew pedophile Baruch 'Barry' Shein's jew aliash)
LOLOK
"LOLOK"??? Is that the sound you make when you choke on dick, cocksucking
Razovic?
--
Nefesh about stinking serb peasant Razovic: "All good people shit on the
Revd"
MID: <8560bbb2-d446-4ba9-a3e7-***@c20g2000prc.googlegroups.com>
Peeler
2017-12-03 21:07:22 UTC
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On Sun, 03 Dec 2017 09:41:44 -0800, serbian bitch Razovic, the resident
psychopath of sci and scj and Usenet's famous sexual cripple, making an ass
of herself as "jew pedophile Ron Jacobson (jew pedophile Baruch 'Barry'
Post by jew pedophile Ron Jacobson (jew pedophile Baruch 'Barry' Shein's jew aliash)
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
"Care for tea and crumpets, sir?"
"No thanks, limey. I'll have some fuckin' coffee instead... Hot and
black, just like I take my women."
Ah, you mean these 'hawt' apes of yers, Midnight?
Awww! While YOU would be SOOO much hotter, eh, you rejected serbian bitch?
LOL
--
Dumb gay anal Razovic about herself:
"And you just wish someone, anyone, anything would cornhole you!"
David
2017-12-04 02:26:37 UTC
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Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Dingbat
What's the equivalent of "no sweat" in UK English?
... or "no worries" or "no problem"
"No problem" is increasingly common here -- irritatingly so when, for
instance, it's said by the wait-person taking one's order in a restaurant
or coffee-shop and when what one's asked for is something from the regular
menu which isn't expected to cause any sort of problem at all. <mutter,
mutter>
"Care for tea and crumpets, sir?"

"No thanks, limey. I'll have some fuckin' coffee instead... Hot and black,
just like I take my women."

I like coffee.
Janet
2017-12-02 16:04:32 UTC
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Post by Dingbat
What's the equivalent of "no sweat" in UK English?
"It's no trouble".
Post by Dingbat
... or "no worries"
"Nothing to worry about " or (informal) "don't fret".
Post by Dingbat
"no problem"
"It's not a problem".

Janet.
occam
2017-12-02 17:07:45 UTC
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Post by Janet
Post by Dingbat
What's the equivalent of "no sweat" in UK English?
"It's no trouble".
Post by Dingbat
... or "no worries"
"Nothing to worry about " or (informal) "don't fret".
Hmm... "don't fret" sounds more like a put-down rather than a waiving
off a debt.
occam
2017-12-02 17:02:44 UTC
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Post by Dingbat
What's the equivalent of "no sweat" in UK English?
... or "no worries" or "no problem"
"Think nothing of it"
Kerr-Mudd,John
2017-12-02 19:55:37 UTC
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Post by occam
Post by Dingbat
What's the equivalent of "no sweat" in UK English?
... or "no worries" or "no problem"
"Think nothing of it"
That's quite all right, old chap.

or
occam
2017-12-02 20:01:39 UTC
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Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by occam
Post by Dingbat
What's the equivalent of "no sweat" in UK English?
... or "no worries" or "no problem"
"Think nothing of it"
That's quite all right, old chap.
OK, is "You're welcome" better?
Peter Moylan
2017-12-03 00:23:22 UTC
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Post by occam
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by occam
Post by Dingbat
What's the equivalent of "no sweat" in UK English?
... or "no worries" or "no problem"
"Think nothing of it"
That's quite all right, old chap.
OK, is "You're welcome" better?
I would avoid "you're welcome" outside North America. It's come to have
a reputation for insincerity.

In AusE, and I think also in BrE, the most common response to "Thank
you" is silence.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Richard Heathfield
2017-12-03 00:49:57 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by occam
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by occam
Post by Dingbat
What's the equivalent of "no sweat" in UK English?
... or "no worries" or "no problem"
"Think nothing of it"
That's quite all right, old chap.
OK, is "You're welcome" better?
I would avoid "you're welcome" outside North America. It's come to have
a reputation for insincerity.
In AusE, and I think also in BrE, the most common response to "Thank
you" is silence.
(UK) I am always glad to say "you're welcome" or even, should I feel so
inclined, "you're very welcome". Certainly those expressions /can/ be
used insincerely, but it's generally easy to tell from the tone of voice
whether or not the speaker means what he or she is saying.

When reading the phrase in written communications (eg in email), I think
the best policy is to assume sincerity unless one has compelling reasons
to think otherwise.
--
Richard Heathfield
Email: rjh at cpax dot org dot uk
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Sig line 4 vacant - apply within
LFS
2017-12-03 07:25:45 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by occam
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by occam
Post by Dingbat
What's the equivalent of "no sweat" in UK English?
... or "no worries" or "no problem"
"Think nothing of it"
That's quite all right, old chap.
OK, is "You're welcome" better?
I would avoid "you're welcome" outside North America. It's come to have
a reputation for insincerity.
I hear it much more often here these days. I like the way it
acknowledges the conclusion of an exchange, especially if accompanied by
a smile.

Saturday is the only day on which we have a newspaper delivery and, as
it consists of two papers with multiple sections, the paper girl rings
the doorbell to hand it to us, rather than laboriously pushing each
section through the letterbox. Every week I say "Thank you" and she
replies "You're welcome". Gets my day off to a pleasant start.
Post by Peter Moylan
In AusE, and I think also in BrE, the most common response to "Thank
you" is silence.
Or possibly a nod and/or a smile.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Ken Blake
2017-12-03 15:20:23 UTC
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On Sun, 3 Dec 2017 11:23:22 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by occam
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by occam
Post by Dingbat
What's the equivalent of "no sweat" in UK English?
... or "no worries" or "no problem"
"Think nothing of it"
That's quite all right, old chap.
OK, is "You're welcome" better?
I would avoid "you're welcome" outside North America. It's come to have
a reputation for insincerity.
In AusE, and I think also in BrE, the most common response to "Thank
you" is silence.
That reminds that when a waitress in a restaurant here in the US
serves a dish, she often says, "enjoy." My standard reply is
Kerr-Mudd,John
2017-12-03 15:56:53 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
On Sun, 3 Dec 2017 11:23:22 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by occam
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by occam
Post by Dingbat
What's the equivalent of "no sweat" in UK English?
... or "no worries" or "no problem"
"Think nothing of it"
That's quite all right, old chap.
OK, is "You're welcome" better?
I would avoid "you're welcome" outside North America. It's come to
have a reputation for insincerity.
In AusE, and I think also in BrE, the most common response to "Thank
you" is silence.
That reminds that when a waitress in a restaurant here in the US
serves a dish, she often says, "enjoy." My standard reply is, "thank."
Attachment decoded: untitled-1.txt
I've frequently (at the same establishment, so it's part of their
"training") been given the order: "Enjoy your meal". I often respond:
"I'll try my best". As indicated by others some seconds later I'm asked
if "Everything is alright". But they disappear before I get a chance to
go into details.
Tak To
2017-12-03 18:50:07 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
On Sun, 3 Dec 2017 11:23:22 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by occam
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by occam
Post by Dingbat
What's the equivalent of "no sweat" in UK English?
... or "no worries" or "no problem"
"Think nothing of it"
That's quite all right, old chap.
OK, is "You're welcome" better?
I would avoid "you're welcome" outside North America. It's come to have
a reputation for insincerity.
In AusE, and I think also in BrE, the most common response to "Thank
you" is silence.
That reminds that when a waitress in a restaurant here in the US
serves a dish, she often says, "enjoy." My standard reply is, "thank."
This is just me, but I think the humor is marred by the dissimilarity
in the absurdity -- whereas "Enjoy" is brusque, "Thank" is close to
ungrammatical for missing an object. And/or "Thank" is parsed as having
an elided subject of "you", which makes no sense as a retort (cf "Be
thanked".)

Again, this is just me.
--
Tak
----------------------------------------------------------------+-----
Tak To ***@alum.mit.eduxx
--------------------------------------------------------------------^^
[taode takto ~{LU5B~}] NB: trim the xx to get my real email addr
Ken Blake
2017-12-03 19:41:23 UTC
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Post by Tak To
Post by Ken Blake
On Sun, 3 Dec 2017 11:23:22 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by occam
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by occam
Post by Dingbat
What's the equivalent of "no sweat" in UK English?
... or "no worries" or "no problem"
"Think nothing of it"
That's quite all right, old chap.
OK, is "You're welcome" better?
I would avoid "you're welcome" outside North America. It's come to have
a reputation for insincerity.
In AusE, and I think also in BrE, the most common response to "Thank
you" is silence.
That reminds that when a waitress in a restaurant here in the US
serves a dish, she often says, "enjoy." My standard reply is, "thank."
This is just me, but I think the humor is marred by the dissimilarity
in the absurdity -- whereas "Enjoy" is brusque, "Thank" is close to
ungrammatical for missing an object.
As far as I'm concerned, both "enjoy" and "thank" are ungrammatical in
exactly the same way-- for missing an object. They are both
transitive verbs.

My humor in saying "thank" is really just internal. It's a rare
waitress who would even notice that "you" is missing, or if she
noticed, would understand why I omitted it. Nobody has ever asked me
why I just said "thank." Probably most, if not all, waitresses
b***@shaw.ca
2017-12-04 01:11:32 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
As far as I'm concerned, both "enjoy" and "thank" are ungrammatical in
exactly the same way-- for missing an object. They are both
transitive verbs.
I think you're missing something. Where I live, "Enjoy" without an object has been common for many years, especially when someone has prepared
or is serving food to the person(s) being addressed. It is how people talk,
and you are presuming that if people don't use the language in the way you
are used to, they must be wrong. I think that's an error.
Post by Ken Blake
My humor in saying "thank" is really just internal. It's a rare
waitress who would even notice that "you" is missing, or if she
noticed, would understand why I omitted it. Nobody has ever asked me
why I just said "thank." Probably most, if not all, waitresses think I
said "thanks."
It seems you don't have a high opinion, or even a neutral opinion, of people
who serve you food. You assume they are all oblivious. In my experience,
some might be oblivious, but many others hear and understand what you
are saying and what your attitude toward them is.

bill
Peter T. Daniels
2017-12-03 20:35:06 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
On Sun, 3 Dec 2017 11:23:22 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by occam
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by occam
Post by Dingbat
What's the equivalent of "no sweat" in UK English?
... or "no worries" or "no problem"
"Think nothing of it"
That's quite all right, old chap.
OK, is "You're welcome" better?
I would avoid "you're welcome" outside North America. It's come to have
a reputation for insincerity.
In AusE, and I think also in BrE, the most common response to "Thank
you" is silence.
Which may well contribute to the British reputation for cold reserve.
Post by Ken Blake
That reminds that when a waitress in a restaurant here in the US
serves a dish, she often says, "enjoy." My standard reply is, "thank."
Should she say "Enjoys," so that you would reply "Thanks," or "Enjoy you,"
so that you would say "Thank you"?
Joy Beeson
2017-12-06 20:49:35 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
That reminds that when a waitress in a restaurant here in the US
serves a dish, she often says, "enjoy." My standard reply is, "thank."
My invariable response is "it will be", but I hope that I've never
actually said it.
--
Joy Beeson, U.S.A., mostly central Hoosier,
some Northern Indiana, Upstate New York, Florida, and Hawaii
joy beeson at comcast dot net http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.
Tak To
2017-12-03 18:19:15 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by occam
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by occam
Post by Dingbat
What's the equivalent of "no sweat" in UK English?
... or "no worries" or "no problem"
"Think nothing of it"
That's quite all right, old chap.
OK, is "You're welcome" better?
I would avoid "you're welcome" outside North America. It's come to have
a reputation for insincerity.
In AusE, and I think also in BrE, the most common response to "Thank
you" is silence.
Whatever happened to "not at all"?
--
Tak
----------------------------------------------------------------+-----
Tak To ***@alum.mit.eduxx
--------------------------------------------------------------------^^
[taode takto ~{LU5B~}] NB: trim the xx to get my real email addr
Katy Jennison
2017-12-03 18:57:43 UTC
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Post by Tak To
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by occam
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by occam
Post by Dingbat
What's the equivalent of "no sweat" in UK English?
... or "no worries" or "no problem"
"Think nothing of it"
That's quite all right, old chap.
OK, is "You're welcome" better?
I would avoid "you're welcome" outside North America. It's come to have
a reputation for insincerity.
In AusE, and I think also in BrE, the most common response to "Thank
you" is silence.
Whatever happened to "not at all"?
I was wondering that too. I still hear it, and sometimes say it myself.
--
Katy Jennison
Sam Plusnet
2017-12-06 20:35:04 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by occam
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by occam
Post by Dingbat
What's the equivalent of "no sweat" in UK English?
... or "no worries" or "no problem"
"Think nothing of it"
That's quite all right, old chap.
OK, is "You're welcome" better?
I would avoid "you're welcome" outside North America. It's come to have
a reputation for insincerity.
In AusE, and I think also in BrE, the most common response to "Thank
you" is silence.
Which makes sense.

Someone provides you with a service.
You recognise their action by thanking them.

The circle is closed and anything more risks starting some endless tit
for tat.
--
Sam Plusnet
Jerry Friedman
2017-12-06 23:13:16 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by occam
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by occam
Post by Dingbat
What's the equivalent of "no sweat" in UK English?
... or "no worries" or "no problem"
"Think nothing of it"
That's quite all right, old chap.
OK, is "You're welcome" better?
I would avoid "you're welcome" outside North America. It's come to have
a reputation for insincerity.
In AusE, and I think also in BrE, the most common response to "Thank
you" is silence.
Which makes sense.
Someone provides you with a service.
You recognise their action by thanking them.
The circle is closed and anything more risks starting some endless tit
for tat.
Which has never happened in my experience.

I can think of one cashier, though, who says "Thank you"; then I say
"Thank you"; then she says "You're welcome." That's one too many for
me, but it's not endless.

In most business transactions, both people are better off afterwards
(or think they are), so the proper response to "Thank you" is
"Thank you."
--
Jerry Friedman
Sam Plusnet
2017-12-07 21:22:40 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by occam
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by occam
Post by Dingbat
What's the equivalent of "no sweat" in UK English?
... or "no worries" or "no problem"
"Think nothing of it"
That's quite all right, old chap.
OK, is "You're welcome" better?
I would avoid "you're welcome" outside North America. It's come to have
a reputation for insincerity.
In AusE, and I think also in BrE, the most common response to "Thank
you" is silence.
Which makes sense.
Someone provides you with a service.
You recognise their action by thanking them.
The circle is closed and anything more risks starting some endless tit
for tat.
Which has never happened in my experience.
I can think of one cashier, though, who says "Thank you"; then I say
"Thank you"; then she says "You're welcome." That's one too many for
me, but it's not endless.
In most business transactions, both people are better off afterwards
(or think they are), so the proper response to "Thank you" is
"Thank you."
I was reminded of those situations where friends or acquaintances go in
for one of those cheek-kissing rituals.

Is it to be one kiss? Or two? (or even three - who knows).
Do you start on the left cheek or the right? Better get it right or the
greeting might go into injury time.

I was brought up in a non greeting-kiss family, so I have no idea what
the ground rules are.
--
Sam Plusnet
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-12-10 16:30:55 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by occam
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by occam
Post by Dingbat
What's the equivalent of "no sweat" in UK English?
... or "no worries" or "no problem"
"Think nothing of it"
That's quite all right, old chap.
OK, is "You're welcome" better?
I would avoid "you're welcome" outside North America. It's come to have
a reputation for insincerity.
In AusE, and I think also in BrE, the most common response to "Thank
you" is silence.
Which makes sense.
Someone provides you with a service.
You recognise their action by thanking them.
The circle is closed and anything more risks starting some endless tit
for tat.
Which has never happened in my experience.
I can think of one cashier, though, who says "Thank you"; then I say
"Thank you"; then she says "You're welcome." That's one too many for
me, but it's not endless.
In most business transactions, both people are better off afterwards
(or think they are), so the proper response to "Thank you" is
"Thank you."
I was reminded of those situations where friends or acquaintances go in
for one of those cheek-kissing rituals.
Is it to be one kiss? Or two? (or even three - who knows).
http://bigthink.com/strange-maps/210-french-kissing-map
Post by Sam Plusnet
Do you start on the left cheek or the right? Better get it right or
the greeting might go into injury time.
I was brought up in a non greeting-kiss family, so I have no idea what
the ground rules are.
--
athel
Peter Moylan
2017-12-11 01:39:24 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
I was reminded of those situations where friends or acquaintances go
in for one of those cheek-kissing rituals.
Is it to be one kiss?Or two? (or even three - who knows).
http://bigthink.com/strange-maps/210-french-kissing-map
Do you start on the left cheek or the right?Better get it right or
the greeting might go into injury time.
I was brought up in a non greeting-kiss family, so I have no idea
what the ground rules are.
My experience in Belgium, when I went to kiss someone, was that the
other person would say in a low voice, as our heads approached, "deux".
I never discovered whether that was help for a foreigner who didn't know
the rules, or a common custom.

I did form the impression that a single kiss had been the norm but that
it was in the process of changing to two.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
J. J. Lodder
2017-12-11 10:02:42 UTC
Reply
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Sam Plusnet
I was reminded of those situations where friends or acquaintances go
in for one of those cheek-kissing rituals.
Is it to be one kiss?Or two? (or even three - who knows).
http://bigthink.com/strange-maps/210-french-kissing-map
Do you start on the left cheek or the right?Better get it right or
the greeting might go into injury time.
I was brought up in a non greeting-kiss family, so I have no idea
what the ground rules are.
My experience in Belgium, when I went to kiss someone, was that the
other person would say in a low voice, as our heads approached, "deux".
I never discovered whether that was help for a foreigner who didn't know
the rules, or a common custom.
I did form the impression that a single kiss had been the norm but that
it was in the process of changing to two.
Never heard it. To add to your data set:
In the Netherlands the rule used to be none,
for the Northern (protestant) part,
three for Brabant and Limburg.
But it's evolving,

Jan
Peter Moylan
2017-12-11 14:19:54 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Sam Plusnet
I was reminded of those situations where friends or acquaintances
go in for one of those cheek-kissing rituals.
Is it to be one kiss?Or two? (or even three - who knows).
http://bigthink.com/strange-maps/210-french-kissing-map
Do you start on the left cheek or the right?Better get it right
or the greeting might go into injury time.
I was brought up in a non greeting-kiss family, so I have no
idea what the ground rules are.
My experience in Belgium, when I went to kiss someone, was that
the other person would say in a low voice, as our heads approached,
"deux". I never discovered whether that was help for a foreigner
who didn't know the rules, or a common custom.
I did form the impression that a single kiss had been the norm but
that it was in the process of changing to two.
Never heard it. To add to your data set: In the Netherlands the rule
used to be none, for the Northern (protestant) part, three for
Brabant and Limburg. But it's evolving,
I do have the impression that it's a very Catholic custom. It's hard to
imagine serious Protestants doing it.

ObSong: Les flamandes dansent sans sourire.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Quinn C
2017-12-11 18:58:19 UTC
Reply
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Sam Plusnet
I was reminded of those situations where friends or acquaintances
go in for one of those cheek-kissing rituals.
Is it to be one kiss?Or two? (or even three - who knows).
http://bigthink.com/strange-maps/210-french-kissing-map
Do you start on the left cheek or the right?Better get it right
or the greeting might go into injury time.
I was brought up in a non greeting-kiss family, so I have no
idea what the ground rules are.
My experience in Belgium, when I went to kiss someone, was that
the other person would say in a low voice, as our heads approached,
"deux". I never discovered whether that was help for a foreigner
who didn't know the rules, or a common custom.
I did form the impression that a single kiss had been the norm but
that it was in the process of changing to two.
Never heard it. To add to your data set: In the Netherlands the rule
used to be none, for the Northern (protestant) part, three for
Brabant and Limburg. But it's evolving,
I do have the impression that it's a very Catholic custom. It's hard to
imagine serious Protestants doing it.
I think it's primarily a French custom, which spreads to other
places. Partly the spread is to geographic neighbors, partly
through subcultures, such as the world of theater.

Here in Quebec, francophones do it much more than anglophones, and
we might be able to test which of language and religion would
prevail when you have "crossovers" (my current choir director is
such an exception, an anglo Catholic).

As for the number, in my experience with French and Quebecois
people, I've never met an expected number other than two or three,
with two being most common locally.
--
Democracy means government by the uneducated,
while aristocracy means government by the badly educated.
-- G. K. Chesterton
J. J. Lodder
2017-12-11 21:15:29 UTC
Reply
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Sam Plusnet
I was reminded of those situations where friends or acquaintances
go in for one of those cheek-kissing rituals.
Is it to be one kiss?Or two? (or even three - who knows).
http://bigthink.com/strange-maps/210-french-kissing-map
Do you start on the left cheek or the right?Better get it right
or the greeting might go into injury time.
I was brought up in a non greeting-kiss family, so I have no
idea what the ground rules are.
My experience in Belgium, when I went to kiss someone, was that
the other person would say in a low voice, as our heads approached,
"deux". I never discovered whether that was help for a foreigner
who didn't know the rules, or a common custom.
I did form the impression that a single kiss had been the norm but
that it was in the process of changing to two.
Never heard it. To add to your data set: In the Netherlands the rule
used to be none, for the Northern (protestant) part, three for
Brabant and Limburg. But it's evolving,
I do have the impression that it's a very Catholic custom. It's hard to
imagine serious Protestants doing it.
ObSong: Les flamandes dansent sans sourire.
Mais, mais, mais, Les Flamandes sont tres catholique,

Jan
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-12-12 07:51:49 UTC
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Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Sam Plusnet
I was reminded of those situations where friends or acquaintances
go in for one of those cheek-kissing rituals.
Is it to be one kiss?Or two? (or even three - who knows).
http://bigthink.com/strange-maps/210-french-kissing-map
Do you start on the left cheek or the right?Better get it right
or the greeting might go into injury time.
I was brought up in a non greeting-kiss family, so I have no
idea what the ground rules are.
My experience in Belgium, when I went to kiss someone, was that
the other person would say in a low voice, as our heads approached,
"deux". I never discovered whether that was help for a foreigner
who didn't know the rules, or a common custom.
I did form the impression that a single kiss had been the norm but
that it was in the process of changing to two.
Never heard it. To add to your data set: In the Netherlands the rule
used to be none, for the Northern (protestant) part, three for
Brabant and Limburg. But it's evolving,
I do have the impression that it's a very Catholic custom. It's hard to
imagine serious Protestants doing it.
ObSong: Les flamandes dansent sans sourire.
Mais, mais, mais, Les Flamandes sont tres catholique,
Oui, c'est cela que j'ai pensé.

As I understand it the religious boundary goes through the Netherlands,
not Belgium, and that a lot of problems would have been avoided if they
had either used that as a national frontier, putting Flanders in the
Netherlands, or else the linguistic boundary, putting Wallonia in
France. Instead they put it half way between the two.
--
athel
J. J. Lodder
2017-12-12 10:59:39 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Sam Plusnet
I was reminded of those situations where friends or acquaintances
go in for one of those cheek-kissing rituals.
Is it to be one kiss?Or two? (or even three - who knows).
http://bigthink.com/strange-maps/210-french-kissing-map
Do you start on the left cheek or the right?Better get it right
or the greeting might go into injury time.
I was brought up in a non greeting-kiss family, so I have no
idea what the ground rules are.
My experience in Belgium, when I went to kiss someone, was that
the other person would say in a low voice, as our heads approached,
"deux". I never discovered whether that was help for a foreigner
who didn't know the rules, or a common custom.
I did form the impression that a single kiss had been the norm but
that it was in the process of changing to two.
Never heard it. To add to your data set: In the Netherlands the rule
used to be none, for the Northern (protestant) part, three for
Brabant and Limburg. But it's evolving,
I do have the impression that it's a very Catholic custom. It's hard to
imagine serious Protestants doing it.
ObSong: Les flamandes dansent sans sourire.
Mais, mais, mais, Les Flamandes sont tres catholique,
Oui, c'est cela que j'ai pensé.
As I understand it the religious boundary goes through the Netherlands,
not Belgium, and that a lot of problems would have been avoided if they
had either used that as a national frontier, putting Flanders in the
Netherlands, or else the linguistic boundary, putting Wallonia in
France. Instead they put it half way between the two.
Yes, but which religious border, and which language border?
Most of Flanders -was- protestant,
but the Spaniards conquered and massacred,
and all who could flee fled to the North.
(see under 'Spanish Fury')
It broke Antwerp, and made Amsterdam.

As for the Dutch and religion,
the Republic grew by conquest of Spanish-held territories
for decades. (it really was an 80-years war of independence)
The broad rule is that those parts that were added
after the counter-Reformation took hold, ca. 1610, remained catholic.
(there is a bible belt in between)

And which language border?
The 1500 one, or the present one?
It has moved far northward,
as the result of centuries of French conquest
and a systematic policy of languicide.
All of the present departement Nord (59) and some more
was on the Flemish side of the language border.

Jan

Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-12-11 18:32:46 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Sam Plusnet
I was reminded of those situations where friends or acquaintances go
in for one of those cheek-kissing rituals.
Is it to be one kiss?Or two? (or even three - who knows).
http://bigthink.com/strange-maps/210-french-kissing-map
Do you start on the left cheek or the right?Better get it right or
the greeting might go into injury time.
I was brought up in a non greeting-kiss family, so I have no idea
what the ground rules are.
My experience in Belgium, when I went to kiss someone, was that the
other person would say in a low voice, as our heads approached, "deux".
I never discovered whether that was help for a foreigner who didn't know
the rules, or a common custom.
I did form the impression that a single kiss had been the norm but that
it was in the process of changing to two.
Although the survey I linked to is not particularly old, I have the
impression that even since then there has been a general trend towards
two. Here in Marseilles it's always been two.

Which cheek you start with remains a mystery. I try to check what
French people ahead of me in the kissing queue are doing, but they
aren't consistent.
--
athel
Quinn C
2017-12-11 04:59:47 UTC
Reply
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Sam Plusnet
I was reminded of those situations where friends or acquaintances go in
for one of those cheek-kissing rituals.
Is it to be one kiss? Or two? (or even three - who knows).
http://bigthink.com/strange-maps/210-french-kissing-map
I remember seeing the map before, but now it doesn't show up.
There's a link to it, but clicking on that says one has to be
logged in.
--
The country has its quota of fools and windbags; such people are
most prominent in politics, where their inherent weaknesses seem
less glaring and attract less ridicule than they would in other
walks of life. -- Robert Bothwell et.al.: Canada since 1945
J. J. Lodder
2017-12-11 10:02:42 UTC
Reply
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Post by Quinn C
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Sam Plusnet
I was reminded of those situations where friends or acquaintances go in
for one of those cheek-kissing rituals.
Is it to be one kiss? Or two? (or even three - who knows).
http://bigthink.com/strange-maps/210-french-kissing-map
I remember seeing the map before, but now it doesn't show up.
There's a link to it, but clicking on that says one has to be
logged in.
Google images for: 'french-kissing-map' brings up many examples.

Jan
Tak To
2017-12-11 16:20:09 UTC
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Post by Quinn C
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Sam Plusnet
I was reminded of those situations where friends or acquaintances go in
for one of those cheek-kissing rituals.
Is it to be one kiss? Or two? (or even three - who knows).
http://bigthink.com/strange-maps/210-french-kissing-map
I remember seeing the map before, but now it doesn't show up.
There's a link to it, but clicking on that says one has to be
logged in.
I got from the above web page the to following link without
any problem.
http://combiendebises.free.fr/

The data come from the survey that is conducted on the same
web page. It asks for department, number of kisses, and
which cheek first. However, the result of the last question
is not posted.

I recall reading from somewhere, probably one of Peter Mayle's
book about Provence, that it was three among women and one or
two (?) otherwise. The survey does not allow a gender
difference. From the map, Provence seems to be divided into
2's and 3's.
--
Tak
----------------------------------------------------------------+-----
Tak To ***@alum.mit.eduxx
--------------------------------------------------------------------^^
[taode takto ~{LU5B~}] NB: trim the xx to get my real email addr
Quinn C
2017-12-11 17:55:20 UTC
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Post by Tak To
Post by Quinn C
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Sam Plusnet
I was reminded of those situations where friends or acquaintances go in
for one of those cheek-kissing rituals.
Is it to be one kiss? Or two? (or even three - who knows).
http://bigthink.com/strange-maps/210-french-kissing-map
I remember seeing the map before, but now it doesn't show up.
There's a link to it, but clicking on that says one has to be
logged in.
I got from the above web page the to following link without
any problem.
http://combiendebises.free.fr/
Thanks. I wasn't in the mood for clicking every link on the page
at the time.
--
If the aeroplane industry had advanced at the same rate as the
computer industry, today's planes could circumnavigate the world
in ten seconds, be two inches long, and crash twice a day.
Peter Moylan in alt.usage.english
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-12-11 18:33:52 UTC
Reply
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Post by Quinn C
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Sam Plusnet
I was reminded of those situations where friends or acquaintances go in
for one of those cheek-kissing rituals.
Is it to be one kiss? Or two? (or even three - who knows).
http://bigthink.com/strange-maps/210-french-kissing-map
I remember seeing the map before, but now it doesn't show up.
There's a link to it, but clicking on that says one has to be
logged in.
Yes, that's what it said to me yesterday. But the information is given
in the text.
--
athel
Tak To
2017-12-02 17:35:27 UTC
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Post by Dingbat
What's the equivalent of "no sweat" in UK English?
.... or "no worries" or "no problem"
"No sweat" of which dialect?

In the US both "no problem" and "no sweat" are used, though the
latter is more casual, more suitable for replying to the request
for a special favor.
--
Tak
----------------------------------------------------------------+-----
Tak To ***@alum.mit.eduxx
--------------------------------------------------------------------^^
[taode takto ~{LU5B~}] NB: trim the xx to get my real email addr
David Kleinecke
2017-12-02 18:17:01 UTC
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Post by Tak To
Post by Dingbat
What's the equivalent of "no sweat" in UK English?
.... or "no worries" or "no problem"
"No sweat" of which dialect?
In the US both "no problem" and "no sweat" are used, though the
latter is more casual, more suitable for replying to the request
for a special favor.
I hear "No problema" and "De nada" often even from people
who don't speak Spanish.
Mark Brader
2017-12-02 22:29:56 UTC
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Post by David Kleinecke
In the US both "no problem" and "no sweat" are used...
I hear "No problema" and "De nada" often even from people
who don't speak Spanish.
I don't know if I've ever heard "No problema", but I've certainly
heard and probably used "No problemo". Which apparently proves
that *I* don't speak Spanish!
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "Operating systems are too important
***@vex.net | to be 'visionary'." --Linus Torvalds
Tak To
2017-12-03 05:01:57 UTC
Reply
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Post by Mark Brader
Post by David Kleinecke
In the US both "no problem" and "no sweat" are used...
I hear "No problema" and "De nada" often even from people
who don't speak Spanish.
I don't know if I've ever heard "No problema", but I've certainly
heard and probably used "No problemo". Which apparently proves
that *I* don't speak Spanish!
I have heard far more "no problemo" than "no problema". Both
Wikip and UrbanDictionary have an entry for "no problemo".
There is apparently a restaurant of that name in New Bedford,
MA.
--
Tak
----------------------------------------------------------------+-----
Tak To ***@alum.mit.eduxx
--------------------------------------------------------------------^^
[taode takto ~{LU5B~}] NB: trim the xx to get my real email addr
Ken Blake
2017-12-03 15:17:51 UTC
Reply
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Post by Tak To
Post by Mark Brader
Post by David Kleinecke
In the US both "no problem" and "no sweat" are used...
I hear "No problema" and "De nada" often even from people
who don't speak Spanish.
I don't know if I've ever heard "No problema", but I've certainly
heard and probably used "No problemo". Which apparently proves
that *I* don't speak Spanish!
I have heard far more "no problemo" than "no problema". Both
Wikip and UrbanDictionary have an entry for "no problemo".
There is apparently a restaurant of that name in New Bedford,
MA.
I don't speak Spanish, and I thought perhaps I was wrong and the "no
problema" that I thought I had often heard was actually "no problemo,"
so I just looked it up
Stefan Ram
2017-12-03 15:59:45 UTC
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Nope, I was right. It's "no problema."
The Greek πρόβλημα is neuter, and neuter nouns usually become
masculine in Spanish, so it's «el problema».
Jerry Friedman
2017-12-03 16:39:29 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Tak To
Post by Mark Brader
Post by David Kleinecke
In the US both "no problem" and "no sweat" are used...
I hear "No problema" and "De nada" often even from people
who don't speak Spanish.
I don't know if I've ever heard "No problema", but I've certainly
heard and probably used "No problemo". Which apparently proves
that *I* don't speak Spanish!
I have heard far more "no problemo" than "no problema". Both
Wikip and UrbanDictionary have an entry for "no problemo".
There is apparently a restaurant of that name in New Bedford,
MA.
I don't speak Spanish, and I thought perhaps I was wrong and the "no
problema" that I thought I had often heard was actually "no problemo,"
so I just looked it up.
Nope, I was right. It's "no problema."
That's Spanish, but "no problemo" is common in English. Maybe not so
much in Arizona.


COCA (the Corpus of Contemporary American English) has

no problemo: 34
no problema: 16

It looks to me as if a greater fraction of the "no problema" instances
are from real or fictional Spanish speakers.
--
Jerry Friedman
Ken Blake
2017-12-03 19:43:00 UTC
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On Sun, 3 Dec 2017 09:39:29 -0700, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Tak To
Post by Mark Brader
Post by David Kleinecke
In the US both "no problem" and "no sweat" are used...
I hear "No problema" and "De nada" often even from people
who don't speak Spanish.
I don't know if I've ever heard "No problema", but I've certainly
heard and probably used "No problemo". Which apparently proves
that *I* don't speak Spanish!
I have heard far more "no problemo" than "no problema". Both
Wikip and UrbanDictionary have an entry for "no problemo".
There is apparently a restaurant of that name in New Bedford,
MA.
I don't speak Spanish, and I thought perhaps I was wrong and the "no
problema" that I thought I had often heard was actually "no problemo,"
so I just looked it up.
Nope, I was right. It's "no problema."
That's Spanish, but "no problemo" is common in English. Maybe not so
much in Arizona.
Could b
Quinn C
2017-12-05 22:50:59 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Tak To
Post by Mark Brader
Post by David Kleinecke
In the US both "no problem" and "no sweat" are used...
I hear "No problema" and "De nada" often even from people
who don't speak Spanish.
I don't know if I've ever heard "No problema", but I've certainly
heard and probably used "No problemo". Which apparently proves
that *I* don't speak Spanish!
I have heard far more "no problemo" than "no problema". Both
Wikip and UrbanDictionary have an entry for "no problemo".
There is apparently a restaurant of that name in New Bedford,
MA.
I don't speak Spanish, and I thought perhaps I was wrong and the "no
problema" that I thought I had often heard was actually "no problemo,"
so I just looked it up.
Nope, I was right. It's "no problema."
That's Spanish, but "no problemo" is common in English. Maybe not so
much in Arizona.
COCA (the Corpus of Contemporary American English) has
no problemo: 34
no problema: 16
It looks to me as if a greater fraction of the "no problema" instances
are from real or fictional Spanish speakers.
Did Alf say "no problemo"?

He was responsible for the temporary (at least 10 years, though)
popularity of the phrase "null Problemo" in German.
--
- It's the title search for the Rachel property.
Guess who owns it?
- Tell me it's not that bastard Donald Trump.
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Tak To
2017-12-03 18:01:59 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
Post by Tak To
Post by Mark Brader
Post by David Kleinecke
In the US both "no problem" and "no sweat" are used...
I hear "No problema" and "De nada" often even from people
who don't speak Spanish.
I don't know if I've ever heard "No problema", but I've certainly
heard and probably used "No problemo". Which apparently proves
that *I* don't speak Spanish!
I have heard far more "no problemo" than "no problema". Both
Wikip and UrbanDictionary have an entry for "no problemo".
There is apparently a restaurant of that name in New Bedford,
MA.
I don't speak Spanish, and I thought perhaps I was wrong and the "no
problema" that I thought I had often heard was actually "no problemo,"
so I just looked it up.
Nope, I was right. It's "no problema."
Looked up where?

Since you do not speak Spanish, mostly likely you hear the
phrase occurring in a conversations that is conducted mainly
in English.

And unless you have other clues, you have no idea if the
speaker is using a Spanish phrase (or truncated sentence)
or a pseudo-Spanish phrase. Looking up a Spanish dictionary
is irrelevant if the speaker is doing the latter.

Prescriptive vs descriptive.

----- -----

I do not speak Spanish and here are my questions:

- Is the form "no <noun>" idiomatic in Spanish?
- Is "no problema" idiomatic in Spanish?
- Which of "no problema" and "no hay problema" is more likely to
be used by a native Spanish speaker?
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Tak
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Tak To ***@alum.mit.eduxx
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[taode takto ~{LU5B~}] NB: trim the xx to get my real email addr
Ken Blake
2017-12-03 19:53:29 UTC
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Post by Tak To
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Tak To
Post by Mark Brader
Post by David Kleinecke
In the US both "no problem" and "no sweat" are used...
I hear "No problema" and "De nada" often even from people
who don't speak Spanish.
I don't know if I've ever heard "No problema", but I've certainly
heard and probably used "No problemo". Which apparently proves
that *I* don't speak Spanish!
I have heard far more "no problemo" than "no problema". Both
Wikip and UrbanDictionary have an entry for "no problemo".
There is apparently a restaurant of that name in New Bedford,
MA.
I don't speak Spanish, and I thought perhaps I was wrong and the "no
problema" that I thought I had often heard was actually "no problemo,"
so I just looked it up.
Nope, I was right. It's "no problema."
Looked up where?
Google. I looked at a couple of web sites, but I don't remember which.
Post by Tak To
Since you do not speak Spanish, mostly likely you hear the
phrase occurring in a conversations that is conducted mainly
in English.
Yes, but some of those conversations are with Spanish-speaking people.
For example, my gardener is Mexican, and I've head him say "no
problema" many times.
Post by Tak To
- Is the form "no <noun>" idiomatic in Spanish?
With nouns other than "problema," I don't know. But I suspect so, at
least in the Spanish in Mexico.
Post by Tak To
- Is "no problema" idiomatic in Spanish?
I've heard it from Mexicans so many times that I'm almost sure it is
Post by Tak To
- Which of "no problema" and "no hay problema" is more likely to
be used by a native Spanish speaker?
As I understand it, "no hay problems" is grammatically correct, and
"no problema" is not. But again, I've heard "no problema" from
Mexicans so many times that I'm almost sure it's preferred by
Mexicans. Which is preferred by Spaniards or speakers of Spanish from
other countri
Ken Blake
2017-12-02 20:21:51 UTC
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Post by Tak To
Post by Dingbat
What's the equivalent of "no sweat" in UK English?
.... or "no worries" or "no problem"
"No sweat" of which dialect?
In the US both "no problem" and "no sweat" are used, though the
latter is more casual, more suitable for replying to the request
for a special favor.
You also hear "no problema" a lot, especial
Brian Austin
2017-12-02 18:22:49 UTC
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Bob's your uncle?

On Sat, 2 Dec 2017 06:01:37 -0800 (PST), Dingbat
Post by Dingbat
What's the equivalent of "no sweat" in UK English?
... or "no worries" or "no problem"
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Stefan Ram
2017-12-03 07:52:25 UTC
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Post by Dingbat
What's the equivalent of "no sweat" in UK English?
What I often have read is the verb "to sweat" as in

"Don't sweat the small stuff.".

Is this also specifically an American usage?
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