Discussion:
Jean-Claude Juncker: 'English is losing importance'
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Dr. Jai Maharaj
2017-05-06 20:21:06 UTC
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Jean-Claude Juncker: 'English is losing importance'

The European Commission president opted to deliver a
speech in Florence in French.

By Ryan Heath
politico.eu
Friday, May 5, 2017

Florence -- Jean-Claude Juncker, the European Commission
president, opted to deliver a speech in French on Friday
morning because he said "English is losing importance" in
Europe.

He gave the comments, which are unlikely to mend fences
after a war of words between Brussels and London over
Brexit negotiations, at the "State of the Union"
conference in Florence's Palazzo Vecchio -- an annual
event for European dignitaries.

Juncker said he was opting for French because "slowly but
surely English is losing importance in Europe and France
has elections this Sunday and I want the French people to
understand what I am saying about the importance of the
EU."

The Commission president tackled the row that erupted
over a private meeting he had with U.K. Prime Minister
Theresa May last week. Following the meeting Juncker
reportedly said: "I leave Downing Street 10 times more
skeptical than I was before." May gave a speech on the
steps of Downing Street on Thursday in which she said
some in Europe were trying influence the British
election.

Continues at:

http://www.politico.eu/article/jean-claude-juncker-english-is-losing-importance/

Jai Maharaj, Jyotishi
Om Shanti

http://bit.do/jaimaharaj
Joe Fineman
2017-05-06 22:27:21 UTC
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Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Jean-Claude Juncker: 'English is losing importance'
It still has a lot of importance to lose.
--
--- Joe Fineman ***@verizon.net

||: They demand patience -- right now! :||
occam
2017-05-07 07:19:21 UTC
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Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Jean-Claude Juncker: 'English is losing importance'
It still has a lot of importance to lose.
In fact, within the EU, its importance has been rising for the last two
decades with the joining of the Eastern European countries like Poland,
Hungary, Romania, not to mention the Baltic countries Latvia, Lithuania
and Estonia. The corrupt Luxembourger knows that very well, yet it
serves his current concerns to pander to francophones because he does
not want to contemplate the consequences of a Frexit.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-05-07 08:30:16 UTC
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Post by occam
Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Jean-Claude Juncker: 'English is losing importance'
It still has a lot of importance to lose.
In fact, within the EU, its importance has been rising for the last two
decades with the joining of the Eastern European countries like Poland,
Hungary, Romania, not to mention the Baltic countries Latvia, Lithuania
and Estonia. The corrupt Luxembourger knows that very well, yet it
serves his current concerns to pander to francophones because he does
not want to contemplate the consequences of a Frexit.
+1
--
athel
Richard Tobin
2017-05-08 07:36:06 UTC
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Post by occam
Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Jean-Claude Juncker: 'English is losing importance'
It still has a lot of importance to lose.
In fact, within the EU, its importance has been rising for the last two
decades with the joining of the Eastern European countries like Poland,
Hungary, Romania, not to mention the Baltic countries Latvia, Lithuania
and Estonia.
And it is of course the language spoken by most people in Ireland.

-- Richard
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-05-08 10:43:47 UTC
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Post by Richard Tobin
Post by occam
Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Jean-Claude Juncker: 'English is losing importance'
It still has a lot of importance to lose.
In fact, within the EU, its importance has been rising for the last two
decades with the joining of the Eastern European countries like Poland,
Hungary, Romania, not to mention the Baltic countries Latvia, Lithuania
and Estonia.
And it is of course the language spoken by most people in Ireland.
-- Richard
I seem to remember that the last time this matter come up I commented
that the use of English in the EU, formally or informally, might
increase with the departure of the UK. The psychological effect of its
no longer being the language of a major (in size) member of the Union
would help it to be treated as a "neutral" language which can be used
without showing any sort of bias towards a member state.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
occam
2017-05-08 10:52:40 UTC
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Post by Richard Tobin
Post by occam
Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Jean-Claude Juncker: 'English is losing importance'
It still has a lot of importance to lose.
In fact, within the EU, its importance has been rising for the last two
decades with the joining of the Eastern European countries like Poland,
Hungary, Romania, not to mention the Baltic countries Latvia, Lithuania
and Estonia.
And it is of course the language spoken by most people in Ireland.
Indeed.
More than a few times I've heard English referred to - ironically - as
the 'lingua franca' of the EU.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-05-08 17:04:24 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by occam
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by occam
Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Jean-Claude Juncker: 'English is losing importance'
It still has a lot of importance to lose.
In fact, within the EU, its importance has been rising for the last two
decades with the joining of the Eastern European countries like Poland,
Hungary, Romania, not to mention the Baltic countries Latvia, Lithuania
and Estonia.
And it is of course the language spoken by most people in Ireland.
Indeed.
More than a few times I've heard English referred to - ironically - as
the 'lingua franca' of the EU.
The first time I heard two people who not native speakers (Italian and
Israeli, if memory serves) conversing in English I was surprised.
However, that was in the 1960s; nowadays one hears it all the time,
even with Spanish and Portuguese. (On that occasion the Portuguese guy
told me that he had no trouble understanding Spanish, but that Spanish
people could make no sense of Portuguese.)
--
athel
Robert Bannister
2017-05-09 01:51:50 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by occam
Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Jean-Claude Juncker: 'English is losing importance'
It still has a lot of importance to lose.
In fact, within the EU, its importance has been rising for the last two
decades with the joining of the Eastern European countries like Poland,
Hungary, Romania, not to mention the Baltic countries Latvia, Lithuania
and Estonia.
And it is of course the language spoken by most people in Ireland.
Indeed.
More than a few times I've heard English referred to - ironically - as
the 'lingua franca' of the EU.
The first time I heard two people who not native speakers (Italian and
Israeli, if memory serves) conversing in English I was surprised.
However, that was in the 1960s; nowadays one hears it all the time, even
with Spanish and Portuguese. (On that occasion the Portuguese guy told
me that he had no trouble understanding Spanish, but that Spanish people
could make no sense of Portuguese.)
I heard something similar from a girl who came from Galicia (Spain):
something like "We can understand the Portuguese and they can understand
us. We can understand people from Madrid too, but they don't understand
us so we have to speak in English".
--
Robert B. born England a long time ago;
Western Australia since 1972
Robert Bannister
2017-05-09 01:54:15 UTC
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Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by occam
Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Jean-Claude Juncker: 'English is losing importance'
It still has a lot of importance to lose.
In fact, within the EU, its importance has been rising for the last two
decades with the joining of the Eastern European countries like Poland,
Hungary, Romania, not to mention the Baltic countries Latvia, Lithuania
and Estonia.
And it is of course the language spoken by most people in Ireland.
Indeed.
More than a few times I've heard English referred to - ironically - as
the 'lingua franca' of the EU.
The first time I heard two people who not native speakers (Italian and
Israeli, if memory serves) conversing in English I was surprised.
However, that was in the 1960s; nowadays one hears it all the time,
even with Spanish and Portuguese. (On that occasion the Portuguese guy
told me that he had no trouble understanding Spanish, but that Spanish
people could make no sense of Portuguese.)
something like "We can understand the Portuguese and they can understand
us. We can understand people from Madrid too, but they don't understand
us so we have to speak in English".
I should have added that I was pretty certain she was exaggerating and
that she could speak perfect Castilian if she wanted to.
--
Robert B. born England a long time ago;
Western Australia since 1972
HVS
2017-05-09 05:00:22 UTC
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On Tue, 9 May 2017 09:51:50 +0800, Robert Bannister
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by occam
Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Jean-Claude Juncker: 'English is losing importance'
It still has a lot of importance to lose.
In fact, within the EU, its importance has been rising for the last two
decades with the joining of the Eastern European countries like Poland,
Hungary, Romania, not to mention the Baltic countries Latvia, Lithuania
and Estonia.
And it is of course the language spoken by most people in
Ireland.
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Indeed.
More than a few times I've heard English referred to -
ironically - as
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
the 'lingua franca' of the EU.
The first time I heard two people who not native speakers
(Italian and
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Israeli, if memory serves) conversing in English I was surprised.
However, that was in the 1960s; nowadays one hears it all the time, even
with Spanish and Portuguese. (On that occasion the Portuguese guy told
me that he had no trouble understanding Spanish, but that Spanish people
could make no sense of Portuguese.)
I heard something similar from a girl who came from Galicia
something like "We can understand the Portuguese and they can
understand
Post by Robert Bannister
us. We can understand people from Madrid too, but they don't
understand
Post by Robert Bannister
us so we have to speak in English".
On my first visit to Italy - about 40 years ago - the woman who was
manning (personing?) the tourist office kiosk in Sienna where you
could book a hotel room indicated that she spoke only a little bit of
English. My Italian was bordering on non-existent, but she was
visibly relieved when I asked (in broken Italian) if she spoke
French.

(I felt ever so grown-up and sophisticated, even though I undoubtedly
exhibited every tell-tale characteristics of a naive traveller.)

I could be wrong, but I suspect her modern-day equivalent uses
English as the default common language.
--
Cheers, Harvey
CanE (30 years) & BrE (34 years),
indiscriminately mixed
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-05-09 06:48:16 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by HVS
On Tue, 9 May 2017 09:51:50 +0800, Robert Bannister
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by occam
Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Jean-Claude Juncker: 'English is losing importance'
It still has a lot of importance to lose.
In fact, within the EU, its importance has been rising for the
last two
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by occam
decades with the joining of the Eastern European countries
like Poland,
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by occam
Hungary, Romania, not to mention the Baltic countries Latvia,
Lithuania
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by occam
and Estonia.
And it is of course the language spoken by most people in
Ireland.
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Indeed.
More than a few times I've heard English referred to -
ironically - as
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
the 'lingua franca' of the EU.
The first time I heard two people who not native speakers
(Italian and
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Israeli, if memory serves) conversing in English I was surprised.
However, that was in the 1960s; nowadays one hears it all the
time, even
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
with Spanish and Portuguese. (On that occasion the Portuguese guy
told
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
me that he had no trouble understanding Spanish, but that Spanish
people
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
could make no sense of Portuguese.)
I heard something similar from a girl who came from Galicia
something like "We can understand the Portuguese and they can
understand
Post by Robert Bannister
us. We can understand people from Madrid too, but they don't
understand
Post by Robert Bannister
us so we have to speak in English".
On my first visit to Italy - about 40 years ago - the woman who was
manning (personing?)
A question I've often asked myself! I'd probably go for womanning if I
didn't cop out and rephrase it.

What about manhandling if a group of women carry a large piece of
furniture. Are they womanhandling it?
Post by HVS
the tourist office kiosk in Sienna where you could book a hotel room
indicated that she spoke only a little bit of English. My Italian was
bordering on non-existent, but she was visibly relieved when I asked
(in broken Italian) if she spoke French.
(I felt ever so grown-up and sophisticated, even though I undoubtedly
exhibited every tell-tale characteristics of a naive traveller.)
I could be wrong, but I suspect her modern-day equivalent uses English
as the default common language.
--
athel
HVS
2017-05-09 07:40:47 UTC
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Raw Message
On Tue, 9 May 2017 08:48:16 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by HVS
On my first visit to Italy - about 40 years ago - the woman who was
manning (personing?)
A question I've often asked myself! I'd probably go for womanning if I
didn't cop out and rephrase it.
When I'm not being silly? "Staffing" works fine.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
What about manhandling if a group of women carry a large piece of
furniture. Are they womanhandling it?
Different "man-" prefix, innit. That's the one relating to hands
(like "manipulation").
--
Cheers, Harvey
CanE (30 years) & BrE (34 years),
indiscriminately mixed
Mark Brader
2017-05-09 08:25:43 UTC
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Post by HVS
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
What about manhandling if a group of women carry a large piece of
furniture. Are they womanhandling it?
Different "man-" prefix, innit. That's the one relating to hands
(like "manipulation").
Do you really believe that that's a likely formation, when it would be
in combination with the Germanic "handle"?

Most of the online dictionaries don't bother giving an etymology for
"manhandle", presumably because it's such an obvious compound word.
My RHU and the OED Online confirm that origin, i.e. that it's "man"
+ "handle" (though it may also be connected to "mangle", whose origin
is more complicated).

However, I did not find a source other than Wiktionary that indicates
whether the word "man" in the compound is meant in the masculine or
the gender-neutral sense. My feeling is that it's obviously the
masculine sense in origin, but does not imply that the manhandler
actually is male, and so the answer to Athel's question is "only if
they're trying to make a point, or a joke, about language."
--
Mark Brader, Toronto "Neither a follower nor a leader be."
***@vex.net --Steve Summit (after Shakespeare)

My text in this article is in the public domain.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-05-09 10:52:49 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
Post by HVS
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
What about manhandling if a group of women carry a large piece of
furniture. Are they womanhandling it?
Different "man-" prefix, innit. That's the one relating to hands
(like "manipulation").
Do you really believe that that's a likely formation, when it would be
in combination with the Germanic "handle"?
Most of the online dictionaries don't bother giving an etymology for
"manhandle", presumably because it's such an obvious compound word.
My RHU and the OED Online confirm that origin, i.e. that it's "man"
+ "handle" (though it may also be connected to "mangle", whose origin
is more complicated).
However, I did not find a source other than Wiktionary that indicates
whether the word "man" in the compound is meant in the masculine or
the gender-neutral sense. My feeling is that it's obviously the
masculine sense in origin, but does not imply that the manhandler
actually is male, and so the answer to Athel's question is "only if
they're trying to make a point, or a joke, about language."
There is also the point that "manhandler" could be interpreted as
someone, even something, that handles a man.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-05-09 18:39:35 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Mark Brader
Post by HVS
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
What about manhandling if a group of women carry a large piece of
furniture. Are they womanhandling it?
Different "man-" prefix, innit. That's the one relating to hands
(like "manipulation").
Do you really believe that that's a likely formation, when it would be
in combination with the Germanic "handle"?
Most of the online dictionaries don't bother giving an etymology for
"manhandle", presumably because it's such an obvious compound word.
My RHU and the OED Online confirm that origin, i.e. that it's "man"
+ "handle" (though it may also be connected to "mangle", whose origin
is more complicated).
However, I did not find a source other than Wiktionary that indicates
whether the word "man" in the compound is meant in the masculine or
the gender-neutral sense. My feeling is that it's obviously the
masculine sense in origin, but does not imply that the manhandler
actually is male, and so the answer to Athel's question is "only if
they're trying to make a point, or a joke, about language."
There is also the point that "manhandler" could be interpreted as
someone, even something, that handles a man.
Indeed. That has been one of the things I've wondered about.
--
athel
HVS
2017-05-09 12:58:51 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Mark Brader
Post by HVS
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
What about manhandling if a group of women carry a large piece of
furniture. Are they womanhandling it?
Different "man-" prefix, innit. That's the one relating to hands
(like "manipulation").
Do you really believe that that's a likely formation, when it would be
in combination with the Germanic "handle"?
Fair cop, guv; was a bit of a first-thought WAG.
(I was thinking of it as a sort of retronym - "manually handled" as
opposed to "mechanically handled".)
Post by Mark Brader
Most of the online dictionaries don't bother giving an etymology for
"manhandle", presumably because it's such an obvious compound word.
My RHU and the OED Online confirm that origin, i.e. that it's "man"
+ "handle" (though it may also be connected to "mangle", whose
origin
Post by Mark Brader
is more complicated)
However, I did not find a source other than Wiktionary that
indicates
Post by Mark Brader
whether the word "man" in the compound is meant in the masculine or
the gender-neutral sense. My feeling is that it's obviously the
masculine sense in origin, but does not imply that the manhandler
actually is male, and so the answer to Athel's question is "only if
they're trying to make a point, or a joke, about language."
--
Cheers, Harvey
CanE (30 years) & BrE (34 years),
indiscriminately mixed
Richard Tobin
2017-05-09 13:23:33 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Mark Brader
Post by HVS
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
What about manhandling if a group of women carry a large piece of
furniture. Are they womanhandling it?
Different "man-" prefix, innit. That's the one relating to hands
(like "manipulation").
Do you really believe that that's a likely formation, when it would be
in combination with the Germanic "handle"?
Most of the online dictionaries don't bother giving an etymology for
"manhandle", presumably because it's such an obvious compound word.
My RHU and the OED Online confirm that origin, i.e. that it's "man"
+ "handle" (though it may also be connected to "mangle", whose origin
is more complicated).
I don't think the OED "confirms" man+handle as the origin. It says:

Perhaps originally a variant of mangle v.1 (compare modern regional
manghangle, manangle to mangle or confuse (Eng. Dial. Dict.)), but
in all quots. as if < man n.1 + handle v.1, and in senses 2 and 3
evidently taken to be so. In modern use in sense 1 perhaps a
development from sense 3.

[Sense 1 is handle roughly, 2 is wield a tool, 3 is move by hand]

-- Richard
CDB
2017-05-09 17:15:10 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Mark Brader
Post by HVS
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
What about manhandling if a group of women carry a large piece of
furniture. Are they womanhandling it?
Different "man-" prefix, innit. That's the one relating to hands
(like "manipulation").
Do you really believe that that's a likely formation, when it would
be in combination with the Germanic "handle"?
Most of the online dictionaries don't bother giving an etymology for
"manhandle", presumably because it's such an obvious compound word.
My RHU and the OED Online confirm that origin, i.e. that it's "man" +
"handle" (though it may also be connected to "mangle", whose origin
is more complicated).
However, I did not find a source other than Wiktionary that
indicates whether the word "man" in the compound is meant in the
masculine or the gender-neutral sense. My feeling is that it's
obviously the masculine sense in origin, but does not imply that the
manhandler actually is male, and so the answer to Athel's question is
"only if they're trying to make a point, or a joke, about language."
The ladies from the first para could horse the piano up those stairs. I
used the word once when I was stuck in an elevator, over the intercom to
the service people. I had gotten tired of waiting for them to show up,
and buzzed them again to say I was going to horse the door open and
leave. I don't know if I damaged it further, because I hadn't given
them a name.

"A farting horse is a strong horse."
Janet
2017-05-09 11:50:27 UTC
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In article <***@mid.individual.net>, ***@imm.cnrs.fr
says...
Subject: Re: Jean-Claude Juncker: 'English is losing importance'
Newsgroups: alt.usage.english
[quoted text muted]
understand
Post by Robert Bannister
us so we have to speak in English".
On my first visit to Italy - about 40 years ago - the woman who was
manning (personing?)
A question I've often asked myself! I'd probably go for womanning if I
didn't cop out and rephrase it.
What about manhandling if a group of women carry a large piece of
furniture. Are they womanhandling it?
I've just come in for a rest, to recover from manhandling a compost
container from one end of the garden to it's new location at the other
end. If any further proof is needed of my manpowerfulness, I did it
singlehanded using two hands, language that some might consider
unfeminine, and wearing trousers.

Janet.
Robert Bannister
2017-05-10 04:05:36 UTC
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Post by HVS
On Tue, 9 May 2017 09:51:50 +0800, Robert Bannister
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by occam
Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Jean-Claude Juncker: 'English is losing importance'
It still has a lot of importance to lose.
In fact, within the EU, its importance has been rising for the
last two
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by occam
decades with the joining of the Eastern European countries
like Poland,
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by occam
Hungary, Romania, not to mention the Baltic countries Latvia,
Lithuania
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by occam
and Estonia.
And it is of course the language spoken by most people in
Ireland.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Indeed.
More than a few times I've heard English referred to -
ironically - as
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
the 'lingua franca' of the EU.
The first time I heard two people who not native speakers
(Italian and
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Israeli, if memory serves) conversing in English I was surprised. >
However, that was in the 1960s; nowadays one hears it all the
time, even
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
with Spanish and Portuguese. (On that occasion the Portuguese guy
told
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
me that he had no trouble understanding Spanish, but that Spanish
people
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
could make no sense of Portuguese.)
I heard something similar from a girl who came from Galicia
something like "We can understand the Portuguese and they can
understand
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
us. We can understand people from Madrid too, but they don't
understand
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
us so we have to speak in English".
On my first visit to Italy - about 40 years ago - the woman who was
manning (personing?) the tourist office kiosk in Sienna where you could
book a hotel room indicated that she spoke only a little bit of English.
My Italian was bordering on non-existent, but she was visibly relieved
when I asked (in broken Italian) if she spoke French.
(I felt ever so grown-up and sophisticated, even though I undoubtedly
exhibited every tell-tale characteristics of a naive traveller.)
I could be wrong, but I suspect her modern-day equivalent uses English
as the default common language.
I remember a conversation with an Armenian lady in what was then
Leningrad. I felt proud that my Russian was slightly better than hers,
but we both struggled.
--
Robert B. born England a long time ago;
Western Australia since 1972
charles
2017-05-09 07:13:47 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by occam
Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Jean-Claude Juncker: 'English is losing importance'
It still has a lot of importance to lose.
In fact, within the EU, its importance has been rising for the last
two decades with the joining of the Eastern European countries like
Poland, Hungary, Romania, not to mention the Baltic countries
Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia.
And it is of course the language spoken by most people in Ireland.
Indeed. More than a few times I've heard English referred to -
ironically - as the 'lingua franca' of the EU.
The first time I heard two people who not native speakers (Italian and
Israeli, if memory serves) conversing in English I was surprised.
However, that was in the 1960s; nowadays one hears it all the time,
even with Spanish and Portuguese. (On that occasion the Portuguese guy
told me that he had no trouble understanding Spanish, but that Spanish
people could make no sense of Portuguese.)
something like "We can understand the Portuguese and they can understand
us. We can understand people from Madrid too, but they don't understand
us so we have to speak in English".
We were in Galacia a couple of months ago - to get served in one restaurant
we needed to speak German
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
J. J. Lodder
2017-05-09 09:28:53 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by charles
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by occam
Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Jean-Claude Juncker: 'English is losing importance'
It still has a lot of importance to lose.
In fact, within the EU, its importance has been rising for the last
two decades with the joining of the Eastern European countries like
Poland, Hungary, Romania, not to mention the Baltic countries
Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia.
And it is of course the language spoken by most people in Ireland.
Indeed. More than a few times I've heard English referred to -
ironically - as the 'lingua franca' of the EU.
The first time I heard two people who not native speakers (Italian and
Israeli, if memory serves) conversing in English I was surprised.
However, that was in the 1960s; nowadays one hears it all the time,
even with Spanish and Portuguese. (On that occasion the Portuguese guy
told me that he had no trouble understanding Spanish, but that Spanish
people could make no sense of Portuguese.)
something like "We can understand the Portuguese and they can understand
us. We can understand people from Madrid too, but they don't understand
us so we have to speak in English".
We were in Galacia a couple of months ago - to get served in one restaurant
we needed to speak German
In Northern Spain and Portugal French may work as well,
or better.
In the post WWII period many Portugese and Spaniards
worked in France.
There is a good train connection,

Jan
charles
2017-05-09 10:42:43 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by charles
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by occam
Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Jean-Claude Juncker: 'English is losing importance'
It still has a lot of importance to lose.
In fact, within the EU, its importance has been rising for the
last two decades with the joining of the Eastern European
countries like Poland, Hungary, Romania, not to mention the
Baltic countries Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia.
And it is of course the language spoken by most people in Ireland.
Indeed. More than a few times I've heard English referred to -
ironically - as the 'lingua franca' of the EU.
The first time I heard two people who not native speakers (Italian
and Israeli, if memory serves) conversing in English I was
surprised. However, that was in the 1960s; nowadays one hears it
all the time, even with Spanish and Portuguese. (On that occasion
the Portuguese guy told me that he had no trouble understanding
Spanish, but that Spanish people could make no sense of Portuguese.)
something like "We can understand the Portuguese and they can
understand us. We can understand people from Madrid too, but they
don't understand us so we have to speak in English".
We were in Galacia a couple of months ago - to get served in one
restaurant we needed to speak German
In Northern Spain and Portugal French may work as well, or better. In the
post WWII period many Portugese and Spaniards worked in France. There is
a good train connection,
Tried that - no use. Remember the string german link in the 1930s.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-05-09 18:43:42 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by charles
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by occam
Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Jean-Claude Juncker: 'English is losing importance'
It still has a lot of importance to lose.
In fact, within the EU, its importance has been rising for the last
two decades with the joining of the Eastern European countries like
Poland, Hungary, Romania, not to mention the Baltic countries
Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia.
And it is of course the language spoken by most people in Ireland.
Indeed. More than a few times I've heard English referred to -
ironically - as the 'lingua franca' of the EU.
The first time I heard two people who not native speakers (Italian and
Israeli, if memory serves) conversing in English I was surprised.
However, that was in the 1960s; nowadays one hears it all the time,
even with Spanish and Portuguese. (On that occasion the Portuguese guy
told me that he had no trouble understanding Spanish, but that Spanish
people could make no sense of Portuguese.)
something like "We can understand the Portuguese and they can understand
us. We can understand people from Madrid too, but they don't understand
us so we have to speak in English".
We were in Galacia a couple of months ago - to get served in one restaurant
we needed to speak German
In Northern Spain and Portugal French may work as well,
or better.
In the post WWII period many Portugese and Spaniards
worked in France.
When we first came here 30 there were still lots of Spanish people, but
a lot of them have gone back to Spain. Whether there are still plenty
of Portuguese is difficult to know, because most of them speak French
with almost no accent.
Post by J. J. Lodder
There is a good train connection,
Jan
--
athel
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-05-08 18:51:55 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by occam
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by occam
Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Jean-Claude Juncker: 'English is losing importance'
It still has a lot of importance to lose.
In fact, within the EU, its importance has been rising for the last two
decades with the joining of the Eastern European countries like Poland,
Hungary, Romania, not to mention the Baltic countries Latvia, Lithuania
and Estonia.
And it is of course the language spoken by most people in Ireland.
Indeed.
More than a few times I've heard English referred to - ironically - as
the 'lingua franca' of the EU.
I may have posted this before. I certainly remember thinking of doing
so.

A few years ago I saw a minute or two of a TV show (on UK TV) that was
some sort of documentary. It was in a city in an East European country.
The presenter spoke with a group of young adults (locals). She asked
about the fact that they spoke English among themselves. It turned out
that this wasn't specific to that small group. They said that all their
friends and acquaintances used English in their everyday lives. I can't
recall the exact words, but when they were asked why they didn't speak
their native language their reply was in effect that only
unsophisticated people spoke that language.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Arindam Banerjee
2017-05-08 22:27:32 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by occam
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by occam
Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Jean-Claude Juncker: 'English is losing importance'
It still has a lot of importance to lose.
In fact, within the EU, its importance has been rising for the last two
decades with the joining of the Eastern European countries like Poland,
Hungary, Romania, not to mention the Baltic countries Latvia, Lithuania
and Estonia.
And it is of course the language spoken by most people in Ireland.
Indeed.
More than a few times I've heard English referred to - ironically - as
the 'lingua franca' of the EU.
I may have posted this before. I certainly remember thinking of doing
so.
A few years ago I saw a minute or two of a TV show (on UK TV) that was
some sort of documentary. It was in a city in an East European country.
The presenter spoke with a group of young adults (locals). She asked
about the fact that they spoke English among themselves. It turned out
that this wasn't specific to that small group. They said that all their
friends and acquaintances used English in their everyday lives. I can't
recall the exact words, but when they were asked why they didn't speak
their native language their reply was in effect that only
unsophisticated people spoke that language.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Indians who have newly learnt English are like that.
On the other hand, the Asians totally avoid English in their daily lives.
I went to South Korea, and it was obvious that apart from the language they
were 100% Western on the face of it.
Cheers,
Arindam Banerjee
Dingbat
2017-05-07 15:18:50 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sunday, May 7, 2017 at 3:57:22 AM UTC+5:30, Joe Fineman wrote:

Re: Jean-Claude Juncker: 'English is losing importance'
Post by Joe Fineman
It still has a lot of importance to lose.
--
Perhaps he means 'French is losing impotence':-)



French on course to be the world's most commonly spoken language | UK Daily Mail
Dec 19, 2015 - C'est impossible! French set to be the world's most commonly spoken language by 2050 because of soaring population growth in sub-Saharan ...

Want To Know The Language Of The Future? | Forbes
Mar 21, 2014 - It was the language of diplomacy and arts. Aristocrats in Imperial Russia spoke French, even amongst themselves, as Tolstoy and many others documented. In short, if you wanted to be educated, you had to speak French. The latest projection is that French will be spoken by 750 million people by 2050.

More headlines:
So what future does the French language have? | The Local
Is French the language of the future? | USA Today

Google search:
https://www.google.com/search?q=french+speakers+growth
Janet
2017-05-07 15:39:48 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Jean-Claude Juncker: 'English is losing importance'
I was highly entertained that he found it necessary to make his very
important comment in English.

Janet.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-05-07 16:39:23 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Janet
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Jean-Claude Juncker: 'English is losing importance'
I was highly entertained that he found it necessary to make his very
important comment in English.
Well of course. He wanted people who don't speak Letzeburgesch to
understand his important point.
--
athel
The Doctor
2017-05-07 01:32:34 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Jean-Claude Juncker: 'English is losing importance'
The European Commission president opted to deliver a
speech in Florence in French.
By Ryan Heath
politico.eu
Friday, May 5, 2017
Florence -- Jean-Claude Juncker, the European Commission
president, opted to deliver a speech in French on Friday
morning because he said "English is losing importance" in
Europe.
He gave the comments, which are unlikely to mend fences
after a war of words between Brussels and London over
Brexit negotiations, at the "State of the Union"
conference in Florence's Palazzo Vecchio -- an annual
event for European dignitaries.
Juncker said he was opting for French because "slowly but
surely English is losing importance in Europe and France
has elections this Sunday and I want the French people to
understand what I am saying about the importance of the
EU."
The Commission president tackled the row that erupted
over a private meeting he had with U.K. Prime Minister
Theresa May last week. Following the meeting Juncker
reportedly said: "I leave Downing Street 10 times more
skeptical than I was before." May gave a speech on the
steps of Downing Street on Thursday in which she said
some in Europe were trying influence the British
election.
http://www.politico.eu/article/jean-claude-juncker-english-is-losing-importance/
Jai Maharaj, Jyotishi
Om Shanti
http://bit.do/jaimaharaj
Still glorying the BJP I see!
--
Member - Liberal International This is doctor@@nl2k.ab.ca Ici doctor@@nl2k.ab.ca
Yahweh, Queen & country!Never Satan President Republic!Beware AntiChrist rising!
http://www.fullyfollow.me/rootnl2k Look at Psalms 14 and 53 on Atheism
BC Keep your province Healthy!! Vote Liberal.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-05-16 12:19:18 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by The Doctor
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Jean-Claude Juncker: 'English is losing importance'
The European Commission president opted to deliver a
speech in Florence in French.
By Ryan Heath
politico.eu
Friday, May 5, 2017
Florence -- Jean-Claude Juncker, the European Commission
president, opted to deliver a speech in French on Friday
morning because he said "English is losing importance" in
Europe.
He gave the comments, which are unlikely to mend fences
after a war of words between Brussels and London over
Brexit negotiations, at the "State of the Union"
conference in Florence's Palazzo Vecchio -- an annual
event for European dignitaries.
Juncker said he was opting for French because "slowly but
surely English is losing importance in Europe and France
has elections this Sunday and I want the French people to
understand what I am saying about the importance of the
EU."
The Commission president tackled the row that erupted
over a private meeting he had with U.K. Prime Minister
Theresa May last week. Following the meeting Juncker
reportedly said: "I leave Downing Street 10 times more
skeptical than I was before." May gave a speech on the
steps of Downing Street on Thursday in which she said
some in Europe were trying influence the British
election.
http://www.politico.eu/article/jean-claude-juncker-english-is-losing-importance/
Jai
Post by The Doctor
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Maharaj, Jyotishi
Om Shanti
http://bit.do/jaimaharaj
Still glorying the BJP I see!
--
athel
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-05-16 12:21:55 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by The Doctor
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Jean-Claude Juncker: 'English is losing importance'
The European Commission president opted to deliver a
speech in Florence in French.
By Ryan Heath
politico.eu
Friday, May 5, 2017
Florence -- Jean-Claude Juncker, the European Commission
president, opted to deliver a speech in French on Friday
morning because he said "English is losing importance" in
Europe.
It's worth noting that when the newly elected President of France and
the Chancellor of Germany met yesterday they spoke to one another in
English, without an interpreter. If Mr Juncker thinks that's not going
to happen more and more he's totally out of touch with reality.
Post by The Doctor
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
He gave the comments, which are unlikely to mend fences
after a war of words between Brussels and London over
Brexit negotiations, at the "State of the Union"
conference in Florence's Palazzo Vecchio -- an annual
event for European dignitaries.
Juncker said he was opting for French because "slowly but
surely English is losing importance in Europe and France
has elections this Sunday and I want the French people to
understand what I am saying about the importance of the
EU."
The Commission president tackled the row that erupted
over a private meeting he had with U.K. Prime Minister
Theresa May last week. Following the meeting Juncker
reportedly said: "I leave Downing Street 10 times more
skeptical than I was before." May gave a speech on the
steps of Downing Street on Thursday in which she said
some in Europe were trying influence the British
election.
http://www.politico.eu/article/jean-claude-juncker-english-is-losing-importance/
Jai
Post by The Doctor
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Maharaj, Jyotishi
Om Shanti
http://bit.do/jaimaharaj
Still glorying the BJP I see!
--
athel
Robin Johnson
2017-05-18 09:39:15 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Jean-Claude Juncker: 'English is losing importance'
The European Commission president opted to deliver a
speech in Florence in French.
By Ryan Heath
politico.eu
Friday, May 5, 2017
Florence -- Jean-Claude Juncker, the European Commission
president, opted to deliver a speech in French on Friday
morning because he said "English is losing importance" in
Europe.
It's worth noting that when the newly elected President of France and
the Chancellor of Germany met yesterday they spoke to one another in
English, without an interpreter. If Mr Juncker thinks that's not going
to happen more and more he's totally out of touch with reality.
He does indulge in an awful lot of free (to him)booze
Paul Wolff
2017-05-18 09:59:53 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Jean-Claude Juncker: 'English is losing importance'
The European Commission president opted to deliver a
speech in Florence in French.
By Ryan Heath
politico.eu
Friday, May 5, 2017
Florence -- Jean-Claude Juncker, the European Commission
president, opted to deliver a speech in French on Friday
morning because he said "English is losing importance" in
Europe.
It's worth noting that when the newly elected President of France and
the Chancellor of Germany met yesterday they spoke to one another in
English, without an interpreter. If Mr Juncker thinks that's not going
to happen more and more he's totally out of touch with reality.
We're going to get (a form of) the European "Unitary Patent" soon. If
it's to be granted in French or German, it will be compulsory to supply
an English translation. If it's granted in English, it will be
compulsory to supply a translation into any other language (of the
participating member states) that the patent owner chooses.

The only purpose I can think of right now of having this second language
requirement is to prevent the applicant from saving money by choosing
English to start with. I look forward to seeing the translations into
Maltese.
--
Paul
Paul Wolff
2017-05-18 15:55:57 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Jean-Claude Juncker: 'English is losing importance'
The European Commission president opted to deliver a
speech in Florence in French.
By Ryan Heath
politico.eu
Friday, May 5, 2017
Florence -- Jean-Claude Juncker, the European Commission
president, opted to deliver a speech in French on Friday
morning because he said "English is losing importance" in
Europe.
It's worth noting that when the newly elected President of France and
the Chancellor of Germany met yesterday they spoke to one another in
English, without an interpreter. If Mr Juncker thinks that's not going
to happen more and more he's totally out of touch with reality.
We're going to get (a form of) the European "Unitary Patent" soon. If
it's to be granted in French or German, it will be compulsory to supply
an English translation. If it's granted in English, it will be
compulsory to supply a translation into any other language (of the
participating member states) that the patent owner chooses.
The only purpose I can think of right now of having this second
language requirement is to prevent the applicant from saving money by
choosing English to start with. I look forward to seeing the
translations into Maltese.
There is a sensible reason, it turns out. The EU has set a high priority
on achieving high quality, usable machine translation in the next few
years (not more than twelve) - not surprising, given the number of
languages it has to translate between. The high quality human
translations of English-language patents into other languages "should
contribute to the training of translation engines".

When these translation engines start contributing to a.u.e, we can sit
up and take notice. I just hope they don't pick up personality problems.
--
Paul
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-05-18 17:07:05 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Jean-Claude Juncker: 'English is losing importance'
The European Commission president opted to deliver a
speech in Florence in French.
By Ryan Heath
politico.eu
Friday, May 5, 2017
Florence -- Jean-Claude Juncker, the European Commission
president, opted to deliver a speech in French on Friday
morning because he said "English is losing importance" in
Europe.
It's worth noting that when the newly elected President of France and
the Chancellor of Germany met yesterday they spoke to one another in
English, without an interpreter. If Mr Juncker thinks that's not going
to happen more and more he's totally out of touch with reality.
We're going to get (a form of) the European "Unitary Patent" soon. If
it's to be granted in French or German, it will be compulsory to supply
an English translation. If it's granted in English, it will be
compulsory to supply a translation into any other language (of the
participating member states) that the patent owner chooses.
The only purpose I can think of right now of having this second
language requirement is to prevent the applicant from saving money by
choosing English to start with. I look forward to seeing the
translations into Maltese.
There is a sensible reason, it turns out. The EU has set a high
priority on achieving high quality, usable machine translation in the
next few years (not more than twelve) - not surprising, given the
number of languages it has to translate between. The high quality human
translations of English-language patents into other languages "should
contribute to the training of translation engines".
When these translation engines start contributing to a.u.e, we can sit
up and take notice. I just hope they don't pick up personality problems.
I wonder if there is a connection with something I've been puzzled by.
In recent months I've had three requests for permission (hardly needed)
to translate web pages of mine into other languages, two in the past
month. The first was to translate something into Latvian. I'd be
surprised if any Latvian speakers would really want to read it, but if
Skitt were still around I'd ask him about the quality of the Latvian.
The second one, a month or so ago, wanted to translate the same page
into Roumanian. The third one, this week, wanted to translate an
obsolete version of the same page into Swedish, but I bet that anyone
interested enough to read it in Swedish could read it with no
difficulty in English.

So what's the point? Is some organization setting these as exercises?
Is it just by chance that they all concern either the same page or an
obsolete version of it?

In the Latvian and Roumanian cases there was really nothing I could say
(other than yes, go ahead). In the Swedish case the translator is
apparently French, not Swedish, and I noticed that she had translated
the name of a publisher (which consists of two everyday words) into
Swedish. I suggested that it was usual to leave proper names unchanged:
she agreed and has corrected it.
--
athel
Paul Wolff
2017-05-18 18:54:56 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Jean-Claude Juncker: 'English is losing importance'
The European Commission president opted to deliver a
speech in Florence in French.
By Ryan Heath
politico.eu
Friday, May 5, 2017
Florence -- Jean-Claude Juncker, the European Commission
president, opted to deliver a speech in French on Friday
morning because he said "English is losing importance" in
Europe.
It's worth noting that when the newly elected President of France
and the Chancellor of Germany met yesterday they spoke to one
another in English, without an interpreter. If Mr Juncker thinks
that's not going to happen more and more he's totally out of touch
We're going to get (a form of) the European "Unitary Patent" soon.
If it's to be granted in French or German, it will be compulsory to
supply an English translation. If it's granted in English, it will
be compulsory to supply a translation into any other language (of
the participating member states) that the patent owner chooses.
The only purpose I can think of right now of having this second
language requirement is to prevent the applicant from saving money by
choosing English to start with. I look forward to seeing the
translations into Maltese.
There is a sensible reason, it turns out. The EU has set a high
priority on achieving high quality, usable machine translation in the
next few years (not more than twelve) - not surprising, given the
number of languages it has to translate between. The high quality
human translations of English-language patents into other languages
"should contribute to the training of translation engines".
When these translation engines start contributing to a.u.e, we can
sit up and take notice. I just hope they don't pick up personality
problems.
I wonder if there is a connection with something I've been puzzled by.
In recent months I've had three requests for permission (hardly needed)
to translate web pages of mine into other languages, two in the past
month. The first was to translate something into Latvian. I'd be
surprised if any Latvian speakers would really want to read it, but if
Skitt were still around I'd ask him about the quality of the Latvian.
The second one, a month or so ago, wanted to translate the same page
into Roumanian. The third one, this week, wanted to translate an
obsolete version of the same page into Swedish, but I bet that anyone
interested enough to read it in Swedish could read it with no
difficulty in English.
So what's the point? Is some organization setting these as exercises?
Is it just by chance that they all concern either the same page or an
obsolete version of it?
In the Latvian and Roumanian cases there was really nothing I could say
(other than yes, go ahead). In the Swedish case the translator is
apparently French, not Swedish, and I noticed that she had translated
the name of a publisher (which consists of two everyday words) into
she agreed and has corrected it.
My only comment is that permission to translate would normally be
required for copyright reasons, unless for private use only. (Of course
there's a bit more to it than that.)
--
Paul
Richard Tobin
2017-05-18 19:00:28 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Paul Wolff
There is a sensible reason, it turns out. The EU has set a high priority
on achieving high quality, usable machine translation in the next few
years (not more than twelve) - not surprising, given the number of
languages it has to translate between. The high quality human
translations of English-language patents into other languages "should
contribute to the training of translation engines".
As I've mentioned before, Google Translate is trained on (among other
things) the parallel translations of EU documents - they are a huge
corpus. As a result it can translate bureaucratic gobbledygook
amazingly well.

-- Richard
Peter Moylan
2017-05-19 03:16:41 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Paul Wolff
There is a sensible reason, it turns out. The EU has set a high priority
on achieving high quality, usable machine translation in the next few
years (not more than twelve) - not surprising, given the number of
languages it has to translate between. The high quality human
translations of English-language patents into other languages "should
contribute to the training of translation engines".
When these translation engines start contributing to a.u.e, we can sit
up and take notice. I just hope they don't pick up personality problems.
How do we know it isn't already happening?
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Paul Wolff
2017-05-19 12:45:51 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Paul Wolff
There is a sensible reason, it turns out. The EU has set a high priority
on achieving high quality, usable machine translation in the next few
years (not more than twelve) - not surprising, given the number of
languages it has to translate between. The high quality human
translations of English-language patents into other languages "should
contribute to the training of translation engines".
When these translation engines start contributing to a.u.e, we can sit
up and take notice. I just hope they don't pick up personality problems.
How do we know it isn't already happening?
The more argumentative ones might be termed the difference engines.
--
Paul
Mr. Man-wai Chang
2017-05-07 14:12:07 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Jean-Claude Juncker: 'English is losing importance'
The European Commission president opted to deliver a
speech in Florence in French.
Does it matter? You could always choose not to use it.
--
@~@ Remain silent! Drink, Blink, Stretch! Live long and prosper!!
/ v \ Simplicity is Beauty!
/( _ )\ May the Force and farces be with you!
^ ^ (x86_64 Ubuntu 9.10) Linux 2.6.39.3
不借貸! 不詐騙! 不援交! 不打交! 不打劫! 不自殺! 請考慮綜援 (CSSA):
http://www.swd.gov.hk/tc/index/site_pubsvc/page_socsecu/sub_addressesa
Lothar Frings
2017-05-08 17:25:33 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Jean-Claude Juncker: 'English is losing importance'
The European Commission president opted to deliver a
speech in Florence in French.
By Ryan Heath
politico.eu
Friday, May 5, 2017
Florence -- Jean-Claude Juncker, the European Commission
president, opted to deliver a speech in French on Friday
morning because he said "English is losing importance" in
Europe.
It's still more important than a moron
who thinks that the brexit has an influence
on English's importance.
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