Discussion:
Annoying American expressions
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James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-18 23:28:58 UTC
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1) "My bad."
Your bad what?

Feel free to add more....
--
The opposite of courage in our society is not cowardice, it is conformity; and there you have the trouble today is conformity: People acting like everyone else without knowing why, without knowing where they're going. -- Earl Nightingale
The Peeler
2017-04-18 23:56:08 UTC
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<FLUSH yet more of the inevitable attention-baiting BULLSHIT>
--
Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson") on UFOs:
"I believe that UFOs have visited us but not in recent times".
"I don't believe in UFOs".
"When someone says "UFO", they do not mean 4000 years ago. Then they
would just be "FO" as they hadn't invented flying yet".
(Courtesy of Mr Pounder)
Dr. Jai Maharaj
2017-04-19 00:31:51 UTC
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Annoying American expressions
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
Feel free to add more....
I've heard Britishers, Canadians and
Australians say that. Did the expression
originate in the U.S.?

Jai Maharaj, Jyotishi
Om Shanti

http://bit.do/jaimaharaj
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-19 00:35:33 UTC
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Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Annoying American expressions
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
Feel free to add more....
I've heard Britishers, Canadians and
Australians say that. Did the expression
originate in the U.S.?
I've never heard anyone but Americans say it.
--
What is the difference between a 69 and driving in the fog?
When driving in the fog, you can't see the asshole in front of you.
Dr. Jai Maharaj
2017-04-19 01:01:24 UTC
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In article
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Annoying American expressions
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
Feel free to add more....
I've heard Britishers, Canadians and
Australians say that. Did the expression
originate in the U.S.?
I've never heard anyone but Americans say it.
Okay, here's one: "bring it, bitches" as a response to a
threat. It seems to have replaced "bring it on".

Jai Maharaj, Jyotishi
Om Shanti

http://groups.google.com/group/alt.fan.jai-maharaj
The Peeler
2017-04-19 01:03:10 UTC
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On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 01:35:33 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
I've heard Britishers, Canadians and
Australians say that. Did the expression
originate in the U.S.?
I've never heard anyone but Americans say it.
That's because you are a REAL idiot, Birdbrain!
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sociopathic "wisdom":
"No ginger is ever sexy. They are faulty people, like albinos. Put them
all in the sun and watch them burn!"
MID: <***@red.lan>
Don Phillipson
2017-04-19 12:05:09 UTC
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Annoying American expressions
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
Function: this is an admission of guilt or responsibility.
Style: this is voiced in baby language, viz. how infants
speak while still too young for their brains to have
apprehended how grammar works (according to
Steven Pinker.)

Imitating children goes in and out of fashion over the
decades (although "fashion" usually means the
preferences of a minority of people in any community,
except perhaps in the case of religious values.)
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-19 12:13:57 UTC
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Post by Don Phillipson
Annoying American expressions
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
Function: this is an admission of guilt or responsibility.
Style: this is voiced in baby language, viz. how infants
speak while still too young for their brains to have
apprehended how grammar works (according to
Steven Pinker.)
Imitating children goes in and out of fashion over the
decades (although "fashion" usually means the
preferences of a minority of people in any community,
except perhaps in the case of religious values.)
Well we never imitate things like that in the UK.
--
The only intuitive user interface is the nipple.
The Peeler
2017-04-19 13:17:29 UTC
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On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 13:13:57 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Don Phillipson
Imitating children goes in and out of fashion over the
decades (although "fashion" usually means the
preferences of a minority of people in any community,
except perhaps in the case of religious values.)
Well we never imitate things like that in the UK.
"We", again? Who's that "we" you keep hiding behind constantly, you forsaken
social misfit! ALL those we you keep hallucinating about think you are a
complete idiot!
--
Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson") on women:
"Women are inferior".
"Crying is unnecessary and pathetic. So is screaming. Why do women
scream when they're frightened? Perhaps they realise they're
inferior and are calling for the nearest man"?
(Courtesy of Mr Pounder)
Peter T. Daniels
2017-04-19 13:43:24 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Don Phillipson
Annoying American expressions
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
Function: this is an admission of guilt or responsibility.
Style: this is voiced in baby language, viz. how infants
speak while still too young for their brains to have
apprehended how grammar works (according to
Steven Pinker.)
Imitating children goes in and out of fashion over the
decades (although "fashion" usually means the
preferences of a minority of people in any community,
except perhaps in the case of religious values.)
Well we never imitate things like that in the UK.
Splork!
occam
2017-04-19 14:02:52 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Don Phillipson
Annoying American expressions
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
Function: this is an admission of guilt or responsibility.
Style: this is voiced in baby language, viz. how infants
speak while still too young for their brains to have
apprehended how grammar works (according to
Steven Pinker.)
Imitating children goes in and out of fashion over the
decades (although "fashion" usually means the
preferences of a minority of people in any community,
except perhaps in the case of religious values.)
Well we never imitate things like that in the UK.
Splork!
I think you have been the victim of British irony. The Brits use
child-like expressions all the time. 'Bickies' (for biscuits), Choccies
(for chocolate) are but a couple of examples. Please don't tell me they
are grown-up expressions.
Peter T. Daniels
2017-04-19 14:41:25 UTC
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Post by occam
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Don Phillipson
Annoying American expressions
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
Function: this is an admission of guilt or responsibility.
Style: this is voiced in baby language, viz. how infants
speak while still too young for their brains to have
apprehended how grammar works (according to
Steven Pinker.)
Imitating children goes in and out of fashion over the
decades (although "fashion" usually means the
preferences of a minority of people in any community,
except perhaps in the case of religious values.)
Well we never imitate things like that in the UK.
Splork!
I think you have been the victim of British irony. The Brits use
child-like expressions all the time. 'Bickies' (for biscuits), Choccies
(for chocolate) are but a couple of examples. Please don't tell me they
are grown-up expressions.
You seem to assume that Tough Guy is capable of irony.
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-19 17:09:57 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by occam
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Don Phillipson
Annoying American expressions
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
Function: this is an admission of guilt or responsibility.
Style: this is voiced in baby language, viz. how infants
speak while still too young for their brains to have
apprehended how grammar works (according to
Steven Pinker.)
Imitating children goes in and out of fashion over the
decades (although "fashion" usually means the
preferences of a minority of people in any community,
except perhaps in the case of religious values.)
Well we never imitate things like that in the UK.
Splork!
I think you have been the victim of British irony. The Brits use
child-like expressions all the time. 'Bickies' (for biscuits), Choccies
(for chocolate) are but a couple of examples. Please don't tell me they
are grown-up expressions.
You seem to assume that Tough Guy is capable of irony.
Nobody understands irony, including Alanis Morissette.
--
It is preferential to refrain from the utilization of sesquipedelian verbiage in the circumstance that your intellectualization can be expressed using comparatively simplistic lexicological entities.
The Peeler
2017-04-19 18:17:25 UTC
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On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 18:09:57 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter T. Daniels
You seem to assume that Tough Guy is capable of irony.
Nobody understands irony, including Alanis Morissette.
Nobody in his right mind assumes that a pathological sociopath like you
really understands irony the way normal humans use it, Birdbrain!
--
Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson") about himself:
"I can sleep outside in a temperature of -20C wearing only shorts".
"I once took a dump behind some bushes and slid down a hill to wipe my
arse".
(Courtesy of Mr Pounder)
Sam Plusnet
2017-04-19 17:44:32 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by occam
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Don Phillipson
Annoying American expressions
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
Function: this is an admission of guilt or responsibility.
Style: this is voiced in baby language, viz. how infants
speak while still too young for their brains to have
apprehended how grammar works (according to
Steven Pinker.)
Imitating children goes in and out of fashion over the
decades (although "fashion" usually means the
preferences of a minority of people in any community,
except perhaps in the case of religious values.)
Well we never imitate things like that in the UK.
Splork!
I think you have been the victim of British irony. The Brits use
child-like expressions all the time. 'Bickies' (for biscuits), Choccies
(for chocolate) are but a couple of examples. Please don't tell me they
are grown-up expressions.
You seem to assume that Tough Guy is capable of irony.
Perhaps he is, in which case corrosion may do us a favour.
--
Sam Plusnet
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-19 17:50:33 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by occam
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Don Phillipson
Annoying American expressions
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
Function: this is an admission of guilt or responsibility.
Style: this is voiced in baby language, viz. how infants
speak while still too young for their brains to have
apprehended how grammar works (according to
Steven Pinker.)
Imitating children goes in and out of fashion over the
decades (although "fashion" usually means the
preferences of a minority of people in any community,
except perhaps in the case of religious values.)
Well we never imitate things like that in the UK.
Splork!
I think you have been the victim of British irony. The Brits use
child-like expressions all the time. 'Bickies' (for biscuits), Choccies
(for chocolate) are but a couple of examples. Please don't tell me they
are grown-up expressions.
You seem to assume that Tough Guy is capable of irony.
Perhaps he is, in which case corrosion may do us a favour.
That is worthy of a very large groan.
--
If it's zero degrees outside today and it's supposed to be twice as cold tomorrow, how cold is it going to be?
The Peeler
2017-04-19 18:18:17 UTC
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On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 18:50:33 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
You seem to assume that Tough Guy is capable of irony.
Perhaps he is, in which case corrosion may do us a favour.
That is worthy of a very large groan.
EVERYTHING you spout is worthy of a large groan, you sick shithead!
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) strange world:
"Around here they like to run in front of cars for a laugh. For some reason
they're surprised when I accelerate."
MID: <***@red.lan>
J. J. Lodder
2017-04-19 20:15:23 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by occam
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Don Phillipson
Annoying American expressions
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
Function: this is an admission of guilt or responsibility.
Style: this is voiced in baby language, viz. how infants
speak while still too young for their brains to have
apprehended how grammar works (according to
Steven Pinker.)
Imitating children goes in and out of fashion over the
decades (although "fashion" usually means the
preferences of a minority of people in any community,
except perhaps in the case of religious values.)
Well we never imitate things like that in the UK.
Splork!
I think you have been the victim of British irony. The Brits use
child-like expressions all the time. 'Bickies' (for biscuits), Choccies
(for chocolate) are but a couple of examples. Please don't tell me they
are grown-up expressions.
You seem to assume that Tough Guy is capable of irony.
Perhaps he is, in which case corrosion may do us a favour.
That is worthy of a very large groan.
Why?
It is common knowledge that good irony meters are made of iron.
Even so, they often explode as a result of overload,

Jan
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-19 20:55:46 UTC
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Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by occam
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Don Phillipson
Annoying American expressions
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
Function: this is an admission of guilt or responsibility.
Style: this is voiced in baby language, viz. how infants
speak while still too young for their brains to have
apprehended how grammar works (according to
Steven Pinker.)
Imitating children goes in and out of fashion over the
decades (although "fashion" usually means the
preferences of a minority of people in any community,
except perhaps in the case of religious values.)
Well we never imitate things like that in the UK.
Splork!
I think you have been the victim of British irony. The Brits use
child-like expressions all the time. 'Bickies' (for biscuits), Choccies
(for chocolate) are but a couple of examples. Please don't tell me they
are grown-up expressions.
You seem to assume that Tough Guy is capable of irony.
Perhaps he is, in which case corrosion may do us a favour.
That is worthy of a very large groan.
Why?
It is common knowledge that good irony meters are made of iron.
Even so, they often explode as a result of overload,
Iron does not explode.
--
A boomerang that doesn't come back is a stick.
The Peeler
2017-04-19 21:19:45 UTC
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On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 21:55:46 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by J. J. Lodder
Why?
It is common knowledge that good irony meters are made of iron.
Even so, they often explode as a result of overload,
Iron does not explode.
Twit!
--
Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) about women:
"I don't want one. Easy enough to get one if I wanted one."
MID: <***@red.lan>
Dingbat
2017-04-20 00:24:45 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
If it's zero degrees outside today and it's supposed to be twice as cold tomorrow, how cold is it going to be?
Any number of meanings:
1) Half way between 0 on your scale and absolute 0.
2) Even colder, by a factor of 2, than the normal temperature for this time of the year; if the normal temperature is 30 and today is 0, tomorrow will be -30.
3) The same temperature as today but windier.
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-20 09:28:33 UTC
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Post by Dingbat
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
If it's zero degrees outside today and it's supposed to be twice as cold tomorrow, how cold is it going to be?
1) Half way between 0 on your scale and absolute 0.
2) Even colder, by a factor of 2, than the normal temperature for this time of the year; if the normal temperature is 30 and today is 0, tomorrow will be -30.
3) The same temperature as today but windier.
I'd say.....
Take your comfortable temperature, let's say it's 20C.
Today is zero, that's 20 lower than you want. It's 20 cold.
So 20 lower would be twice as cold.
--
Why are hemorrhoids called "hemorrhoids" instead of "asteroids"?
The Peeler
2017-04-20 10:31:50 UTC
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On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 10:28:33 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
I'd say.....
Please don't, driveling idiot!
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) endless inane drivel:
"let's say you prefer 20C water. If you go in 10C water you'd say that was
cold (10C colder than you want). Now you go in 0C water, that's twice as
cold, because it's now 20C colder than you want."
MID: <***@red.lan>
GordonD
2017-04-20 17:19:25 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Dingbat
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
If it's zero degrees outside today and it's supposed to be twice as
cold tomorrow, how cold is it going to be?
1) Half way between 0 on your scale and absolute 0.
2) Even colder, by a factor of 2, than the normal temperature for this
time of the year; if the normal temperature is 30 and today is 0,
tomorrow will be -30.
3) The same temperature as today but windier.
I'd say.....
Take your comfortable temperature, let's say it's 20C.
Which is 68F.
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Today is zero, that's 20 lower than you want.
Which is 32F.

It's 20 cold.
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
So 20 lower would be twice as cold.
It's 36 degrees colder - what percentage is that?
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-20 17:39:19 UTC
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Post by GordonD
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Dingbat
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
If it's zero degrees outside today and it's supposed to be twice as
cold tomorrow, how cold is it going to be?
1) Half way between 0 on your scale and absolute 0.
2) Even colder, by a factor of 2, than the normal temperature for this
time of the year; if the normal temperature is 30 and today is 0,
tomorrow will be -30.
3) The same temperature as today but windier.
I'd say.....
Take your comfortable temperature, let's say it's 20C.
Which is 68F.
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Today is zero, that's 20 lower than you want.
Which is 32F.
It's 20 cold.
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
So 20 lower would be twice as cold.
It's 36 degrees colder - what percentage is that?
It doesn't matter what unit you use, "twice as cold" is still the same temperature. Take the difference betwen comfortable and the first figure, then double the difference.
--
Three guys go to a ski lodge, and there aren't enough rooms, so they have to share a bed. In the middle of the night, the guy on the right wakes up and says, "I had this wild, vivid dream of getting a hand job!" The guy on the left wakes up, and unbelievably, he's had the same dream, too. Then the guy in the middle wakes up and says, "That's funny, I dreamt I was skiing!"
The Peeler
2017-04-20 18:00:46 UTC
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On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 18:39:19 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
the pathological attention whore of all the uk ngs, blathered again:

<FLUSH yet more of the inevitable sick BLATHER>
--
More from Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) strange sociopathic
world:
"If I don't get AC for this summer, I'm going to frighten my neighbours
again by walking around naked."
MID: <***@red.lan>
Mr Pounder Esquire
2017-04-20 18:04:17 UTC
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Post by GordonD
On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 01:24:45 +0100, Dingbat
On Wednesday, April 19, 2017 at 11:20:44 PM UTC+5:30, James
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
If it's zero degrees outside today and it's supposed to be twice as
cold tomorrow, how cold is it going to be?
1) Half way between 0 on your scale and absolute 0.
2) Even colder, by a factor of 2, than the normal temperature for
this time of the year; if the normal temperature is 30 and today is
0, tomorrow will be -30.
3) The same temperature as today but windier.
I'd say.....
Take your comfortable temperature, let's say it's 20C.
Which is 68F.
Today is zero, that's 20 lower than you want.
Which is 32F.
It's 20 cold.
So 20 lower would be twice as cold.
It's 36 degrees colder - what percentage is that?
Why are you feeding this psychotic troll?
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-19 17:09:22 UTC
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Post by occam
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Don Phillipson
Annoying American expressions
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
Function: this is an admission of guilt or responsibility.
Style: this is voiced in baby language, viz. how infants
speak while still too young for their brains to have
apprehended how grammar works (according to
Steven Pinker.)
Imitating children goes in and out of fashion over the
decades (although "fashion" usually means the
preferences of a minority of people in any community,
except perhaps in the case of religious values.)
Well we never imitate things like that in the UK.
Splork!
I think you have been the victim of British irony. The Brits use
child-like expressions all the time. 'Bickies' (for biscuits), Choccies
(for chocolate) are but a couple of examples. Please don't tell me they
are grown-up expressions.
Please distinguish between "word" and "expression".
--
What's black and white and rolls down the Boardwalk?
A nigger and a seagull fighting over a French Fry.
The Peeler
2017-04-19 18:19:10 UTC
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On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 18:09:22 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by occam
I think you have been the victim of British irony. The Brits use
child-like expressions all the time. 'Bickies' (for biscuits), Choccies
(for chocolate) are but a couple of examples. Please don't tell me they
are grown-up expressions.
Please distinguish between "word" and "expression".
Oh, shut your stupid gob finally, sicko!
--
More details from Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) strange
world:
"I have never found out the purpose of underpants".
(Courtesy of Mr Pounder)
b***@aol.com
2017-04-19 13:56:11 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Don Phillipson
Annoying American expressions
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
Function: this is an admission of guilt or responsibility.
Style: this is voiced in baby language, viz. how infants
speak while still too young for their brains to have
apprehended how grammar works (according to
Steven Pinker.)
Imitating children goes in and out of fashion over the
decades (although "fashion" usually means the
preferences of a minority of people in any community,
except perhaps in the case of religious values.)
Well we never imitate things like that in the UK.
I've heard many Brits say e.g. "Long time no see" or "No can do", though.
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
--
The only intuitive user interface is the nipple.
Peter T. Daniels
2017-04-19 13:59:06 UTC
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Post by b***@aol.com
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Don Phillipson
Annoying American expressions
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
How does it differ from "My fault"?
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Don Phillipson
Function: this is an admission of guilt or responsibility.
Style: this is voiced in baby language, viz. how infants
speak while still too young for their brains to have
apprehended how grammar works (according to
Steven Pinker.)
Imitating children goes in and out of fashion over the
decades (although "fashion" usually means the
preferences of a minority of people in any community,
except perhaps in the case of religious values.)
Well we never imitate things like that in the UK.
I've heard many Brits say e.g. "Long time no see" or "No can do", though.
The former, at least, is an attempted imitation of a Chinese pidgin English,
not from child-talk.
b***@aol.com
2017-04-19 14:22:12 UTC
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No, he didn't.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Don Phillipson
Annoying American expressions
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
How does it differ from "My fault"?
It's inarticulate.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Don Phillipson
Function: this is an admission of guilt or responsibility.
Style: this is voiced in baby language, viz. how infants
speak while still too young for their brains to have
apprehended how grammar works (according to
Steven Pinker.)
Imitating children goes in and out of fashion over the
decades (although "fashion" usually means the
preferences of a minority of people in any community,
except perhaps in the case of religious values.)
Well we never imitate things like that in the UK.
I've heard many Brits say e.g. "Long time no see" or "No can do", though.
The former, at least, is an attempted imitation of a Chinese pidgin English,
not from child-talk.
The result is the same.
Peter T. Daniels
2017-04-19 14:43:03 UTC
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Post by b***@aol.com
No, he didn't.
Really? Whose else attributions are given in French?
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Don Phillipson
Annoying American expressions
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
How does it differ from "My fault"?
It's inarticulate.
Explain.
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Don Phillipson
Function: this is an admission of guilt or responsibility.
Style: this is voiced in baby language, viz. how infants
speak while still too young for their brains to have
apprehended how grammar works (according to
Steven Pinker.)
Imitating children goes in and out of fashion over the
decades (although "fashion" usually means the
preferences of a minority of people in any community,
except perhaps in the case of religious values.)
Well we never imitate things like that in the UK.
I've heard many Brits say e.g. "Long time no see" or "No can do", though.
The former, at least, is an attempted imitation of a Chinese pidgin English,
not from child-talk.
The result is the same.
You think Chinamen talk like children?
b***@aol.com
2017-04-19 14:59:06 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
No, he didn't.
Really? Whose else attributions are given in French?
You wrote
'How does it differ from "My fault"?' in response to JWS's
'Your bad what?' as part of responding to my post.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Don Phillipson
Annoying American expressions
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
How does it differ from "My fault"?
It's inarticulate.
Explain.
"bad" is an adjective", a possessive followed by an
adjective without a noun doesn't make sense.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Don Phillipson
Function: this is an admission of guilt or responsibility.
Style: this is voiced in baby language, viz. how infants
speak while still too young for their brains to have
apprehended how grammar works (according to
Steven Pinker.)
Imitating children goes in and out of fashion over the
decades (although "fashion" usually means the
preferences of a minority of people in any community,
except perhaps in the case of religious values.)
Well we never imitate things like that in the UK.
I've heard many Brits say e.g. "Long time no see" or "No can do", though.
The former, at least, is an attempted imitation of a Chinese pidgin English,
not from child-talk.
The result is the same.
You think Chinamen talk like children?
No, but "Long time no see" could be child talk due to the inconsistent syntax.
The Peeler
2017-04-19 15:49:30 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
It's inarticulate.
Explain.
"bad" is an adjective", a possessive followed by an
adjective without a noun doesn't make sense.
Nonsense, it can be a noun: "go to the bad", "be in bad with someone".
Peter T. Daniels
2017-04-19 16:40:48 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
No, he didn't.
Really? Whose else attributions are given in French?
'How does it differ from "My fault"?' in response to JWS's
'Your bad what?' as part of responding to my post.
What does that have to do with the fact that you wrote "Le mercredi ..."?

Who wrote what is clear from the number of chevrons before each line.
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Don Phillipson
Annoying American expressions
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
How does it differ from "My fault"?
It's inarticulate.
Explain.
"bad" is an adjective", a possessive followed by an
adjective without a noun doesn't make sense.
And in the expression "My bad," "bad" has undergone "conversion" or "zero derivation"
to a noun. English is flexible that way. Cf. Shak. "But me no buts."
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Don Phillipson
Function: this is an admission of guilt or responsibility.
Style: this is voiced in baby language, viz. how infants
speak while still too young for their brains to have
apprehended how grammar works (according to
Steven Pinker.)
Imitating children goes in and out of fashion over the
decades (although "fashion" usually means the
preferences of a minority of people in any community,
except perhaps in the case of religious values.)
Well we never imitate things like that in the UK.
I've heard many Brits say e.g. "Long time no see" or "No can do", though.
The former, at least, is an attempted imitation of a Chinese pidgin English,
not from child-talk.
The result is the same.
You think Chinamen talk like children?
No, but "Long time no see" could be child talk due to the inconsistent syntax.
No, "inconsistent syntax" is the last thing you'd find in child language.
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-19 16:52:08 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Le mercredi 19 avril 2017 16:43:05 UTC+2, Peter T. Daniels a =E9crit =
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Le mercredi 19 avril 2017 15:59:10 UTC+2, Peter T. Daniels a =E9c=
No, he didn't.
Really? Whose else attributions are given in French?
'How does it differ from "My fault"?' in response to JWS's
'Your bad what?' as part of responding to my post.
What does that have to do with the fact that you wrote "Le mercredi ..=
."?
Who wrote what is clear from the number of chevrons before each line.
He never said it wasn't.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Le mercredi 19 avril 2017 14:14:07 UTC+2, James Wilkinson Swo=
Annoying American expressions
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
How does it differ from "My fault"?
It's inarticulate.
Explain.
"bad" is an adjective", a possessive followed by an
adjective without a noun doesn't make sense.
And in the expression "My bad," "bad" has undergone "conversion" or "z=
ero derivation"
to a noun. English is flexible that way. Cf. Shak. "But me no buts."
Only if you're an idiot.

-- =

I took an IQ test and the results were negative.
The Peeler
2017-04-19 17:06:09 UTC
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Raw Message
On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 17:52:08 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Only if you're an idiot.
Says, of course, the resident idiot of all the UK groups!
--
AndyW addressing Birdbrain:
"Troll or idiot?...
You have been presented with a viewpoint with information, reasoning,
historical cases, citations and references to back it up and wilfully
ignore all going back to your idea which has no supporting information."
MID: <KaToA.263621$***@fx10.am4>
GordonD
2017-04-19 19:25:44 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Annoying American expressions
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
How does it differ from "My fault"?
'Fault' is a noun.
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
Don Phillipson
2017-04-19 18:48:30 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by b***@aol.com
Imitating children goes in and out of fashion . . .
I've heard many Brits say e.g. "Long time no see" or "No can do", though.
Both seem derived not so much from childish language as the
Chinese-influenced pidgin English widely used in tropical seaports
50 or 100 years ago.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
JoeyDee
2017-04-19 12:05:06 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
Feel free to add more....
Language evolves.
--
Joey Dee
Remember: It is To Laugh
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-19 12:08:47 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by JoeyDee
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
Feel free to add more....
Language evolves.
Or as in the above, devolves.
--
Why do they rate a movie "R" for "adult language?"
The only people I hear using that language are teenagers.
The Peeler
2017-04-19 13:16:36 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 13:08:47 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by JoeyDee
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
Feel free to add more....
Language evolves.
Or as in the above, devolves.
Oh my god ...and this coming from the idiot with the devolved birdbrain!
--
Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson") about himself:
"I can sleep outside in a temperature of -20C wearing only shorts".
"I once took a dump behind some bushes and slid down a hill to wipe my
arse".
(Courtesy of Mr Pounder)
John Dawkins
2017-04-19 18:00:19 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by JoeyDee
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
Feel free to add more....
Language evolves.
Or as in the above, devolves.
Has this use of "devolve" become common in the UK? The OED labels this
"degenerate" usage as Obsolete.
--
J.
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-19 18:45:44 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by John Dawkins
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by JoeyDee
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
Feel free to add more....
Language evolves.
Or as in the above, devolves.
Has this use of "devolve" become common in the UK? The OED labels this
"degenerate" usage as Obsolete.
What would you say? Unevolves?
--
Please tell your pants it's not polite to point.
The Peeler
2017-04-19 19:13:17 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 19:45:44 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by John Dawkins
Has this use of "devolve" become common in the UK? The OED labels this
"degenerate" usage as Obsolete.
What would you say? Unevolves?
Yeah, keep baiting another simpleton on aue, Birdbrian! YOU can do it! <BG>
--
Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson") about himself:
"My IQ is superiour to that of most people".
"I am inferior in some ways but superior in other ways".
"I admit I should not have been born".
(Courtesy of Mr Pounder)
b***@aol.com
2017-04-20 04:58:18 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by John Dawkins
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by JoeyDee
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
Feel free to add more....
Language evolves.
Or as in the above, devolves.
Has this use of "devolve" become common in the UK? The OED labels this
"degenerate" usage as Obsolete.
What would you say? Unevolves?
Regresses.
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
--
Please tell your pants it's not polite to point.
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-20 09:28:54 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Le mercredi 19 avril 2017 20:45:55 UTC+2, James Wilkinson Sword a =E9c=
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by JoeyDee
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
Feel free to add more....
Language evolves.
Or as in the above, devolves.
Has this use of "devolve" become common in the UK? The OED labels =
this
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
"degenerate" usage as Obsolete.
What would you say? Unevolves?
Regresses.
Pah! The same word should be re-formed, like everything else.

-- =

Madness takes its toll. Please have exact change ready.
The Peeler
2017-04-20 10:32:11 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 10:28:54 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by b***@aol.com
Regresses.
Pah! The same word should be re-formed, like everything else.
Not before your birdbrain has been reformed, Birdbrain!
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) "deep thinking":
"Curry is for chavs."
MID: <***@red.lan>
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-04-19 19:22:08 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by John Dawkins
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by JoeyDee
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
Feel free to add more....
Language evolves.
Or as in the above, devolves.
Has this use of "devolve" become common in the UK? The OED labels this
"degenerate" usage as Obsolete.
I'm not aware of its being common or even used except perhaps
occasionally in the way that JWS did.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-19 20:54:48 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by John Dawkins
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by JoeyDee
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
Feel free to add more....
Language evolves.
Or as in the above, devolves.
Has this use of "devolve" become common in the UK? The OED labels this
"degenerate" usage as Obsolete.
I'm not aware of its being common or even used except perhaps
occasionally in the way that JWS did.
John Major (our ex prime minister) used "devolution" and was taken the piss out of - people imagined him wanting us to go back to living in caves.
--
Earth is 98% full, please delete anyone you can.
The Peeler
2017-04-19 21:20:53 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 21:54:48 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
John Major (our ex prime minister) used "devolution" and was taken the
piss out of - people imagined him wanting us to go back to living in
caves.
Post your SOURCE for this, you endlessly driveling idiot!
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) "deep thinking":
"I consider the Irish to be one of the stupidest people on the planet."
MID: <***@red.lan>
Peter T. Daniels
2017-04-20 03:32:32 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by John Dawkins
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by JoeyDee
Language evolves.
Or as in the above, devolves.
Has this use of "devolve" become common in the UK? The OED labels this
"degenerate" usage as Obsolete.
Where was Devo from?
RH Draney
2017-04-20 07:02:54 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by John Dawkins
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by JoeyDee
Language evolves.
Or as in the above, devolves.
Has this use of "devolve" become common in the UK? The OED labels this
"degenerate" usage as Obsolete.
Where was Devo from?
A car wash in Akron, Ohio...HTH....r
Peter T. Daniels
2017-04-20 11:49:32 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by RH Draney
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by John Dawkins
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by JoeyDee
Language evolves.
Or as in the above, devolves.
Has this use of "devolve" become common in the UK? The OED labels this
"degenerate" usage as Obsolete.
Where was Devo from?
A car wash in Akron, Ohio...HTH....r
no, it doesn't ...

(One of the two things I know about them is that their name refers to Devolution.)

(The other is that they performed a song that began "We are Devo" while costumed as
robots -- they were on SNL long ago.)
John Dawkins
2017-04-20 18:32:10 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by RH Draney
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by John Dawkins
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by JoeyDee
Language evolves.
Or as in the above, devolves.
Has this use of "devolve" become common in the UK? The OED labels this
"degenerate" usage as Obsolete.
Where was Devo from?
A car wash in Akron, Ohio...HTH....r
no, it doesn't ...
(One of the two things I know about them is that their name refers to Devolution.)
De-evolution. You can check out "Jocko Homo" ("Are we not men? We are
Devo") on youtube.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
(The other is that they performed a song that began "We are Devo" while
costumed as robots -- they were on SNL long ago.)
The host that night was Fred Willard, also from northern Ohio.
--
J.
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-20 09:29:16 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by John Dawkins
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by JoeyDee
Language evolves.
Or as in the above, devolves.
Has this use of "devolve" become common in the UK? The OED labels this
"degenerate" usage as Obsolete.
Where was Devo from?
No, I added "de" to evolve.
--
Bikini e pareo, camicia di pizzo e shorts, top e gonna di crochet!
The Peeler
2017-04-20 10:32:18 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 10:29:16 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Where was Devo from?
No, I added "de" to evolve.
<BG> Driveling idiot!
--
More from Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) strange sociopathic
world:
"I don't use doors much."
MID: <***@red.lan>
GordonD
2017-04-19 19:27:22 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
Feel free to add more....
"Do you want to come with?"
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-19 20:55:12 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by GordonD
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
Feel free to add more....
"Do you want to come with?"
I hear that from snobs sometimes.
--
Viagra Lite
For people who only want to masturbate

Viagrallium
A mix of Viagra and Vallium: if you don't get to fuck, then you don't give a fuck.
The Peeler
2017-04-19 21:22:56 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 21:55:12 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by GordonD
"Do you want to come with?"
I hear that from snobs sometimes.
Congratulations, Birdbrain! You managed to bait yet another bunch of more
than ten fucked up idiots with your troll!
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) "deep thinking":
"Curry is for chavs."
MID: <***@red.lan>
RH Draney
2017-04-19 20:56:35 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
Feel free to add more....
That's a pretty big ask....r
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-19 21:49:09 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by RH Draney
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
Feel free to add more....
That's a pretty big ask....r
Your top 3 will suffice. I don't need all of them.
--
The teacher wrote "Like I ain't had no fun in months" on the board and then she said, "Timmy, how should I correct that?"
Timmy replied, "Maybe get a new boyfriend?"
The Peeler
2017-04-19 22:12:16 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 22:49:09 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by RH Draney
That's a pretty big ask....r
Your top 3 will suffice. I don't need all of them.
Right, attention whore! What you need is the ATTENTION!
--
More from Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) strange sociopathic
world:
"I don't use doors much."
MID: <***@red.lan>
GordonD
2017-04-20 08:20:52 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by RH Draney
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
Feel free to add more....
That's a pretty big ask....r
Your top 3 will suffice. I don't need all of them.
I've already given one, so:

2) If he would have <done something>, then <consequence>

3) Do the math.
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-20 09:30:33 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by GordonD
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by RH Draney
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
Feel free to add more....
That's a pretty big ask....r
Your top 3 will suffice. I don't need all of them.
What is wrong with "That's a pretty big ask"?
Post by GordonD
2) If he would have <done something>, then <consequence>
That doesn't annoy me either. The something is in the context of the conversation.
Post by GordonD
3) Do the math.
The only thing wrong with that is it should be maths. Do you object to "do the maths"?
--
REALITY.EXE corrupt. Reboot universe (Y/N)?
The Peeler
2017-04-20 10:32:22 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 10:30:33 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
the pathological attention whore of all the uk ngs, blathered again:

<FLUSH sick shit>
--
Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson") about himself:
"I can sleep outside in a temperature of -20C wearing only shorts".
"I once took a dump behind some bushes and slid down a hill to wipe my
arse".
(Courtesy of Mr Pounder)
GordonD
2017-04-20 17:13:25 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by GordonD
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by RH Draney
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
Feel free to add more....
That's a pretty big ask....r
Your top 3 will suffice. I don't need all of them.
What is wrong with "That's a pretty big ask"?
Post by GordonD
2) If he would have <done something>, then <consequence>
That doesn't annoy me either. The something is in the context of the conversation.
No, it should be "If he HAD <done something>". "If he would have..." is
meaningless.
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by GordonD
3) Do the math.
The only thing wrong with that is it should be maths. Do you object to "do the maths"?
Not at all. That's my point.
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-20 17:18:15 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by GordonD
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by GordonD
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by RH Draney
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
Feel free to add more....
That's a pretty big ask....r
Your top 3 will suffice. I don't need all of them.
What is wrong with "That's a pretty big ask"?
Post by GordonD
2) If he would have <done something>, then <consequence>
That doesn't annoy me either. The something is in the context of the conversation.
No, it should be "If he HAD <done something>". "If he would have..." is
meaningless.
It makes perfect sense to me, why are you having a problem with it? "Would have" means exactly the same as "had".
"If Mr Jones would have driven more carefully, he wouldn't have crashed his car."
Post by GordonD
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by GordonD
3) Do the math.
The only thing wrong with that is it should be maths. Do you object to "do the maths"?
Not at all. That's my point.
Good. I've yet to convince an American that mathematics should be shortened to maths. Do they not understand plurals?
--
History teaches us that no other cause has brought more death than the word of god. -- Giulian Buzila
GordonD
2017-04-20 17:35:44 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by GordonD
On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 09:20:52 +0100, GordonD
Post by GordonD
On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 21:56:35 +0100, RH Draney
Post by RH Draney
1) "My bad." Your bad what?
Feel free to add more....
That's a pretty big ask....r
Your top 3 will suffice. I don't need all of them.
What is wrong with "That's a pretty big ask"?
Post by GordonD
2) If he would have <done something>, then <consequence>
That doesn't annoy me either. The something is in the context of the conversation.
No, it should be "If he HAD <done something>". "If he would
have..." is meaningless.
It makes perfect sense to me, why are you having a problem with it?
"Would have" means exactly the same as "had". "If Mr Jones would have
driven more carefully, he wouldn't have crashed his car."
"If Mr Jones had driven more carefully..." makes perfect sense. Past tense.

"I would have bought you a pint if I had seen you in the pub." The 'if'
connects to 'had'.
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-20 17:40:14 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by GordonD
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by GordonD
On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 09:20:52 +0100, GordonD
Post by GordonD
On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 21:56:35 +0100, RH Draney
Post by RH Draney
1) "My bad." Your bad what?
Feel free to add more....
That's a pretty big ask....r
Your top 3 will suffice. I don't need all of them.
What is wrong with "That's a pretty big ask"?
Post by GordonD
2) If he would have <done something>, then <consequence>
That doesn't annoy me either. The something is in the context of the conversation.
No, it should be "If he HAD <done something>". "If he would
have..." is meaningless.
It makes perfect sense to me, why are you having a problem with it?
"Would have" means exactly the same as "had". "If Mr Jones would have
driven more carefully, he wouldn't have crashed his car."
"If Mr Jones had driven more carefully..." makes perfect sense. Past tense.
"I would have bought you a pint if I had seen you in the pub." The 'if'
connects to 'had'.
They're all valid past tenses.
--
Once upon a time, a Prince asked a beautiful Princess, Will you marry me? The Princess said; No!!! So the Prince lived happily ever after and rode Harley Davidson motorcycles and banged skinny long-legged big-titted broads and hunted and fished and raced cars and went to naked bars and dated women half his age and drank whiskey, beer and Captain Morgan and never heard bitching and never paid child support or alimony and banged cheerleaders and kept his house and guns and ate spam and potato chips and beans and blew enormous farts and never got cheated on while he was at work and all his friends and family thought he was freak'in cool as hell and he had tons of money in the bank and left the toilet seat up.
The end.
The Peeler
2017-04-20 18:11:26 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 18:40:14 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
They're all valid past tenses.
Nothing you spout is valid, Birdbrain!
--
More details from Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sociopathic
"mind":
"If I wanted you to stab me with a knife and kill me, you should not
get into trouble for it".
"I would kill my sister if I thought I'd get away with it".
"I'm not what most people think of as human".
(Courtesy of Mr Pounder)
The Peeler
2017-04-20 18:01:38 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 18:18:15 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
the pathological attention whore of all the uk ngs, blathered again:

<FLUSH the incredibly idiotic BULLSHIT>
--
Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson") on Jimmy Savile:
"If he had done it against their will, they would have come forwards
earlier. The fact that they didn't suggests either he did nothing at
all, or the children liked it".
(Courtesy of Mr Pounder)
Peter T. Daniels
2017-04-20 20:47:01 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by GordonD
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by GordonD
3) Do the math.
The only thing wrong with that is it should be maths. Do you object to
"do the maths"?
Not at all. That's my point.
Good. I've yet to convince an American that mathematics should be shortened to maths. Do they not understand plurals?
Where is there a plural? Do you say "Mathematics are the queens of science"?
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-20 21:03:45 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by GordonD
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by GordonD
3) Do the math.
The only thing wrong with that is it should be maths. Do you object to
"do the maths"?
Not at all. That's my point.
Good. I've yet to convince an American that mathematics should be shortened to maths. Do they not understand plurals?
Where is there a plural? Do you say "Mathematics are the queens of science"?
It has an S on the end, it's plural.
"There are many branches of mathematics"
Do you think there's only one type?
--
While taking down the vitals for a soon-to-be mom, I asked how much she weighed.
"I really don't know," she said.
"Well, more or less," I prompted.
"More, I guess," she answered sadly.
Peter T. Daniels
2017-04-20 21:18:04 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by GordonD
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by GordonD
3) Do the math.
The only thing wrong with that is it should be maths. Do you object to
"do the maths"?
Not at all. That's my point.
Good. I've yet to convince an American that mathematics should be shortened to maths. Do they not understand plurals?
Where is there a plural? Do you say "Mathematics are the queens of science"?
It has an S on the end, it's plural.
"There are many branches of mathematics"
Do you think there's only one type?
There are many branches of chemistry.

Do you think "chemistry" is a plural noun?

There's a s on the end of "bus." Do you think "bus" is plural?
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-20 22:17:08 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by GordonD
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by GordonD
3) Do the math.
The only thing wrong with that is it should be maths. Do you object to
"do the maths"?
Not at all. That's my point.
Good. I've yet to convince an American that mathematics should be shortened to maths. Do they not understand plurals?
Where is there a plural? Do you say "Mathematics are the queens of science"?
It has an S on the end, it's plural.
"There are many branches of mathematics"
Do you think there's only one type?
There are many branches of chemistry.
Do you think "chemistry" is a plural noun?
Yes.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
There's a s on the end of "bus." Do you think "bus" is plural?
An S doesn't necessarily make it plural. With Maths it does.
--
Why are hemorrhoids called "hemorrhoids" instead of "asteroids"?
The Peeler
2017-04-20 22:26:25 UTC
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On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 23:17:08 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter T. Daniels
There are many branches of chemistry.
Do you think "chemistry" is a plural noun?
Yes.
IDIOT!
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter T. Daniels
There's a s on the end of "bus." Do you think "bus" is plural?
An S doesn't necessarily make it plural. With Maths it does.
Again, IDIOT!
--
Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson") on UFOs:
"I believe that UFOs have visited us but not in recent times".
"I don't believe in UFOs".
"When someone says "UFO", they do not mean 4000 years ago. Then they
would just be "FO" as they hadn't invented flying yet".
(Courtesy of Mr Pounder)
David Kleinecke
2017-04-20 23:14:32 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter T. Daniels
There are many branches of chemistry.
Do you think "chemistry" is a plural noun?
Yes.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
There's a s on the end of "bus." Do you think "bus" is plural?
An S doesn't necessarily make it plural. With Maths it does.
I'm too lazy to check this out but I think all UKE speakers
on AUE treat "maths" as singular.
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-20 23:46:40 UTC
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Post by David Kleinecke
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter T. Daniels
There are many branches of chemistry.
Do you think "chemistry" is a plural noun?
Yes.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
There's a s on the end of "bus." Do you think "bus" is plural?
An S doesn't necessarily make it plural. With Maths it does.
I'm too lazy to check this out but I think all UKE speakers
on AUE treat "maths" as singular.
Then they're wrong. Maths is short for mathematics. Which is clearly a lot of different branches.
--
Peter is listening to "Johnny Cash - God's Gonna Cut You Down"
The Peeler
2017-04-21 00:42:53 UTC
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On Fri, 21 Apr 2017 00:46:40 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Then they're wrong.
Yes, and the resident idiot of all the UK ngs is right! Take your
medication, you abnormal fucked up idiot!
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) "deep thinking":
"Do you play musical instruments like that? No. Why would I want several
notes instead of one? That would be like playing the piano with parkinsons
disease."
MID: <***@red.lan>
The Peeler
2017-04-20 22:04:32 UTC
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On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 22:03:45 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Where is there a plural? Do you say "Mathematics are the queens of science"?
It has an S on the end, it's plural.
"There are many branches of mathematics"
Do you think there's only one type?
You are such an unbelievable IDIOT, Birdbrain! LOL
--
Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson") on Jimmy Savile:
"If he had done it against their will, they would have come forwards
earlier. The fact that they didn't suggests either he did nothing at
all, or the children liked it".
(Courtesy of Mr Pounder)
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-04-20 23:10:42 UTC
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On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 22:03:45 +0100, "James Wilkinson Sword"
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by GordonD
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by GordonD
3) Do the math.
The only thing wrong with that is it should be maths. Do you object to
"do the maths"?
Not at all. That's my point.
Good. I've yet to convince an American that mathematics should be shortened to maths. Do they not understand plurals?
Where is there a plural? Do you say "Mathematics are the queens of science"?
It has an S on the end, it's plural.
"There are many branches of mathematics"
Do you think there's only one type?
Like "physics"?

I assume that the "s" at the end of your name "James" doesn't mean that
you are a collective rather than an individual?

Anyway, the OED says of the word "mathematics":

In early use always construed as a plural, and usually preceded by
"the". In modern use regarded as a mass noun, except when used of
calculations.

Selected quotations:

1587 F. Thynne Ann. Scotl. 461/1 in Holinshed's Chron. (new ed.)
II A learned man in all philosophie, astronomie and the other
mathematiks.
1697 J. Wallis in Peter Langtoft's Chron. (1725) I. Pref. 147
Mathematicks, (at that time..) were scarce looked upon as
Academical Studies.
1712 R. Bentley Let. in Corr. (1842) II. 449 Mathematicks was
brought to that height, that [etc.].
1726 Swift Gulliver I. i. i. 2 Navigation, and other Parts of
the Mathematicks, useful to those who intend to travel.
1755 Man No. 35. 3 Mathematics derives its accuracy..from logic.
1855 R. Browning Toccata of Galuppi's xiii, in Wks. (1894) VI. 76
You know physics, something of geology, Mathematics are your
pastime.
1945 E. T. Bell Devel. Math. (ed. 2) i. 4 Without the strictest
deductive proof from admitted assumptions, explicitly stated as
such, mathematics does not exist.
1971 Times Lit. Suppl. 24
Dec. 1595/1 The proportion of women to
men, if our mathematics are correct, is 1:13.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
David Kleinecke
2017-04-20 23:23:50 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
In early use always construed as a plural, and usually preceded by
"the". In modern use regarded as a mass noun, except when used of
calculations.
1587 F. Thynne Ann. Scotl. 461/1 in Holinshed's Chron. (new ed.)
II A learned man in all philosophie, astronomie and the other
mathematiks.
1697 J. Wallis in Peter Langtoft's Chron. (1725) I. Pref. 147
Mathematicks, (at that time..) were scarce looked upon as
Academical Studies.
1712 R. Bentley Let. in Corr. (1842) II. 449 Mathematicks was
brought to that height, that [etc.].
1726 Swift Gulliver I. i. i. 2 Navigation, and other Parts of
the Mathematicks, useful to those who intend to travel.
1755 Man No. 35. 3 Mathematics derives its accuracy..from logic.
1855 R. Browning Toccata of Galuppi's xiii, in Wks. (1894) VI. 76
You know physics, something of geology, Mathematics are your
pastime.
1945 E. T. Bell Devel. Math. (ed. 2) i. 4 Without the strictest
deductive proof from admitted assumptions, explicitly stated as
such, mathematics does not exist.
1971 Times Lit. Suppl. 24
Dec. 1595/1 The proportion of women to
men, if our mathematics are correct, is 1:13.
1697, 1855, 1971 plural
1712, 1755, 1945 singular (mass noun?)

Old argument.

And I don't think it is a mass noun. To me it is singular.

1971 is, I think, very improbable to a modern mathematician.
We would say "The proportion of women to men, if our
calculations are correct, is 1:13." Use of "mathematics" to
refer to calculation sounds Victorian to me.
Peter T. Daniels
2017-04-20 20:45:15 UTC
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Post by GordonD
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by GordonD
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by RH Draney
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
Feel free to add more....
That's a pretty big ask....r
Your top 3 will suffice. I don't need all of them.
What is wrong with "That's a pretty big ask"?
Post by GordonD
2) If he would have <done something>, then <consequence>
That doesn't annoy me either. The something is in the context of the conversation.
No, it should be "If he HAD <done something>". "If he would have..." is
meaningless.
Language changes. Get over it.
Joe Fineman
2017-04-20 21:24:56 UTC
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Post by GordonD
No, it should be "If he HAD <done something>".
I agree that, usually, that is the better choice, and that most
occurrences of "If he would have" are vulgar. But not
Post by GordonD
"If he would have..." is meaningless.
There are contexts where it has a meaning, and a different one.
Compare, in the present indicative,

If he goes, she will go.
(conditions her consent on his going)
If he will go, I will go.
(conditions her consent on his consent)

Contrafactually, we have correspondingly

If he went, she would go.
If he would go, she would go.

And in the past,

If he had gone, she would have gone.
If he would have gone, she would have gone.
--
--- Joe Fineman ***@verizon.net

||: A large part of altruism is grounded upon the fact that it :||
||: is uncomfortable to have unhappy people about one. :||
Richard Heathfield
2017-04-20 10:41:57 UTC
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Post by GordonD
3) Do the math.
Only one? That shouldn't take too long.
--
Richard Heathfield
Email: rjh at cpax dot org dot uk
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Sig line 4 vacant - apply within
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-20 13:07:56 UTC
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Post by Richard Heathfield
Post by GordonD
3) Do the math.
Only one? That shouldn't take too long.
Americans can't handle more than one.
--
The dot over the letter i is called a tittle.
The Peeler
2017-04-20 14:19:38 UTC
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On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 14:07:56 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Richard Heathfield
Only one? That shouldn't take too long.
Americans can't handle more than one.
Idiot!
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) "deep thinking":
"Curry is for chavs."
MID: <***@red.lan>
Jerry Friedman
2017-04-19 21:58:23 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
Feel free to add more....
That's a pretty big ask....r
Maybe it's too big of an ask.
--
Jerry Friedman
Quinn C
2017-04-19 22:23:30 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
Feel free to add more....
That's a pretty big ask....r
There's always a gotcha.
--
Some things are taken away from you, some you leave behind-and
some you carry with you, world without end.
-- Robert C. Wilson, Vortex (novel), p.31
GordonD
2017-04-21 08:19:38 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
Feel free to add more....
Don't know how I forgot this one...

"I could care less..."
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-21 09:15:32 UTC
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Post by GordonD
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
1) "My bad."
Your bad what?
Feel free to add more....
Don't know how I forgot this one...
"I could care less..."
Every time I see that I point out to the moron that typed it: You've got that backwards. What you wrote means you care enormously about it, since everything else is less.
I guess it's linked to their inability to do more than one math.
--
Pat Glenn, weightlifting commentator - "And this is Gregoriava from Bulgaria. I saw her snatch this morning and it was amazing!"
The Peeler
2017-04-21 10:21:03 UTC
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On Fri, 21 Apr 2017 10:15:32 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by GordonD
Don't know how I forgot this one...
"I could care less..."
Every time I see that I point out to the moron that typed it: You've got that backwards. What you wrote means you care enormously about it, since everything else is less.
I guess it's linked to their inability to do more than one math.
What you keep forgetting in that context is that YOU are the acknowledged
moron here! And you just proved it again!
--
Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson") on Pain:
"Pain is not harmful. The victim may well want rid of it, but it's
no reason for anyone to rush there".
(Courtesy of Mr Pounder)
GordonD
2017-04-21 10:48:52 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by GordonD
1) "My bad." Your bad what?
Feel free to add more....
Don't know how I forgot this one...
"I could care less..."
Every time I see that I point out to the moron that typed it: You've
got that backwards. What you wrote means you care enormously about
it, since everything else is less. I guess it's linked to their
inability to do more than one math.
Ooh, that's another one!

"I guess." when they mean "I suppose so." Supposing means coming to a
conclusion with less than compelling evidence - but you do have *some*
evidence. Guessing is no better than sticking a pin in a list of
alternatives.
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-21 11:45:05 UTC
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Post by GordonD
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by GordonD
1) "My bad." Your bad what?
Feel free to add more....
Don't know how I forgot this one...
"I could care less..."
Every time I see that I point out to the moron that typed it: You've
got that backwards. What you wrote means you care enormously about
it, since everything else is less. I guess it's linked to their
inability to do more than one math.
Ooh, that's another one!
"I guess." when they mean "I suppose so." Supposing means coming to a
conclusion with less than compelling evidence - but you do have *some*
evidence. Guessing is no better than sticking a pin in a list of
alternatives.
So you're always fairly sure when you suppose? I'm not.
--
It turns out that several protected, rare birds in Germany have been feeding on a species of protected, rare fish. In response to this dilemma, exasperated German officials have decided to do the only thing that makes sense in this kind of a situation - kill all the environmentalists.
Richard Heathfield
2017-04-21 12:00:53 UTC
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On 21/04/17 11:48, GordonD wrote:
<snip>
Post by GordonD
"I guess." when they mean "I suppose so." Supposing means coming to a
conclusion with less than compelling evidence - but you do have *some*
evidence. Guessing is no better than sticking a pin in a list of
alternatives.
I disagree. A guess can be educated.

(Let the puns begin.)
--
Richard Heathfield
Email: rjh at cpax dot org dot uk
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Sig line 4 vacant - apply within
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-21 12:07:13 UTC
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Post by Richard Heathfield
<snip>
Post by GordonD
"I guess." when they mean "I suppose so." Supposing means coming to a
conclusion with less than compelling evidence - but you do have *some*
evidence. Guessing is no better than sticking a pin in a list of
alternatives.
I disagree. A guess can be educated.
(Let the puns begin.)
My Maths teacher invented the word "guesstimate". I can't remember what it was about - some branch of Maths where you made guesses and made your way towards the correct answer. He claimed a guess would be uneducated, and an estimate would be impossible.
--
I got invited to a party and was told to dress to kill. Apparently a turban, beard and a backpack wasn't what they had in mind.
JoeyDee
2017-04-21 12:19:11 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
My Maths teacher invented the word "guesstimate".
ROFL
--
Joey Dee
Remember: It is To Laugh
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-21 12:26:43 UTC
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Post by JoeyDee
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
My Maths teacher invented the word "guesstimate".
ROFL
Damn, it is actually a word.
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/guesstimate
Post by JoeyDee
--
Remember: It is To Laugh
Explain your sig.
--
Corduroy pillows are making headlines!
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