Discussion:
Opiate vs. Opioid
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Ken Blake
2018-06-07 21:43:45 UTC
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The word I am accustomed to is "opiate," but every time I see it these
days, it's "opioid."

Do they mean the same thing? If so, when and why did it change? Is the
same thing true in the UK--used to be "opiate," and now "opioid"?

The reason this question comes to mind is that I just had outpatient
surgery for my spinal stenosis,and I was given a prescription for
oxycodone in case I needed it for the pain (I haven't needed it and
haven't taken any). The container for the pills is marked "opioid."
Stefan Ram
2018-06-07 21:49:50 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
The word I am accustomed to is "opiate," but every time I see it these
days, it's "opioid."
"Opiate" is a term classically used in pharmacology to mean a
drug derived from opium. "Opioid", a more modern term, is used
to designate all substances, both natural and synthetic,
that bind to opioid receptors in the brain (including antagonists).

(Hemmings, Hugh C.; Egan, Talmage D. (2013). Pharmacology
and Physiology for Anesthesia: Foundations and Clinical
Application: Expert Consult - Online and Print. Elsevier
Health Scienc,es. p. 253. ISBN 1437716792.)
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-06-07 22:18:15 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
The word I am accustomed to is "opiate," but every time I see it these
days, it's "opioid."
Do they mean the same thing? If so, when and why did it change? Is the
same thing true in the UK--used to be "opiate," and now "opioid"?
The reason this question comes to mind is that I just had outpatient
surgery for my spinal stenosis,and I was given a prescription for
oxycodone in case I needed it for the pain (I haven't needed it and
haven't taken any). The container for the pills is marked "opioid."
No, there is a clear difference. Opiates are derivatives of opium. Opioids
are substances, usually synthetic, that act in in a similar way to opiates
but are not in any way opium based. As opiates are strictly controlled
and rarely prescribed these days it is inevitable that opioids should now
be the most commonly seen term. That the hope that moving away from
opiates to new compounds would result in fewer problems with addiction
and withdrawal has proved utterly misplaced has of course meant that
opioids are very much in the news of late!
Ken Blake
2018-06-07 23:23:06 UTC
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On Thu, 7 Jun 2018 15:18:15 -0700 (PDT), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Ken Blake
The word I am accustomed to is "opiate," but every time I see it these
days, it's "opioid."
Do they mean the same thing? If so, when and why did it change? Is the
same thing true in the UK--used to be "opiate," and now "opioid"?
The reason this question comes to mind is that I just had outpatient
surgery for my spinal stenosis,and I was given a prescription for
oxycodone in case I needed it for the pain (I haven't needed it and
haven't taken any). The container for the pills is marked "opioid."
No, there is a clear difference. Opiates are derivatives of opium. Opioids
are substances, usually synthetic, that act in in a similar way to opiates
but are not in any way opium based. As opiates are strictly controlled
and rarely prescribed these days it is inevitable that opioids should now
be the most commonly seen term. That the hope that moving away from
opiates to new compounds would result in fewer problems with addiction
and withdrawal has proved utterly misplaced has of course meant that
opioids are very much in the news of late!
Thanks to you and the others who said the same thing.
Horace LaBadie
2018-06-07 22:21:25 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
The word I am accustomed to is "opiate," but every time I see it these
days, it's "opioid."
Do they mean the same thing? If so, when and why did it change? Is the
same thing true in the UK--used to be "opiate," and now "opioid"?
The reason this question comes to mind is that I just had outpatient
surgery for my spinal stenosis,and I was given a prescription for
oxycodone in case I needed it for the pain (I haven't needed it and
haven't taken any). The container for the pills is marked "opioid."
Opiods include artificial opiate-like substances.
musika
2018-06-07 22:21:46 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
The word I am accustomed to is "opiate," but every time I see it these
days, it's "opioid."
Do they mean the same thing? If so, when and why did it change? Is the
same thing true in the UK--used to be "opiate," and now "opioid"?
The reason this question comes to mind is that I just had outpatient
surgery for my spinal stenosis,and I was given a prescription for
oxycodone in case I needed it for the pain (I haven't needed it and
haven't taken any). The container for the pills is marked "opioid."
As I understand it opiates are derived from opium and opioids are
synthetic. I think there has been a change in that "opioids" is used for
all classes now.
--
Ray
UK
RH Draney
2018-06-08 04:00:32 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
The reason this question comes to mind is that I just had outpatient
surgery for my spinal stenosis,and I was given a prescription for
oxycodone in case I needed it for the pain (I haven't needed it and
haven't taken any). The container for the pills is marked "opioid."
About three months ago I developed a persistent toothache that, while
not severe, was continuous enough to make it almost impossible for me to
sleep...when the weekend was over, I was able to get in to see a dentist
who pronounced exactly the cause I was anticipated: gum infection to be
correct via root canal...the root was deep enough and curved enough that
he had to refer me to an endodontist to complete the job, and the latter
specialist wrote me a pain prescription for ibuprofen plus hydrocodone
before sending me back to the original dentist to put a temporary crown
on the tooth until a permanent one could be fashioned....

Between the original work, the continuation by a specialist in another
office almost three miles away, and the return visit with the drilling
and grinding to prepare the tooth for the crown, I received three sets
of anesthetic injections in the same place over a period of about four
hours...the bruising from those injections was the only source of pain
once the root canal was completed, and I was able to control that pain
with a couple of over-the-counter acetaminophen tablets, and two days
later all the pain was gone....

I never took the opioid prescription...in actual fact, I never even
bothered to have it filled (so I can't confirm Mr Blake's observation
that the container would have carried a special warning)...I can say
with the voice of experience that health-care professionals do in fact
write prescriptions that are not strictly necessary....

(That said, I still have never found a doctor willing to prescribe
leeches for my ongoing high blood pressure condition)....r
Cheryl
2018-06-08 08:48:12 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by Ken Blake
The reason this question comes to mind is that I just had outpatient
surgery for my spinal stenosis,and I was given a prescription for
oxycodone in case I needed it for the pain (I haven't needed it and
haven't taken any). The container for the pills is marked "opioid."
About three months ago I developed a persistent toothache that, while
not severe, was continuous enough to make it almost impossible for me to
sleep...when the weekend was over, I was able to get in to see a dentist
who pronounced exactly the cause I was anticipated: gum infection to be
correct via root canal...the root was deep enough and curved enough that
he had to refer me to an endodontist to complete the job, and the latter
specialist wrote me a pain prescription for ibuprofen plus hydrocodone
before sending me back to the original dentist to put a temporary crown
on the tooth until a permanent one could be fashioned....
Between the original work, the continuation by a specialist in another
office almost three miles away, and the return visit with the drilling
and grinding to prepare the tooth for the crown, I received three sets
of anesthetic injections in the same place over a period of about four
hours...the bruising from those injections was the only source of pain
once the root canal was completed, and I was able to control that pain
with a couple of over-the-counter acetaminophen tablets, and two days
later all the pain was gone....
I never took the opioid prescription...in actual fact, I never even
bothered to have it filled (so I can't confirm Mr Blake's observation
that the container would have carried a special warning)...I can say
with the voice of experience that health-care professionals do in fact
write prescriptions that are not strictly necessary....
(That said, I still have never found a doctor willing to prescribe
leeches for my ongoing high blood pressure condition)....r
I was recently given an opioid after surgery, but it isn't called that
on the label - I know what it is because I check into things like that
and it's in the news as something that's used and abused illegally.
There are an assortment of dire warnings on the label about drowsiness,
breathing problems and using heavy machinery. There's no refill on the
prescription, but I got enough to see me through the post-surgery period
and still have some I'm holding on to in case the arthritis acts up. I
suppose that means I was given too many, but on the other hand, I might
have needed them all during my recovery. People differ a bit in their
response to both pain and drugs.
--
Cheryl
Ken Blake
2018-06-08 15:23:45 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by Ken Blake
The reason this question comes to mind is that I just had outpatient
surgery for my spinal stenosis,and I was given a prescription for
oxycodone in case I needed it for the pain (I haven't needed it and
haven't taken any). The container for the pills is marked "opioid."
About three months ago I developed a persistent toothache that, while
not severe, was continuous enough to make it almost impossible for me to
sleep...when the weekend was over, I was able to get in to see a dentist
who pronounced exactly the cause I was anticipated: gum infection to be
correct via root canal...the root was deep enough and curved enough that
he had to refer me to an endodontist to complete the job, and the latter
specialist wrote me a pain prescription for ibuprofen plus hydrocodone
before sending me back to the original dentist to put a temporary crown
on the tooth until a permanent one could be fashioned....
Between the original work, the continuation by a specialist in another
office almost three miles away, and the return visit with the drilling
and grinding to prepare the tooth for the crown, I received three sets
of anesthetic injections in the same place over a period of about four
hours...the bruising from those injections was the only source of pain
once the root canal was completed, and I was able to control that pain
with a couple of over-the-counter acetaminophen tablets, and two days
later all the pain was gone....
I never took the opioid prescription...in actual fact, I never even
bothered to have it filled (so I can't confirm Mr Blake's observation
No formality necessary. Just "Ken" is fine.
Post by RH Draney
that the container would have carried a special warning)...I can say
with the voice of experience that health-care professionals do in fact
write prescriptions that are not strictly necessary....
No, I knew the oxycodone prescription wasn't necessary. The surgeon
made it clear that I should fill it in case I needed it. I was glad
that I didn't need it.
Peter Moylan
2018-06-10 16:27:41 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by Ken Blake
The reason this question comes to mind is that I just had
outpatient surgery for my spinal stenosis,and I was given a
prescription for oxycodone in case I needed it for the pain (I
haven't needed it and haven't taken any). The container for the
pills is marked "opioid."
About three months ago I developed a persistent toothache that,
while not severe, was continuous enough to make it almost impossible
for me to sleep...when the weekend was over, I was able to get in to
gum infection to be correct via root canal...the root was deep enough
and curved enough that he had to refer me to an endodontist to
complete the job, and the latter specialist wrote me a pain
prescription for ibuprofen plus hydrocodone before sending me back to
the original dentist to put a temporary crown on the tooth until a
permanent one could be fashioned....
Some of the strongest pain remedies I have been prescribed have been
prescribed for me by dentists. In my case, it was because I had three
root canals and the original dentist only discovered two.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Jerry Friedman
2018-06-08 17:32:39 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
The word I am accustomed to is "opiate," but every time I see it these
days, it's "opioid."
Do they mean the same thing? If so, when and why did it change? Is the
same thing true in the UK--used to be "opiate," and now "opioid"?
The reason this question comes to mind is that I just had outpatient
surgery for my spinal stenosis,and I was given a prescription for
oxycodone in case I needed it for the pain (I haven't needed it and
haven't taken any). The container for the pills is marked "opioid."
I'd suggest that people who use their real names be careful about saying
they have opioid pills in their possession. I don't know how much
digging it would take to find an address, but addicts have nothing else
on their minds.
--
Jerry Friedman
Ken Blake
2018-06-08 19:37:13 UTC
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On Fri, 8 Jun 2018 11:32:39 -0600, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Ken Blake
The word I am accustomed to is "opiate," but every time I see it these
days, it's "opioid."
Do they mean the same thing? If so, when and why did it change? Is the
same thing true in the UK--used to be "opiate," and now "opioid"?
The reason this question comes to mind is that I just had outpatient
surgery for my spinal stenosis,and I was given a prescription for
oxycodone in case I needed it for the pain (I haven't needed it and
haven't taken any). The container for the pills is marked "opioid."
I'd suggest that people who use their real names be careful about saying
they have opioid pills in their possession. I don't know how much
digging it would take to find an address, but addicts have nothing else
on their minds.
A good suggestion, thanks. However the pills are gone. Not having
needed them, I flushed them down the toilet.
HVS
2018-06-08 19:52:13 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
On Fri, 8 Jun 2018 11:32:39 -0600, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Ken Blake
The word I am accustomed to is "opiate," but every time I see it these
days, it's "opioid."
Do they mean the same thing? If so, when and why did it change? Is the
same thing true in the UK--used to be "opiate," and now "opioid"?
The reason this question comes to mind is that I just had
outpatient
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Ken Blake
surgery for my spinal stenosis,and I was given a prescription for
oxycodone in case I needed it for the pain (I haven't needed it and
haven't taken any). The container for the pills is marked
"opioid."
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Jerry Friedman
I'd suggest that people who use their real names be careful about saying
they have opioid pills in their possession. I don't know how much
digging it would take to find an address, but addicts have nothing else
on their minds.
A good suggestion, thanks. However the pills are gone. Not having
needed them, I flushed them down the toilet.
Oh, great - junkie sewer rats; just what we needed....
Cheryl
2018-06-08 20:08:17 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
On Fri, 8 Jun 2018 11:32:39 -0600, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Ken Blake
The word I am accustomed to is "opiate," but every time I see it these
days, it's "opioid."
Do they mean the same thing? If so, when and why did it change? Is the
same thing true in the UK--used to be "opiate," and now "opioid"?
The reason this question comes to mind is that I just had outpatient
surgery for my spinal stenosis,and I was given a prescription for
oxycodone in case I needed it for the pain (I haven't needed it and
haven't taken any). The container for the pills is marked "opioid."
I'd suggest that people who use their real names be careful about saying
they have opioid pills in their possession. I don't know how much
digging it would take to find an address, but addicts have nothing else
on their minds.
A good suggestion, thanks. However the pills are gone. Not having
needed them, I flushed them down the toilet.
The recommended procedure here is to turn unneeded pills in to a
pharmacy. I did that with all the drugs that were left over when a
relative died.
--
Cheryl
bill van
2018-06-08 20:41:54 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
On Fri, 8 Jun 2018 11:32:39 -0600, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Ken Blake
The word I am accustomed to is "opiate," but every time I see it these
days, it's "opioid."
Do they mean the same thing? If so, when and why did it change? Is the
same thing true in the UK--used to be "opiate," and now "opioid"?
The reason this question comes to mind is that I just had outpatient
surgery for my spinal stenosis,and I was given a prescription for
oxycodone in case I needed it for the pain (I haven't needed it and
haven't taken any). The container for the pills is marked "opioid."
I'd suggest that people who use their real names be careful about saying
they have opioid pills in their possession. I don't know how much
digging it would take to find an address, but addicts have nothing else
on their minds.
A good suggestion, thanks. However the pills are gone. Not having
needed them, I flushed them down the toilet.
There is a better option: Return them to the pharmacy where you bought
them. They can dispose of them safely. (Check to see if they will
accept them, of course. They do here in Canada, but I don't know if
that's universal.)

If you flush them, one way or another they end up in the environment,
and quite possibly in the water supply after a tour of a sewage
treatment plant, perhaps with enough potency remaining to harm living
critters.

bill
Peter Young
2018-06-08 20:48:41 UTC
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Post by bill van
Post by Ken Blake
On Fri, 8 Jun 2018 11:32:39 -0600, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Ken Blake
The word I am accustomed to is "opiate," but every time I see it these
days, it's "opioid."
Do they mean the same thing? If so, when and why did it change? Is the
same thing true in the UK--used to be "opiate," and now "opioid"?
The reason this question comes to mind is that I just had outpatient
surgery for my spinal stenosis,and I was given a prescription for
oxycodone in case I needed it for the pain (I haven't needed it and
haven't taken any). The container for the pills is marked "opioid."
I'd suggest that people who use their real names be careful about saying
they have opioid pills in their possession. I don't know how much
digging it would take to find an address, but addicts have nothing else
on their minds.
A good suggestion, thanks. However the pills are gone. Not having
needed them, I flushed them down the toilet.
There is a better option: Return them to the pharmacy where you bought
them. They can dispose of them safely. (Check to see if they will
accept them, of course. They do here in Canada, but I don't know if
that's universal.)
Certainly so in the UK.
Post by bill van
If you flush them, one way or another they end up in the environment,
and quite possibly in the water supply after a tour of a sewage
treatment plant, perhaps with enough potency remaining to harm living
critters.
Verb sap.

Peter
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Pt)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Garrett Wollman
2018-06-08 22:01:22 UTC
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Post by Peter Young
Post by bill van
There is a better option: Return them to the pharmacy where you bought
them. They can dispose of them safely. (Check to see if they will
accept them, of course. They do here in Canada, but I don't know if
that's universal.)
Certainly so in the UK.
We are instructed here that it's preferable to dump pills in the trash
(and thus have them be landfilled or incinerated) rather than in the
wastewater stream. That is, however, the opposite of what we used to
be told to do.

-GAWollman
--
Garrett A. Wollman | "Act to avoid constraining the future; if you can,
***@bimajority.org| act to remove constraint from the future. This is
Opinions not shared by| a thing you can do, are able to do, to do together."
my employers. | - Graydon Saunders, _A Succession of Bad Days_ (2015)
Snidely
2018-06-09 07:18:04 UTC
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Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by Peter Young
Post by bill van
There is a better option: Return them to the pharmacy where you bought
them. They can dispose of them safely. (Check to see if they will
accept them, of course. They do here in Canada, but I don't know if
that's universal.)
Certainly so in the UK.
We are instructed here that it's preferable to dump pills in the trash
(and thus have them be landfilled or incinerated) rather than in the
wastewater stream. That is, however, the opposite of what we used to
be told to do.
California advises of returns to the pharmacy.

I have seen places in the LA area where the Sheriff or PD provide
something like a sharps drop, but for illegal drugs. Those are
supposed to be Ollie Ollie Inphree. I haven't yet had to prove that to
be the case.

/dps
--
Killing a mouse was hardly a Nobel Prize-worthy exercise, and Lawrence
went apopleptic when he learned a lousy rodent had peed away all his
precious heavy water.
_The Disappearing Spoon_, Sam Kean
Peter T. Daniels
2018-06-09 02:23:03 UTC
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Post by bill van
Post by Ken Blake
A good suggestion, thanks. However the pills are gone. Not having
needed them, I flushed them down the toilet.
There is a better option: Return them to the pharmacy where you bought
them. They can dispose of them safely. (Check to see if they will
accept them, of course. They do here in Canada, but I don't know if
that's universal.)
If you flush them, one way or another they end up in the environment,
and quite possibly in the water supply after a tour of a sewage
treatment plant, perhaps with enough potency remaining to harm living
critters.
Theoretically we have red "medical waste" bags, but they don't tell us
what to do with them. Better to drop them off at a medical facility that
routinely disposes of such things. Including "sharps."
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