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Scientific terms you're using wrong
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Dingbat
2017-09-20 14:29:42 UTC
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Scientific terms you're using wrong
http://science.howstuffworks.com/dictionary/astronomy-terms/10-scientific-words-using-wrong.htm
Peter Moylan
2017-09-20 16:43:30 UTC
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Post by Dingbat
Scientific terms you're using wrong
http://science.howstuffworks.com/dictionary/astronomy-terms/10-scientific-words-using-wrong.htm
Why do news outlets feel a need to use video presentations rather than
written text? I didn't get to find out what the ten words were.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Cheryl
2017-09-20 16:53:04 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Dingbat
Scientific terms you're using wrong
http://science.howstuffworks.com/dictionary/astronomy-terms/10-scientific-words-using-wrong.htm
Why do news outlets feel a need to use video presentations rather than
written text? I didn't get to find out what the ten words were.
BBC has drastically increased the proportion of the stories that are on
video. I hate it. I watch videos sometimes, sure, but when I'm skimming
the news stories, I want text.
--
Cheryl
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-09-20 17:13:55 UTC
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Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Dingbat
Scientific terms you're using wrong
http://science.howstuffworks.com/dictionary/astronomy-terms/10-scientific-words-using-wrong.htm
Why do news outlets feel a need to use video presentations rather than
written text? I didn't get to find out what the ten words were.
BBC has drastically increased the proportion of the stories that are on
video. I hate it. I watch videos sometimes, sure, but when I'm skimming
the news stories, I want text.
+1

Trouble with you and me, Cheryl, is that we value efficient transfer of
information over slickness.
--
athel
HVS
2017-09-20 17:51:51 UTC
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On Wed, 20 Sep 2017 19:13:55 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Dingbat
Scientific terms you're using wrong
http://science.howstuffworks.com/dictionary/astronomy-terms/10-scientif
ic-words-using-wrong.htm
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Moylan
Why do news outlets feel a need to use video presentations
rather than
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Moylan
written text? I didn't get to find out what the ten words were.
BBC has drastically increased the proportion of the stories that are on
video. I hate it. I watch videos sometimes, sure, but when I'm skimming
the news stories, I want text.
+1
Trouble with you and me, Cheryl, is that we value efficient
transfer of
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
information over slickness.
+1, although I don't think it's the slickness that attracts
journalists to video - it's a control thing.

Video is linear, and the writer/presenter/whatever gets to control
the speed and sequence of how the story is revealed. That's harder to
do with print, where the reader can scan, read ahead, look back, and
generally decide what bits are or aren't interesting or relevant.

Reading text is interactive; video is consumed passively.
--
Cheers, Harvey
CanE (30 years) & BrE (34 years),
indiscriminately mixed
Peter T. Daniels
2017-09-20 17:55:41 UTC
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Post by HVS
On Wed, 20 Sep 2017 19:13:55 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Moylan
Why do news outlets feel a need to use video presentations
rather than
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Moylan
written text? I didn't get to find out what the ten words were.
BBC has drastically increased the proportion of the stories that
are on
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Cheryl
video. I hate it. I watch videos sometimes, sure, but when I'm
skimming
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Cheryl
the news stories, I want text.
+1
Trouble with you and me, Cheryl, is that we value efficient
transfer of
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
information over slickness.
Others of us don't indiscriminately click on things that aren't likely to be of
any interest at all.
Post by HVS
+1, although I don't think it's the slickness that attracts
journalists to video - it's a control thing.
Video is linear, and the writer/presenter/whatever gets to control
the speed and sequence of how the story is revealed. That's harder to
do with print, where the reader can scan, read ahead, look back, and
generally decide what bits are or aren't interesting or relevant.
Reading text is interactive; video is consumed passively.
--
Cheers, Harvey
CanE (30 years) & BrE (34 years),
indiscriminately mixed
Mixed with a little McLuhan?
b***@shaw.ca
2017-09-20 19:48:43 UTC
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Post by HVS
On Wed, 20 Sep 2017 19:13:55 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Cheryl
Post by Dingbat
Scientific terms you're using wrong
http://science.howstuffworks.com/dictionary/astronomy-terms/10-scientif
ic-words-using-wrong.htm
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Cheryl
Why do news outlets feel a need to use video presentations > rather than
written text? I didn't get to find out what the ten words were.
BBC has drastically increased the proportion of the stories that
are on video. I hate it. I watch videos sometimes, sure, but when I'm
skimming the news stories, I want text.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
+1
Trouble with you and me, Cheryl, is that we value efficient
transfer of information over slickness.
+1, although I don't think it's the slickness that attracts
journalists to video - it's a control thing.
I was a journalist when video was first being added to newspapers' websites, and I can attest that print journalists hated it. It mean extra work -- recording video in addition to gathering all the information needed to write a story, editing the video and posting it, all stuff we were expected to pick up on the fly without any training -- and without extra pay. (Requirements to post items to FaceBook and Twitter to promote stories soon followed. I'm so glad I'm retired.)

For newspapers, it was one of many not very successful attempts to attract more people to their websites so they could make a few bucks off additional clicks. I don't think "control" really entered into it.
Post by HVS
Video is linear, and the writer/presenter/whatever gets to control
the speed and sequence of how the story is revealed. That's harder to
do with print, where the reader can scan, read ahead, look back, and
generally decide what bits are or aren't interesting or relevant.
Both as a producer of news and as a consumer, I usually want to read my news. When I want to view it, I'll go to television or, increasingly, YouTube.
Post by HVS
Reading text is interactive; video is consumed passively.
My wife and I have access to YouTube on our living room television, via Apple TV. Increasingly, we search YouTube for background on whatever news story we're interested in. That is quite interactive. We enter search terms and try to gauge which videos are relevant. YouTube is such a vast enterprise now that you can find almost anything you want within minutes of a news event.
Mark Brader
2017-09-20 20:06:19 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Trouble with you and me, Cheryl, is that we value efficient transfer of
information over slickness.
To be fair, sometimes video *does* provide the most efficient transfer
of information on a newscast. When that's the case it's usually because
the event involves some sort of action rather than just people talking,
and the video actually shows that action rather than just a reporter talking.

But I still refuse to have a video capability in my web browser.
--
Mark Brader "You can stop laughing now.
Toronto Well, maybe you *can't*, but you *may*."
***@vex.net -- Rick Burger

My text in this article is in the public domain.
charles
2017-09-20 20:09:54 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Trouble with you and me, Cheryl, is that we value efficient transfer of
information over slickness.
To be fair, sometimes video *does* provide the most efficient transfer of
information on a newscast. When that's the case it's usually because the
event involves some sort of action rather than just people talking, and
the video actually shows that action rather than just a reporter talking.
nothing has really changed in the last 50 years. In the tv programme "That
was the Week that Was" there was a fake news bulletin. "The whole of
Britain was hit today by blizzards - here is a picture of snow outside the
newsroom window."
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
Garrett Wollman
2017-09-20 17:58:49 UTC
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Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Moylan
Why do news outlets feel a need to use video presentations rather than
written text? I didn't get to find out what the ten words were.
BBC has drastically increased the proportion of the stories that are on
video. I hate it. I watch videos sometimes, sure, but when I'm skimming
the news stories, I want text.
Facebook (the company) demands video. Since that's where an estimated
60% of the news audience is, newsrooms follow suit. (Facebook demands
video because video means you'll spend more time looking at the
advertising they serve alongside, and increase "engagement" numbers
they report to Wall Street and advertisers.)

-GAWollman
--
Garrett A. Wollman | "Act to avoid constraining the future; if you can,
***@bimajority.org| act to remove constraint from the future. This is
Opinions not shared by| a thing you can do, are able to do, to do together."
my employers. | - Graydon Saunders, _A Succession of Bad Days_ (2015)
Cheryl
2017-09-20 18:04:52 UTC
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Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Moylan
Why do news outlets feel a need to use video presentations rather than
written text? I didn't get to find out what the ten words were.
BBC has drastically increased the proportion of the stories that are on
video. I hate it. I watch videos sometimes, sure, but when I'm skimming
the news stories, I want text.
Facebook (the company) demands video. Since that's where an estimated
60% of the news audience is, newsrooms follow suit. (Facebook demands
video because video means you'll spend more time looking at the
advertising they serve alongside, and increase "engagement" numbers
they report to Wall Street and advertisers.)
Yet another reason not to bother with Facebook!

I figured the BBC management must have had a reason for the change, but
I didn't know what it could be, unless there are a LOT of people out
there who prefer video to text. Or perhaps video is easier or faster or
cheaper to produce, although I don't know why it might be.

Catering to Facebook users, and Facebook itself and its need for ad
revenue does sound more plausible than my theories.
--
Cheryl
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-09-20 19:35:38 UTC
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Post by Cheryl
Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Moylan
Why do news outlets feel a need to use video presentations rather than
written text? I didn't get to find out what the ten words were.
BBC has drastically increased the proportion of the stories that are on
video. I hate it. I watch videos sometimes, sure, but when I'm skimming
the news stories, I want text.
Facebook (the company) demands video. Since that's where an estimated
60% of the news audience is, newsrooms follow suit. (Facebook demands
video because video means you'll spend more time looking at the
advertising they serve alongside, and increase "engagement" numbers
they report to Wall Street and advertisers.)
Yet another reason not to bother with Facebook!
I figured the BBC management must have had a reason for the change, but
I didn't know what it could be, unless there are a LOT of people out
there who prefer video to text. Or perhaps video is easier or faster or
cheaper to produce, although I don't know why it might be.
Don't forget that the BBC is a TV company. The videos on the website are
likely to have already been shown on TV or at least produced for showing
on TV.
Post by Cheryl
Catering to Facebook users, and Facebook itself and its need for ad
revenue does sound more plausible than my theories.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-09-20 19:55:40 UTC
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Post by Cheryl
Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Moylan
Why do news outlets feel a need to use video presentations rather than
written text? I didn't get to find out what the ten words were.
BBC has drastically increased the proportion of the stories that are on
video. I hate it. I watch videos sometimes, sure, but when I'm skimming
the news stories, I want text.
Facebook (the company) demands video. Since that's where an estimated
60% of the news audience is, newsrooms follow suit. (Facebook demands
video because video means you'll spend more time looking at the
advertising they serve alongside, and increase "engagement" numbers
they report to Wall Street and advertisers.)
Yet another reason not to bother with Facebook!
Another +1!
--
athel
Katy Jennison
2017-09-20 18:31:13 UTC
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Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Dingbat
Scientific terms you're using wrong
http://science.howstuffworks.com/dictionary/astronomy-terms/10-scientific-words-using-wrong.htm
Why do news outlets feel a need to use video presentations rather than
written text? I didn't get to find out what the ten words were.
BBC has drastically increased the proportion of the stories that are on
video. I hate it. I watch videos sometimes, sure, but when I'm skimming
the news stories, I want text.
+1. I rarely click on videos, and I feel cheated if those are what I'm
offered rather than text. (Sometimes, to be fair, there's both.)
--
Katy Jennison
b***@shaw.ca
2017-09-20 19:30:42 UTC
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Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Dingbat
Scientific terms you're using wrong
http://science.howstuffworks.com/dictionary/astronomy-terms/10-scientific-words-using-wrong.htm
Why do news outlets feel a need to use video presentations rather than
written text? I didn't get to find out what the ten words were.
BBC has drastically increased the proportion of the stories that are on
video. I hate it. I watch videos sometimes, sure, but when I'm skimming
the news stories, I want text.
I'm with you. If a news site springs a video on me, especially one that I did not ask to play, can't easily be turned off and comes with a commercial, I leave the site immediately.

bill
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-09-20 19:56:50 UTC
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Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Dingbat
Scientific terms you're using wrong
http://science.howstuffworks.com/dictionary/astronomy-terms/10-scientific-words-using-wrong.htm
Why do news outlets feel a need to use video presentations rather than
written text? I didn't get to find out what the ten words were.
BBC has drastically increased the proportion of the stories that are on
video. I hate it. I watch videos sometimes, sure, but when I'm skimming
the news stories, I want text.
I'm with you. If a news site springs a video on me, especially one that
I did not ask to play, can't easily be turned off and comes with a
commercial, I leave the site immediately.
Yes, but none of those who've contributed to this discussion form part
of the target audience.
--
athel
musika
2017-09-20 20:36:01 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by b***@shaw.ca
I'm with you. If a news site springs a video on me, especially one
that I did not ask to play, can't easily be turned off and comes with
a commercial, I leave the site immediately.
Yes, but none of those who've contributed to this discussion form part
of the target audience.
Besides which, I have turned off video autostart in Firefox.
--
Ray
UK
musika
2017-09-20 17:06:09 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Dingbat
Scientific terms you're using wrong
http://science.howstuffworks.com/dictionary/astronomy-terms/10-scientific-words-using-wrong.htm
Why do news outlets feel a need to use video presentations rather than
written text? I didn't get to find out what the ten words were.
Ignore the single video and just click on <NEXT> above each picture.
--
Ray
UK
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-09-20 17:19:27 UTC
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Post by musika
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Dingbat
Scientific terms you're using wrong
http://science.howstuffworks.com/dictionary/astronomy-terms/10-scientific-words-using-wrong.htm
Why do news outlets feel a need to use video presentations rather than
written text? I didn't get to find out what the ten words were.
Ignore the single video and just click on <NEXT> above each picture.
OK, thanks, but having followed your advice, I don't think the report
was directed at people like me. I'm pretty sure that I'm not using
_any_ of these terms wrongly.
--
athel
occam
2017-09-20 19:56:54 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by musika
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Dingbat
Scientific terms you're using wrong
http://science.howstuffworks.com/dictionary/astronomy-terms/10-scientific-words-using-wrong.htm
Why do news outlets feel a need to use video presentations rather
than written text? I didn't get to find out what the ten words were.
Ignore the single video and just click on <NEXT> above each picture.
OK, thanks, but having followed your advice, I don't think the report
was directed at people like me. I'm pretty sure that I'm not using _any_
of these terms wrongly.
Are you sure you have never used the colloquial "I have a theory about
that..." outside of scientific conversations? Most people would say they
have a theory rather than "I have an opinion about that..." when
explaining a mundane observation, because it sounds more authoritative.
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