Discussion:
Hippo Pat Muss
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Mack A. Damia
2018-08-07 23:57:40 UTC
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"Hippo Pat Muss"

Seen on closed-captioning on the news about a resident of the San
Diego Zoo.
Peter Young
2018-08-08 06:41:06 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
"Hippo Pat Muss"
Seen on closed-captioning on the news about a resident of the San
Diego Zoo.
Hippo birdie two ewe.
Hippo birdie two ewe.
Hippo birdie deer ewe.
Hippo birdie two ewe.

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Au)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Peter Moylan
2018-08-08 10:06:59 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
"Hippo Pat Muss"
Seen on closed-captioning on the news about a resident of the San
Diego Zoo.
Hippo birdie two ewe. Hippo birdie two ewe. Hippo birdie deer ewe.
Hippo birdie two ewe.
I once got a birthday card that had a pictorial version of this. It
began with pictures indicating
hippo bird dog two ewes
and continued in the obvious way.

A card I once got from my sister was equally inventive. It said "I was
going to get you one of those pornographic cards, but I didn't know
whether you had a pornograph."
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Jack
2018-08-08 12:22:40 UTC
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On Wed, 8 Aug 2018 20:06:59 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mack A. Damia
"Hippo Pat Muss"
Seen on closed-captioning on the news about a resident of the San
Diego Zoo.
Hippo birdie two ewe. Hippo birdie two ewe. Hippo birdie deer ewe.
Hippo birdie two ewe.
I once got a birthday card that had a pictorial version of this. It
began with pictures indicating
hippo bird dog two ewes
and continued in the obvious way.
A card I once got from my sister was equally inventive. It said "I was
going to get you one of those pornographic cards, but I didn't know
whether you had a pornograph."
I once got a card from a girlfriend that said "I wanted to send you
something halfway decent", with a cartoon girl wearing only a skirt.
--
John
LFS
2018-08-09 11:29:36 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
"Hippo Pat Muss"
Seen on closed-captioning on the news about a resident of the San
Diego Zoo.
I know that US closed-captions are the same as subtitles in the UK but
what does the closed bit refer to? Is there such a thing as open-captioning?
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
RHDraney
2018-08-09 11:36:39 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Mack A. Damia
"Hippo Pat Muss"
Seen on closed-captioning on the news about a resident of the San
Diego Zoo.
I know that US closed-captions are the same as subtitles in the UK but
what does the closed bit refer to? Is there such a thing as
open-captioning?
Yes...open captioning looks just like closed captioning, but you can't
turn it off....r
HVS
2018-08-09 12:33:25 UTC
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Post by RHDraney
Post by LFS
Post by Mack A. Damia
"Hippo Pat Muss"
Seen on closed-captioning on the news about a resident of the San
Diego Zoo.
I know that US closed-captions are the same as subtitles in the UK but
what does the closed bit refer to? Is there such a thing as
open-captioning?
Yes...open captioning looks just like closed captioning, but you can't
turn it off....r
I don't have much of a problem with captioned/subtitled programmes, but I
find I can't watch programmes with a sign-language person on the screen
without being entirely distracted. (We've occasionally recorded something
overnight without noticing the "SL" note, and have been unable to watch it.)
--
Cheers, Harvey
CanEng (30yrs) and BrEng (34yrs), indiscriminately mixed
Mack A. Damia
2018-08-09 13:56:13 UTC
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Post by HVS
Post by RHDraney
Post by LFS
Post by Mack A. Damia
"Hippo Pat Muss"
Seen on closed-captioning on the news about a resident of the San
Diego Zoo.
I know that US closed-captions are the same as subtitles in the UK but
what does the closed bit refer to? Is there such a thing as
open-captioning?
Yes...open captioning looks just like closed captioning, but you can't
turn it off....r
I don't have much of a problem with captioned/subtitled programmes, but I
find I can't watch programmes with a sign-language person on the screen
without being entirely distracted. (We've occasionally recorded something
overnight without noticing the "SL" note, and have been unable to watch it.)
The guy doing sign language at the Mandela memorial service was a
complete fraud.


Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-08-09 11:48:02 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Mack A. Damia
"Hippo Pat Muss"
Seen on closed-captioning on the news about a resident of the San
Diego Zoo.
I know that US closed-captions are the same as subtitles in the UK but
what does the closed bit refer to? Is there such a thing as open-captioning?
--
A quick trip to Wiki provides ...

The term "closed" (versus "open") indicates that the captions are not
visible until activated by the viewer, usually via the remote control or
menu option. On the other hand, "open", "burned-in", "baked on", or
"hard-coded" captions are visible to all viewers.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-08-09 11:50:29 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Mack A. Damia
"Hippo Pat Muss"
Seen on closed-captioning on the news about a resident of the San
Diego Zoo.
I know that US closed-captions are the same as subtitles in the UK but
what does the closed bit refer to? Is there such a thing as open-captioning?
"Subtitles" are provided by the distributor of the programming and have
been written rather carefully to repeat (very occasionally, abbreviate)
or translate what is being said. "Closed captioning" seems to be done by
the local TV station and is an on-the-fly attempt at transcription of
what is being said (sometimes, as with the previous World Cup that I
looked in on, translation).

One program will not normally have both. They are turned on/off with the
same button. Commercial DVDs often offer a choice of translation-languages
that can appear in the subtitling.
Mack A. Damia
2018-08-09 13:50:40 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Mack A. Damia
"Hippo Pat Muss"
Seen on closed-captioning on the news about a resident of the San
Diego Zoo.
I know that US closed-captions are the same as subtitles in the UK but
what does the closed bit refer to? Is there such a thing as open-captioning?
"Closed Captions" are not visible until the viewer turns them on
through the menu. "Open Captions" are visible all of the time.
Mack A. Damia
2018-08-09 14:36:41 UTC
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On Tue, 07 Aug 2018 16:57:40 -0700, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
"Hippo Pat Muss"
Seen on closed-captioning on the news about a resident of the San
Diego Zoo.
Just saw, "Somerville, New Jersey, which was settled by the Dux in
colonial times" on the news.

As far as, say, daily news is concerned, how does it work? I am
imagining that somebody is in the control room keyboarding the words
while they are being spoken; hence, the mistakes. He/she enters what
he/she hears.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-08-09 14:59:56 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
On Tue, 07 Aug 2018 16:57:40 -0700, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
"Hippo Pat Muss"
Seen on closed-captioning on the news about a resident of the San
Diego Zoo.
Just saw, "Somerville, New Jersey, which was settled by the Dux in
colonial times" on the news.
As far as, say, daily news is concerned, how does it work? I am
imagining that somebody is in the control room keyboarding the words
while they are being spoken; hence, the mistakes. He/she enters what
he/she hears.
And it goes out instantly, but still always at least a sentence, usually
several, behind the speakers.

That was "Dutch" (not "dukes" or some such). There might be some sort of
shorthand / steno machine in between, with "x" the usual abbreviation for
the "ch" sound, but the computer didn't have "Dux" in its dictionary so
didn't have anything to translate it to. Or maybe the typist heard an
unfamiliar word and did their best.
bill van
2018-08-10 06:41:15 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Tue, 07 Aug 2018 16:57:40 -0700, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
"Hippo Pat Muss"
Seen on closed-captioning on the news about a resident of the San
Diego Zoo.
Just saw, "Somerville, New Jersey, which was settled by the Dux in
colonial times" on the news.
As far as, say, daily news is concerned, how does it work? I am
imagining that somebody is in the control room keyboarding the words
while they are being spoken; hence, the mistakes. He/she enters what
he/she hears.
And it goes out instantly, but still always at least a sentence, usually
several, behind the speakers.
That was "Dutch" (not "dukes" or some such). There might be some sort of
shorthand / steno machine in between, with "x" the usual abbreviation for
the "ch" sound, but the computer didn't have "Dux" in its dictionary so
didn't have anything to translate it to. Or maybe the typist heard an
unfamiliar word and did their best.
There are machines that translate spoken word into text. They are
imperfect, but they are much cheaper than humans. I've taken dictation
over the phone and I know that when a human is trying to type fast
enough to keep up with dictation, the kinds of errors produced look
like key jam-ups. When a machine errs in the same task, it mishears
things. I can't explain, however, why this machine didn't try "ducks"
rather than "Dux", since the former is an actual word.

bill
John Dunlop
2018-08-10 06:50:41 UTC
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Post by bill van
There are machines that translate spoken word into text. They are
imperfect, but they are much cheaper than humans. I've taken dictation
over the phone and I know that when a human is trying to type fast
enough to keep up with dictation, the kinds of errors produced look
like key jam-ups. When a machine errs in the same task, it mishears
things. I can't explain, however, why this machine didn't try "ducks"
rather than "Dux", since the former is an actual word.
"Dux" is an actual word, and not all that rare here.
--
John
bill van
2018-08-10 19:24:12 UTC
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Post by John Dunlop
Post by bill van
There are machines that translate spoken word into text. They are
imperfect, but they are much cheaper than humans. I've taken dictation
over the phone and I know that when a human is trying to type fast
enough to keep up with dictation, the kinds of errors produced look
like key jam-ups. When a machine errs in the same task, it mishears
things. I can't explain, however, why this machine didn't try "ducks"
rather than "Dux", since the former is an actual word.
"Dux" is an actual word, and not all that rare here.
I'm not sure where "here" is for you, but I see that dux means "top
pupil" in South African and New Zealand English. I hadn't encountered
it. No reason to capitalize it in the context you snipped though, is
there?

bill
Cheryl
2018-08-10 19:47:52 UTC
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Post by bill van
Post by John Dunlop
Post by bill van
There are machines that translate spoken word into text. They are
imperfect, but they are much cheaper than humans. I've taken dictation
over the phone and I know that when a human is trying to type fast
enough to keep up with dictation, the kinds of errors produced look
like key jam-ups. When a machine errs in the same task, it mishears
things. I can't explain, however, why this machine didn't try "ducks"
rather than "Dux", since the former is an actual word.
"Dux" is an actual word, and not all that rare here.
I'm not sure where "here" is for you, but I see that dux means "top
pupil" in South African and New Zealand English. I hadn't encountered
it. No reason to capitalize it in the context you snipped though, is there?
And it's apparently known in Scotland. I'd never heard of or seen it
before this thread, and assumed it was a mis-spelling or typo.
--
Cheryl
Peter Moylan
2018-08-11 03:14:58 UTC
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Post by bill van
Post by John Dunlop
Post by bill van
There are machines that translate spoken word into text. They
are imperfect, but they are much cheaper than humans. I've taken
dictation over the phone and I know that when a human is trying
to type fast enough to keep up with dictation, the kinds of
errors produced look like key jam-ups. When a machine errs in the
same task, it mishears things. I can't explain, however, why this
machine didn't try "ducks" rather than "Dux", since the former is
an actual word.
"Dux" is an actual word, and not all that rare here.
I'm not sure where "here" is for you, but I see that dux means "top
pupil" in South African and New Zealand English. I hadn't encountered
it. No reason to capitalize it in the context you snipped though, is
there?
I didn't realise it was so geographically limited. The on-line
dictionaries I've just consulted say that it's Scottish, which I didn't
know. It's well enough known in Australia.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Jerry Friedman
2018-08-11 15:56:46 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bill van
Post by John Dunlop
Post by bill van
There are machines that translate spoken word into text. They
are imperfect, but they are much cheaper than humans. I've taken
dictation over the phone and I know that when a human is trying
to type fast enough to keep up with dictation, the kinds of
errors produced look like key jam-ups. When a machine errs in the
same task, it mishears things. I can't explain, however, why this
machine didn't try "ducks" rather than "Dux", since the former is
an actual word.
"Dux" is an actual word, and not all that rare here.
I'm not sure where "here" is for you, but I see that dux means "top
pupil" in South African and New Zealand English. I hadn't encountered
 it. No reason to capitalize it in the context you snipped though, is
there?
I didn't realise it was so geographically limited. The on-line
dictionaries I've just consulted say that it's Scottish, which I didn't
know. It's well enough known in Australia.
If anyone's wondering, the OED says it's pronounced "ducks". Come to
think of it, the Scottish pronunciation might not be too far from the
ancient Latin.
--
Jerry Friedman
HVS
2018-08-11 16:12:01 UTC
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On Sat, 11 Aug 2018 13:14:58 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bill van
I'm not sure where "here" is for you, but I see that dux means "top
pupil" in South African and New Zealand English. I hadn't
encountered
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bill van
it. No reason to capitalize it in the context you snipped
though, is
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bill van
there?
I didn't realise it was so geographically limited. The on-line
dictionaries I've just consulted say that it's Scottish, which I didn't
know. It's well enough known in Australia.
Isn't "Dux" also a brand of laundry detergent?
charles
2018-08-11 16:29:16 UTC
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No - that's LUXIn article
Post by HVS
On Sat, 11 Aug 2018 13:14:58 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bill van
I'm not sure where "here" is for you, but I see that dux means
"top
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bill van
pupil" in South African and New Zealand English. I hadn't
encountered
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bill van
it. No reason to capitalize it in the context you snipped
though, is
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bill van
there?
I didn't realise it was so geographically limited. The on-line
dictionaries I've just consulted say that it's Scottish, which I
didn't
Post by Peter Moylan
know. It's well enough known in Australia.
Isn't "Dux" also a brand of laundry detergent?
No - that's LUX
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
HVS
2018-08-11 16:40:25 UTC
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-snip -
Post by charles
Post by HVS
Isn't "Dux" also a brand of laundry detergent?
No - that's LUX
I think they're both names of detergents.
Peter Moylan
2018-08-12 00:18:10 UTC
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Post by HVS
-snip -
Post by charles
Post by HVS
Isn't "Dux" also a brand of laundry detergent?
No - that's LUX
I think they're both names of detergents.
Much to my surprise, Dux laundry powder can be found on the web. I'd
never heard of it before.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-08-12 09:59:51 UTC
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Post by HVS
-snip -
Post by charles
Post by HVS
Isn't "Dux" also a brand of laundry detergent?
No - that's LUX
I think they're both names of detergents.
I searched for "dux detergent" but because of a useful typo I found
"Duz":
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Procter_%26_Gamble_brands#Discontinued_brands

Duz, powdered laundry soap and later, a powdered laundry detergent
which had glassware and plates in each box; sold from 1940s to 1980.

This is a TV ad for Duz:
https://archive.org/details/dmbb47016
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-08-12 10:05:48 UTC
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Post by HVS
-snip -
Post by charles
Post by HVS
Isn't "Dux" also a brand of laundry detergent?
No - that's LUX
I think they're both names of detergents.
And if you merge them you get a brand of paint: "Dulux".

The name is derived from Durable and Luxury.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
bill van
2018-08-11 17:01:57 UTC
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Post by charles
No - that's LUXIn article
Post by HVS
On Sat, 11 Aug 2018 13:14:58 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bill van
I'm not sure where "here" is for you, but I see that dux means
"top
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bill van
pupil" in South African and New Zealand English. I hadn't
encountered
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bill van
it. No reason to capitalize it in the context you snipped
though, is
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bill van
there?
I didn't realise it was so geographically limited. The on-line
dictionaries I've just consulted say that it's Scottish, which I
didn't
Post by Peter Moylan
know. It's well enough known in Australia.
Isn't "Dux" also a brand of laundry detergent?
No - that's LUX
Also Duz, in the 1950s.

bill
Mack A. Damia
2018-08-11 17:10:24 UTC
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Post by bill van
Post by charles
No - that's LUXIn article
Post by HVS
On Sat, 11 Aug 2018 13:14:58 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bill van
I'm not sure where "here" is for you, but I see that dux means
"top
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bill van
pupil" in South African and New Zealand English. I hadn't
encountered
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bill van
it. No reason to capitalize it in the context you snipped
though, is
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bill van
there?
I didn't realise it was so geographically limited. The on-line
dictionaries I've just consulted say that it's Scottish, which I
didn't
Post by Peter Moylan
know. It's well enough known in Australia.
Isn't "Dux" also a brand of laundry detergent?
No - that's LUX
Also Duz, in the 1950s.
We Biz Bag.
RHDraney
2018-08-11 18:01:35 UTC
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Post by bill van
Post by charles
Post by HVS
Isn't "Dux" also a brand of laundry detergent?
No - that's LUX
Also Duz, in the 1950s.
Duz is for laundry; Lux is for dishes....r
Mack A. Damia
2018-08-11 19:20:16 UTC
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Post by RHDraney
Post by bill van
Post by charles
Post by HVS
Isn't "Dux" also a brand of laundry detergent?
No - that's LUX
Also Duz, in the 1950s.
Duz is for laundry; Lux is for dishes....r
Fux all around.
Ken Blake
2018-08-11 20:12:52 UTC
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Post by RHDraney
Post by bill van
Post by charles
Post by HVS
Isn't "Dux" also a brand of laundry detergent?
No - that's LUX
Also Duz, in the 1950s.
Duz is for laundry; Lux is for dishes....r
Duz is just for laundry? And here I thought that Duz does everything.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-08-11 20:21:16 UTC
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Post by bill van
Post by charles
No - that's LUXIn article
Post by HVS
On Sat, 11 Aug 2018 13:14:58 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bill van
I'm not sure where "here" is for you, but I see that dux means
"top
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bill van
pupil" in South African and New Zealand English. I hadn't
encountered
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bill van
it. No reason to capitalize it in the context you snipped
though, is
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bill van
there?
I didn't realise it was so geographically limited. The on-line
dictionaries I've just consulted say that it's Scottish, which I
didn't
Post by Peter Moylan
know. It's well enough known in Australia.
Isn't "Dux" also a brand of laundry detergent?
No - that's LUX
Also Duz, in the 1950s.
Daz, I think, probably because you dazzled to see how bright your clothes.
--
athel
Sam Plusnet
2018-08-11 23:03:34 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by bill van
Post by charles
No - that's LUXIn article
Post by HVS
On Sat, 11 Aug 2018 13:14:58 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bill van
I'm not sure where "here" is for you, but I see that dux means
"top
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bill van
pupil" in South African and New Zealand English. I hadn't
encountered
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bill van
it. No reason to capitalize it in the context you snipped
though, is
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bill van
there?
I didn't realise it was so geographically limited. The on-line
dictionaries I've just consulted say that it's Scottish, which I
didn't
Post by Peter Moylan
know. It's well enough known in Australia.
Isn't "Dux" also a brand of laundry detergent?
No - that's LUX
Also Duz, in the 1950s.
Daz, I think, probably because you dazzled to see how bright your clothes.
Daz in the UK certainly.
Do you have a suggested derivation for "Omo"?
--
Sam Plusnet
RHDraney
2018-08-12 00:17:28 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by bill van
Post by charles
Post by HVS
Isn't "Dux" also a brand of laundry detergent?
No - that's LUX
Also Duz, in the 1950s.
Daz, I think, probably because you dazzled to see how bright your clothes.
Daz in the UK certainly.
Do you have a suggested derivation for "Omo"?
Greek for "shoulder"?...r
Peter Moylan
2018-08-12 00:20:34 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Do you have a suggested derivation for "Omo"?
When I was in primary school we had a riddle about Liberace on the top
of a snow-capped mountain. By the time I reached high school that riddle
was already considered to be corny.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-08-12 06:55:37 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by bill van
Post by charles
No - that's LUXIn article
Post by HVS
On Sat, 11 Aug 2018 13:14:58 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bill van
I'm not sure where "here" is for you, but I see that dux means
"top
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bill van
pupil" in South African and New Zealand English. I hadn't
encountered
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bill van
it. No reason to capitalize it in the context you snipped
though, is
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bill van
there?
I didn't realise it was so geographically limited. The on-line
dictionaries I've just consulted say that it's Scottish, which I
didn't
Post by Peter Moylan
know. It's well enough known in Australia.
Isn't "Dux" also a brand of laundry detergent?
No - that's LUX
Also Duz, in the 1950s.
Daz, I think, probably because you dazzled to see how bright your clothes.
Daz in the UK certainly.
Do you have a suggested derivation for "Omo"?
I was going to suggest one, but I remembered in time that it was what I
was told many years ago was the origin of oxo (as in cubes). Supposedly
it burst on an unsuspecting public in the 1930s in a series of four
advertisements on the front page of a newspaper (the Daily Mail, I
think -- rather different at that time from its descendant today). The
first day the front page contained nothing except a gigantic O, the
second day a gigantic X, the third a gigantic O, and on the fourth day
the word OXO, with an explanation of what a wonderful product it was.
--
athel
RHDraney
2018-08-12 13:27:25 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
it burst on an unsuspecting public in the 1930s in a series of four
advertisements on the front page of a newspaper (the Daily Mail, I think
-- rather different at that time from its descendant today). The first
day the front page contained nothing except a gigantic O, the second day
a gigantic X, the third a gigantic O, and on the fourth day the word
OXO, with an explanation of what a wonderful product it was.
I'm somehow reminded of the skywriting planes that started appearing one
summer in the mid-1960s over the skies of the Los Angeles area, spelling
out the letters MSP over and over again for (what seemed like) months....

Eventually the message was revealed: electronics maven Earl "Mad Man"
Muntz had just come up with a new world-changing invention called "Muntz
Stereo Pak", later called the 4-track tape cartridge....r
Peter Moylan
2018-08-12 13:56:24 UTC
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Post by RHDraney
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
it burst on an unsuspecting public in the 1930s in a series of four
advertisements on the front page of a newspaper (the Daily Mail, I
think -- rather different at that time from its descendant today).
The first day the front page contained nothing except a gigantic O,
the second day a gigantic X, the third a gigantic O, and on the
fourth day the word OXO, with an explanation of what a wonderful
product it was.
I'm somehow reminded of the skywriting planes that started appearing
one summer in the mid-1960s over the skies of the Los Angeles area,
spelling out the letters MSP over and over again for (what seemed
like) months....
Eventually the message was revealed: electronics maven Earl "Mad Man"
Muntz had just come up with a new world-changing invention called
"Muntz Stereo Pak", later called the 4-track tape cartridge....r
The rate of technological change is driving me crazy. I'm still at an
early stage of transferring my vinyl records onto cassette tape. The
delay, it seems, is because it's hard to find anyone who can fix my
cassette tape recorder.

By the time I have sorted this out, there will probably be no computers
left that can read my CDs.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-08-12 11:00:47 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by bill van
Post by charles
No - that's LUXIn article
Post by HVS
On Sat, 11 Aug 2018 13:14:58 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bill van
I'm not sure where "here" is for you, but I see that dux means
"top
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bill van
pupil" in South African and New Zealand English. I hadn't
encountered
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bill van
it. No reason to capitalize it in the context you snipped
though, is
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bill van
there?
I didn't realise it was so geographically limited. The on-line
dictionaries I've just consulted say that it's Scottish, which I
didn't
Post by Peter Moylan
know. It's well enough known in Australia.
Isn't "Dux" also a brand of laundry detergent?
No - that's LUX
Also Duz, in the 1950s.
Daz, I think, probably because you dazzled to see how bright your clothes.
Daz in the UK certainly.
Do you have a suggested derivation for "Omo"?
According to the manufacturer, Unilever, it's an abbreviation of
Old Mother Owl! In Turkey the brand was so successful that its
name is now used as a generic term for detergent in the same
way that 'hoover' is used in the West for all vacuum cleaners.
Sam Plusnet
2018-08-12 18:45:42 UTC
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Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by bill van
Post by charles
No - that's LUXIn article
Post by HVS
On Sat, 11 Aug 2018 13:14:58 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bill van
I'm not sure where "here" is for you, but I see that dux means
"top
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bill van
pupil" in South African and New Zealand English. I hadn't
encountered
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bill van
it. No reason to capitalize it in the context you snipped
though, is
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bill van
there?
I didn't realise it was so geographically limited. The on-line
dictionaries I've just consulted say that it's Scottish, which I
didn't
Post by Peter Moylan
know. It's well enough known in Australia.
Isn't "Dux" also a brand of laundry detergent?
No - that's LUX
Also Duz, in the 1950s.
Daz, I think, probably because you dazzled to see how bright your clothes.
Daz in the UK certainly.
Do you have a suggested derivation for "Omo"?
According to the manufacturer, Unilever, it's an abbreviation of
Old Mother Owl!
Marketing must have had one hell of a party before coming up with that one.
--
Sam Plusnet
John Dunlop
2018-08-11 08:35:15 UTC
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Post by bill van
Post by John Dunlop
"Dux" is an actual word, and not all that rare here.
I'm not sure where "here" is for you,
Scotland.
Post by bill van
but I see that dux means "top pupil" in South African and New Zealand
English. I hadn't encountered it. No reason to capitalize it in the
context you snipped though, is there?
No reason to use it at all. In contexts it actually fits, I don't think
it's unusual to capitalize it.

(I didn't include any more context in my previous post, by the way,
because I wasn't commenting on anything other than the doubt cast on
"dux"'s wordhood. The wider context was irrelevant.

In hindsight I see I quoted too much. I should have included your final
sentence alone instead of the whole paragraph. But that is a minor
transgression compared with the space-bar-wearing-out quoting this group
suffers from.)
--
John
Peter T. Daniels
2018-08-11 12:04:15 UTC
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Post by John Dunlop
In hindsight I see I quoted too much. I should have included your final
sentence alone instead of the whole paragraph. But that is a minor
transgression compared with the space-bar-wearing-out quoting this group
suffers from.)
Sorry, how does quoting wear out a space bar?

One clicks "Reply," and GG puts the previous message in a new window, cursor
at the bottom. It is the work of a moment to select all above that has
become irrelevant and press Enter or Delete or Backspace; no spacebarring
involved.

If one has deleted too much (and done another operation so that Undo would
be awkward), there's a "Quote original" to click. Still no spacebarring.
John Dunlop
2018-08-11 12:36:11 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Sorry, how does quoting wear out a space bar?
As a reader, I use the space bar to page down, and excessive quoting
means I use it more than I would otherwise.

The Committee should receive an invoice for a new one once I find an
address for them.
--
John
Peter T. Daniels
2018-08-11 12:57:36 UTC
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Post by John Dunlop
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Sorry, how does quoting wear out a space bar?
As a reader, I use the space bar to page down, and excessive quoting
means I use it more than I would otherwise.
The Committee should receive an invoice for a new one once I find an
address for them.
If you were using GG, then when you went to the next message, it would
show you the first new content, with (usually) all quoted material behind
a link labeled "show quoted text."
John Dunlop
2018-08-11 14:49:18 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
If you were using GG, then when you went to the next message, it
would show you the first new content, with (usually) all quoted
material behind a link labeled "show quoted text."
GG has Thunderbird beat(-en) there.

However, after a bit of searching this afternoon, I found an Add-on,
called QuoteCollapse, that can hide quoted text. You can toggle quotes
off and on with a single key press. Highly recommended to users of TB.

So thank you for prompting me to look into it.
--
John
Peter T. Daniels
2018-08-11 16:34:11 UTC
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Post by John Dunlop
Post by Peter T. Daniels
If you were using GG, then when you went to the next message, it
would show you the first new content, with (usually) all quoted
material behind a link labeled "show quoted text."
GG has Thunderbird beat(-en) there.
I'd say "beat" is idiomatic there.
Post by John Dunlop
However, after a bit of searching this afternoon, I found an Add-on,
called QuoteCollapse, that can hide quoted text. You can toggle quotes
off and on with a single key press. Highly recommended to users of TB.
So thank you for prompting me to look into it.
:-)
Peter Young
2018-08-11 17:52:26 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by John Dunlop
Post by Peter T. Daniels
If you were using GG, then when you went to the next message, it
would show you the first new content, with (usually) all quoted
material behind a link labeled "show quoted text."
GG has Thunderbird beat(-en) there.
I'd say "beat" is idiomatic there.
In AmE.

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Au)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Peter T. Daniels
2018-08-12 00:10:58 UTC
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Post by Peter Young
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by John Dunlop
Post by Peter T. Daniels
If you were using GG, then when you went to the next message, it
would show you the first new content, with (usually) all quoted
material behind a link labeled "show quoted text."
GG has Thunderbird beat(-en) there.
I'd say "beat" is idiomatic there.
In AmE.
Isn't JDunlop One of You?
John Dunlop
2018-08-12 08:53:18 UTC
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...
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Young
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by John Dunlop
GG has Thunderbird beat(-en) there.
I'd say "beat" is idiomatic there.
In AmE.
Isn't JDunlop One of You?
Yes, but I would probably have said "beat". I don't know if that's
American influence or not. Anyway, I thought I'd cover all bases.
--
John
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-08-11 15:39:18 UTC
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Post by bill van
Post by John Dunlop
Post by bill van
There are machines that translate spoken word into text. They are
imperfect, but they are much cheaper than humans. I've taken dictation
over the phone and I know that when a human is trying to type fast
enough to keep up with dictation, the kinds of errors produced look
like key jam-ups. When a machine errs in the same task, it mishears
things. I can't explain, however, why this machine didn't try "ducks"
rather than "Dux", since the former is an actual word.
"Dux" is an actual word, and not all that rare here.
I'm not sure where "here" is for you, but I see that dux means "top
pupil" in South African and New Zealand English. I hadn't encountered
it. No reason to capitalize it in the context you snipped though, is
there?
bill
I have a very distant memory of having met "Dux" long ago.
The OED says it comes form the Latin "dux" meaning "leader".

1. A leader, chief; spec. the head pupil in a class or division in a
school: chiefly in Scotland.
a1832 Scott Mem. Early Years in J. G. Lockhart Mem. Life Sir W.
Scott (1837) I. i. 28 Our class contained some very excellent
scholars. The first Dux was James Buchan, who retained his
honoured place, almost without a day's interval, all the while we
were at the High school.
1870 E. B. Ramsay Reminisc. Sc. Life (ed. 18) p. xxix ‘I'm
second dux’..means in Scottish academical language second from the
top of the class.
1876 J. Grant Hist. Burgh Schools Scotl. ii. v. 213 (note) A
gold medal [is given] to the dux of the [Aberdeen grammar] school.

Presumably it is sometimes capitalized as it is a form of title.

There is also:

duxship n. the position of dux.
1845 R. W. Hamilton Inst. Pop. Educ. viii. 192 In Scotch schools
very generally..Places are taken, tickets are given, and notices
of the duxship are recorded.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Rich Ulrich
2018-08-11 17:48:01 UTC
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On Sat, 11 Aug 2018 16:39:18 +0100, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by bill van
Post by John Dunlop
Post by bill van
There are machines that translate spoken word into text. They are
imperfect, but they are much cheaper than humans. I've taken dictation
over the phone and I know that when a human is trying to type fast
enough to keep up with dictation, the kinds of errors produced look
like key jam-ups. When a machine errs in the same task, it mishears
things. I can't explain, however, why this machine didn't try "ducks"
rather than "Dux", since the former is an actual word.
"Dux" is an actual word, and not all that rare here.
I'm not sure where "here" is for you, but I see that dux means "top
pupil" in South African and New Zealand English. I hadn't encountered
it. No reason to capitalize it in the context you snipped though, is
there?
bill
I have a very distant memory of having met "Dux" long ago.
The OED says it comes form the Latin "dux" meaning "leader".
1. A leader, chief; spec. the head pupil in a class or division in a
school: chiefly in Scotland.
a1832 Scott Mem. Early Years in J. G. Lockhart Mem. Life Sir W.
Scott (1837) I. i. 28 Our class contained some very excellent
scholars. The first Dux was James Buchan, who retained his
honoured place, almost without a day's interval, all the while we
were at the High school.
1870 E. B. Ramsay Reminisc. Sc. Life (ed. 18) p. xxix ‘I'm
second dux’..means in Scottish academical language second from the
top of the class.
1876 J. Grant Hist. Burgh Schools Scotl. ii. v. 213 (note) A
gold medal [is given] to the dux of the [Aberdeen grammar] school.
Presumably it is sometimes capitalized as it is a form of title.
duxship n. the position of dux.
1845 R. W. Hamilton Inst. Pop. Educ. viii. 192 In Scotch schools
very generally..Places are taken, tickets are given, and notices
of the duxship are recorded.
Somewhere in the British novels that I have read,
I remember reading "ducks" as a term I took as "guys" -
"Come on, ducks!" I never borrowed it, but it stuck with me.

Maybe "duckies", too.

Is that a common usage, or was that the invention
of one author?
--
Rich Ulrich
Peter Young
2018-08-11 17:54:24 UTC
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On 11 Aug 2018 Rich Ulrich <***@comcast.net> wrote:

[snip]
Post by Rich Ulrich
Somewhere in the British novels that I have read,
I remember reading "ducks" as a term I took as "guys" -
"Come on, ducks!" I never borrowed it, but it stuck with me.
Maybe "duckies", too.
Is that a common usage, or was that the invention
of one author?
It's a familiar way of addressing a person of the other gender.

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Au)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Sam Plusnet
2018-08-11 19:07:29 UTC
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Post by J. J. Lodder
[snip]
Post by Rich Ulrich
Somewhere in the British novels that I have read,
I remember reading "ducks" as a term I took as "guys" -
"Come on, ducks!" I never borrowed it, but it stuck with me.
Maybe "duckies", too.
Is that a common usage, or was that the invention
of one author?
It's a familiar way of addressing a person of the other gender.
More common in some parts of the country.
A standard greeting the East Midlands is said to be

"Ay up me duck!"
--
Sam Plusnet
Tony Cooper
2018-08-11 19:22:38 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by J. J. Lodder
[snip]
Post by Rich Ulrich
Somewhere in the British novels that I have read,
I remember reading "ducks" as a term I took as "guys" -
"Come on, ducks!" I never borrowed it, but it stuck with me.
Maybe "duckies", too.
Is that a common usage, or was that the invention
of one author?
It's a familiar way of addressing a person of the other gender.
More common in some parts of the country.
A standard greeting the East Midlands is said to be
"Ay up me duck!"
If fiction is to be believed, waitresses in pubs say "What'll you
have, Ducks?" Or, "Ducky".
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Mack A. Damia
2018-08-11 22:32:24 UTC
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On Sat, 11 Aug 2018 15:22:38 -0400, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by J. J. Lodder
[snip]
Post by Rich Ulrich
Somewhere in the British novels that I have read,
I remember reading "ducks" as a term I took as "guys" -
"Come on, ducks!" I never borrowed it, but it stuck with me.
Maybe "duckies", too.
Is that a common usage, or was that the invention
of one author?
It's a familiar way of addressing a person of the other gender.
More common in some parts of the country.
A standard greeting the East Midlands is said to be
"Ay up me duck!"
If fiction is to be believed, waitresses in pubs say "What'll you
have, Ducks?" Or, "Ducky".
"Wanna kiss me, Ducky?"

1:45:

Sam Plusnet
2018-08-11 23:06:29 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by J. J. Lodder
[snip]
Post by Rich Ulrich
Somewhere in the British novels that I have read,
I remember reading "ducks" as a term I took as "guys" -
"Come on, ducks!" I never borrowed it, but it stuck with me.
Maybe "duckies", too.
Is that a common usage, or was that the invention
of one author?
It's a familiar way of addressing a person of the other gender.
More common in some parts of the country.
A standard greeting the East Midlands is said to be
"Ay up me duck!"
If fiction is to be believed, waitresses in pubs say "What'll you
have, Ducks?" Or, "Ducky".
I think your version would be delivered in a Cockney accent.

In the East Midlands, you wouldn't hear "Ducks" or "Ducky".
--
Sam Plusnet
bill van
2018-08-12 07:04:14 UTC
Reply
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Post by Rich Ulrich
On Sat, 11 Aug 2018 16:39:18 +0100, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by bill van
Post by John Dunlop
Post by bill van
There are machines that translate spoken word into text. They are
imperfect, but they are much cheaper than humans. I've taken dictation
over the phone and I know that when a human is trying to type fast
enough to keep up with dictation, the kinds of errors produced look
like key jam-ups. When a machine errs in the same task, it mishears
things. I can't explain, however, why this machine didn't try "ducks"
rather than "Dux", since the former is an actual word.
"Dux" is an actual word, and not all that rare here.
I'm not sure where "here" is for you, but I see that dux means "top
pupil" in South African and New Zealand English. I hadn't encountered
it. No reason to capitalize it in the context you snipped though, is
there?
bill
I have a very distant memory of having met "Dux" long ago.
The OED says it comes form the Latin "dux" meaning "leader".
1. A leader, chief; spec. the head pupil in a class or division in a
school: chiefly in Scotland.
a1832 Scott Mem. Early Years in J. G. Lockhart Mem. Life Sir W.
Scott (1837) I. i. 28 Our class contained some very excellent
scholars. The first Dux was James Buchan, who retained his
honoured place, almost without a day's interval, all the while we
were at the High school.
1870 E. B. Ramsay Reminisc. Sc. Life (ed. 18) p. xxix ‘I'm
second dux’..means in Scottish academical language second from the
top of the class.
1876 J. Grant Hist. Burgh Schools Scotl. ii. v. 213 (note) A
gold medal [is given] to the dux of the [Aberdeen grammar] school.
Presumably it is sometimes capitalized as it is a form of title.
duxship n. the position of dux.
1845 R. W. Hamilton Inst. Pop. Educ. viii. 192 In Scotch schools
very generally..Places are taken, tickets are given, and notices
of the duxship are recorded.
Somewhere in the British novels that I have read,
I remember reading "ducks" as a term I took as "guys" -
"Come on, ducks!" I never borrowed it, but it stuck with me.
Maybe "duckies", too.
Is that a common usage, or was that the invention
of one author?
Those usages are unknown over here in western Canadian. But if you'd
shed some light on the one author, that would be ducky.

bill
Peter T. Daniels
2018-08-10 12:21:29 UTC
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Post by bill van
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Tue, 07 Aug 2018 16:57:40 -0700, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
"Hippo Pat Muss"
Seen on closed-captioning on the news about a resident of the San
Diego Zoo.
Just saw, "Somerville, New Jersey, which was settled by the Dux in
colonial times" on the news.
As far as, say, daily news is concerned, how does it work? I am
imagining that somebody is in the control room keyboarding the words
while they are being spoken; hence, the mistakes. He/she enters what
he/she hears.
And it goes out instantly, but still always at least a sentence, usually
several, behind the speakers.
That was "Dutch" (not "dukes" or some such). There might be some sort of
shorthand / steno machine in between, with "x" the usual abbreviation for
the "ch" sound, but the computer didn't have "Dux" in its dictionary so
didn't have anything to translate it to. Or maybe the typist heard an
unfamiliar word and did their best.
There are machines that translate spoken word into text. They are
imperfect, but they are much cheaper than humans.
How do they do on homonyms?
Post by bill van
I've taken dictation
over the phone and I know that when a human is trying to type fast
enough to keep up with dictation, the kinds of errors produced look
like key jam-ups.
See, however, court stenographers. Presumably, as with traditional
shorthand, if they don't transcribe what is called their "notes" within a
day or so, they're not able to fully recover the content.
Post by bill van
When a machine errs in the same task, it mishears
things. I can't explain, however, why this machine didn't try "ducks"
rather than "Dux", since the former is an actual word.
They were trained as English schoolboys and are familiar with Latin.
Janet
2018-08-10 14:16:21 UTC
Reply
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Post by bill van
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Tue, 07 Aug 2018 16:57:40 -0700, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
"Hippo Pat Muss"
Seen on closed-captioning on the news about a resident of the San
Diego Zoo.
Just saw, "Somerville, New Jersey, which was settled by the Dux in
colonial times" on the news.
As far as, say, daily news is concerned, how does it work? I am
imagining that somebody is in the control room keyboarding the words
while they are being spoken; hence, the mistakes. He/she enters what
he/she hears.
And it goes out instantly, but still always at least a sentence, usually
several, behind the speakers.
That was "Dutch" (not "dukes" or some such). There might be some sort of
shorthand / steno machine in between, with "x" the usual abbreviation for
the "ch" sound, but the computer didn't have "Dux" in its dictionary so
didn't have anything to translate it to. Or maybe the typist heard an
unfamiliar word and did their best.
There are machines that translate spoken word into text. They are
imperfect, but they are much cheaper than humans. I've taken dictation
over the phone and I know that when a human is trying to type fast
enough to keep up with dictation, the kinds of errors produced look
like key jam-ups. When a machine errs in the same task, it mishears
things. I can't explain, however, why this machine didn't try "ducks"
rather than "Dux", since the former is an actual word.
bill
So is Dux. Anyone educated in Scotland knows "Dux".
The Dux of a school is the top academic student.

Janet.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-08-10 17:39:28 UTC
Reply
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Post by Janet
Post by bill van
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
Just saw, "Somerville, New Jersey, which was settled by the Dux in
colonial times" on the news.
As far as, say, daily news is concerned, how does it work? I am
imagining that somebody is in the control room keyboarding the words
while they are being spoken; hence, the mistakes. He/she enters what
he/she hears.
And it goes out instantly, but still always at least a sentence, usually
several, behind the speakers.
That was "Dutch" (not "dukes" or some such). There might be some sort of
shorthand / steno machine in between, with "x" the usual abbreviation for
the "ch" sound, but the computer didn't have "Dux" in its dictionary so
didn't have anything to translate it to. Or maybe the typist heard an
unfamiliar word and did their best.
There are machines that translate spoken word into text. They are
imperfect, but they are much cheaper than humans. I've taken dictation
over the phone and I know that when a human is trying to type fast
enough to keep up with dictation, the kinds of errors produced look
like key jam-ups. When a machine errs in the same task, it mishears
things. I can't explain, however, why this machine didn't try "ducks"
rather than "Dux", since the former is an actual word.
So is Dux. Anyone educated in Scotland knows "Dux".
The Dux of a school is the top academic student.
Very few people were educated in Scotland.

(Which is not equivalent to Very few people in Scotland were educated.)
Janet
2018-08-10 18:04:59 UTC
Reply
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Janet
Post by bill van
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
Just saw, "Somerville, New Jersey, which was settled by the Dux in
colonial times" on the news.
As far as, say, daily news is concerned, how does it work? I am
imagining that somebody is in the control room keyboarding the words
while they are being spoken; hence, the mistakes. He/she enters what
he/she hears.
And it goes out instantly, but still always at least a sentence, usually
several, behind the speakers.
That was "Dutch" (not "dukes" or some such). There might be some sort of
shorthand / steno machine in between, with "x" the usual abbreviation for
the "ch" sound, but the computer didn't have "Dux" in its dictionary so
didn't have anything to translate it to. Or maybe the typist heard an
unfamiliar word and did their best.
There are machines that translate spoken word into text. They are
imperfect, but they are much cheaper than humans. I've taken dictation
over the phone and I know that when a human is trying to type fast
enough to keep up with dictation, the kinds of errors produced look
like key jam-ups. When a machine errs in the same task, it mishears
things. I can't explain, however, why this machine didn't try "ducks"
rather than "Dux", since the former is an actual word.
So is Dux. Anyone educated in Scotland knows "Dux".
The Dux of a school is the top academic student.
Very few people were educated in Scotland.
and even fewer in America, apparently.

Janet.
Mack A. Damia
2018-08-10 18:18:31 UTC
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Post by Janet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Janet
Post by bill van
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
Just saw, "Somerville, New Jersey, which was settled by the Dux in
colonial times" on the news.
As far as, say, daily news is concerned, how does it work? I am
imagining that somebody is in the control room keyboarding the words
while they are being spoken; hence, the mistakes. He/she enters what
he/she hears.
And it goes out instantly, but still always at least a sentence, usually
several, behind the speakers.
That was "Dutch" (not "dukes" or some such). There might be some sort of
shorthand / steno machine in between, with "x" the usual abbreviation for
the "ch" sound, but the computer didn't have "Dux" in its dictionary so
didn't have anything to translate it to. Or maybe the typist heard an
unfamiliar word and did their best.
There are machines that translate spoken word into text. They are
imperfect, but they are much cheaper than humans. I've taken dictation
over the phone and I know that when a human is trying to type fast
enough to keep up with dictation, the kinds of errors produced look
like key jam-ups. When a machine errs in the same task, it mishears
things. I can't explain, however, why this machine didn't try "ducks"
rather than "Dux", since the former is an actual word.
So is Dux. Anyone educated in Scotland knows "Dux".
The Dux of a school is the top academic student.
Very few people were educated in Scotland.
and even fewer in America, apparently.
The OED lists your definition, but it is chiefly in Scotland.

I have not been able to link "Dux" and "Dutch".

Please don't feed my pet troll, Sparky. He is hypersensitive to
criticism.
Janet
2018-08-10 18:58:42 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Janet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Janet
Post by bill van
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
Just saw, "Somerville, New Jersey, which was settled by the Dux in
colonial times" on the news.
As far as, say, daily news is concerned, how does it work? I am
imagining that somebody is in the control room keyboarding the words
while they are being spoken; hence, the mistakes. He/she enters what
he/she hears.
And it goes out instantly, but still always at least a sentence, usually
several, behind the speakers.
That was "Dutch" (not "dukes" or some such). There might be some sort of
shorthand / steno machine in between, with "x" the usual abbreviation for
the "ch" sound, but the computer didn't have "Dux" in its dictionary so
didn't have anything to translate it to. Or maybe the typist heard an
unfamiliar word and did their best.
There are machines that translate spoken word into text. They are
imperfect, but they are much cheaper than humans. I've taken dictation
over the phone and I know that when a human is trying to type fast
enough to keep up with dictation, the kinds of errors produced look
like key jam-ups. When a machine errs in the same task, it mishears
things. I can't explain, however, why this machine didn't try "ducks"
rather than "Dux", since the former is an actual word.
So is Dux. Anyone educated in Scotland knows "Dux".
The Dux of a school is the top academic student.
Very few people were educated in Scotland.
and even fewer in America, apparently.
The OED lists your definition, but it is chiefly in Scotland.
Shirley one or two pizza-loving Americans remember Il Duce.
Post by Mack A. Damia
I have not been able to link "Dux" and "Dutch".
Il Duce wasn't Dutch either.

Janet
Post by Mack A. Damia
Please don't feed my pet troll, Sparky. He is hypersensitive to
criticism.
Mack A. Damia
2018-08-10 19:47:57 UTC
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Post by Janet
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Janet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Janet
Post by bill van
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
Just saw, "Somerville, New Jersey, which was settled by the Dux in
colonial times" on the news.
As far as, say, daily news is concerned, how does it work? I am
imagining that somebody is in the control room keyboarding the words
while they are being spoken; hence, the mistakes. He/she enters what
he/she hears.
And it goes out instantly, but still always at least a sentence, usually
several, behind the speakers.
That was "Dutch" (not "dukes" or some such). There might be some sort of
shorthand / steno machine in between, with "x" the usual abbreviation for
the "ch" sound, but the computer didn't have "Dux" in its dictionary so
didn't have anything to translate it to. Or maybe the typist heard an
unfamiliar word and did their best.
There are machines that translate spoken word into text. They are
imperfect, but they are much cheaper than humans. I've taken dictation
over the phone and I know that when a human is trying to type fast
enough to keep up with dictation, the kinds of errors produced look
like key jam-ups. When a machine errs in the same task, it mishears
things. I can't explain, however, why this machine didn't try "ducks"
rather than "Dux", since the former is an actual word.
So is Dux. Anyone educated in Scotland knows "Dux".
The Dux of a school is the top academic student.
Very few people were educated in Scotland.
and even fewer in America, apparently.
The OED lists your definition, but it is chiefly in Scotland.
Shirley one or two pizza-loving Americans remember Il Duce.
ITYM, "Il Douché"
Post by Janet
Post by Mack A. Damia
I have not been able to link "Dux" and "Dutch".
Il Duce wasn't Dutch either.
Neither is trump.
Post by Janet
Janet
Post by Mack A. Damia
Please don't feed my pet troll, Sparky. He is hypersensitive to
criticism.
charles
2018-08-10 19:47:38 UTC
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Post by Janet
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Janet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by bill van
On Thursday, August 9, 2018 at 10:36:58 AM UTC-4, Mack A.
Post by Mack A. Damia
Just saw, "Somerville, New Jersey, which was settled by the
Dux in colonial times" on the news. As far as, say, daily
news is concerned, how does it work? I am imagining that
somebody is in the control room keyboarding the words while
they are being spoken; hence, the mistakes. He/she enters
what he/she hears.
And it goes out instantly, but still always at least a
sentence, usually several, behind the speakers. That was
"Dutch" (not "dukes" or some such). There might be some sort
of shorthand / steno machine in between, with "x" the usual
abbreviation for the "ch" sound, but the computer didn't have
"Dux" in its dictionary so didn't have anything to translate
it to. Or maybe the typist heard an unfamiliar word and did
their best.
There are machines that translate spoken word into text. They
are imperfect, but they are much cheaper than humans. I've
taken dictation over the phone and I know that when a human is
trying to type fast enough to keep up with dictation, the kinds
of errors produced look like key jam-ups. When a machine errs
in the same task, it mishears things. I can't explain, however,
why this machine didn't try "ducks" rather than "Dux", since
the former is an actual word.
So is Dux. Anyone educated in Scotland knows "Dux". The Dux of a
school is the top academic student.
Very few people were educated in Scotland.
and even fewer in America, apparently.
The OED lists your definition, but it is chiefly in Scotland.
Shirley one or two pizza-loving Americans remember Il Duce.
Post by Mack A. Damia
I have not been able to link "Dux" and "Dutch".
Il Duce wasn't Dutch either.
and, of course, the Latin word became anglicised as "duke"
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Cheryl
2018-08-10 20:23:48 UTC
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Post by charles
Post by Janet
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Janet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by bill van
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
Just saw, "Somerville, New Jersey, which was settled by the
Dux in colonial times" on the news. As far as, say, daily
news is concerned, how does it work? I am imagining that
somebody is in the control room keyboarding the words while
they are being spoken; hence, the mistakes. He/she enters
what he/she hears.
And it goes out instantly, but still always at least a
sentence, usually several, behind the speakers. That was
"Dutch" (not "dukes" or some such). There might be some sort
of shorthand / steno machine in between, with "x" the usual
abbreviation for the "ch" sound, but the computer didn't have
"Dux" in its dictionary so didn't have anything to translate
it to. Or maybe the typist heard an unfamiliar word and did
their best.
There are machines that translate spoken word into text. They
are imperfect, but they are much cheaper than humans. I've
taken dictation over the phone and I know that when a human is
trying to type fast enough to keep up with dictation, the kinds
of errors produced look like key jam-ups. When a machine errs
in the same task, it mishears things. I can't explain, however,
why this machine didn't try "ducks" rather than "Dux", since
the former is an actual word.
So is Dux. Anyone educated in Scotland knows "Dux". The Dux of a
school is the top academic student.
Very few people were educated in Scotland.
and even fewer in America, apparently.
The OED lists your definition, but it is chiefly in Scotland.
Shirley one or two pizza-loving Americans remember Il Duce.
Post by Mack A. Damia
I have not been able to link "Dux" and "Dutch".
Il Duce wasn't Dutch either.
and, of course, the Latin word became anglicised as "duke"
I didn't work through all that; I assumed it was a mis-spelling or typo
for "ducks", although why they'd be settling New Jersey or anywhere
else, I don't know. If I'd given it a bit of thought, I'd have come up
with a guess of either Dutch, or possibly Deutsch as in Pennsylvania
Dutch who are really of German ancestry, but it would never have
occurred to me that dux was a word in English.
--
Cheryl
Mack A. Damia
2018-08-10 20:30:18 UTC
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Post by Cheryl
Post by charles
Post by Janet
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Janet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by bill van
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
Just saw, "Somerville, New Jersey, which was settled by the
Dux in colonial times" on the news. As far as, say, daily
news is concerned, how does it work? I am imagining that
somebody is in the control room keyboarding the words while
they are being spoken; hence, the mistakes. He/she enters
what he/she hears.
And it goes out instantly, but still always at least a
sentence, usually several, behind the speakers. That was
"Dutch" (not "dukes" or some such). There might be some sort
of shorthand / steno machine in between, with "x" the usual
abbreviation for the "ch" sound, but the computer didn't have
"Dux" in its dictionary so didn't have anything to translate
it to. Or maybe the typist heard an unfamiliar word and did
their best.
There are machines that translate spoken word into text. They
are imperfect, but they are much cheaper than humans. I've
taken dictation over the phone and I know that when a human is
trying to type fast enough to keep up with dictation, the kinds
of errors produced look like key jam-ups. When a machine errs
in the same task, it mishears things. I can't explain, however,
why this machine didn't try "ducks" rather than "Dux", since
the former is an actual word.
So is Dux. Anyone educated in Scotland knows "Dux". The Dux of a
school is the top academic student.
Very few people were educated in Scotland.
and even fewer in America, apparently.
The OED lists your definition, but it is chiefly in Scotland.
Shirley one or two pizza-loving Americans remember Il Duce.
Post by Mack A. Damia
I have not been able to link "Dux" and "Dutch".
Il Duce wasn't Dutch either.
and, of course, the Latin word became anglicised as "duke"
I didn't work through all that; I assumed it was a mis-spelling or typo
for "ducks", although why they'd be settling New Jersey or anywhere
else, I don't know. If I'd given it a bit of thought, I'd have come up
with a guess of either Dutch, or possibly Deutsch as in Pennsylvania
Dutch who are really of German ancestry, but it would never have
occurred to me that dux was a word in English.
"Somerville was settled in colonial times primarily by the Dutch who
purchased land from the English proprietors of the colony. The Dutch
established their church near what is today Somerville and a Dutch
Reformed minister or Domine lived at the Old Dutch Parsonage from
about 1754." (Wiki)
charles
2018-08-10 20:37:45 UTC
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Post by Cheryl
Post by charles
Post by Janet
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Janet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by bill van
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
Just saw, "Somerville, New Jersey, which was settled by the
Dux in colonial times" on the news. As far as, say, daily
news is concerned, how does it work? I am imagining that
somebody is in the control room keyboarding the words while
they are being spoken; hence, the mistakes. He/she enters
what he/she hears.
And it goes out instantly, but still always at least a
sentence, usually several, behind the speakers. That was
"Dutch" (not "dukes" or some such). There might be some sort
of shorthand / steno machine in between, with "x" the usual
abbreviation for the "ch" sound, but the computer didn't have
"Dux" in its dictionary so didn't have anything to translate
it to. Or maybe the typist heard an unfamiliar word and did
their best.
There are machines that translate spoken word into text. They
are imperfect, but they are much cheaper than humans. I've
taken dictation over the phone and I know that when a human is
trying to type fast enough to keep up with dictation, the kinds
of errors produced look like key jam-ups. When a machine errs
in the same task, it mishears things. I can't explain, however,
why this machine didn't try "ducks" rather than "Dux", since
the former is an actual word.
So is Dux. Anyone educated in Scotland knows "Dux". The Dux of a
school is the top academic student.
Very few people were educated in Scotland.
and even fewer in America, apparently.
The OED lists your definition, but it is chiefly in Scotland.
Shirley one or two pizza-loving Americans remember Il Duce.
Post by Mack A. Damia
I have not been able to link "Dux" and "Dutch".
Il Duce wasn't Dutch either.
and, of course, the Latin word became anglicised as "duke"
I didn't work through all that; I assumed it was a mis-spelling or typo
for "ducks", although why they'd be settling New Jersey or anywhere
else, I don't know. If I'd given it a bit of thought, I'd have come up
with a guess of either Dutch, or possibly Deutsch as in Pennsylvania
Dutch who are really of German ancestry, but it would never have
occurred to me that dux was a word in English.
certainly it is in Scots.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
RHDraney
2018-08-10 23:55:10 UTC
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Post by charles
Post by Janet
Shirley one or two pizza-loving Americans remember Il Duce.
Post by Mack A. Damia
I have not been able to link "Dux" and "Dutch".
Il Duce wasn't Dutch either.
and, of course, the Latin word became anglicised as "duke"
And what did the Doge do?...r
Kerr-Mudd,John
2018-08-11 10:04:45 UTC
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Post by RHDraney
Post by charles
Post by Janet
Shirley one or two pizza-loving Americans remember Il Duce.
Post by Mack A. Damia
I have not been able to link "Dux" and "Dutch".
Il Duce wasn't Dutch either.
and, of course, the Latin word became anglicised as "duke"
And what did the Doge do?...r
A bigger mess than the pupe?
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Quinn C
2018-08-13 17:44:31 UTC
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Post by Janet
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Janet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Janet
Post by bill van
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
Just saw, "Somerville, New Jersey, which was settled by the Dux in
colonial times" on the news.
As far as, say, daily news is concerned, how does it work? I am
imagining that somebody is in the control room keyboarding the words
while they are being spoken; hence, the mistakes. He/she enters what
he/she hears.
And it goes out instantly, but still always at least a sentence, usually
several, behind the speakers.
That was "Dutch" (not "dukes" or some such). There might be some sort of
shorthand / steno machine in between, with "x" the usual abbreviation for
the "ch" sound, but the computer didn't have "Dux" in its dictionary so
didn't have anything to translate it to. Or maybe the typist heard an
unfamiliar word and did their best.
There are machines that translate spoken word into text. They are
imperfect, but they are much cheaper than humans. I've taken dictation
over the phone and I know that when a human is trying to type fast
enough to keep up with dictation, the kinds of errors produced look
like key jam-ups. When a machine errs in the same task, it mishears
things. I can't explain, however, why this machine didn't try "ducks"
rather than "Dux", since the former is an actual word.
So is Dux. Anyone educated in Scotland knows "Dux".
The Dux of a school is the top academic student.
Very few people were educated in Scotland.
and even fewer in America, apparently.
The OED lists your definition, but it is chiefly in Scotland.
Shirley one or two pizza-loving Americans remember Il Duce.
Whereas the English don't need to look as far, having Dukes at home.
--
If you kill one person, you go to jail; if you kill 20, you go
to an institution for the insane; if you kill 20,000, you get
political asylum. -- Reed Brody, special counsel
for prosecutions at Human Rights Watch
David Kleinecke
2018-08-13 19:05:50 UTC
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Post by Quinn C
Post by Janet
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Janet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Janet
Post by bill van
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
Just saw, "Somerville, New Jersey, which was settled by the Dux in
colonial times" on the news.
As far as, say, daily news is concerned, how does it work? I am
imagining that somebody is in the control room keyboarding the words
while they are being spoken; hence, the mistakes. He/she enters what
he/she hears.
And it goes out instantly, but still always at least a sentence, usually
several, behind the speakers.
That was "Dutch" (not "dukes" or some such). There might be some sort of
shorthand / steno machine in between, with "x" the usual abbreviation for
the "ch" sound, but the computer didn't have "Dux" in its dictionary so
didn't have anything to translate it to. Or maybe the typist heard an
unfamiliar word and did their best.
There are machines that translate spoken word into text. They are
imperfect, but they are much cheaper than humans. I've taken dictation
over the phone and I know that when a human is trying to type fast
enough to keep up with dictation, the kinds of errors produced look
like key jam-ups. When a machine errs in the same task, it mishears
things. I can't explain, however, why this machine didn't try "ducks"
rather than "Dux", since the former is an actual word.
So is Dux. Anyone educated in Scotland knows "Dux".
The Dux of a school is the top academic student.
Very few people were educated in Scotland.
and even fewer in America, apparently.
The OED lists your definition, but it is chiefly in Scotland.
Shirley one or two pizza-loving Americans remember Il Duce.
Whereas the English don't need to look as far, having Dukes at home.
I'd hazzard a guess you are right.
Kerr-Mudd,John
2018-08-14 10:26:27 UTC
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On Mon, 13 Aug 2018 17:44:31 GMT, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Janet
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Janet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Janet
Post by bill van
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
Just saw, "Somerville, New Jersey, which was settled by the
Dux in colonial times" on the news.
As far as, say, daily news is concerned, how does it work?
I am imagining that somebody is in the control room
keyboarding the words while they are being spoken; hence,
the mistakes. He/she enters what he/she hears.
And it goes out instantly, but still always at least a
sentence, usually several, behind the speakers.
That was "Dutch" (not "dukes" or some such). There might be
some sort of shorthand / steno machine in between, with "x"
the usual abbreviation for the "ch" sound, but the computer
didn't have "Dux" in its dictionary so didn't have anything
to translate it to. Or maybe the typist heard an
unfamiliar word and did their best.
There are machines that translate spoken word into text. They
are imperfect, but they are much cheaper than humans. I've
taken dictation over the phone and I know that when a human is
trying to type fast enough to keep up with dictation, the
kinds of errors produced look like key jam-ups. When a machine
errs in the same task, it mishears things. I can't explain,
however, why this machine didn't try "ducks" rather than
"Dux", since the former is an actual word.
So is Dux. Anyone educated in Scotland knows "Dux".
The Dux of a school is the top academic student.
Very few people were educated in Scotland.
and even fewer in America, apparently.
The OED lists your definition, but it is chiefly in Scotland.
Shirley one or two pizza-loving Americans remember Il Duce.
Whereas the English don't need to look as far, having Dukes at home.
Very handy, always keep a spare Duke for your personal railway:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GWR_3252_Class.
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
J. J. Lodder
2018-08-11 08:13:44 UTC
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Mack A. Damia <***@yahoo.com> wrote:
[snip]
Post by Mack A. Damia
The OED lists your definition, but it is chiefly in Scotland.
I have not been able to link "Dux" and "Dutch".
Please don't feed my pet troll, Sparky. He is hypersensitive to
criticism.
With good reason, for they are completely unrelated.
'Diets', 'Dutch', 'Duits' etc derive from medieval 'diet',
or Old Gothic 'thiuda', originally meaning 'people'.
Dux, dukes etc. (from LAtin)
are upstarts who grabbed power in the dark ages,

Jan
Peter T. Daniels
2018-08-10 19:55:45 UTC
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Post by Janet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Janet
Post by bill van
things. I can't explain, however, why this machine didn't try "ducks"
rather than "Dux", since the former is an actual word.
So is Dux. Anyone educated in Scotland knows "Dux".
The Dux of a school is the top academic student.
Very few people were educated in Scotland.
and even fewer in America, apparently.
I could bother to look up the comparative figures, but I won't. All of the
UK has maybe 20% of the population of the US, and Scotland has a rather
small percentage of the UK population.
J. J. Lodder
2018-08-11 09:16:39 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Janet
Post by bill van
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
Just saw, "Somerville, New Jersey, which was settled by the Dux in
colonial times" on the news.
As far as, say, daily news is concerned, how does it work? I am
imagining that somebody is in the control room keyboarding the words
while they are being spoken; hence, the mistakes. He/she enters what
he/she hears.
And it goes out instantly, but still always at least a sentence,
usually several, behind the speakers. That was "Dutch" (not "dukes"
or some such). There might be some sort of shorthand / steno machine
in between, with "x" the usual abbreviation for the "ch" sound, but
the computer didn't have "Dux" in its dictionary so didn't have
anything to translate it to. Or maybe the typist heard an unfamiliar
word and did their best.
There are machines that translate spoken word into text. They are
imperfect, but they are much cheaper than humans. I've taken dictation
over the phone and I know that when a human is trying to type fast
enough to keep up with dictation, the kinds of errors produced look
like key jam-ups. When a machine errs in the same task, it mishears
things. I can't explain, however, why this machine didn't try "ducks"
rather than "Dux", since the former is an actual word.
So is Dux. Anyone educated in Scotland knows "Dux".
The Dux of a school is the top academic student.
Very few people were educated in Scotland.
(Which is not equivalent to Very few people in Scotland were educated.)
OTOH Edinburgh (and Leyden) were for a long time the only places
where you could get a good modern education,
fitting with the new development of science, and the Enlightenment..
They had the 'new' universities, Leyden 1575, Edinburgh 1582,
and were much less bound by stuffy traditions.

At the traditional universities otoh
you could only learn useless traditional things,
like linguistics for example.
They didn't come out of the middle ages
until well in the 19th century,

Jan
Peter T. Daniels
2018-08-11 12:06:49 UTC
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Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Janet
Post by bill van
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
Just saw, "Somerville, New Jersey, which was settled by the Dux in
colonial times" on the news.
As far as, say, daily news is concerned, how does it work? I am
imagining that somebody is in the control room keyboarding the words
while they are being spoken; hence, the mistakes. He/she enters what
he/she hears.
And it goes out instantly, but still always at least a sentence,
usually several, behind the speakers. That was "Dutch" (not "dukes"
or some such). There might be some sort of shorthand / steno machine
in between, with "x" the usual abbreviation for the "ch" sound, but
the computer didn't have "Dux" in its dictionary so didn't have
anything to translate it to. Or maybe the typist heard an unfamiliar
word and did their best.
There are machines that translate spoken word into text. They are
imperfect, but they are much cheaper than humans. I've taken dictation
over the phone and I know that when a human is trying to type fast
enough to keep up with dictation, the kinds of errors produced look
like key jam-ups. When a machine errs in the same task, it mishears
things. I can't explain, however, why this machine didn't try "ducks"
rather than "Dux", since the former is an actual word.
So is Dux. Anyone educated in Scotland knows "Dux".
The Dux of a school is the top academic student.
Very few people were educated in Scotland.
(Which is not equivalent to Very few people in Scotland were educated.)
OTOH Edinburgh (and Leyden) were for a long time the only places
where you could get a good modern education,
grandmother, suck, eggs
Post by J. J. Lodder
fitting with the new development of science, and the Enlightenment..
They had the 'new' universities, Leyden 1575, Edinburgh 1582,
and were much less bound by stuffy traditions.
At the traditional universities otoh
you could only learn useless traditional things,
like linguistics for example.
Wrong.
Post by J. J. Lodder
They didn't come out of the middle ages
until well in the 19th century,
Too bad _your_ university (if you attended one) didn't teach you the
meaning of "linguistics." At the era you seem to be referring to, there
wasn't even a discipline called "philology" to distinguish it from.
J. J. Lodder
2018-08-12 13:26:39 UTC
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[snip]
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Very few people were educated in Scotland.
(Which is not equivalent to Very few people in Scotland were educated.)
OTOH Edinburgh (and Leyden) were for a long time the only places
where you could get a good modern education,
grandmother, suck, eggs
Post by J. J. Lodder
fitting with the new development of science, and the Enlightenment..
They had the 'new' universities, Leyden 1575, Edinburgh 1582,
and were much less bound by stuffy traditions.
At the traditional universities otoh
you could only learn useless traditional things,
like linguistics for example.
Wrong.
Post by J. J. Lodder
They didn't come out of the middle ages
until well in the 19th century,
Too bad _your_ university (if you attended one) didn't teach you the
meaning of "linguistics." At the era you seem to be referring to, there
wasn't even a discipline called "philology" to distinguish it from.
Eh, being PTD, you didn't consider the possibility
of a minor pull on the leg?

Jan
Peter T. Daniels
2018-08-12 14:04:27 UTC
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Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Very few people were educated in Scotland.
(Which is not equivalent to Very few people in Scotland were educated.)
OTOH Edinburgh (and Leyden) were for a long time the only places
where you could get a good modern education,
grandmother, suck, eggs
Post by J. J. Lodder
fitting with the new development of science, and the Enlightenment..
They had the 'new' universities, Leyden 1575, Edinburgh 1582,
and were much less bound by stuffy traditions.
At the traditional universities otoh
you could only learn useless traditional things,
like linguistics for example.
Wrong.
Post by J. J. Lodder
They didn't come out of the middle ages
until well in the 19th century,
Too bad _your_ university (if you attended one) didn't teach you the
meaning of "linguistics." At the era you seem to be referring to, there
wasn't even a discipline called "philology" to distinguish it from.
Eh, being PTD, you didn't consider the possibility
of a minor pull on the leg?
Not from you.
J. J. Lodder
2018-08-12 15:29:10 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by J. J. Lodder
Eh, being PTD, you didn't consider the possibility
of a minor pull on the leg?
Not from you.
You don't know what you have missed,

Jan
Peter T. Daniels
2018-08-12 16:15:56 UTC
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Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by J. J. Lodder
Eh, being PTD, you didn't consider the possibility
of a minor pull on the leg?
Not from you.
You don't know what you have missed,
Well, I certainly haven't seen anything you've placed anywhere but here.,
Mack A. Damia
2018-08-10 14:48:21 UTC
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Post by bill van
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Tue, 07 Aug 2018 16:57:40 -0700, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
"Hippo Pat Muss"
Seen on closed-captioning on the news about a resident of the San
Diego Zoo.
Just saw, "Somerville, New Jersey, which was settled by the Dux in
colonial times" on the news.
As far as, say, daily news is concerned, how does it work? I am
imagining that somebody is in the control room keyboarding the words
while they are being spoken; hence, the mistakes. He/she enters what
he/she hears.
And it goes out instantly, but still always at least a sentence, usually
several, behind the speakers.
That was "Dutch" (not "dukes" or some such). There might be some sort of
shorthand / steno machine in between, with "x" the usual abbreviation for
the "ch" sound, but the computer didn't have "Dux" in its dictionary so
didn't have anything to translate it to. Or maybe the typist heard an
unfamiliar word and did their best.
There are machines that translate spoken word into text. They are
imperfect, but they are much cheaper than humans. I've taken dictation
over the phone and I know that when a human is trying to type fast
enough to keep up with dictation, the kinds of errors produced look
like key jam-ups. When a machine errs in the same task, it mishears
things. I can't explain, however, why this machine didn't try "ducks"
rather than "Dux", since the former is an actual word.
I had thought of the machine angle. However, I can't imagine a data
base that has "Dux" (a rare word) and not "Dutch" - although I
understand that the machine may be hard of hearing.

But....

"That is, during a live broadcast of a special event or of a news
program, captions appear just a few seconds behind the action to show
what is being said. A stenographer listens to the broadcast and types
the words into a special computer program that adds the captions to
the television signal."

https://electronics.howstuffworks.com/question427.htm
Peter T. Daniels
2018-08-10 17:41:51 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by bill van
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
Just saw, "Somerville, New Jersey, which was settled by the Dux in
colonial times" on the news.
As far as, say, daily news is concerned, how does it work? I am
imagining that somebody is in the control room keyboarding the words
while they are being spoken; hence, the mistakes. He/she enters what
he/she hears.
And it goes out instantly, but still always at least a sentence, usually
several, behind the speakers.
That was "Dutch" (not "dukes" or some such). There might be some sort of
shorthand / steno machine in between, with "x" the usual abbreviation for
the "ch" sound, but the computer didn't have "Dux" in its dictionary so
didn't have anything to translate it to. Or maybe the typist heard an
unfamiliar word and did their best.
There are machines that translate spoken word into text. They are
imperfect, but they are much cheaper than humans. I've taken dictation
over the phone and I know that when a human is trying to type fast
enough to keep up with dictation, the kinds of errors produced look
like key jam-ups. When a machine errs in the same task, it mishears
things. I can't explain, however, why this machine didn't try "ducks"
rather than "Dux", since the former is an actual word.
I had thought of the machine angle. However, I can't imagine a data
base that has "Dux" (a rare word) and not "Dutch" - although I
understand that the machine may be hard of hearing.
Whoever was listening to the original did not hear "Dutch" -- or they used
the one-stroke equivalent "x" for "tch."
Post by Mack A. Damia
But....
"That is, during a live broadcast of a special event or of a news
program, captions appear just a few seconds behind the action to show
what is being said. A stenographer listens to the broadcast and types
the words into a special computer program that adds the captions to
the television signal."
Which is exactly what I said just above.
Post by Mack A. Damia
https://electronics.howstuffworks.com/question427.htm
Richard Tobin
2018-08-17 14:30:25 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
As far as, say, daily news is concerned, how does it work? I am
imagining that somebody is in the control room keyboarding the words
while they are being spoken; hence, the mistakes. He/she enters what
he/she hears.
Often speech-to-text software is used, but the speech is repeated by a
skilled subtitler in a good acoustic environment.

-- Richard
Quinn C
2018-08-17 18:15:44 UTC
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Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Mack A. Damia
As far as, say, daily news is concerned, how does it work? I am
imagining that somebody is in the control room keyboarding the words
while they are being spoken; hence, the mistakes. He/she enters what
he/she hears.
Often speech-to-text software is used, but the speech is repeated by a
skilled subtitler in a good acoustic environment.
In the converse order. Your description might be confusing.
--
The bee must not pass judgment on the hive. (Voxish proverb)
-- Robert C. Wilson, Vortex (novel), p.125
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