Discussion:
"Yellow press", "tabloids", "rags"
(too old to reply)
Lothar Frings
2018-06-08 09:59:58 UTC
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Which of the three is/are in current use?
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-06-08 10:23:22 UTC
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Post by Lothar Frings
Which of the three is/are in current use?
Yellow press is rare but the other two are fully extant in BrE,
along with 'red top', 'gutter press', and, in the age of fake news,
'comic'! However, with most of the broadsheets having gone to
tabloid format in recent years, 'tabloid' doesn't really carry the
same sting it once did.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-06-08 12:07:51 UTC
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Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Lothar Frings
Which of the three is/are in current use?
He's caught the Bozo disease!
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Yellow press is rare but the other two are fully extant in BrE,
along with 'red top', 'gutter press', and, in the age of fake news,
'comic'! However, with most of the broadsheets having gone to
tabloid format in recent years, 'tabloid' doesn't really carry the
same sting it once did.
"Yellow journalism" was more likely. The NYT is still a broadsheet but the
sheets are less broad than they used to be. It can't be confused with the
two tabloids, the Daily News and the Post.
Snidely
2018-06-09 07:14:15 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Lothar Frings
Which of the three is/are in current use?
He's caught the Bozo disease!
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Yellow press is rare but the other two are fully extant in BrE,
along with 'red top', 'gutter press', and, in the age of fake news,
'comic'! However, with most of the broadsheets having gone to
tabloid format in recent years, 'tabloid' doesn't really carry the
same sting it once did.
"Yellow journalism" was more likely.
More likely for what? I haven't seen it applied to 21st C
publications.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The NYT is still a broadsheet but the
sheets are less broad than they used to be. It can't be confused with the
two tabloids, the Daily News and the Post.
For many people of the US who are not in Giancarlo Stanton range of the
Geo Wash Br, "tabloid" refers to the supermarket stock of the likes of
The National Enquirer.

/dps
--
Rule #0: Don't be on fire.
In case of fire, exit the building before tweeting about it.
(Sighting reported by Adam F)
Peter T. Daniels
2018-06-09 13:10:33 UTC
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Post by Snidely
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Lothar Frings
Which of the three is/are in current use?
He's caught the Bozo disease!
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Yellow press is rare but the other two are fully extant in BrE,
along with 'red top', 'gutter press', and, in the age of fake news,
'comic'! However, with most of the broadsheets having gone to
tabloid format in recent years, 'tabloid' doesn't really carry the
same sting it once did.
"Yellow journalism" was more likely.
More likely for what? I haven't seen it applied to 21st C
publications.
Hence the past tense.
Post by Snidely
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The NYT is still a broadsheet but the
sheets are less broad than they used to be. It can't be confused with the
two tabloids, the Daily News and the Post.
For many people of the US who are not in Giancarlo Stanton range of the
Geo Wash Br, "tabloid" refers to the supermarket stock of the likes of
The National Enquirer.
And in England, the two senses seem to have merged. They don't need the
National Enquirer or the Weekly World News as long as the have the Daily
Mail.

I did look up Mike "Giancarlo" Stanton. He seems to be more of a California
celebrity, with a recent and tenuous connection to the NY Yankees after the
Florida Marlins inexplicably traded away a 50-HR hitter.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giancarlo_Stanton#New_York_Yankees

Though what that has to do with the GWB, I do not see.
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-06-09 13:36:19 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Snidely
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Lothar Frings
Which of the three is/are in current use?
He's caught the Bozo disease!
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Yellow press is rare but the other two are fully extant in BrE,
along with 'red top', 'gutter press', and, in the age of fake news,
'comic'! However, with most of the broadsheets having gone to
tabloid format in recent years, 'tabloid' doesn't really carry the
same sting it once did.
"Yellow journalism" was more likely.
More likely for what? I haven't seen it applied to 21st C
publications.
Hence the past tense.
Post by Snidely
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The NYT is still a broadsheet but the
sheets are less broad than they used to be. It can't be confused with the
two tabloids, the Daily News and the Post.
For many people of the US who are not in Giancarlo Stanton range of the
Geo Wash Br, "tabloid" refers to the supermarket stock of the likes of
The National Enquirer.
And in England, the two senses seem to have merged. They don't need the
National Enquirer or the Weekly World News as long as the have the Daily
Mail.
I did look up Mike "Giancarlo" Stanton. He seems to be more of a California
celebrity, with a recent and tenuous connection to the NY Yankees after the
Florida Marlins inexplicably traded away a 50-HR hitter.
Not that inexplicable. New owners, having just acquired the club, simply didn't
have the cash left to pay for another season of his huge salary. Stanton turned
down two trades, invoking his no-trade clause, before accepting the move to
the Yankees so it certainly wasn't a lightly made decision on his part.
LFS
2018-06-09 14:17:22 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Snidely
For many people of the US who are not in Giancarlo Stanton range of the
Geo Wash Br, "tabloid" refers to the supermarket stock of the likes of
The National Enquirer.
And in England, the two senses seem to have merged. They don't need the
National Enquirer or the Weekly World News as long as the have the Daily
Mail.
Believe me, I am no apologist for the DM but it is a good deal more
intellectual than the National Enquirer, which is more like a really
stupid version of the Sun or the Mirror on their bad days.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Peter T. Daniels
2018-06-09 14:48:49 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Snidely
For many people of the US who are not in Giancarlo Stanton range of the
Geo Wash Br, "tabloid" refers to the supermarket stock of the likes of
The National Enquirer.
And in England, the two senses seem to have merged. They don't need the
National Enquirer or the Weekly World News as long as the have the Daily
Mail.
Believe me, I am no apologist for the DM but it is a good deal more
intellectual than the National Enquirer, which is more like a really
stupid version of the Sun or the Mirror on their bad days.
That was the only English tabloid that's been mentioned here recently. Feel
free to replace "Mail" with whichever one you wish to denigrate.

The Nat Enquirer, though, does these days occasionally print real news. They
first published the John Edwards scandal before the 2008 presidential primaries,
and they're currently in the news for paying one of Trump's dalliances for the
exclusive rights to her story -- and then killing the story. Trump and its
editor are close.

Not to be confused with the Philadelphia Inquirer, a respectable metropolitan
broadsheet -- and one of the few Philadelphia institutions that doesn't trace
its ancestry directly back to Benjamin Franklin.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Philadelphia_Inquirer
Rich Ulrich
2018-06-09 16:40:33 UTC
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On Sat, 9 Jun 2018 07:48:49 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by LFS
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Snidely
For many people of the US who are not in Giancarlo Stanton range of the
Geo Wash Br, "tabloid" refers to the supermarket stock of the likes of
The National Enquirer.
And in England, the two senses seem to have merged. They don't need the
National Enquirer or the Weekly World News as long as the have the Daily
Mail.
Believe me, I am no apologist for the DM but it is a good deal more
intellectual than the National Enquirer, which is more like a really
stupid version of the Sun or the Mirror on their bad days.
That was the only English tabloid that's been mentioned here recently. Feel
free to replace "Mail" with whichever one you wish to denigrate.
The Nat Enquirer, though, does these days occasionally print real news. They
first published the John Edwards scandal before the 2008 presidential primaries,
and they're currently in the news for paying one of Trump's dalliances for the
exclusive rights to her story -- and then killing the story. Trump and its
editor are close.
I assume that the Nat Enquirer has always had a sprinkling of
factual stuff, though my only direct knowledge is from 1968-1969.

I was living in my first apartment after college, and a friendly
neighbor was a reader and fan. So I read some of their stories.
One of them was a titillating report on marriage and sex practices
in some distant, tribal society -- and I had read the same report in
an anthropology course the previous year.

A year later, my boss gave several interviews as followup to a press
release on a study, a "psychological survey of normal adults" in
Carroll County, Md. Jerry (my boss) mentioned that the news
story in the Nat. Enquirer was the best one. (I think Jerry granted
the interview to a free-lancer, or someone who said he was a
free-lancer. The rag had the same reputation then as it does now.)

I half-way expect that the journals it competes with are similar in
providing some real news, but I haven't heard that about them.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Not to be confused with the Philadelphia Inquirer, a respectable metropolitan
broadsheet -- and one of the few Philadelphia institutions that doesn't trace
its ancestry directly back to Benjamin Franklin.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Philadelphia_Inquirer
--
Rich Ulrich
Sam Plusnet
2018-06-09 22:31:05 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
The Nat Enquirer, though, does these days occasionally print real news. They
first published the John Edwards scandal before the 2008 presidential primaries,
and they're currently in the news for paying one of Trump's dalliances for the
exclusive rights to her story -- and then killing the story. Trump and its
editor are close.
When the National Enquirer used "catch & kill" methods to protect D
Trump, it cost them a certain amount of money, time and resources.

Wouldn't an editor have to account for the wasted money to the owner of
the 'newspaper'?
--
Sam Plusnet
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-06-09 22:52:11 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The Nat Enquirer, though, does these days occasionally print real news. They
first published the John Edwards scandal before the 2008 presidential primaries,
and they're currently in the news for paying one of Trump's dalliances for the
exclusive rights to her story -- and then killing the story. Trump and its
editor are close.
When the National Enquirer used "catch & kill" methods to protect D
Trump, it cost them a certain amount of money, time and resources.
Wouldn't an editor have to account for the wasted money to the owner of
the 'newspaper'?
In the Trump / National Enquirer case the dicision wa taking higher up
than the editor.
https://upload.democraticunderground.com/100210238885

On November 4, 2016, four days before the election, the Wall Street
Journal reported that American Media, Inc., the publisher of the
National Enquirer, had paid a hundred and fifty thousand dollars for
exclusive rights to McDougal’s story, which it never ran. Purchasing
a story in order to bury it is a practice that many in the tabloid
industry call “catch and kill.” This is a favorite tactic of the
C.E.O. and chairman of A.M.I., David Pecker, who describes the
President as “a personal friend.”

[It is alleged that Karen McDougal had an affair with Trump.]

It is possible that readers of the National Enquirer who are admirers of
Trump would approve of that stifling of the story and that the
circulation of the paper would be maintained. It might even increase.

"catch & kill" makes it impossible for anyone else to publish the story
unless they have a completely independent source for it. Trump's
followers might approve of that "killing" of the story.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Richard Yates
2018-06-09 22:53:21 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The Nat Enquirer, though, does these days occasionally print real news. They
first published the John Edwards scandal before the 2008 presidential primaries,
and they're currently in the news for paying one of Trump's dalliances for the
exclusive rights to her story -- and then killing the story. Trump and its
editor are close.
When the National Enquirer used "catch & kill" methods to protect D
Trump, it cost them a certain amount of money, time and resources.
Wouldn't an editor have to account for the wasted money to the owner of
the 'newspaper'?
It's the "newspaper's" owner that wants it to happen.
Tony Cooper
2018-06-09 23:56:11 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The Nat Enquirer, though, does these days occasionally print real news. They
first published the John Edwards scandal before the 2008 presidential primaries,
and they're currently in the news for paying one of Trump's dalliances for the
exclusive rights to her story -- and then killing the story. Trump and its
editor are close.
When the National Enquirer used "catch & kill" methods to protect D
Trump, it cost them a certain amount of money, time and resources.
Wouldn't an editor have to account for the wasted money to the owner of
the 'newspaper'?
Do you not think it's owner's idea in the first place?

The _National Enquirer_ is owned by American Media, Inc. The
principals are David J. Pecker and Roger Altman. Pecker is a close
friend of Trump and a supporter of Trump's political ambitions.
Altman, however, is a Democrat and served in the Carter and Clinton
administrations.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Sam Plusnet
2018-06-10 22:15:03 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The Nat Enquirer, though, does these days occasionally print real news. They
first published the John Edwards scandal before the 2008 presidential primaries,
and they're currently in the news for paying one of Trump's dalliances for the
exclusive rights to her story -- and then killing the story. Trump and its
editor are close.
When the National Enquirer used "catch & kill" methods to protect D
Trump, it cost them a certain amount of money, time and resources.
Wouldn't an editor have to account for the wasted money to the owner of
the 'newspaper'?
Do you not think it's owner's idea in the first place?
The _National Enquirer_ is owned by American Media, Inc. The
principals are David J. Pecker and Roger Altman. Pecker is a close
friend of Trump and a supporter of Trump's political ambitions.
Altman, however, is a Democrat and served in the Carter and Clinton
administrations.
Someone who is prepared to fork out $150,000 in order to help out a
friend seems very magnanimous and altruistic.
--
Sam Plusnet
Tony Cooper
2018-06-10 22:55:44 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The Nat Enquirer, though, does these days occasionally print real news. They
first published the John Edwards scandal before the 2008 presidential primaries,
and they're currently in the news for paying one of Trump's dalliances for the
exclusive rights to her story -- and then killing the story. Trump and its
editor are close.
When the National Enquirer used "catch & kill" methods to protect D
Trump, it cost them a certain amount of money, time and resources.
Wouldn't an editor have to account for the wasted money to the owner of
the 'newspaper'?
Do you not think it's owner's idea in the first place?
The _National Enquirer_ is owned by American Media, Inc. The
principals are David J. Pecker and Roger Altman. Pecker is a close
friend of Trump and a supporter of Trump's political ambitions.
Altman, however, is a Democrat and served in the Carter and Clinton
administrations.
Someone who is prepared to fork out $150,000 in order to help out a
friend seems very magnanimous and altruistic.
Trump's tax "reform" probably put more than that back into Pecker's
pocket.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Rich Ulrich
2018-06-11 06:20:15 UTC
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Raw Message
On Sun, 10 Jun 2018 18:55:44 -0400, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The Nat Enquirer, though, does these days occasionally print real news. They
first published the John Edwards scandal before the 2008 presidential primaries,
and they're currently in the news for paying one of Trump's dalliances for the
exclusive rights to her story -- and then killing the story. Trump and its
editor are close.
When the National Enquirer used "catch & kill" methods to protect D
Trump, it cost them a certain amount of money, time and resources.
Wouldn't an editor have to account for the wasted money to the owner of
the 'newspaper'?
Do you not think it's owner's idea in the first place?
The _National Enquirer_ is owned by American Media, Inc. The
principals are David J. Pecker and Roger Altman. Pecker is a close
friend of Trump and a supporter of Trump's political ambitions.
Altman, however, is a Democrat and served in the Carter and Clinton
administrations.
Someone who is prepared to fork out $150,000 in order to help out a
friend seems very magnanimous and altruistic.
Trump's tax "reform" probably put more than that back into Pecker's
pocket.
I think it was shortly after Nixon got in trouble for accepting
secret, illegal campaign contributions from the dairy interests
that I calculated the known pay-backs for dirty political money
as falling in the range of 100-to-one to 1000-to-one. Of course,
that was betting that your dirty candidate would win.

The difference today is that the big-money bribes aren't always
kept secret and almost never get prosecuted. That's because the
Supreme Court conservatives concluded that money doesn't have
any bad effect on elections.
--
Rich Ulrich
Snidely
2018-06-13 10:03:43 UTC
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Remember when Peter T. Daniels bragged outrageously? That was
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Snidely
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Which of the three is/are in current use? He's caught the Bozo disease!
Yellow press is rare but the other two are fully extant in BrE,
along with 'red top', 'gutter press', and, in the age of fake news,
'comic'! However, with most of the broadsheets having gone to
tabloid format in recent years, 'tabloid' doesn't really carry the
same sting it once did.
"Yellow journalism" was more likely.
More likely for what? I haven't seen it applied to 21st C
publications.
Hence the past tense.
Post by Snidely
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The NYT is still a broadsheet but the
sheets are less broad than they used to be. It can't be confused with the
two tabloids, the Daily News and the Post.
For many people of the US who are not in Giancarlo Stanton range of the
Geo Wash Br, "tabloid" refers to the supermarket stock of the likes of
The National Enquirer.
And in England, the two senses seem to have merged. They don't need the
National Enquirer or the Weekly World News as long as the have the Daily
Mail.
I did look up Mike "Giancarlo" Stanton. He seems to be more of a California
celebrity, with a recent and tenuous connection to the NY Yankees after the
tenuous? with that paycheck?
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Florida Marlins inexplicably traded away a 50-HR hitter.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giancarlo_Stanton#New_York_Yankees
Though what that has to do with the GWB, I do not see.
find a spot on the GWB, draw a circle 458 feet around it. Consult the
people outside that circle.

/dps
--
"I'm glad unicorns don't ever need upgrades."
"We are as up as it is possible to get graded!"
_Phoebe and Her Unicorn_, 2016.05.15
Peter T. Daniels
2018-06-13 12:15:41 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Snidely
Remember when Peter T. Daniels bragged outrageously? That was
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Snidely
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Which of the three is/are in current use? He's caught the Bozo disease!
Yellow press is rare but the other two are fully extant in BrE,
along with 'red top', 'gutter press', and, in the age of fake news,
'comic'! However, with most of the broadsheets having gone to
tabloid format in recent years, 'tabloid' doesn't really carry the
same sting it once did.
"Yellow journalism" was more likely.
More likely for what? I haven't seen it applied to 21st C
publications.
Hence the past tense.
Post by Snidely
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The NYT is still a broadsheet but the
sheets are less broad than they used to be. It can't be confused with the
two tabloids, the Daily News and the Post.
For many people of the US who are not in Giancarlo Stanton range of the
Geo Wash Br, "tabloid" refers to the supermarket stock of the likes of
The National Enquirer.
And in England, the two senses seem to have merged. They don't need the
National Enquirer or the Weekly World News as long as the have the Daily
Mail.
I did look up Mike "Giancarlo" Stanton. He seems to be more of a California
celebrity, with a recent and tenuous connection to the NY Yankees after the
tenuous? with that paycheck?
New Yorkers aren't impressed by Yankee paychecks. There's no "salary cap"
in baseball.
Post by Snidely
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Florida Marlins inexplicably traded away a 50-HR hitter.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giancarlo_Stanton#New_York_Yankees
Though what that has to do with the GWB, I do not see.
find a spot on the GWB, draw a circle 458 feet around it. Consult the
people outside that circle.
Decades ago, when we lived a few blocks from the GWB, a couple of times we
walked across to Fort Lee and back. The free span is 3500 feet long (the
"total length," however that might be calculated, is 4,760 feet). so most
such circles would enclose nothing but Bridge itself.
s***@gmail.com
2018-06-13 20:13:15 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Snidely
Remember when Peter T. Daniels bragged outrageously? That was
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Snidely
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Which of the three is/are in current use? He's caught the Bozo disease!
Yellow press is rare but the other two are fully extant in BrE,
along with 'red top', 'gutter press', and, in the age of fake news,
'comic'! However, with most of the broadsheets having gone to
tabloid format in recent years, 'tabloid' doesn't really carry the
same sting it once did.
"Yellow journalism" was more likely.
More likely for what? I haven't seen it applied to 21st C
publications.
Hence the past tense.
Post by Snidely
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The NYT is still a broadsheet but the
sheets are less broad than they used to be. It can't be confused with the
two tabloids, the Daily News and the Post.
For many people of the US who are not in Giancarlo Stanton range of the
Geo Wash Br, "tabloid" refers to the supermarket stock of the likes of
The National Enquirer.
And in England, the two senses seem to have merged. They don't need the
National Enquirer or the Weekly World News as long as the have the Daily
Mail.
I did look up Mike "Giancarlo" Stanton. He seems to be more of a California
celebrity, with a recent and tenuous connection to the NY Yankees after the
tenuous? with that paycheck?
New Yorkers aren't impressed by Yankee paychecks. There's no "salary cap"
in baseball.
I didn't say anything about "impressed". I was responding to "tenuous".
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Snidely
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Florida Marlins inexplicably traded away a 50-HR hitter.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giancarlo_Stanton#New_York_Yankees
Though what that has to do with the GWB, I do not see.
find a spot on the GWB, draw a circle 458 feet around it. Consult the
people outside that circle.
Decades ago, when we lived a few blocks from the GWB, a couple of times we
walked across to Fort Lee and back. The free span is 3500 feet long (the
"total length," however that might be calculated, is 4,760 feet). so most
such circles would enclose nothing but Bridge itself.
And there will be plenty of people to be found outside of that circle.

You seem to have turned off your imagery circuits.

/dps

Peter Moylan
2018-06-11 02:55:33 UTC
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Post by Lothar Frings
Which of the three is/are in current use?
Yellow press is rare but the other two are fully extant in BrE, along
with 'red top', 'gutter press', and, in the age of fake news,
'comic'! However, with most of the broadsheets having gone to tabloid
format in recent years, 'tabloid' doesn't really carry the same sting
it once did.
In the several cases that I'm familiar with, the switch from broadsheet
to tabloid seemed to be accompanied by a drop in standards. It was
almost as if becoming a tabloid brought about a change of attitude.

It could have been a coincidence, though. That was also an era of staff
cuts, outsourcing, a greater focus on advertising rather than news, and
so on; all factors that would have turned newspapers into tabloids even
if they'd kept the broadsheet format.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Peter T. Daniels
2018-06-11 03:41:32 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Lothar Frings
Which of the three is/are in current use?
Yellow press is rare but the other two are fully extant in BrE, along
with 'red top', 'gutter press', and, in the age of fake news,
'comic'! However, with most of the broadsheets having gone to tabloid
format in recent years, 'tabloid' doesn't really carry the same sting
it once did.
In the several cases that I'm familiar with, the switch from broadsheet
to tabloid seemed to be accompanied by a drop in standards. It was
almost as if becoming a tabloid brought about a change of attitude.
It could have been a coincidence, though. That was also an era of staff
cuts, outsourcing, a greater focus on advertising rather than news, and
so on; all factors that would have turned newspapers into tabloids even
if they'd kept the broadsheet format.
OTOH the Chicago Sun-Times is in tabloid format but was never "tabloid" in
content.
bill van
2018-06-11 05:40:47 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Lothar Frings
Which of the three is/are in current use?
Yellow press is rare but the other two are fully extant in BrE, along
with 'red top', 'gutter press', and, in the age of fake news,
'comic'! However, with most of the broadsheets having gone to tabloid
format in recent years, 'tabloid' doesn't really carry the same sting
it once did.
In the several cases that I'm familiar with, the switch from broadsheet
to tabloid seemed to be accompanied by a drop in standards. It was
almost as if becoming a tabloid brought about a change of attitude.
It could have been a coincidence, though. That was also an era of staff
cuts, outsourcing, a greater focus on advertising rather than news, and
so on; all factors that would have turned newspapers into tabloids even
if they'd kept the broadsheet format.
OTOH the Chicago Sun-Times is in tabloid format but was never "tabloid" in
content.
That's not usual, but not unheard of. The Village Voice, for one,
delivered its content in a tabloid format without turning into the
National Enquirer. Regardless of format, a paper's direction is set by
its owners and managers. I'm not intimate with the history of the
Sun-Times, but in most of the first decade of this century, its
publisher was John Cruickshank, who I worked for when he was editor of
the Vancouver Sun. He was smart, intellectual and inquisitive.
Regardless of format, a newspaper he ran wasn't going to be
gutter/yellow press. The owners must have hired people like him over
the decades to establish and maintain the paper's reputation.

John Cruickshank retired back to Canada, but has recently been named
Canada's consul-general in Chicago.

bill
Peter T. Daniels
2018-06-11 11:40:56 UTC
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Post by bill van
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Lothar Frings
Which of the three is/are in current use?
Yellow press is rare but the other two are fully extant in BrE, along
with 'red top', 'gutter press', and, in the age of fake news,
'comic'! However, with most of the broadsheets having gone to tabloid
format in recent years, 'tabloid' doesn't really carry the same sting
it once did.
In the several cases that I'm familiar with, the switch from broadsheet
to tabloid seemed to be accompanied by a drop in standards. It was
almost as if becoming a tabloid brought about a change of attitude.
It could have been a coincidence, though. That was also an era of staff
cuts, outsourcing, a greater focus on advertising rather than news, and
so on; all factors that would have turned newspapers into tabloids even
if they'd kept the broadsheet format.
OTOH the Chicago Sun-Times is in tabloid format but was never "tabloid" in
content.
That's not usual, but not unheard of. The Village Voice, for one,
delivered its content in a tabloid format without turning into the
National Enquirer. Regardless of format, a paper's direction is set by
its owners and managers. I'm not intimate with the history of the
Sun-Times, but in most of the first decade of this century, its
publisher was John Cruickshank, who I worked for when he was editor of
the Vancouver Sun. He was smart, intellectual and inquisitive.
Regardless of format, a newspaper he ran wasn't going to be
gutter/yellow press. The owners must have hired people like him over
the decades to establish and maintain the paper's reputation.
John Cruickshank retired back to Canada, but has recently been named
Canada's consul-general in Chicago.
The Canadian consulate in Chicago was the locus of the great late-90s
series *Due South*, about an idealistic Dudley Do-Right sort of character
who refused to let the gritty big city get him, or his Canadian optimism,
down. (And a very opulent facility it was.) Of all the TV series set in
Chicago in the late 90s, when I was missing the city, it was the one that
captured its essence best. Paul Gross played the hero.

And then there was *Early Edition*, in which each morning's Sun-Times
brought the hero a story of a disaster he had one day to avert. During the
day he would keep checking his copy to see how the headline had changed --
usually he made the situation worse several times but finally got it right
by the end of the hour. It starred Kyle Chandler, who became better known
in two subsequent series.

The Village Voice was also famous for its scurrilous sex ads in the back
pages. There was apparently nothing it wouldn't publish.
Mark Brader
2018-06-11 07:02:52 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
It could have been a coincidence, though. That was also an era of staff
cuts, outsourcing, a greater focus on advertising rather than news, and
so on; all factors that would have turned newspapers into tabloids even
if they'd kept the broadsheet format.
Was? Are you suggesting that there was an era of newspaper staff
cuts, outsourcing, a greater focus on advertising, and so on, that
has *ended*?

ObXkcd: 1996.
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | Bad news disturbs his game; so does good; so
***@vex.net | also does the absence of news. --Stephen Leacock
Peter Moylan
2018-06-11 13:48:19 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
Post by Peter Moylan
It could have been a coincidence, though. That was also an era of
staff cuts, outsourcing, a greater focus on advertising rather than
news, and so on; all factors that would have turned newspapers into
tabloids even if they'd kept the broadsheet format.
Was? Are you suggesting that there was an era of newspaper staff
cuts, outsourcing, a greater focus on advertising, and so on, that
has *ended*?
ObXkcd: 1996.
I didn't express myself clearly enough. What I had in mind was that time
just past the knee of the curve, when the rate of change was the obvious
point. Of course the changes made at that time haven't been reversed,
and probably never will be.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
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