Discussion:
Joyce: He had done for himself
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Marius Hancu
2017-04-20 00:55:21 UTC
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Hello,

~~~
[Angry man.]

A very sullen-faced man stood at the corner of O'Connell Bridge waiting
for the little Sandymount tram to take him home. He was full of
smouldering anger and revengefulness. He felt humiliated and
discontented; he did not even feel drunk; and he had only twopence in
his pocket. He cursed everything. He had done for himself in the office,
pawned his watch, spent all his money; and he had not even got drunk.

James Joyce, Dubliners (Counterparts)
~~~

1. "He had done for himself": ?
Didn't find this idiom. Irish?

Thanks.
--
Marius Hancu
Ross
2017-04-20 01:15:42 UTC
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Post by Marius Hancu
Hello,
~~~
[Angry man.]
A very sullen-faced man stood at the corner of O'Connell Bridge waiting
for the little Sandymount tram to take him home. He was full of
smouldering anger and revengefulness. He felt humiliated and
discontented; he did not even feel drunk; and he had only twopence in
his pocket. He cursed everything. He had done for himself in the office,
pawned his watch, spent all his money; and he had not even got drunk.
James Joyce, Dubliners (Counterparts)
~~~
1. "He had done for himself": ?
Didn't find this idiom. Irish?
Thanks.
--
Marius Hancu
See your thread "He'll do for himself one day", 2015, also based
on Joyce. Originally "kill" or "destroy" (OE for-don). Here I would
understand it as meaning he had ruined all his chances, burned his
bridges...Someone else will express it better.
Mark Brader
2017-04-20 03:23:29 UTC
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Post by Ross
Post by Marius Hancu
~~~
[Angry man.]
A very sullen-faced man stood at the corner of O'Connell Bridge waiting
for the little Sandymount tram to take him home. He was full of
smouldering anger and revengefulness. He felt humiliated and
discontented; he did not even feel drunk; and he had only twopence in
his pocket. He cursed everything. He had done for himself in the office,
pawned his watch, spent all his money; and he had not even got drunk.
James Joyce, Dubliners (Counterparts)
~~~
1. "He had done for himself": ?
Didn't find this idiom. Irish?
See your thread "He'll do for himself one day", 2015, also based
on Joyce. Originally "kill" or "destroy" (OE for-don).
And in wider usage in the passive -- if it had said "He was done for at
the office", I would have understood the meaning immediately.
Post by Ross
Here I would understand it as meaning he had ruined all his chances,
burned his bridges...
Agreed.
--
Mark Brader | "I thought it was a big joke.
Toronto | Dr. Brader is known for joking around a lot."
***@vex.net | --Matthew McKnight

My text in this article is in the public domain.
Marius Hancu
2017-04-20 11:49:24 UTC
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Post by Ross
Post by Marius Hancu
~~~
[Angry man.]
A very sullen-faced man stood at the corner of O'Connell Bridge waiting
for the little Sandymount tram to take him home. He was full of
smouldering anger and revengefulness. He felt humiliated and
discontented; he did not even feel drunk; and he had only twopence in
his pocket. He cursed everything. He had done for himself in the office,
pawned his watch, spent all his money; and he had not even got drunk.
James Joyce, Dubliners (Counterparts)
~~~
1. "He had done for himself": ?
Didn't find this idiom. Irish?
See your thread "He'll do for himself one day", 2015, also based
on Joyce. Originally "kill" or "destroy" (OE for-don). Here I would
understand it as meaning he had ruined all his chances, burned his
bridges...Someone else will express it better.
Thanks for digging that out:-)

--
Marius Hancu
GordonD
2017-04-20 17:48:31 UTC
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Post by Ross
Post by Marius Hancu
Hello,
~~~
[Angry man.]
A very sullen-faced man stood at the corner of O'Connell Bridge waiting
for the little Sandymount tram to take him home. He was full of
smouldering anger and revengefulness. He felt humiliated and
discontented; he did not even feel drunk; and he had only twopence in
his pocket. He cursed everything. He had done for himself in the office,
pawned his watch, spent all his money; and he had not even got drunk.
James Joyce, Dubliners (Counterparts)
~~~
1. "He had done for himself": ?
Didn't find this idiom. Irish?
Thanks.
--
Marius Hancu
See your thread "He'll do for himself one day", 2015, also based
on Joyce. Originally "kill" or "destroy" (OE for-don). Here I would
understand it as meaning he had ruined all his chances, burned his
bridges...Someone else will express it better.
"Pissed on his chips."
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
David Kleinecke
2017-04-20 18:53:34 UTC
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Post by GordonD
Post by Ross
Post by Marius Hancu
Hello,
~~~
[Angry man.]
A very sullen-faced man stood at the corner of O'Connell Bridge waiting
for the little Sandymount tram to take him home. He was full of
smouldering anger and revengefulness. He felt humiliated and
discontented; he did not even feel drunk; and he had only twopence in
his pocket. He cursed everything. He had done for himself in the office,
pawned his watch, spent all his money; and he had not even got drunk.
James Joyce, Dubliners (Counterparts)
~~~
1. "He had done for himself": ?
Didn't find this idiom. Irish?
Thanks.
--
Marius Hancu
See your thread "He'll do for himself one day", 2015, also based
on Joyce. Originally "kill" or "destroy" (OE for-don). Here I would
understand it as meaning he had ruined all his chances, burned his
bridges...Someone else will express it better.
"Pissed on his chips."
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
Folded.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-04-20 10:40:53 UTC
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On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 20:55:21 -0400, Marius Hancu
Post by Marius Hancu
Hello,
~~~
[Angry man.]
A very sullen-faced man stood at the corner of O'Connell Bridge waiting
for the little Sandymount tram to take him home. He was full of
smouldering anger and revengefulness. He felt humiliated and
discontented; he did not even feel drunk; and he had only twopence in
his pocket. He cursed everything. He had done for himself in the office,
pawned his watch, spent all his money; and he had not even got drunk.
James Joyce, Dubliners (Counterparts)
~~~
1. "He had done for himself": ?
Didn't find this idiom. Irish?
Thanks.
In addition to the other comments:- It is not specifically Irish.

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/done_for

done for
informal

In a situation so bad that it is impossible to get out.
‘if the guard sees us, we're done for’

‘We thought it was done for but then after much jumping up and
down and sand throwing we unbeached it.’

That seems to refer to a boat stuck on a beach. If they can't get it
into the water the boat will be "done for" in the sense of not being
useable as a boat.

‘At the end of the fifth book about the schoolboy spy, we
thought our young hero was done for.’

In that the young hero would be "done for" as a spy, unable for some
reason to continue spying (discovered to be a spy / captured / even
killed).
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Peter T. Daniels
2017-04-20 11:47:11 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 20:55:21 -0400, Marius Hancu
Post by Marius Hancu
Hello,
~~~
[Angry man.]
A very sullen-faced man stood at the corner of O'Connell Bridge waiting
for the little Sandymount tram to take him home. He was full of
smouldering anger and revengefulness. He felt humiliated and
discontented; he did not even feel drunk; and he had only twopence in
his pocket. He cursed everything. He had done for himself in the office,
pawned his watch, spent all his money; and he had not even got drunk.
James Joyce, Dubliners (Counterparts)
~~~
1. "He had done for himself": ?
Didn't find this idiom. Irish?
Thanks.
In addition to the other comments:- It is not specifically Irish.
But the below is an adjective( phrase), not the reflexive verb used by Joyce (and
other Irishpeople?).
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/done_for
done for
informal
In a situation so bad that it is impossible to get out.
‘if the guard sees us, we're done for’
‘We thought it was done for but then after much jumping up and
down and sand throwing we unbeached it.’
That seems to refer to a boat stuck on a beach. If they can't get it
into the water the boat will be "done for" in the sense of not being
useable as a boat.
‘At the end of the fifth book about the schoolboy spy, we
thought our young hero was done for.’
In that the young hero would be "done for" as a spy, unable for some
reason to continue spying (discovered to be a spy / captured / even
killed).
Marius Hancu
2017-04-20 11:47:51 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Marius Hancu
~~~
[Angry man.]
A very sullen-faced man stood at the corner of O'Connell Bridge waiting
for the little Sandymount tram to take him home. He was full of
smouldering anger and revengefulness. He felt humiliated and
discontented; he did not even feel drunk; and he had only twopence in
his pocket. He cursed everything. He had done for himself in the office,
pawned his watch, spent all his money; and he had not even got drunk.
James Joyce, Dubliners (Counterparts)
~~~
1. "He had done for himself": ?
Didn't find this idiom. Irish?
In addition to the other comments:- It is not specifically Irish.
Thank you.
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/done_for
done for
informal
In a situation so bad that it is impossible to get out.
‘if the guard sees us, we're done for’
‘We thought it was done for but then after much jumping up and
down and sand throwing we unbeached it.’
That seems to refer to a boat stuck on a beach. If they can't get it
into the water the boat will be "done for" in the sense of not being
useable as a boat.
‘At the end of the fifth book about the schoolboy spy, we
thought our young hero was done for.’
In that the young hero would be "done for" as a spy, unable for some
reason to continue spying (discovered to be a spy / captured / even
killed).
"Finished," I guess, would work as well.
--
Marius Hancu
Hen Hanna
2017-04-20 19:06:44 UTC
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Post by Marius Hancu
Hello,
~~~
[Angry man.]
A very sullen-faced man stood at the corner of O'Connell Bridge waiting
for the little Sandymount tram to take him home. He was full of
smouldering anger and revengefulness. He felt humiliated and
discontented; he did not even feel drunk; and he had only twopence in
his pocket. He cursed everything. He had done for himself in the office,
pawned his watch, spent all his money; and he had not even got drunk.
James Joyce, Dubliners (Counterparts)
~~~
1. "He had done for himself": ?
Didn't find this idiom. Irish?
Thanks.
--
Marius Hancu
Sharon Stone saying "Now, you've done it!"


we often hear this in (older) war movies, etc.
-- One more mix-up like that, and we're done for!

also "do someone in" https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/do_in
Post by Marius Hancu
He had done for himself in the office,
apparently this "done for" is the same "done for"
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/do_for

Smoking did for him in the end.

But he did for them both by his plan of attack.

1922, James Joyce, Ulysses,chapter 16
--That bitch, that English whore, did for him, the shebeen proprietor commented. She put the first nail in his coffin.

HH
Hen Hanna
2017-04-22 14:49:30 UTC
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Post by Marius Hancu
Hello,
~~~
[Angry man.]
A very sullen-faced man stood at the corner of O'Connell Bridge waiting
for the little Sandymount tram to take him home. He was full of
smouldering anger and revengefulness. He felt humiliated and
discontented; he did not even feel drunk; and he had only twopence in
his pocket. He cursed everything. He had done for himself in the office,
pawned his watch, spent all his money; and he had not even got drunk.
James Joyce, Dubliners (Counterparts)
~~~
1. "He had done for himself": ?
Didn't find this idiom. Irish?
Thanks.
--
Marius Hancu
pls see the new thread in Sci.Lang
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/sci.lang
[do for] -- [she's spoken for]

wherein [for] signifies [completion]

as in [fordo] ?

HH

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