Discussion:
uninjured
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a***@gmail.com
2018-07-09 07:04:46 UTC
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1) She jumped off the balcony of the second floor and landed on her
feet, uninjured.

2) He fell of the horse and landed on his back, unscathed.


Are the sentences grammatical?
Are they idiomatic?

I think they work, but I don't like the past participles there.
The idea is that the falls did not injure them. They are not uninjured when they
land. The landing doesn't injure them.


Gratefully,
Navi
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-07-09 07:43:16 UTC
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On 2018-07-09 07:04:46 +0000, ***@gmail.com said:

> 1) She jumped off the balcony of the second floor and landed on her
> feet, uninjured.
>
> 2) He fell of the horse and landed on his back, unscathed.
>
>
> Are the sentences grammatical?

Yes (apart "of" rather than "off" in 2.

> Are they idiomatic?

Yes, though 2 is unbelievable.
>
> I think they work, but I don't like the past participles there.
> The idea is that the falls did not injure them. They are not uninjured
> when they
> land. The landing doesn't injure them.

An interesting case here, in that the "explanation" is more difficult
to understand than the original sentences.

--
athel
Mark Brader
2018-07-09 19:18:36 UTC
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"Navi":
> > 2) He fell of the horse and landed on his back, unscathed.
> >
> > Are the sentences grammatical?

Athel Cornish-Bowden:
> Yes (apart "of" rather than "off" in 2.

(Oops, I missed that myself.)

> > Are they idiomatic?
>
> Yes, though 2 is unbelievable.

Maybe there happened to be something soft to land on, just there.
--
Mark Brader "The world little knows or cares the storm through
Toronto which you have had to pass. It asks only if you
***@vex.net brought the ship safely to port." -- Joseph Conrad
s***@gmail.com
2018-07-09 20:43:59 UTC
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On Monday, July 9, 2018 at 12:18:43 PM UTC-7, Mark Brader wrote:
> "Navi":
> > > 2) He fell of the horse and landed on his back, unscathed.
> > >
> > > Are the sentences grammatical?
>
> Athel Cornish-Bowden:
> > Yes (apart "of" rather than "off" in 2.
>
> (Oops, I missed that myself.)
>
> > > Are they idiomatic?
> >
> > Yes, though 2 is unbelievable.
>
> Maybe there happened to be something soft to land on, just there.


If the arena has just been dragged [1], and you don't land on any of the gates.

[1] "just been" is often satisfied when the tractor did the dragging
before the first class [2] at 9 am, and it's only 11 am now.
On the other hand, walking through a just-dragged arena
can help high-mileage knees achieve tendonitis.

[2] The bronc riders in the rodeo deal with rounds, not classes,
but I'm sure that after 8 seconds they are happy that the arena
was dragged before their shot from the chute.

/dps
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-09 11:28:43 UTC
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On Monday, July 9, 2018 at 3:04:48 AM UTC-4, ***@gmail.com wrote:

> 1) She jumped off the balcony of the second floor and landed on her
> feet, uninjured.

"second floor balcony"

> 2) He fell of the horse and landed on his back, unscathed.

"unscathed" is a strange choice, if it refers to the effect of the fall.
Did he fall off the horse because he was ducking an arrow or a lance?

> Are the sentences grammatical?
> Are they idiomatic?
>
> I think they work, but I don't like the past participles there.
> The idea is that the falls did not injure them. They are not uninjured when they
> land. The landing doesn't injure them.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-07-09 12:08:45 UTC
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On Mon, 9 Jul 2018 04:28:43 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
<***@verizon.net> wrote:

>On Monday, July 9, 2018 at 3:04:48 AM UTC-4, ***@gmail.com wrote:
>
>> 1) She jumped off the balcony of the second floor and landed on her
>> feet, uninjured.
>
>"second floor balcony"
>
>> 2) He fell of the horse and landed on his back, unscathed.
>
>"unscathed" is a strange choice, if it refers to the effect of the fall.
>Did he fall off the horse because he was ducking an arrow or a lance?

According to this, "unscathed" means "Without suffering any injury,
damage, or harm"
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/unscathed
so it could refer to the lack of harm caused by hitting the ground.

Personally I wouldn't use "unscathed" in that context. I'd use
"unharmed" or "uninjured".

>
>> Are the sentences grammatical?
>> Are they idiomatic?
>>
>> I think they work, but I don't like the past participles there.
>> The idea is that the falls did not injure them. They are not uninjured when they
>> land. The landing doesn't injure them.

--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-09 15:59:02 UTC
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On Monday, July 9, 2018 at 8:08:53 AM UTC-4, PeterWD wrote:
> On Mon, 9 Jul 2018 04:28:43 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
> <***@verizon.net> wrote:
>
> >On Monday, July 9, 2018 at 3:04:48 AM UTC-4, ***@gmail.com wrote:
> >
> >> 1) She jumped off the balcony of the second floor and landed on her
> >> feet, uninjured.
> >
> >"second floor balcony"
> >
> >> 2) He fell of the horse and landed on his back, unscathed.
> >
> >"unscathed" is a strange choice, if it refers to the effect of the fall.
> >Did he fall off the horse because he was ducking an arrow or a lance?
>
> According to this, "unscathed" means "Without suffering any injury,
> damage, or harm"
> https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/unscathed
> so it could refer to the lack of harm caused by hitting the ground.
>
> Personally I wouldn't use "unscathed" in that context. I'd use
> "unharmed" or "uninjured".

Scathing seems to refer to deliberate injury, or maybe life-threatening
injury -- I think you can escape from a fire unscathed, but you don't
say that of recovering from a skinned knee or a paper cut. Except for
humorous intent.

> >> Are the sentences grammatical?
> >> Are they idiomatic?
> >>
> >> I think they work, but I don't like the past participles there.
> >> The idea is that the falls did not injure them. They are not uninjured when they
> >> land. The landing doesn't injure them.
>
> --
> Peter Duncanson, UK
> (in alt.usage.english)
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-07-09 17:15:49 UTC
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On Monday, 9 July 2018 16:59:05 UTC+1, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
> On Monday, July 9, 2018 at 8:08:53 AM UTC-4, PeterWD wrote:
> > On Mon, 9 Jul 2018 04:28:43 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
> > <***@verizon.net> wrote:
> >
> > >On Monday, July 9, 2018 at 3:04:48 AM UTC-4, ***@gmail.com wrote:
> > >
> > >> 1) She jumped off the balcony of the second floor and landed on her
> > >> feet, uninjured.
> > >
> > >"second floor balcony"
> > >
> > >> 2) He fell of the horse and landed on his back, unscathed.
> > >
> > >"unscathed" is a strange choice, if it refers to the effect of the fall.
> > >Did he fall off the horse because he was ducking an arrow or a lance?
> >
> > According to this, "unscathed" means "Without suffering any injury,
> > damage, or harm"
> > https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/unscathed
> > so it could refer to the lack of harm caused by hitting the ground.
> >
> > Personally I wouldn't use "unscathed" in that context. I'd use
> > "unharmed" or "uninjured".
>
> Scathing seems to refer to deliberate injury, or maybe life-threatening
> injury -- I think you can escape from a fire unscathed, but you don't
> say that of recovering from a skinned knee or a paper cut. Except for
> humorous intent.
>

Don't skinned knees and paper cuts automatically qualify as
scathed then?
Mark Brader
2018-07-09 19:13:57 UTC
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"Navi":
> 1) She jumped off the balcony of the second floor and landed on her
> feet, uninjured.
>
> 2) He fell of the horse and landed on his back, unscathed.
>
>
> Are the sentences grammatical?
> Are they idiomatic?

Yes.
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "I don't have a life; I have a program." --the Doctor
***@vex.net | (Michael Piller, Star Trek: Voyager, "Tattoo")
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