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Buick
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Joy Beeson
2018-07-08 21:47:58 UTC
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I've long pooh-poohed the idea of studded tires for bicycles because
"I don't go out until the Buicks stop coming down the road sideways.".

(The proponents of studded tires don't ride them on shared
facilities.)

Then one day as I was passing through a waiting room where I'd just
dropped off some old magazines, one of the patients commented on my
attire, asking whether I'd come on a Harley. Nope, a Fuji, and after a
while I commented that the weather would be fit for bike riding only a
few more days and he said, "And then you'll have to drive your Buick."

It's a Versa, actually, but now I'm wondering: is "Buick" a fairly
common figure of speech for "large road vehicle", or is it, as I'd
thought, my idiosyncracy

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Joy Beeson
2018-07-08 21:53:30 UTC
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Please ignore this post. I was trying to type "N" and hit ctl instead
of shift.

I'd try to cancel it, but I have it on good authority that by the time
I figure out how, the post will be all over the world.
--
Joy Beeson, U.S.A., mostly central Hoosier,
some Northern Indiana, Upstate New York, Florida, and Hawaii
joy beeson at comcast dot net http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.



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Snidely
2018-07-09 10:17:34 UTC
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Post by Joy Beeson
Please ignore this post. I was trying to type "N" and hit ctl instead
of shift.
I'd try to cancel it, but I have it on good authority that by the time
I figure out how, the post will be all over the world.
Oh, darn.

In TONG we occasionally discuss Trump's objections to people marrying
Buicks. Sadly, engagements to Pontiacs are becoming rare.

/dps
--
Trust, but verify.
John Varela
2018-07-08 23:12:35 UTC
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On Sun, 8 Jul 2018 21:47:58 UTC, Joy Beeson
Post by Joy Beeson
I've long pooh-poohed the idea of studded tires for bicycles because
"I don't go out until the Buicks stop coming down the road sideways.".
(The proponents of studded tires don't ride them on shared
facilities.)
Then one day as I was passing through a waiting room where I'd just
dropped off some old magazines, one of the patients commented on my
attire, asking whether I'd come on a Harley. Nope, a Fuji, and after a
while I commented that the weather would be fit for bike riding only a
few more days and he said, "And then you'll have to drive your Buick."
It's a Versa, actually, but now I'm wondering: is "Buick" a fairly
common figure of speech for "large road vehicle", or is it, as I'd
thought, my idiosyncracy
I've never heard it, and I've never owned a Buick, but if I wanted
to name a large car that's incompetent on slippery roads I'd say
"Volvo", a front-wheel-drive version of which I have owned.
Post by Joy Beeson
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--
John Varela
Tony Cooper
2018-07-09 01:26:00 UTC
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Post by John Varela
On Sun, 8 Jul 2018 21:47:58 UTC, Joy Beeson
Post by Joy Beeson
I've long pooh-poohed the idea of studded tires for bicycles because
"I don't go out until the Buicks stop coming down the road sideways.".
(The proponents of studded tires don't ride them on shared
facilities.)
Then one day as I was passing through a waiting room where I'd just
dropped off some old magazines, one of the patients commented on my
attire, asking whether I'd come on a Harley. Nope, a Fuji, and after a
while I commented that the weather would be fit for bike riding only a
few more days and he said, "And then you'll have to drive your Buick."
It's a Versa, actually, but now I'm wondering: is "Buick" a fairly
common figure of speech for "large road vehicle", or is it, as I'd
thought, my idiosyncracy
I've never heard it, and I've never owned a Buick, but if I wanted
to name a large car that's incompetent on slippery roads I'd say
"Volvo", a front-wheel-drive version of which I have owned.
I'm afraid Joy was being dissed.

Buick has been trying for years to overcome the perception that Buick
is an old people's car. They even ran a series of ads with the theme
"Not your grandfather's car".

https://rcars.co/2016/07/06/not-your-grandfathers-car-a-buick-story-of-attempted-redemption/

(The splash page omits the possessive apostrophe)

This page has it right:

https://carbuzz.com/news/new-buick-regal-is-not-like-your-grandfather-s-car


The perception of a Buick owner was a person whose white hair could
barely be seen over the seat from the back, who drives 5 mph under the
speed limit, and a person who trade in their Buick after five years
and 30,000 miles.

Where I grew up, though, a Buick was a "doctor's car". The doctor
didn't want to seem ostentatious and drive a Cadillac, but wanted the
next-best big luxury car.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Pavel Svinchnik
2018-07-09 01:45:05 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
Post by John Varela
On Sun, 8 Jul 2018 21:47:58 UTC, Joy Beeson
Post by Joy Beeson
I've long pooh-poohed the idea of studded tires for bicycles because
"I don't go out until the Buicks stop coming down the road sideways.".
(The proponents of studded tires don't ride them on shared
facilities.)
Then one day as I was passing through a waiting room where I'd just
dropped off some old magazines, one of the patients commented on my
attire, asking whether I'd come on a Harley. Nope, a Fuji, and after a
while I commented that the weather would be fit for bike riding only a
few more days and he said, "And then you'll have to drive your Buick."
It's a Versa, actually, but now I'm wondering: is "Buick" a fairly
common figure of speech for "large road vehicle", or is it, as I'd
thought, my idiosyncracy
I've never heard it, and I've never owned a Buick, but if I wanted
to name a large car that's incompetent on slippery roads I'd say
"Volvo", a front-wheel-drive version of which I have owned.
I'm afraid Joy was being dissed.
Buick has been trying for years to overcome the perception that Buick
is an old people's car. They even ran a series of ads with the theme
"Not your grandfather's car".
https://rcars.co/2016/07/06/not-your-grandfathers-car-a-buick-story-of-attempted-redemption/
(The splash page omits the possessive apostrophe)
https://carbuzz.com/news/new-buick-regal-is-not-like-your-grandfather-s-car
The perception of a Buick owner was a person whose white hair could
barely be seen over the seat from the back, who drives 5 mph under the
speed limit, and a person who trade in their Buick after five years
and 30,000 miles.
Where I grew up, though, a Buick was a "doctor's car". The doctor
didn't want to seem ostentatious and drive a Cadillac, but wanted the
next-best big luxury car.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
I just turned 71 a few months ago. I recently got an email from an old friend asking if I were driving an old man's car yet, "like a Buick or Cadillac". I actually have a Ford Fusion and an F-150 pickup truck.

Paul
Horace LaBadie
2018-07-09 04:49:28 UTC
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Post by Pavel Svinchnik
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by John Varela
On Sun, 8 Jul 2018 21:47:58 UTC, Joy Beeson
Post by Joy Beeson
I've long pooh-poohed the idea of studded tires for bicycles because
"I don't go out until the Buicks stop coming down the road sideways.".
(The proponents of studded tires don't ride them on shared
facilities.)
Then one day as I was passing through a waiting room where I'd just
dropped off some old magazines, one of the patients commented on my
attire, asking whether I'd come on a Harley. Nope, a Fuji, and after a
while I commented that the weather would be fit for bike riding only a
few more days and he said, "And then you'll have to drive your Buick."
It's a Versa, actually, but now I'm wondering: is "Buick" a fairly
common figure of speech for "large road vehicle", or is it, as I'd
thought, my idiosyncracy
I've never heard it, and I've never owned a Buick, but if I wanted
to name a large car that's incompetent on slippery roads I'd say
"Volvo", a front-wheel-drive version of which I have owned.
I'm afraid Joy was being dissed.
Buick has been trying for years to overcome the perception that Buick
is an old people's car. They even ran a series of ads with the theme
"Not your grandfather's car".
https://rcars.co/2016/07/06/not-your-grandfathers-car-a-buick-story-of-attem
pted-redemption/
(The splash page omits the possessive apostrophe)
https://carbuzz.com/news/new-buick-regal-is-not-like-your-grandfather-s-car
The perception of a Buick owner was a person whose white hair could
barely be seen over the seat from the back, who drives 5 mph under the
speed limit, and a person who trade in their Buick after five years
and 30,000 miles.
Where I grew up, though, a Buick was a "doctor's car". The doctor
didn't want to seem ostentatious and drive a Cadillac, but wanted the
next-best big luxury car.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
I just turned 71 a few months ago. I recently got an email from an old friend
asking if I were driving an old man's car yet, "like a Buick or Cadillac". I
actually have a Ford Fusion and an F-150 pickup truck.
Paul
"It's not your father's Oldsmobile."

Back when GM still made Oldsmobiles.
Steve Hayes
2018-07-10 10:58:55 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
I've never heard it, and I've never owned a Buick, but if I wanted to
name a large car that's incompetent on slippery roads I'd say "Volvo", a
front-wheel-drive version of which I have owned.
I'm afraid Joy was being dissed.
Buick has been trying for years to overcome the perception that Buick is
an old people's car. They even ran a series of ads with the theme "Not
your grandfather's car".
My father had three, not all at the same time.
Post by Tony Cooper
The perception of a Buick owner was a person whose white hair could
barely be seen over the seat from the back, who drives 5 mph under the
speed limit, and a person who trade in their Buick after five years and
30,000 miles.
Where I grew up, though, a Buick was a "doctor's car". The doctor
didn't want to seem ostentatious and drive a Cadillac, but wanted the
next-best big luxury car.
I'm not sure why they are perceived as more likely to go sideways than
any other big American car.
--
Steve Hayes http://khanya.wordpress.com
Peter Moylan
2018-07-09 02:04:44 UTC
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I've never heard it, and I've never owned a Buick, but if I wanted to
name a large car that's incompetent on slippery roads I'd say
"Volvo", a front-wheel-drive version of which I have owned.
"Volvo driver" used to be a term of derision here. It meant the sort of
person who had poor driving skills and little consideration for other
road users.

Those people have since switched to SUVs.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
John Varela
2018-07-09 23:53:16 UTC
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On Mon, 9 Jul 2018 02:04:44 UTC, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
I've never heard it, and I've never owned a Buick, but if I wanted to
name a large car that's incompetent on slippery roads I'd say
"Volvo", a front-wheel-drive version of which I have owned.
"Volvo driver" used to be a term of derision here. It meant the sort of
person who had poor driving skills and little consideration for other
road users.
In my experience Mercedes, BMW, and Cadillac drivers are the ones
who feel intitled.
Post by Peter Moylan
Those people have since switched to SUVs.
There is truth in that.

My Volvo was a 1995 850 Turbo, which was a pretty hot car. I bought
it to supersede my 1985 Honda Prelude 2.0 Si (Honda's--and my--first
fuel injected car), as my "retirement car" in anticipation of making
long road trips. Two months later our first such trip was about
8,000 miles.
--
John Varela
John Varela
2018-07-11 00:31:53 UTC
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On Mon, 9 Jul 2018 23:53:16 UTC, "John Varela"
Post by John Varela
On Mon, 9 Jul 2018 02:04:44 UTC, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
I've never heard it, and I've never owned a Buick, but if I wanted to
name a large car that's incompetent on slippery roads I'd say
"Volvo", a front-wheel-drive version of which I have owned.
"Volvo driver" used to be a term of derision here. It meant the sort of
person who had poor driving skills and little consideration for other
road users.
In my experience Mercedes, BMW, and Cadillac drivers are the ones
who feel intitled.
entitled
Post by John Varela
Post by Peter Moylan
Those people have since switched to SUVs.
There is truth in that.
My Volvo was a 1995 850 Turbo, which was a pretty hot car. I bought
it to supersede my 1985 Honda Prelude 2.0 Si (Honda's--and my--first
fuel injected car), as my "retirement car" in anticipation of making
long road trips. Two months later our first such trip was about
8,000 miles.
--
John Varela
Richard Yates
2018-07-09 04:09:22 UTC
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On Mon, 9 Jul 2018 12:04:44 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
I've never heard it, and I've never owned a Buick, but if I wanted to
name a large car that's incompetent on slippery roads I'd say
"Volvo", a front-wheel-drive version of which I have owned.
"Volvo driver" used to be a term of derision here. It meant the sort of
person who had poor driving skills and little consideration for other
road users.
Here it meant stodgy, conservative, practical, and maybe
unimaginative.
Peter Moylan
2018-07-10 12:09:39 UTC
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Post by Richard Yates
On Mon, 9 Jul 2018 12:04:44 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by John Varela
I've never heard it, and I've never owned a Buick, but if I
wanted to name a large car that's incompetent on slippery roads
I'd say "Volvo", a front-wheel-drive version of which I have
owned.
"Volvo driver" used to be a term of derision here. It meant the
sort of person who had poor driving skills and little
consideration for other road users.
Here it meant stodgy, conservative, practical, and maybe
unimaginative.
This might depend on how they were marketed. I seem to recall an
emphasis on safety in the advertising here. Some people, I think,
detected an undertone of "You don't have to drive carefully, because in
a collision the other guy will be worse off".

I never checked the measurements, but a Volvo gave the impression of
being larger and heavier than the average (Australian) car.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Tony Cooper
2018-07-10 12:50:41 UTC
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On Sun, 08 Jul 2018 21:09:22 -0700, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
On Mon, 9 Jul 2018 12:04:44 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
I've never heard it, and I've never owned a Buick, but if I wanted to
name a large car that's incompetent on slippery roads I'd say
"Volvo", a front-wheel-drive version of which I have owned.
"Volvo driver" used to be a term of derision here. It meant the sort of
person who had poor driving skills and little consideration for other
road users.
Here it meant stodgy, conservative, practical, and maybe
unimaginative.
Over here, the perception of a Volvo owner has changed over the years.
I bought a Volvo 245 (a "station wagon" or "estate") during the 1979
gas crisis in the US. The Volvo was more fuel-efficient than any
American car at the time. It was also considered to be the safest car
on the road at the time, and I was doing a lot road traveling.

Volvo drivers were considered to be of the practical sort not
concerned with luxury, style, or comfort. I don't think Volvo drivers
were thought of any differently than drivers of any other make as far
as driving skills or road manners.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
RH Draney
2018-07-10 14:01:35 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
On Sun, 08 Jul 2018 21:09:22 -0700, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
On Mon, 9 Jul 2018 12:04:44 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
I've never heard it, and I've never owned a Buick, but if I wanted to
name a large car that's incompetent on slippery roads I'd say
"Volvo", a front-wheel-drive version of which I have owned.
"Volvo driver" used to be a term of derision here. It meant the sort of
person who had poor driving skills and little consideration for other
road users.
Here it meant stodgy, conservative, practical, and maybe
unimaginative.
Over here, the perception of a Volvo owner has changed over the years.
I bought a Volvo 245 (a "station wagon" or "estate") during the 1979
gas crisis in the US. The Volvo was more fuel-efficient than any
American car at the time. It was also considered to be the safest car
on the road at the time, and I was doing a lot road traveling.
Volvo drivers were considered to be of the practical sort not
concerned with luxury, style, or comfort. I don't think Volvo drivers
were thought of any differently than drivers of any other make as far
as driving skills or road manners.
It's not for nothing that Dudley Moore, as an advertising executive who
goes off his nut in the film "Crazy People", suggests as a slogan for
the Volvo "they're boxy but they're good"....

For a time, the iconic car that automatically implied a poor driver with
little concern for anyone else who might be on the road was a Volkswagen
Jetta....r
Peter Moylan
2018-07-10 15:46:43 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
On Sun, 08 Jul 2018 21:09:22 -0700, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
On Mon, 9 Jul 2018 12:04:44 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by John Varela
I've never heard it, and I've never owned a Buick, but if I
wanted to name a large car that's incompetent on slippery roads
I'd say "Volvo", a front-wheel-drive version of which I have
owned.
"Volvo driver" used to be a term of derision here. It meant the
sort of person who had poor driving skills and little
consideration for other road users.
Here it meant stodgy, conservative, practical, and maybe
unimaginative.
Over here, the perception of a Volvo owner has changed over the
years. I bought a Volvo 245 (a "station wagon" or "estate") during
the 1979 gas crisis in the US. The Volvo was more fuel-efficient
than any American car at the time. It was also considered to be the
safest car on the road at the time, and I was doing a lot road
traveling.
Volvo drivers were considered to be of the practical sort not
concerned with luxury, style, or comfort. I don't think Volvo
drivers were thought of any differently than drivers of any other
make as far as driving skills or road manners.
As it happens, I was buying a car in the US in 1979. I test-drove a
Volvo, but considered it far too big for my needs. (In addition, I was
warned that that particular car was too close to the mileage that would
suggest an engine replacement.) I had no interest in buying what we
Australians called a "Yank tank" (an excessively big car), so in the end
I bought a Japanese station wagon, a lot smaller than the Volvo.

I considered it seriously, but in the end I was not interested in buying
a giant car. Too many of the cars available in those days, including the
Volvo, were inappropriate for a family of only three people.

After I bought my car (a Toyota wagon, IIRC), I was amused to see the
result of my parking in a supermarket car lot. The car beside me was a
typical car bought by black Americans. (A Cadillac, I think.) It was
twice the length of my car, but had only half the passenger space. An
excellent example of why US cars could not compete on the international
market, even if they could jump up and down as they proceeded down the
street.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Snidely
2018-07-10 16:30:25 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sun, 08 Jul 2018 21:09:22 -0700, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
On Mon, 9 Jul 2018 12:04:44 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by John Varela
I've never heard it, and I've never owned a Buick, but if I
wanted to name a large car that's incompetent on slippery roads
I'd say "Volvo", a front-wheel-drive version of which I have
owned.
"Volvo driver" used to be a term of derision here. It meant the
sort of person who had poor driving skills and little
consideration for other road users.
Here it meant stodgy, conservative, practical, and maybe
unimaginative.
Over here, the perception of a Volvo owner has changed over the
years. I bought a Volvo 245 (a "station wagon" or "estate") during
the 1979 gas crisis in the US. The Volvo was more fuel-efficient
than any American car at the time. It was also considered to be the
safest car on the road at the time, and I was doing a lot road
traveling.
Volvo drivers were considered to be of the practical sort not
concerned with luxury, style, or comfort. I don't think Volvo
drivers were thought of any differently than drivers of any other
make as far as driving skills or road manners.
As it happens, I was buying a car in the US in 1979. I test-drove a
Volvo, but considered it far too big for my needs. (In addition, I was
warned that that particular car was too close to the mileage that would
suggest an engine replacement.) I had no interest in buying what we
Australians called a "Yank tank" (an excessively big car), so in the end
I bought a Japanese station wagon, a lot smaller than the Volvo.
I considered it seriously, but in the end I was not interested in buying
a giant car. Too many of the cars available in those days, including the
Volvo, were inappropriate for a family of only three people.
I never saw a Volvo I would consider a giant car. Most would be in the
class I would call compact (a decade earlier, that would include the
Ford Falcon). My Beetle was considered a sub-compact, as was a Morris
Minor (and the few Mini's brought in one-at-a-time) or the early Honda
Civic.

(And I'm talking the classic "square" Volvo that replaced the
whaleback, which was also a compact.) The Mercedes of the 70s were
about the same size, and that's still true, although Volvo currently
has a hatchback that's more Civic-sized ... the C30, I think.

And while the numbers were limited, there was a small Volvo sportscar a
few years before you looked.
<URL:http://www.danjedlicka.com/classic_cars/1961-73_Volvo_P1800.html>

Full-size family cars did eventually shrink down to the
Post by Peter Moylan
After I bought my car (a Toyota wagon, IIRC), I was amused to see the
result of my parking in a supermarket car lot. The car beside me was a
typical car bought by black Americans. (A Cadillac, I think.) It was
twice the length of my car, but had only half the passenger space. An
excellent example of why US cars could not compete on the international
market, even if they could jump up and down as they proceeded down the
street.
Jumping up and down was later than 1979, IIRC, although often applied
to cars of the '60s that were being customized. Around 1970, many
Cadillacs were easily able to hold a family of four, or even four
adults (I'm thinking Seville), and were often used by successful real
estate agents because most of their customers could ride along.
Meeting the agent at the house-to-be-viewed was less common in those
days than now, as I remember it. There were, however, Cadillacs that
were more ostentatious.

And remember, the Ford Pinto was still in production in 1979, and had
been a very popular car until the gas tank issue caught people's
imagination.

What were Holdens like in those days?

/dps
--
"I'm glad unicorns don't ever need upgrades."
"We are as up as it is possible to get graded!"
_Phoebe and Her Unicorn_, 2016.05.15
Peter Moylan
2018-07-10 16:51:10 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
I considered it seriously, but in the end I was not interested in
buying a giant car. Too many of the cars available in those days,
including the Volvo, were inappropriate for a family of only three
people.
WriteString (" alert ");
I never saw a Volvo I would consider a giant car.
That's because you were living in an era where US "compact" = Au "huge".
It took many years before US car manufacturers were willing to give up
their "large car" obsession. The reason Japanese cars took over the
market was that the US manufacturers were unwilling to accept that
people really wanted cars about half the size.
Most would be in the class I would call compact (a decade earlier,
that would include the Ford Falcon).
The Ford Falcon actually did quite well in the "large car" end of the
Australian market.
What were Holdens like in those days?
Struggling. Holden too failed to notice that what the market wanted was
smaller cars.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Quinn C
2018-07-10 17:53:56 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
I considered it seriously, but in the end I was not interested in
buying a giant car. Too many of the cars available in those days,
including the Volvo, were inappropriate for a family of only three
people.
WriteString (" alert ");
I never saw a Volvo I would consider a giant car.
That's because you were living in an era where US "compact" = Au "huge".
Wikipedia informs me that the Volvo 140 and the 240 (the famous boxy
one that I remember a German journalist describing as "having the charm
of the Battleship Potemkin") are officially categorized as "mid-sized",
which is the North American and Australian category that corresponds to
a European "large family car".

<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mid-size_car>

Was Australian naming aligned with Europe at the time?
--
Everyone gets one personality tic that's then expanded into an
entire character, in the same way that a balloon with a smiley
face will look like a person if at some point you just stop
caring. -- David Berry, NatPost (on the cast of Criminal Minds)
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-07-11 08:13:06 UTC
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Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
I considered it seriously, but in the end I was not interested in
buying a giant car. Too many of the cars available in those days,
including the Volvo, were inappropriate for a family of only three
people.
WriteString (" alert ");
I never saw a Volvo I would consider a giant car.
That's because you were living in an era where US "compact" = Au "huge".
Wikipedia informs me that the Volvo 140 and the 240 (the famous boxy
one that I remember a German journalist describing as "having the charm
of the Battleship Potemkin"
Breeze blocks on wheels, on British journalist said.
Post by Quinn C
) are officially categorized as "mid-sized",
which is the North American and Australian category that corresponds to
a European "large family car".
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mid-size_car>
Was Australian naming aligned with Europe at the time?
--
athel
Ken Blake
2018-07-10 19:02:19 UTC
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Post by Snidely
I never saw a Volvo I would consider a giant car. Most would be in the
class I would call compact (a decade earlier, that would include the
Ford Falcon).
I owned four Volvos: a 1964 122 (I think), 1967 144, a 1969 144, and a
1975 164. I wouldn't call any of them giant. They were all smaller
than any of the standard full-size American cars, and like you, I
called them "compact."

I liked them all.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-10 16:40:51 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sun, 08 Jul 2018 21:09:22 -0700, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
On Mon, 9 Jul 2018 12:04:44 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by John Varela
I've never heard it, and I've never owned a Buick, but if I
wanted to name a large car that's incompetent on slippery roads
I'd say "Volvo", a front-wheel-drive version of which I have
owned.
"Volvo driver" used to be a term of derision here. It meant the
sort of person who had poor driving skills and little
consideration for other road users.
Here it meant stodgy, conservative, practical, and maybe
unimaginative.
Over here, the perception of a Volvo owner has changed over the
years. I bought a Volvo 245 (a "station wagon" or "estate") during
the 1979 gas crisis in the US. The Volvo was more fuel-efficient
than any American car at the time. It was also considered to be the
safest car on the road at the time, and I was doing a lot road
traveling.
Volvo drivers were considered to be of the practical sort not
concerned with luxury, style, or comfort. I don't think Volvo
drivers were thought of any differently than drivers of any other
make as far as driving skills or road manners.
As it happens, I was buying a car in the US in 1979. I test-drove a
Volvo, but considered it far too big for my needs. (In addition, I was
warned that that particular car was too close to the mileage that would
suggest an engine replacement.) I had no interest in buying what we
Australians called a "Yank tank" (an excessively big car), so in the end
I bought a Japanese station wagon, a lot smaller than the Volvo.
I considered it seriously, but in the end I was not interested in buying
a giant car. Too many of the cars available in those days, including the
Volvo, were inappropriate for a family of only three people.
After I bought my car (a Toyota wagon, IIRC), I was amused to see the
result of my parking in a supermarket car lot. The car beside me was a
typical car bought by black Americans. (A Cadillac, I think.) It was
twice the length of my car, but had only half the passenger space. An
excellent example of why US cars could not compete on the international
market, even if they could jump up and down as they proceeded down the
street.
Yesterday I was behind a Cooper Mini Countryman, about the same size as
any SUV but still with Mini in the name.

Subaru's current ad campaign emphasizes safety, trying to take that laurel
from Volvo.
Tony Cooper
2018-07-10 21:29:23 UTC
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On Wed, 11 Jul 2018 01:46:43 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sun, 08 Jul 2018 21:09:22 -0700, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
On Mon, 9 Jul 2018 12:04:44 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by John Varela
I've never heard it, and I've never owned a Buick, but if I
wanted to name a large car that's incompetent on slippery roads
I'd say "Volvo", a front-wheel-drive version of which I have
owned.
"Volvo driver" used to be a term of derision here. It meant the
sort of person who had poor driving skills and little
consideration for other road users.
Here it meant stodgy, conservative, practical, and maybe
unimaginative.
Over here, the perception of a Volvo owner has changed over the
years. I bought a Volvo 245 (a "station wagon" or "estate") during
the 1979 gas crisis in the US. The Volvo was more fuel-efficient
than any American car at the time. It was also considered to be the
safest car on the road at the time, and I was doing a lot road
traveling.
Volvo drivers were considered to be of the practical sort not
concerned with luxury, style, or comfort. I don't think Volvo
drivers were thought of any differently than drivers of any other
make as far as driving skills or road manners.
As it happens, I was buying a car in the US in 1979. I test-drove a
Volvo, but considered it far too big for my needs. (In addition, I was
warned that that particular car was too close to the mileage that would
suggest an engine replacement.) I had no interest in buying what we
Australians called a "Yank tank" (an excessively big car), so in the end
I bought a Japanese station wagon, a lot smaller than the Volvo.
Interesting - because it's completely different - perspective. When I
bought that Volvo (new from a dealer), I was down-sizing from an
Oldsmobile station wagon. I went to a "small wagon" and did lose a
lot of cargo space.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Katy Jennison
2018-07-10 13:36:23 UTC
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Post by Richard Yates
On Mon, 9 Jul 2018 12:04:44 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
"Volvo driver" used to be a term of derision here. It meant the sort of
person who had poor driving skills and little consideration for other
road users.
Here it meant stodgy, conservative, practical, and maybe
unimaginative.
Not in the late 60s/early 70s when I drove a succession of Volvo
estates, usually more full of children than one can get away with under
the current rules about seat-belts and so forth.

I did the ton in one of those, too.

When I say 'late 60s/early 70s' I'm talking the decades of the last
century, not the age of the driver.
--
Katy Jennison
Steve Hayes
2018-07-10 11:01:49 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
I've never heard it, and I've never owned a Buick, but if I wanted to
name a large car that's incompetent on slippery roads I'd say "Volvo",
a front-wheel-drive version of which I have owned.
"Volvo driver" used to be a term of derision here. It meant the sort of
person who had poor driving skills and little consideration for other
road users.
Gone are the days when the Volvo was the fastest saloon car on the road.
They seem bigger than they used to be.
--
Steve Hayes http://khanya.wordpress.com
HVS
2018-07-10 12:46:15 UTC
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On Tue, 10 Jul 2018 11:01:49 -0000 (UTC), Steve Hayes
<***@telkomsa.net> wrote:

-snip -
Post by Steve Hayes
Gone are the days when the Volvo was the fastest saloon car on the road.
They seem bigger than they used to be.
Is there *any* car that's not bigger than its predecessor models?

(The BMW "Mini" isn't mini, etc.)
Lewis
2018-07-08 23:54:55 UTC
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Post by Joy Beeson
I've long pooh-poohed the idea of studded tires for bicycles because
"I don't go out until the Buicks stop coming down the road sideways.".
(The proponents of studded tires don't ride them on shared
facilities.)
Then one day as I was passing through a waiting room where I'd just
dropped off some old magazines, one of the patients commented on my
attire, asking whether I'd come on a Harley. Nope, a Fuji, and after a
while I commented that the weather would be fit for bike riding only a
few more days and he said, "And then you'll have to drive your Buick."
It's a Versa, actually, but now I'm wondering: is "Buick" a fairly
common figure of speech for "large road vehicle", or is it, as I'd
thought, my idiosyncracy
Buick often stands in for "large car" especially for anyone over... oh,
50?
--
The Auditors avoided death by never going so far as to get a life --The
Thief of Time
CDB
2018-07-09 10:14:46 UTC
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Post by Lewis
Post by Joy Beeson
I've long pooh-poohed the idea of studded tires for bicycles
because "I don't go out until the Buicks stop coming down the road
sideways.".
(The proponents of studded tires don't ride them on shared
facilities.)
Then one day as I was passing through a waiting room where I'd
just dropped off some old magazines, one of the patients commented
on my attire, asking whether I'd come on a Harley. Nope, a Fuji,
and after a while I commented that the weather would be fit for
bike riding only a few more days and he said, "And then you'll have
to drive your Buick."
It's a Versa, actually, but now I'm wondering: is "Buick" a
fairly common figure of speech for "large road vehicle", or is it,
as I'd thought, my idiosyncracy
Buick often stands in for "large car" especially for anyone over...
oh, 50?
"Thick as a buick".
Pavel Svinchnik
2018-07-09 12:21:27 UTC
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Post by CDB
Post by Lewis
Post by Joy Beeson
I've long pooh-poohed the idea of studded tires for bicycles
because "I don't go out until the Buicks stop coming down the road
sideways.".
(The proponents of studded tires don't ride them on shared
facilities.)
Then one day as I was passing through a waiting room where I'd
just dropped off some old magazines, one of the patients commented
on my attire, asking whether I'd come on a Harley. Nope, a Fuji,
and after a while I commented that the weather would be fit for
bike riding only a few more days and he said, "And then you'll have
to drive your Buick."
It's a Versa, actually, but now I'm wondering: is "Buick" a
fairly common figure of speech for "large road vehicle", or is it,
as I'd thought, my idiosyncracy
Buick often stands in for "large car" especially for anyone over...
oh, 50?
"Thick as a buick".
That brings to mind the scene where Annie Hall asks Woody Allen to kill a spider in her bathtub. He comes running out of the bathroom exclaiming, "That spider is as big as a Buick!"

Paul
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-07-09 14:12:12 UTC
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[ ... ]
That brings to mind the scene where Annie Hall asks Woody Allen to kill
a spider in her bathtub. He comes running out of the bathroom
exclaiming, "That spider is as big as a Buick!"
We watched Vicky Cristina Barcelona last night. Not one of Woody
Allen's best films, indeed possibly his worst. Looking at IMDb (after
writing the previous sentence) I see that some peope liked it, but the
modal opinion seems to be "so-so". One IMDb reviewer described it as
"Boring, self-indulgent people walking around a beautiful city, not
really knowing what they wanted out of life, or really interested in
anyone or anything else, except for what it meant for themselves"; that
sums it up well for me. the only character I felt even mildly attracted
to was Vicky. Well, maybe Maria Elena as well, but she was crazy.
--
athel
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-07-09 14:31:35 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
[ ... ]
That brings to mind the scene where Annie Hall asks Woody Allen to kill
a spider in her bathtub. He comes running out of the bathroom
exclaiming, "That spider is as big as a Buick!"
We watched Vicky Cristina Barcelona last night. Not one of Woody
Allen's best films, indeed possibly his worst. Looking at IMDb (after
writing the previous sentence) I see that some peope liked it, but the
modal opinion seems to be "so-so". One IMDb reviewer described it as
"Boring, self-indulgent people walking around a beautiful city, not
really knowing what they wanted out of life, or really interested in
anyone or anything else, except for what it meant for themselves"; that
sums it up well for me. the only character I felt even mildly attracted
to was Vicky. Well, maybe Maria Elena as well, but she was crazy.
If your 'worst' film is getting a 7.1 IMDb rating, I reckon you're
not doing so bad!
Mark Brader
2018-07-09 19:37:11 UTC
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We watched Vicky Cristina Barcelona last night...
Looking at IMDb... the modal opinion seems to be "so-so".
I'll agree with that. It was okay to watch, but there wasn't much
"there" there.
One IMDb reviewer described it as
"Boring, self-indulgent people walking around a beautiful city, not
really knowing what they wanted out of life, or really interested in
anyone or anything else..."
One thing that surprised me was that one of the beautiful women was
specifically interested in Catalan culture and this comes up several
times in the movie, the Catalan language is never mentioned. Most of
the time everyone speaks English for the benefit of the Americans,
although from time to time the Americans try their limited Spanish.

(If there was any dialogue in Catalan I would not have known it; I'm
only talking about what languages they spoke about speaking.)
--
Mark Brader "Oh, I'm a programmer and I'm O.K....
Toronto I work all night and I sleep all day"
***@vex.net -- Trygve Lode (after Monty Python)

My text in this article is in the public domain.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-07-10 08:11:42 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
We watched Vicky Cristina Barcelona last night...
Looking at IMDb... the modal opinion seems to be "so-so".
I'll agree with that. It was okay to watch, but there wasn't much
"there" there.
One IMDb reviewer described it as
"Boring, self-indulgent people walking around a beautiful city, not
really knowing what they wanted out of life, or really interested in
anyone or anything else..."
One thing that surprised me was that one of the beautiful women was
specifically interested in Catalan culture and this comes up several
times in the movie, the Catalan language is never mentioned. Most of
the time everyone speaks English for the benefit of the Americans,
although from time to time the Americans try their limited Spanish.
(If there was any dialogue in Catalan I would not have known it;
My wife would, though. She said that there was no Catalan spoken and
very little evidence of how the Catalans see themselves. The people who
spoke Spanish did not have Catalan accents.
Post by Mark Brader
I'm
only talking about what languages they spoke about speaking.)
--
athel
Quinn C
2018-07-10 17:27:14 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
We watched Vicky Cristina Barcelona last night. Not one of Woody
Allen's best films, indeed possibly his worst. Looking at IMDb (after
writing the previous sentence) I see that some peope liked it, but the
modal opinion seems to be "so-so".
I agree. Rather pointless. But there are so many films of his I haven't
seen - including all the ones that came after VCB - that I won't
venture a guess on the "worst" question.
--
The bee must not pass judgment on the hive. (Voxish proverb)
-- Robert C. Wilson, Vortex (novel), p.125
Richard Yates
2018-07-09 00:06:24 UTC
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On Sun, 8 Jul 2018 23:54:55 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Post by Lewis
Post by Joy Beeson
I've long pooh-poohed the idea of studded tires for bicycles because
"I don't go out until the Buicks stop coming down the road sideways.".
(The proponents of studded tires don't ride them on shared
facilities.)
Then one day as I was passing through a waiting room where I'd just
dropped off some old magazines, one of the patients commented on my
attire, asking whether I'd come on a Harley. Nope, a Fuji, and after a
while I commented that the weather would be fit for bike riding only a
few more days and he said, "And then you'll have to drive your Buick."
It's a Versa, actually, but now I'm wondering: is "Buick" a fairly
common figure of speech for "large road vehicle", or is it, as I'd
thought, my idiosyncracy
Buick often stands in for "large car" especially for anyone over... oh,
50?
Cadillac and Oldsmobile sometimes also serve this purpose.
Lewis
2018-07-10 16:32:06 UTC
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Post by Richard Yates
On Sun, 8 Jul 2018 23:54:55 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Post by Lewis
Post by Joy Beeson
I've long pooh-poohed the idea of studded tires for bicycles because
"I don't go out until the Buicks stop coming down the road sideways.".
(The proponents of studded tires don't ride them on shared
facilities.)
Then one day as I was passing through a waiting room where I'd just
dropped off some old magazines, one of the patients commented on my
attire, asking whether I'd come on a Harley. Nope, a Fuji, and after a
while I commented that the weather would be fit for bike riding only a
few more days and he said, "And then you'll have to drive your Buick."
It's a Versa, actually, but now I'm wondering: is "Buick" a fairly
common figure of speech for "large road vehicle", or is it, as I'd
thought, my idiosyncracy
Buick often stands in for "large car" especially for anyone over... oh,
50?
Cadillac and Oldsmobile sometimes also serve this purpose.
Yes, at different quality levels.

Cadillac highest, and I think Buick next, and most common, while
Oldsmobile was the lower (at least in general regard) stodgier choice.
--
There is a road, no simple highway, between the dawn and the dark of
night
John Varela
2018-07-11 00:34:34 UTC
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On Tue, 10 Jul 2018 16:32:06 UTC, Lewis
Post by Lewis
Post by Richard Yates
On Sun, 8 Jul 2018 23:54:55 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Post by Lewis
Post by Joy Beeson
I've long pooh-poohed the idea of studded tires for bicycles because
"I don't go out until the Buicks stop coming down the road sideways.".
(The proponents of studded tires don't ride them on shared
facilities.)
Then one day as I was passing through a waiting room where I'd just
dropped off some old magazines, one of the patients commented on my
attire, asking whether I'd come on a Harley. Nope, a Fuji, and after a
while I commented that the weather would be fit for bike riding only a
few more days and he said, "And then you'll have to drive your Buick."
It's a Versa, actually, but now I'm wondering: is "Buick" a fairly
common figure of speech for "large road vehicle", or is it, as I'd
thought, my idiosyncracy
Buick often stands in for "large car" especially for anyone over... oh,
50?
Cadillac and Oldsmobile sometimes also serve this purpose.
Yes, at different quality levels.
Cadillac highest, and I think Buick next, and most common, while
Oldsmobile was the lower (at least in general regard) stodgier choice.
Those perceptions change with the decades. In the 1950s the Olds
"Rocket 88" was a pretty hot car.
--
John Varela
Lewis
2018-07-11 10:21:23 UTC
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Post by John Varela
On Tue, 10 Jul 2018 16:32:06 UTC, Lewis
Post by Lewis
Post by Richard Yates
On Sun, 8 Jul 2018 23:54:55 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Post by Lewis
Post by Joy Beeson
I've long pooh-poohed the idea of studded tires for bicycles because
"I don't go out until the Buicks stop coming down the road sideways.".
(The proponents of studded tires don't ride them on shared
facilities.)
Then one day as I was passing through a waiting room where I'd just
dropped off some old magazines, one of the patients commented on my
attire, asking whether I'd come on a Harley. Nope, a Fuji, and after a
while I commented that the weather would be fit for bike riding only a
few more days and he said, "And then you'll have to drive your Buick."
It's a Versa, actually, but now I'm wondering: is "Buick" a fairly
common figure of speech for "large road vehicle", or is it, as I'd
thought, my idiosyncracy
Buick often stands in for "large car" especially for anyone over... oh,
50?
Cadillac and Oldsmobile sometimes also serve this purpose.
Yes, at different quality levels.
Cadillac highest, and I think Buick next, and most common, while
Oldsmobile was the lower (at least in general regard) stodgier choice.
Those perceptions change with the decades. In the 1950s the Olds
"Rocket 88" was a pretty hot car.
But we're talking about modern usage, not the actual cars.

Cadillac is still used to mean luxury and excellence even through the
Cadillac hasn't be luxurious or excellent in decades. Buick is still
used to mean a large lumbering boat of a car, and Oldsmobile is still
used to means something stodgy and boring and not very good.

I suspect that all of them are waning in use as these brands fade into
obscurity and fewer and fewer people care about cars.
--
'Is it heroic to die like this?' said Conina. 'I think it is,' he said,
'and when it comes to dying, there's only one opinion that matters.'
Quinn C
2018-07-11 18:10:56 UTC
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Post by Lewis
Post by John Varela
On Tue, 10 Jul 2018 16:32:06 UTC, Lewis
Post by Lewis
Post by Richard Yates
On Sun, 8 Jul 2018 23:54:55 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Post by Lewis
Post by Joy Beeson
I've long pooh-poohed the idea of studded tires for bicycles because
"I don't go out until the Buicks stop coming down the road sideways.".
(The proponents of studded tires don't ride them on shared
facilities.)
Then one day as I was passing through a waiting room where I'd just
dropped off some old magazines, one of the patients commented on my
attire, asking whether I'd come on a Harley. Nope, a Fuji, and after a
while I commented that the weather would be fit for bike riding only a
few more days and he said, "And then you'll have to drive your Buick."
It's a Versa, actually, but now I'm wondering: is "Buick" a fairly
common figure of speech for "large road vehicle", or is it, as I'd
thought, my idiosyncracy
Buick often stands in for "large car" especially for anyone over... oh,
50?
Cadillac and Oldsmobile sometimes also serve this purpose.
Yes, at different quality levels.
Cadillac highest, and I think Buick next, and most common, while
Oldsmobile was the lower (at least in general regard) stodgier choice.
Those perceptions change with the decades. In the 1950s the Olds
"Rocket 88" was a pretty hot car.
But we're talking about modern usage, not the actual cars.
Cadillac is still used to mean luxury and excellence even through the
Cadillac hasn't be luxurious or excellent in decades.
Last time I read what was offered in a doctor's waiting room, I learned
that the recent (a few years back) Cadillac had mostly caught up to the
leaders (Mercedes, BMW, Lexus), even taking the lead in this and that
feature.
--
Some things are taken away from you, some you leave behind-and
some you carry with you, world without end.
-- Robert C. Wilson, Vortex (novel), p.31
Tony Cooper
2018-07-11 20:42:52 UTC
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On Wed, 11 Jul 2018 14:10:56 -0400, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Lewis
Post by John Varela
On Tue, 10 Jul 2018 16:32:06 UTC, Lewis
Post by Lewis
Post by Richard Yates
On Sun, 8 Jul 2018 23:54:55 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Post by Lewis
Post by Joy Beeson
I've long pooh-poohed the idea of studded tires for bicycles because
"I don't go out until the Buicks stop coming down the road sideways.".
(The proponents of studded tires don't ride them on shared
facilities.)
Then one day as I was passing through a waiting room where I'd just
dropped off some old magazines, one of the patients commented on my
attire, asking whether I'd come on a Harley. Nope, a Fuji, and after a
while I commented that the weather would be fit for bike riding only a
few more days and he said, "And then you'll have to drive your Buick."
It's a Versa, actually, but now I'm wondering: is "Buick" a fairly
common figure of speech for "large road vehicle", or is it, as I'd
thought, my idiosyncracy
Buick often stands in for "large car" especially for anyone over... oh,
50?
Cadillac and Oldsmobile sometimes also serve this purpose.
Yes, at different quality levels.
Cadillac highest, and I think Buick next, and most common, while
Oldsmobile was the lower (at least in general regard) stodgier choice.
Those perceptions change with the decades. In the 1950s the Olds
"Rocket 88" was a pretty hot car.
But we're talking about modern usage, not the actual cars.
Cadillac is still used to mean luxury and excellence even through the
Cadillac hasn't be luxurious or excellent in decades.
Last time I read what was offered in a doctor's waiting room, I learned
that the recent (a few years back) Cadillac had mostly caught up to the
leaders (Mercedes, BMW, Lexus), even taking the lead in this and that
feature.
I know a doctor who drives a Cadillac because it's "American Made". At
a party I attended he was criticizing another doctor for driving a BMW
and not buying American-made products.

Shortly after that, BMW announced that they would produce fewer
automobiles in their South Carolina facility and move the production
of certain models to China because Trump's tariff policy resulted in
higher tariffs by China.

https://www.motorauthority.com/news/1117647_bmw-adding-suv-production-in-china-increasing-prices-on-us-built-suvs-in-response-to-trumps-tariffs

This article says that production levels at the SC facility will not
be affected, but the article I read (now gone)says they will.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-11 20:58:02 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
I know a doctor who drives a Cadillac because it's "American Made". At
a party I attended he was criticizing another doctor for driving a BMW
and not buying American-made products.
Shortly after that, BMW announced that they would produce fewer
automobiles in their South Carolina facility and move the production
of certain models to China because Trump's tariff policy resulted in
higher tariffs by China.
https://www.motorauthority.com/news/1117647_bmw-adding-suv-production-in-china-increasing-prices-on-us-built-suvs-in-response-to-trumps-tariffs
This article says that production levels at the SC facility will not
be affected, but the article I read (now gone)says they will.
Today, both Houses of Congress passed, with overwhelming majorities,
resolutions demanding that Trump stop messing with tariffs (especially
since the dodgy "national security" provision is the only legitimacy
the tantrums have). Unfortunately, they are non-binding.
Peter Moylan
2018-07-12 02:31:51 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Tony Cooper
I know a doctor who drives a Cadillac because it's "American Made". At
a party I attended he was criticizing another doctor for driving a BMW
and not buying American-made products.
Shortly after that, BMW announced that they would produce fewer
automobiles in their South Carolina facility and move the production
of certain models to China because Trump's tariff policy resulted in
higher tariffs by China.
https://www.motorauthority.com/news/1117647_bmw-adding-suv-production-in-china-increasing-prices-on-us-built-suvs-in-response-to-trumps-tariffs
This article says that production levels at the SC facility will not
be affected, but the article I read (now gone)says they will.
Today, both Houses of Congress passed, with overwhelming majorities,
resolutions demanding that Trump stop messing with tariffs (especially
since the dodgy "national security" provision is the only legitimacy
the tantrums have). Unfortunately, they are non-binding.
Once the national economy is wrecked, the people he will have put out of
work will include a lot of his own supporters. I wonder whether they'll
ever realise that they did it to themselves.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-12 03:15:03 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Tony Cooper
I know a doctor who drives a Cadillac because it's "American Made". At
a party I attended he was criticizing another doctor for driving a BMW
and not buying American-made products.
Shortly after that, BMW announced that they would produce fewer
automobiles in their South Carolina facility and move the production
of certain models to China because Trump's tariff policy resulted in
higher tariffs by China.
https://www.motorauthority.com/news/1117647_bmw-adding-suv-production-in-china-increasing-prices-on-us-built-suvs-in-response-to-trumps-tariffs
This article says that production levels at the SC facility will not
be affected, but the article I read (now gone)says they will.
Today, both Houses of Congress passed, with overwhelming majorities,
resolutions demanding that Trump stop messing with tariffs (especially
since the dodgy "national security" provision is the only legitimacy
the tantrums have). Unfortunately, they are non-binding.
Once the national economy is wrecked, the people he will have put out of
work will include a lot of his own supporters. I wonder whether they'll
ever realise that they did it to themselves.
But will it happen in time for this November's election? When the entire
House and 1/3 of the Senate is elected. The Dems need 20-something seats
to take control of the House (435 total), and only 2 for the Senate (100
total), but far more of the seats up this time round are Dem than Rep,
and there are several Dem senators in states that went for Trump.
CDB
2018-07-12 10:59:45 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Tony Cooper
I know a doctor who drives a Cadillac because it's "American
Made". At a party I attended he was criticizing another doctor
for driving a BMW and not buying American-made products.
Shortly after that, BMW announced that they would produce fewer
automobiles in their South Carolina facility and move the
production of certain models to China because Trump's tariff
policy resulted in higher tariffs by China.
https://www.motorauthority.com/news/1117647_bmw-adding-suv-production-in-china-increasing-prices-on-us-built-suvs-in-response-to-trumps-tariffs
This article says that production levels at the SC facility will
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Tony Cooper
not be affected, but the article I read (now gone)says they
will.
Today, both Houses of Congress passed, with overwhelming
majorities, resolutions demanding that Trump stop messing with
tariffs (especially since the dodgy "national security" provision
is the only legitimacy the tantrums have). Unfortunately, they are
non-binding.
Once the national economy is wrecked, the people he will have put
out of work will include a lot of his own supporters. I wonder
whether they'll ever realise that they did it to themselves.
Enemies will be named, and a long, confused, and damaging struggle will
ensue. What his opponents really need is a copy of the video Putin is
holding over him, now. Since Russia's objective is destabilisation, I
won't be surprised to see it released later, when it can be most disruptive.
Rich Ulrich
2018-07-12 18:30:07 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Tony Cooper
I know a doctor who drives a Cadillac because it's "American
Made". At a party I attended he was criticizing another doctor
for driving a BMW and not buying American-made products.
Shortly after that, BMW announced that they would produce fewer
automobiles in their South Carolina facility and move the
production of certain models to China because Trump's tariff
policy resulted in higher tariffs by China.
https://www.motorauthority.com/news/1117647_bmw-adding-suv-production-in-china-increasing-prices-on-us-built-suvs-in-response-to-trumps-tariffs
This article says that production levels at the SC facility will
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Tony Cooper
not be affected, but the article I read (now gone)says they
will.
Today, both Houses of Congress passed, with overwhelming
majorities, resolutions demanding that Trump stop messing with
tariffs (especially since the dodgy "national security" provision
is the only legitimacy the tantrums have). Unfortunately, they are
non-binding.
A hostile Congress will look at Trump declaring Canada a threat
to national security and include it in the list under "Abuse of
authority." Another list will be "failure to carry out the law."
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Peter Moylan
Once the national economy is wrecked, the people he will have put
out of work will include a lot of his own supporters. I wonder
whether they'll ever realise that they did it to themselves.
Enemies will be named, and a long, confused, and damaging struggle will
ensue. What his opponents really need is a copy of the video Putin is
holding over him, now. Since Russia's objective is destabilisation, I
won't be surprised to see it released later, when it can be most disruptive.
Trump's superpower is his shamelessness. How soon may it
happen? Every day, he further deadens our ability to be shocked.
--
Rich Ulrich
Tony Cooper
2018-07-12 19:59:05 UTC
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On Thu, 12 Jul 2018 14:30:07 -0400, Rich Ulrich
Post by Rich Ulrich
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Tony Cooper
I know a doctor who drives a Cadillac because it's "American
Made". At a party I attended he was criticizing another doctor
for driving a BMW and not buying American-made products.
Shortly after that, BMW announced that they would produce fewer
automobiles in their South Carolina facility and move the
production of certain models to China because Trump's tariff
policy resulted in higher tariffs by China.
https://www.motorauthority.com/news/1117647_bmw-adding-suv-production-in-china-increasing-prices-on-us-built-suvs-in-response-to-trumps-tariffs
This article says that production levels at the SC facility will
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Tony Cooper
not be affected, but the article I read (now gone)says they
will.
Today, both Houses of Congress passed, with overwhelming
majorities, resolutions demanding that Trump stop messing with
tariffs (especially since the dodgy "national security" provision
is the only legitimacy the tantrums have). Unfortunately, they are
non-binding.
A hostile Congress will look at Trump declaring Canada a threat
to national security and include it in the list under "Abuse of
authority." Another list will be "failure to carry out the law."
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Peter Moylan
Once the national economy is wrecked, the people he will have put
out of work will include a lot of his own supporters. I wonder
whether they'll ever realise that they did it to themselves.
Enemies will be named, and a long, confused, and damaging struggle will
ensue. What his opponents really need is a copy of the video Putin is
holding over him, now. Since Russia's objective is destabilisation, I
won't be surprised to see it released later, when it can be most disruptive.
Trump's superpower is his shamelessness. How soon may it
happen? Every day, he further deadens our ability to be shocked.
I forget who it was, but someone on TV was discussing this. Trump's
strategy is to come out with so many lies and misrepresentations of
facts, one after another, that each becomes buried in the onslaught.
Those that recognize the lies and misrepresentations can't keep up so
many are glossed over and forgotten.

We are no longer shocked by a lie or a misrepresentation because the
next one gets our attention, and the next one is then passed over
because there's another next one.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
b***@gmail.com
2018-07-09 13:45:18 UTC
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Post by Joy Beeson
I've long pooh-poohed the idea of studded tires for bicycles because
"I don't go out until the Buicks stop coming down the road sideways.".
(The proponents of studded tires don't ride them on shared
facilities.)
Then one day as I was passing through a waiting room where I'd just
dropped off some old magazines, one of the patients commented on my
attire, asking whether I'd come on a Harley. Nope, a Fuji, and after a
while I commented that the weather would be fit for bike riding only a
few more days and he said, "And then you'll have to drive your Buick."
It's a Versa, actually, but now I'm wondering: is "Buick" a fairly
common figure of speech for "large road vehicle", or is it, as I'd
thought, my idiosyncracy
---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com
Long established truism in comedy that things that start with a B are funny — hence Buick is funny, prolly cuz lots of things that start with a B are funny (or strike people as such) don't ask me why, just is —— just like Bob, Behemoth, and yeah Bohso.
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-07-09 14:17:58 UTC
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Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Joy Beeson
I've long pooh-poohed the idea of studded tires for bicycles because
"I don't go out until the Buicks stop coming down the road sideways.".
(The proponents of studded tires don't ride them on shared
facilities.)
Then one day as I was passing through a waiting room where I'd just
dropped off some old magazines, one of the patients commented on my
attire, asking whether I'd come on a Harley. Nope, a Fuji, and after a
while I commented that the weather would be fit for bike riding only a
few more days and he said, "And then you'll have to drive your Buick."
It's a Versa, actually, but now I'm wondering: is "Buick" a fairly
common figure of speech for "large road vehicle", or is it, as I'd
thought, my idiosyncracy
---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com
Long established truism in comedy that things that start with a B are funny — hence Buick is funny, prolly cuz lots of things that start with a B are funny (or strike people as such) don't ask me why, just is —— just like Bob, Behemoth, and yeah Bohso.
Botulism, bacteria, book burning, beatings ... no, just not seeing it!
Joseph C. Fineman
2018-07-09 21:38:18 UTC
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Post by Joy Beeson
It's a Versa, actually, but now I'm wondering: is "Buick" a fairly
common figure of speech for "large road vehicle", or is it, as I'd
thought, my idiosyncracy
People used to say, I think in allusion to a Twenty-Questions-like radio
program, "Is it bigger than a breadbox? Is it smaller than a Buick?"
--
--- Joe Fineman ***@verizon.net

||: Malt does more than Milton can :||
||: To justify God's ways to man. :||
Quinn C
2018-07-11 17:34:46 UTC
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Post by Joseph C. Fineman
Post by Joy Beeson
It's a Versa, actually, but now I'm wondering: is "Buick" a fairly
common figure of speech for "large road vehicle", or is it, as I'd
thought, my idiosyncracy
People used to say, I think in allusion to a Twenty-Questions-like radio
program, "Is it bigger than a breadbox? Is it smaller than a Buick?"
IIRC, in one of my children's books, a dragon was described as being
bigger than a duck, but smaller than a bus. I got the impression it was
actually bigger than a Buick.
--
In the old days, the complaints about the passing of the
golden age were much more sophisticated.
-- James Hogg in alt.usage.english
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