Discussion:
"Cue sad trombone"
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Lothar Frings
2018-01-03 08:54:08 UTC
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Is "Cue sad trombone" idiomatic
for "How sad!" or "What bad luck!"?
Harrison Hill
2018-01-03 09:08:38 UTC
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Post by Lothar Frings
Is "Cue sad trombone" idiomatic
for "How sad!" or "What bad luck!"?
I've never heard it said before, but it seems like good idiom to me.
I'd normally expect "Cue violins" or "Cue sad harpsichords".
Lothar Frings
2018-01-03 09:23:58 UTC
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Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Lothar Frings
Is "Cue sad trombone" idiomatic
for "How sad!" or "What bad luck!"?
I've never heard it said before, but it seems like good idiom to me.
I'd normally expect "Cue violins" or "Cue sad harpsichords".
It's from today's

http://retailcomic.com/comics/january-3-2018/

Donnie: Hey, Cooper. This box for Computer Cabin
was mixed in with our shipment.

Cooper: Computer Cabin? They went out of business
years ago.

Donnie: Weird. How is that even possible?

Cooper: I don't know, but it looks like we got
ourselves a free box of...
(opens the box)

Donnie: Mouse pads.

Cooper: Cue sad trombone.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-01-03 10:16:46 UTC
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Post by Lothar Frings
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Lothar Frings
Is "Cue sad trombone" idiomatic
for "How sad!" or "What bad luck!"?
I've never heard it said before, but it seems like good idiom to me.
I'd normally expect "Cue violins" or "Cue sad harpsichords".
It's from today's
http://retailcomic.com/comics/january-3-2018/
Donnie: Hey, Cooper. This box for Computer Cabin
was mixed in with our shipment.
Cooper: Computer Cabin? They went out of business
years ago.
Donnie: Weird. How is that even possible?
Cooper: I don't know, but it looks like we got
ourselves a free box of...
(opens the box)
Donnie: Mouse pads.
Cooper: Cue sad trombone.
It can turn out better than that. About three years ago a substantial
number of women's garments of good quality were delivered to our
institute. The young woman who deals with that sort of thing got in
touch with the company that sent them, telling them that it was a
mistake and that they should arrange for them to be recovered. French
law doesn't require people who receive unwanted goods to keep them
safely stored for all eternity, but only to inform the sender and store
them for one year. After that they become the property of the receiving
person to do as she pleases. Nothing was done, so after a year several
women around the building (including my wife) got some very nice
articles of clothing. In my wife's case the shop price was probably of
the order of 300€.
--
athel
Sam Plusnet
2018-01-05 00:41:17 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Lothar Frings
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Lothar Frings
Is "Cue sad trombone" idiomatic
for "How sad!" or "What bad luck!"?
I've never heard it said before, but it seems like good idiom to me.
I'd normally expect "Cue violins" or "Cue sad harpsichords".
It's from today's
http://retailcomic.com/comics/january-3-2018/
Donnie: Hey, Cooper. This box for Computer Cabin
        was mixed in with our shipment.
Cooper: Computer Cabin? They went out of business
        years ago.
Donnie: Weird. How is that even possible?
Cooper: I don't know, but it looks like we got
        ourselves a free box of...
        (opens the box)
Donnie: Mouse pads.
Cooper: Cue sad trombone.
It can turn out better than that. About three years ago a substantial
number of women's garments of good quality were delivered to our
institute. The young woman who deals with that sort of thing got in
touch with the company that sent them, telling them that it was a
mistake and that they should arrange for them to be recovered. French
law doesn't require people who receive unwanted goods to keep them
safely stored for all eternity, but only to inform the sender and store
them for one year. After that they become the property of the receiving
person to do as she pleases. Nothing was done, so after a year several
women around the building (including my wife) got some very nice
articles of clothing. In my wife's case the shop price was probably of
the order of 300€.
Shirley, after a year they would be horribly out of fashion & thus
unwearable?
--
Sam Plusnet
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-01-05 07:25:15 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Lothar Frings
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Lothar Frings
Is "Cue sad trombone" idiomatic
for "How sad!" or "What bad luck!"?
I've never heard it said before, but it seems like good idiom to me.
I'd normally expect "Cue violins" or "Cue sad harpsichords".
It's from today's
http://retailcomic.com/comics/january-3-2018/
Donnie: Hey, Cooper. This box for Computer Cabin
        was mixed in with our shipment.
Cooper: Computer Cabin? They went out of business
        years ago.
Donnie: Weird. How is that even possible?
Cooper: I don't know, but it looks like we got
        ourselves a free box of...
        (opens the box)
Donnie: Mouse pads.
Cooper: Cue sad trombone.
It can turn out better than that. About three years ago a substantial
number of women's garments of good quality were delivered to our
institute. The young woman who deals with that sort of thing got in
touch with the company that sent them, telling them that it was a
mistake and that they should arrange for them to be recovered. French
law doesn't require people who receive unwanted goods to keep them
safely stored for all eternity, but only to inform the sender and store
them for one year. After that they become the property of the receiving
person to do as she pleases. Nothing was done, so after a year several
women around the building (including my wife) got some very nice
articles of clothing. In my wife's case the shop price was probably of
the order of 300€.
Shirley, after a year they would be horribly out of fashion & thus unwearable?
If my wife were a teenager she might take that view!
--
athel
Snidely
2018-01-03 10:36:52 UTC
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Post by Lothar Frings
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Lothar Frings
Is "Cue sad trombone" idiomatic
for "How sad!" or "What bad luck!"?
I've never heard it said before, but it seems like good idiom to me.
I'd normally expect "Cue violins" or "Cue sad harpsichords".
It's from today's
http://retailcomic.com/comics/january-3-2018/
Donnie: Hey, Cooper. This box for Computer Cabin
was mixed in with our shipment.
Cooper: Computer Cabin? They went out of business
years ago.
Donnie: Weird. How is that even possible?
Cooper: I don't know, but it looks like we got
ourselves a free box of...
(opens the box)
Donnie: Mouse pads.
Cooper: Cue sad trombone.
I think in this case it would be a touch of each ... how sad, and what
bad luck. Good luck would be a box of laptops, or something, but then
maybe "laptops from years ago" would be even worse luck.

/dps
--
Rule #0: Don't be on fire.
In case of fire, exit the building before tweeting about it.
(Sighting reported by Adam F)
Horace LaBadie
2018-01-03 13:37:29 UTC
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Post by Lothar Frings
Is "Cue sad trombone" idiomatic
for "How sad!" or "What bad luck!"?
It's a reference to the "wah-wah" crying sound effect created by a
trombone in motion pictures and animations.

Usually the phrase is uttered sarcastically.
Mark Brader
2018-01-04 08:58:13 UTC
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Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Lothar Frings
Is "Cue sad trombone" idiomatic
for "How sad!" or "What bad luck!"?
It's a reference to the "wah-wah" crying sound effect created by a
trombone in motion pictures and animations.
And specifically, "cue" means "now it's the time for" that effect.
Post by Horace LaBadie
Usually the phrase is uttered sarcastically.
"Usually?" I don't know that I've ever heard it. But I'd take it
as sarcastic if someone said it in response to another person's
complaint.
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "*I* never have problems distinguishing
***@vex.net | Peter Seebach and Steve Summit!" -- Steve Summit

My text in this article is in the public domain.
Horace LaBadie
2018-01-04 13:00:53 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Lothar Frings
Is "Cue sad trombone" idiomatic
for "How sad!" or "What bad luck!"?
It's a reference to the "wah-wah" crying sound effect created by a
trombone in motion pictures and animations.
And specifically, "cue" means "now it's the time for" that effect.
Post by Horace LaBadie
Usually the phrase is uttered sarcastically.
"Usually?" I don't know that I've ever heard it. But I'd take it
as sarcastic if someone said it in response to another person's
complaint.
World's smallest violin.
Horace LaBadie
2018-01-04 16:40:51 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Lothar Frings
Is "Cue sad trombone" idiomatic
for "How sad!" or "What bad luck!"?
It's a reference to the "wah-wah" crying sound effect created by a
trombone in motion pictures and animations.
And specifically, "cue" means "now it's the time for" that effect.
Post by Horace LaBadie
Usually the phrase is uttered sarcastically.
"Usually?" I don't know that I've ever heard it. But I'd take it
as sarcastic if someone said it in response to another person's
complaint.
Usually, as in Barney & Clyde, October 3, 2014.

<http://www.gocomics.com/barneyandclyde/2014/10/3>
Mark Brader
2018-01-04 17:07:35 UTC
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Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Mark Brader
"Usually?" I don't know that I've ever heard it. But I'd take it
as sarcastic if someone said it in response to another person's
complaint.
Usually, as in Barney & Clyde, October 3, 2014.
The Toronto Star doesn't carry that one.
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "The problem is that tax lawyers are
***@vex.net | amazingly creative." -- David Sherman
Horace LaBadie
2018-01-04 19:25:43 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Mark Brader
"Usually?" I don't know that I've ever heard it. But I'd take it
as sarcastic if someone said it in response to another person's
complaint.
Usually, as in Barney & Clyde, October 3, 2014.
The Toronto Star doesn't carry that one.
Write a letter to the editor !
Lewis
2018-01-03 19:45:46 UTC
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Post by Lothar Frings
Is "Cue sad trombone" idiomatic
It is a relatively new, but common, phrase. I think of it as
Internet-sourced, but have no evidence of that.
Post by Lothar Frings
for "How sad!" or "What bad luck!"?
Sad, sure. Bad luck, maybe. Mostly it is used to indicate the sort of
ennui that comes with failure. Imagine a sitcom soundtrack playing a
sad trombone sound.



No need to understand the language, it's obvious what's happened.
--
Mister Teatime had a truly brilliant mind, but it was brilliant like a
fractured mirror, all marvelous facets and rainbows but, ultimately,
also something that was broken. --Hogfather
Tak To
2018-01-07 00:55:43 UTC
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Post by Lothar Frings
Is "Cue sad trombone" idiomatic
for "How sad!" or "What bad luck!"?
It is probably referring to this sound or something
similar.

--
Tak
----------------------------------------------------------------+-----
Tak To ***@alum.mit.eduxx
--------------------------------------------------------------------^^
[taode takto ~{LU5B~}] NB: trim the xx to get my real email addr
David Kleinecke
2018-01-10 22:28:02 UTC
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Post by Tak To
Post by Lothar Frings
Is "Cue sad trombone" idiomatic
for "How sad!" or "What bad luck!"?
It is probably referring to this sound or something
similar.
http://youtu.be/dqPxDYdbgoc
From today's Wonkette:

Instead of focusing on that, though, let’s look at a new
Quinnipiac poll that shows that, as Trump wraps up his
first full year in office, Americans hate him more than
ever and think he’s stupider than ever. Folks are happy
about the economy, though! But, SAD TROMBONE, they give
Barack Obama all the credit for it, perhaps because Trump
hasn’t done shit for the economy besides make a bunch of
empty promises and sign a piece of shit corporate tax
giveaway that will probably fuck America for decades. Oh,
and also his jobs numbers are weak and sad compared to
those of Barry Bamz, Sexual President of our Hearts and
also our Pants.

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