Discussion:
xanthic
(too old to reply)
Harrison Hill
2017-04-11 22:13:33 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
I'm all for making up new words, but "xanthic"
meaning "yellowish", is a liverish new addition
to my vocabulary - or am being jaundiced?
j***@mdfs.net
2017-04-11 22:26:52 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Harrison Hill
I'm all for making up new words, but "xanthic"
meaning "yellowish", is a liverish new addition
to my vocabulary - or am being jaundiced?
Hardly a new word, it's been around for centuries. In school
one of the paints I used was "Xanthic Yellow", and I remember
a comedy on the steam wireless with a character called Xanthippe
and it was clear to my teen-age ears what it meant (plus, who it
was, which was not as obvious).
Whiskers
2017-04-11 22:53:30 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by j***@mdfs.net
Post by Harrison Hill
I'm all for making up new words, but "xanthic"
meaning "yellowish", is a liverish new addition
to my vocabulary - or am being jaundiced?
Hardly a new word, it's been around for centuries. In school
one of the paints I used was "Xanthic Yellow", and I remember
a comedy on the steam wireless with a character called Xanthippe
and it was clear to my teen-age ears what it meant (plus, who it
was, which was not as obvious).
Wife of Socrates; name means 'yellow horse'.

I think I can remember the wireless comedy you refer to. Ah yes, here
it is <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acropolis_Now_(radio)>.
--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
Janet
2017-04-12 15:13:19 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by j***@mdfs.net
Post by Harrison Hill
I'm all for making up new words, but "xanthic"
meaning "yellowish", is a liverish new addition
to my vocabulary - or am being jaundiced?
Hardly a new word, it's been around for centuries. In school
one of the paints I used was "Xanthic Yellow", and I remember
a comedy on the steam wireless with a character called Xanthippe
and it was clear to my teen-age ears what it meant (plus, who it
was, which was not as obvious).
Girl's name Xanthe, means yellow/blonde.

Janet.
Snidely
2017-04-13 04:41:35 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Janet
Post by j***@mdfs.net
Post by Harrison Hill
I'm all for making up new words, but "xanthic"
meaning "yellowish", is a liverish new addition
to my vocabulary - or am being jaundiced?
Hardly a new word, it's been around for centuries. In school
one of the paints I used was "Xanthic Yellow", and I remember
a comedy on the steam wireless with a character called Xanthippe
and it was clear to my teen-age ears what it meant (plus, who it
was, which was not as obvious).
Girl's name Xanthe, means yellow/blonde.
Janet.
Alas, despite encountering many blondes, I've yet to meet a Xanthe.

/dps "would a tow-head go by Blanche?"
--
But happiness cannot be pursued; it must ensue. One must have a reason
to 'be happy.'"
Viktor Frankl
Peter Moylan
2017-04-13 07:09:07 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Snidely
Post by Janet
Girl's name Xanthe, means yellow/blonde.
Alas, despite encountering many blondes, I've yet to meet a Xanthe.
I've met one, and by coincidence it was only a month or so ago. She was
dark-haired, as I recall.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
s***@gmail.com
2017-04-13 19:07:15 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Snidely
Post by Janet
Girl's name Xanthe, means yellow/blonde.
Alas, despite encountering many blondes, I've yet to meet a Xanthe.
I've met one, and by coincidence it was only a month or so ago. She was
dark-haired, as I recall.
Best I can do is having met Melanies that were blonde.
The current First Lady, however, seems to be staying brunette.

/dps
Bob Martin
2017-04-14 06:09:09 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Snidely
Post by Janet
Girl's name Xanthe, means yellow/blonde.
Alas, despite encountering many blondes, I've yet to meet a Xanthe.
I've met one, and by coincidence it was only a month or so ago. She was
dark-haired, as I recall.
Wasn't one featured in the BBC's "Coast Australia"?
Peter Moylan
2017-04-15 14:07:57 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Bob Martin
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Snidely
Post by Janet
Girl's name Xanthe, means yellow/blonde.
Alas, despite encountering many blondes, I've yet to meet a Xanthe.
I've met one, and by coincidence it was only a month or so ago. She was
dark-haired, as I recall.
Wasn't one featured in the BBC's "Coast Australia"?
I never saw that. My Xanthe was a high school pupil. I was greatly
tempted to ask whether her mother was a fan of Piers Anthony, but I
resisted the temptation.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Sam Plusnet
2017-04-15 00:40:55 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Snidely
/dps "would a tow-head go by Blanche?"
I've heard of petrol-heads (US Motorheads?), but that's a new one on me.

Horseboxes or caravans?
--
Sam Plusnet
Tony Cooper
2017-04-15 03:49:14 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Snidely
/dps "would a tow-head go by Blanche?"
I've heard of petrol-heads (US Motorheads?), but that's a new one on me.
Horseboxes or caravans?
A "towhead" (not hyphenated) is a blond or blonde. Not an uncommon
description of blonde haired people in the US.

I'd never looked into the origin before, but a websource says it comes
from the color of flax, and "flaxen-haired" is also a term for
blondes.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Snidely
2017-04-15 07:38:27 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Snidely
/dps "would a tow-head go by Blanche?"
I've heard of petrol-heads (US Motorheads?), but that's a new one on me.
Horseboxes or caravans?
A "towhead" (not hyphenated) is a blond or blonde. Not an uncommon
description of blonde haired people in the US.
I'd never looked into the origin before, but a websource says it comes
from the color of flax, and "flaxen-haired" is also a term for
blondes.
And of course, this being the US, the answer to Mr Plusnet would be
"flaxen-haired pullers of U-Haul(tm) trailers".

/dps
--
Who, me? And what lacuna?
Peter T. Daniels
2017-04-15 12:14:23 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Snidely
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Snidely
/dps "would a tow-head go by Blanche?"
I've heard of petrol-heads (US Motorheads?), but that's a new one on me.
Horseboxes or caravans?
A "towhead" (not hyphenated) is a blond or blonde. Not an uncommon
description of blonde haired people in the US.
I'd never looked into the origin before, but a websource says it comes
from the color of flax, and "flaxen-haired" is also a term for
blondes.
And of course, this being the US, the answer to Mr Plusnet would be
"flaxen-haired pullers of U-Haul(tm) trailers".
I think "trailer trash" is the idiom, and that doesn't refer to cargo-containing
towed vehicles -- i.e., U-Hauls --but to the trailers ("mobile homes" when the
owners are better off) one lives in. I don't know what "horse box" is (the options
seem to be either cargo holder pulled by a horse, or a horse trailer in which
horses are transported), but "caravan" or "charabanc" seems to be BrE for 'mobile home'.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-04-15 15:48:13 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:14:23 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Snidely
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Snidely
/dps "would a tow-head go by Blanche?"
I've heard of petrol-heads (US Motorheads?), but that's a new one on me.
Horseboxes or caravans?
A "towhead" (not hyphenated) is a blond or blonde. Not an uncommon
description of blonde haired people in the US.
I'd never looked into the origin before, but a websource says it comes
from the color of flax, and "flaxen-haired" is also a term for
blondes.
And of course, this being the US, the answer to Mr Plusnet would be
"flaxen-haired pullers of U-Haul(tm) trailers".
I think "trailer trash" is the idiom, and that doesn't refer to cargo-containing
towed vehicles -- i.e., U-Hauls --but to the trailers ("mobile homes" when the
owners are better off) one lives in. I don't know what "horse box" is (the options
seem to be either cargo holder pulled by a horse, or a horse trailer in which
horses are transported), but "caravan" or "charabanc" seems to be BrE for 'mobile home'.
Close.

"horse box": trailer for tranporting horses.
"caravan": a mobile home.
"charabanc": an early form of bus, used typically for pleasure trips.[1]
(Pronounced something like "shar-uh-bang" with the both "a"s short.)
Today we would use "coach"[2] in place of "charabanc".

[1]
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/charabanc

[2]
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/coach

coach1
noun

1 British A comfortably equipped single-decker bus used for longer
journeys.
as modifier ‘a coach trip’
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Peter T. Daniels
2017-04-15 16:17:23 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:14:23 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Snidely
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Snidely
/dps "would a tow-head go by Blanche?"
I've heard of petrol-heads (US Motorheads?), but that's a new one on me.
Horseboxes or caravans?
A "towhead" (not hyphenated) is a blond or blonde. Not an uncommon
description of blonde haired people in the US.
I'd never looked into the origin before, but a websource says it comes
from the color of flax, and "flaxen-haired" is also a term for
blondes.
And of course, this being the US, the answer to Mr Plusnet would be
"flaxen-haired pullers of U-Haul(tm) trailers".
I think "trailer trash" is the idiom, and that doesn't refer to cargo-containing
towed vehicles -- i.e., U-Hauls --but to the trailers ("mobile homes" when the
owners are better off) one lives in. I don't know what "horse box" is (the options
seem to be either cargo holder pulled by a horse, or a horse trailer in which
horses are transported), but "caravan" or "charabanc" seems to be BrE for 'mobile home'.
Close.
"horse box": trailer for tranporting horses.
"caravan": a mobile home.
We did this a long time ago, but if "caravan" means 'house trailer', what sort
of mental image do you get of the biblical "caravan of camels" (ModE "camel caravan")?
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
"charabanc": an early form of bus, used typically for pleasure trips.[1]
(Pronounced something like "shar-uh-bang" with the both "a"s short.)
Today we would use "coach"[2] in place of "charabanc".
[1]
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/charabanc
[2]
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/coach
coach1
noun
1 British A comfortably equipped single-decker bus used for longer
journeys.
as modifier ‘a coach trip’
Not "British." Possibly "chiefly Brit.," as M-W puts it, but various bus companies
are called "coach line" in their name, and the nicer long-distance buses may be called coaches.
Reinhold {Rey} Aman
2017-04-15 16:26:42 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
if "caravan" means 'house trailer', what sort of mental image do
you get of the biblical "caravan of camels" (ModE "camel caravan")?
Please ignore the Loony Linguist's stupid question. Thanks.

See the lonesome attention-whore:
Loading Image...

--
~~~ Reinhold {Rey} Aman ~~~
The Conscience of AUE
Janet
2017-04-15 16:45:57 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter T. Daniels
We did this a long time ago, but if "caravan" means 'house trailer', what sort
of mental image do you get of the biblical "caravan of camels" (ModE "camel caravan")?
<sigh>

A procession of American cigarettes crossing the desert.

A travelling home on wheels for a humpy ungulate

Janet
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-04-15 17:43:48 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sat, 15 Apr 2017 09:17:23 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:14:23 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Snidely
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Snidely
/dps "would a tow-head go by Blanche?"
I've heard of petrol-heads (US Motorheads?), but that's a new one on me.
Horseboxes or caravans?
A "towhead" (not hyphenated) is a blond or blonde. Not an uncommon
description of blonde haired people in the US.
I'd never looked into the origin before, but a websource says it comes
from the color of flax, and "flaxen-haired" is also a term for
blondes.
And of course, this being the US, the answer to Mr Plusnet would be
"flaxen-haired pullers of U-Haul(tm) trailers".
I think "trailer trash" is the idiom, and that doesn't refer to cargo-containing
towed vehicles -- i.e., U-Hauls --but to the trailers ("mobile homes" when the
owners are better off) one lives in. I don't know what "horse box" is (the options
seem to be either cargo holder pulled by a horse, or a horse trailer in which
horses are transported), but "caravan" or "charabanc" seems to be BrE for 'mobile home'.
Close.
"horse box": trailer for tranporting horses.
"caravan": a mobile home.
We did this a long time ago, but if "caravan" means 'house trailer', what sort
of mental image do you get of the biblical "caravan of camels" (ModE "camel caravan")?
For those unfamiliar with the original sense of "caravan", total
confusion.

It could be worse. A "caravan of caravans" could be a convoy of vehicles
or a convoy of convoys.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
"charabanc": an early form of bus, used typically for pleasure trips.[1]
(Pronounced something like "shar-uh-bang" with the both "a"s short.)
Today we would use "coach"[2] in place of "charabanc".
[1]
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/charabanc
[2]
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/coach
coach1
noun
1 British A comfortably equipped single-decker bus used for longer
journeys.
as modifier ‘a coach trip’
Not "British." Possibly "chiefly Brit.," as M-W puts it, but various bus companies
are called "coach line" in their name, and the nicer long-distance buses may be called coaches.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
David Kleinecke
2017-04-15 18:06:27 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sat, 15 Apr 2017 09:17:23 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:14:23 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Snidely
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Snidely
/dps "would a tow-head go by Blanche?"
I've heard of petrol-heads (US Motorheads?), but that's a new one on me.
Horseboxes or caravans?
A "towhead" (not hyphenated) is a blond or blonde. Not an uncommon
description of blonde haired people in the US.
I'd never looked into the origin before, but a websource says it comes
from the color of flax, and "flaxen-haired" is also a term for
blondes.
And of course, this being the US, the answer to Mr Plusnet would be
"flaxen-haired pullers of U-Haul(tm) trailers".
I think "trailer trash" is the idiom, and that doesn't refer to cargo-containing
towed vehicles -- i.e., U-Hauls --but to the trailers ("mobile homes" when the
owners are better off) one lives in. I don't know what "horse box" is (the options
seem to be either cargo holder pulled by a horse, or a horse trailer in which
horses are transported), but "caravan" or "charabanc" seems to be BrE for 'mobile home'.
Close.
"horse box": trailer for tranporting horses.
"caravan": a mobile home.
We did this a long time ago, but if "caravan" means 'house trailer', what sort
of mental image do you get of the biblical "caravan of camels" (ModE "camel caravan")?
For those unfamiliar with the original sense of "caravan", total
confusion.
It could be worse. A "caravan of caravans" could be a convoy of vehicles
or a convoy of convoys.
And there is the Dodge Caravan (a brand of car).
Tony Cooper
2017-04-15 21:32:26 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sat, 15 Apr 2017 18:43:48 +0100, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sat, 15 Apr 2017 09:17:23 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:14:23 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Snidely
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Snidely
/dps "would a tow-head go by Blanche?"
I've heard of petrol-heads (US Motorheads?), but that's a new one on me.
Horseboxes or caravans?
A "towhead" (not hyphenated) is a blond or blonde. Not an uncommon
description of blonde haired people in the US.
I'd never looked into the origin before, but a websource says it comes
from the color of flax, and "flaxen-haired" is also a term for
blondes.
And of course, this being the US, the answer to Mr Plusnet would be
"flaxen-haired pullers of U-Haul(tm) trailers".
I think "trailer trash" is the idiom, and that doesn't refer to cargo-containing
towed vehicles -- i.e., U-Hauls --but to the trailers ("mobile homes" when the
owners are better off) one lives in. I don't know what "horse box" is (the options
seem to be either cargo holder pulled by a horse, or a horse trailer in which
horses are transported), but "caravan" or "charabanc" seems to be BrE for 'mobile home'.
Close.
"horse box": trailer for tranporting horses.
"caravan": a mobile home.
A BrE "caravan" is also an AmE "RV" or "Recreational Vehicle" that is
towed behind a vehicle.

An AmE "mobile home" is a fixed abode. It may be moveable, but it is
fixed when lived in.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
RH Draney
2017-04-16 00:32:05 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter T. Daniels
We did this a long time ago, but if "caravan" means 'house trailer', what sort
of mental image do you get of the biblical "caravan of camels" (ModE "camel caravan")?
And what was your take on this song by The Monkees?

And he thought he heard the echo of a penny whistle band
And the laughter from a distant caravan
And the brightly painted line of circus wagons in the sand
Fading through the door into summer

....r
Peter T. Daniels
2017-04-16 03:07:00 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by RH Draney
Post by Peter T. Daniels
We did this a long time ago, but if "caravan" means 'house trailer', what sort
of mental image do you get of the biblical "caravan of camels" (ModE "camel caravan")?
And what was your take on this song by The Monkees?
I had no take on it. Never watched them.
Post by RH Draney
And he thought he heard the echo of a penny whistle band
And the laughter from a distant caravan
And the brightly painted line of circus wagons in the sand
Fading through the door into summer
Whose, mine? There was always a "circus parade" when the Ringling Brothers
train parked in Long Island City and the whole shebang traveled to Madison
Square Garden via the Queens-Midtown Tunnel. But unlike in small towns, they
did it in the wee hours so as not to disrupt traffic too much. (Unlike Donnie-
John, who chose to have the Lincoln Tunnel closed down during rush hour so
he could be driven to his golf course in New Jersey.)

But "circus caravan" doesn't sound alien.
Sam Plusnet
2017-04-15 21:47:43 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
"horse box": trailer for tranporting horses.
"caravan": a mobile home.
Shouldn't "caravan" equate to "travel trailer"?

I thought the better off inhabitant of a US "mobile home" referred to it
as a "Manufactured Home"?
--
Sam Plusnet
Tony Cooper
2017-04-15 22:23:39 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
"horse box": trailer for tranporting horses.
"caravan": a mobile home.
Shouldn't "caravan" equate to "travel trailer"?
I thought the better off inhabitant of a US "mobile home" referred to it
as a "Manufactured Home"?
That is the term that manufacturers of "mobile homes" would like you
to use, but people often refer to them as "trailers" or "mobile
homes". They are not mobile when lived in, but may be mobile before
they are set in place.

A "manufactured home", "trailer", or "mobile home" is constructed
somewhere other than where it ends up being lived in. Even a
"pre-fab" is constructed on-site although the components are
manufactured elsewhere.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Joy Beeson
2017-04-16 02:35:47 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sat, 15 Apr 2017 18:23:39 -0400, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
That is the term that manufacturers of "mobile homes" would like you
to use, but people often refer to them as "trailers" or "mobile
homes". They are not mobile when lived in, but may be mobile before
they are set in place.
A "manufactured home", "trailer", or "mobile home" is constructed
somewhere other than where it ends up being lived in. Even a
"pre-fab" is constructed on-site although the components are
manufactured elsewhere.
The last few times I heard a manufactured home referred to, it was a
"double wide". Both the examples I remember were from my sister who
lives in central Indiana. "Trailers" are always theoretically
towable, but I don't recall seeing any that still had their wheels.

On the other hand, I hardly ever go into a trailer park and look
around.
--
Joy Beeson, U.S.A., mostly central Hoosier,
some Northern Indiana, Upstate New York, Florida, and Hawaii
joy beeson at comcast dot net http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-04-15 23:26:47 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
"horse box": trailer for tranporting horses.
"caravan": a mobile home.
Shouldn't "caravan" equate to "travel trailer"?
Some caravans are motorised and are not "trailed".
Post by Sam Plusnet
I thought the better off inhabitant of a US "mobile home" referred to it
as a "Manufactured Home"?
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Sam Plusnet
2017-04-16 01:28:45 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
"horse box": trailer for tranporting horses.
"caravan": a mobile home.
Shouldn't "caravan" equate to "travel trailer"?
Some caravans are motorised and are not "trailed".
Doesn't that make it a "motor home" & not a caravan?
--
Sam Plusnet
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-04-16 11:08:52 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
"horse box": trailer for tranporting horses.
"caravan": a mobile home.
Shouldn't "caravan" equate to "travel trailer"?
Some caravans are motorised and are not "trailed".
Doesn't that make it a "motor home" & not a caravan?
The description "motor caravan" may be mainly historic (for a recent
value of historic) but it is still in formal governmental use.

OED has this in the "caravan" entry:

motor caravan n.

(a) a caravan designed to be towed by a motor car;
(b) a motor vehicle incorporating the features of a caravan.

1909 Daily Chron. 10 June 4/6 The sight-seeing motor-caravans
now yellowing the thoroughfares between London's historic sights.
1957 Motor 28 Aug. 97/2 A vehicle known as the Motor Caravan.
1964 Which? Apr. 35/1 A motor caravan is basically an ordinary
van that has been fitted with windows, beds and cupboards, a
table, cooker and sink.
1990 Internat. H & E Monthly 91 No. 9. 11/1 Caravans are
available for hire..and if you've got your own motor caravan you
can bring that too.

I've not met (a) before.

"motor caravan" is still used in the names of some dealers:

http://www.webbsmotorcaravans.co.uk/motorhomes/

Webbs Motor Caravans are one of the UK’s leading motorhome dealers,
with a large selection of both new and used motorhomes for sale.

Autocraft Motor Caravans Ltd
http://www.autocraftmotorcaravans.co.uk/

Suppliers of interior build equipment to the Motor Caravan and
Camper industry.

That is "Camper" meaning "Campervan".

"Motor Caravan" is the legal designation of that type of vehicle.

The (UK) Vehicle Certification Agency certifies *types* of vehicle.

http://www.dft.gov.uk/vca/vehicletype/motor-caravans.asp

Motor Caravan certification

Historically, some European Member States may have operated their
own set of national requirements for Motor Caravans. However,
Directive 2007/46/EC, as amended, introduced a European wide
certification scheme for this kind of vehicle, which is currently
being phased in.

There is an image on that page of a Motor Caravan. Outside that forml
context it would be called a "motorhome".
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Quinn C
2017-04-19 22:01:05 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Snidely
/dps "would a tow-head go by Blanche?"
I've heard of petrol-heads (US Motorheads?), but that's a new one on me.
Horseboxes or caravans?
A "towhead" (not hyphenated) is a blond or blonde. Not an uncommon
description of blonde haired people in the US.
I'd never looked into the origin before, but a websource says it comes
from the color of flax, and "flaxen-haired" is also a term for
blondes.
Ah, La fille aux cheveux de filasse.
--
Some things are taken away from you, some you leave behind-and
some you carry with you, world without end.
-- Robert C. Wilson, Vortex (novel), p.31
Jerry Friedman
2017-04-17 19:01:51 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Snidely
/dps "would a tow-head go by Blanche?"
I've heard of petrol-heads (US Motorheads?),
"Gearheads", I think.

A fan of a certain English heavy-metal band of the past would be a
Motörheadhead.
Post by Sam Plusnet
but that's a new one on me.
...
--
Jerry Friedman
bill van
2017-04-17 23:45:58 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Snidely
/dps "would a tow-head go by Blanche?"
I've heard of petrol-heads (US Motorheads?),
"Gearheads", I think.
Referring to the mechanically inclined.
Post by Jerry Friedman
A fan of a certain English heavy-metal band of the past would be a
Motörheadhead.
And fans of heavy metal in general are head-bangers.
--
bill
Jerry Friedman
2017-04-18 14:09:48 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by bill van
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Snidely
/dps "would a tow-head go by Blanche?"
I've heard of petrol-heads (US Motorheads?),
"Gearheads", I think.
Referring to the mechanically inclined.
Especially when the machine is a car, I think.
Post by bill van
Post by Jerry Friedman
A fan of a certain English heavy-metal band of the past would be a
Motörheadhead.
And fans of heavy metal in general are head-bangers.
Or metalheads.
--
Jerry Friedman
Rich Ulrich
2017-04-18 16:28:32 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 08:09:48 -0600, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by bill van
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Snidely
/dps "would a tow-head go by Blanche?"
I've heard of petrol-heads (US Motorheads?),
"Gearheads", I think.
Referring to the mechanically inclined.
Especially when the machine is a car, I think.
Post by bill van
Post by Jerry Friedman
A fan of a certain English heavy-metal band of the past would be a
Motörheadhead.
And fans of heavy metal in general are head-bangers.
Or metalheads.
From what I recall, the first "heads" among music fans
would be the Dead-heads -- the druggie reference or
implication was usually appropriate for those fans who
followed the Grateful Dead from concert to concert.

I've heard of gearheads more than once. I can't say
I'm aware of the other ones catching on, but I don't
read those music reviews.
--
Rich Ulrich
bill van
2017-04-18 17:24:10 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Rich Ulrich
On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 08:09:48 -0600, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by bill van
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Snidely
/dps "would a tow-head go by Blanche?"
I've heard of petrol-heads (US Motorheads?),
"Gearheads", I think.
Referring to the mechanically inclined.
Especially when the machine is a car, I think.
Post by bill van
Post by Jerry Friedman
A fan of a certain English heavy-metal band of the past would be a
Motörheadhead.
And fans of heavy metal in general are head-bangers.
Or metalheads.
From what I recall, the first "heads" among music fans
would be the Dead-heads -- the druggie reference or
implication was usually appropriate for those fans who
followed the Grateful Dead from concert to concert.
I've heard of gearheads more than once. I can't say
I'm aware of the other ones catching on, but I don't
read those music reviews.
As I recall, in the mid-1960s the early users of marijuana and other
recreational drugs referred to themselves as "heads". I don't think that
was derived from "Dead-heads", but arose independently. Both probably
owe something to "hop-head", from the jazz era, which meant drug user.

The Jefferson Airplane lyric "Feed your head" in the 1967 song White
Rabbit is another example of that sort of usage. A little later, LSD
users came to be called acid-heads. "Head-bangers" didn't arrive until
heavy metal music did in the 1970s, and a label was required for people
who listened to it.

I think everyone agreed that pop culture of the mid-20th century resided
in one's head.
--
bill
Rich Ulrich
2017-04-18 22:14:01 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by bill van
Post by Rich Ulrich
On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 08:09:48 -0600, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by bill van
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Snidely
/dps "would a tow-head go by Blanche?"
I've heard of petrol-heads (US Motorheads?),
"Gearheads", I think.
Referring to the mechanically inclined.
Especially when the machine is a car, I think.
Post by bill van
Post by Jerry Friedman
A fan of a certain English heavy-metal band of the past would be a
Motörheadhead.
And fans of heavy metal in general are head-bangers.
Or metalheads.
From what I recall, the first "heads" among music fans
would be the Dead-heads -- the druggie reference or
implication was usually appropriate for those fans who
followed the Grateful Dead from concert to concert.
I've heard of gearheads more than once. I can't say
I'm aware of the other ones catching on, but I don't
read those music reviews.
As I recall, in the mid-1960s the early users of marijuana and other
recreational drugs referred to themselves as "heads". I don't think that
was derived from "Dead-heads", but arose independently. Both probably
When I said the druggie implication was appropriate, I was
assuming that pot-head and acid-head were terms that were
widely prevalent when Dead-head was coined.

Maybe some folks used it, but I don't remember users being called
"heads" all by itself. Hippies were mostly assumed to "do dope" -
which could be pot or the stronger hallucinogens. "Dope-head" was
common after the other terms were known; "dope fiends" was
originally a derogatory Establishment label; "dopers" may have come
about later than when "freaks" replaced hippies (early 1970s).
Post by bill van
owe something to "hop-head", from the jazz era, which meant drug user.
Google ngram confirms that "hop head+hophead" had peaks between
1924 and 1946, the jazz era. I was surprised to see that before then,
"pot head+pothead" had peak years at 1904 and 1913. "Dope fiend"
beats them both after 1915. (After getting a negative set of counts
for one search with a hyphen, I got worried about what specified
"minus" versus "hypen"; so I quit searching for pot-head.)
Post by bill van
The Jefferson Airplane lyric "Feed your head" in the 1967 song White
Rabbit is another example of that sort of usage. A little later, LSD
users came to be called acid-heads. "Head-bangers" didn't arrive until
heavy metal music did in the 1970s, and a label was required for people
who listened to it.
I think everyone agreed that pop culture of the mid-20th century resided
in one's head.
--
Rich Ulrich
s***@gmail.com
2017-04-19 21:35:09 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Rich Ulrich
Post by bill van
Post by Rich Ulrich
On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 08:09:48 -0600, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by bill van
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Snidely
/dps "would a tow-head go by Blanche?"
I've heard of petrol-heads (US Motorheads?),
"Gearheads", I think.
Referring to the mechanically inclined.
Especially when the machine is a car, I think.
Post by bill van
Post by Jerry Friedman
A fan of a certain English heavy-metal band of the past would be a
Motörheadhead.
And fans of heavy metal in general are head-bangers.
Or metalheads.
From what I recall, the first "heads" among music fans
would be the Dead-heads -- the druggie reference or
implication was usually appropriate for those fans who
followed the Grateful Dead from concert to concert.
I've heard of gearheads more than once. I can't say
I'm aware of the other ones catching on, but I don't
read those music reviews.
As I recall, in the mid-1960s the early users of marijuana and other
recreational drugs referred to themselves as "heads". I don't think that
was derived from "Dead-heads", but arose independently. Both probably
When I said the druggie implication was appropriate, I was
assuming that pot-head and acid-head were terms that were
widely prevalent when Dead-head was coined.
Maybe some folks used it, but I don't remember users being called
"heads" all by itself. Hippies were mostly assumed to "do dope" -
which could be pot or the stronger hallucinogens. "Dope-head" was
common after the other terms were known; "dope fiends" was
originally a derogatory Establishment label; "dopers" may have come
about later than when "freaks" replaced hippies (early 1970s).
Post by bill van
owe something to "hop-head", from the jazz era, which meant drug user.
Google ngram confirms that "hop head+hophead" had peaks between
1924 and 1946, the jazz era. I was surprised to see that before then,
"pot head+pothead" had peak years at 1904 and 1913. "Dope fiend"
beats them both after 1915. (After getting a negative set of counts
for one search with a hyphen, I got worried about what specified
"minus" versus "hypen"; so I quit searching for pot-head.)
Post by bill van
The Jefferson Airplane lyric "Feed your head" in the 1967 song White
Rabbit is another example of that sort of usage. A little later, LSD
users came to be called acid-heads. "Head-bangers" didn't arrive until
heavy metal music did in the 1970s, and a label was required for people
who listened to it.
I think everyone agreed that pop culture of the mid-20th century resided
in one's head.
Meanwhile, it seems "drophead coupe" isn't a blow to a user of LSD liquids,
but a term for a convertible with only 2 doors.
Is this primarily a Brit term ? Is it widely used?
(I encountered it when looking up in WhiPee
the Sunbeam Alpine and its progenitors)

/dps
bill van
2017-04-20 00:45:29 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by s***@gmail.com
Post by Rich Ulrich
Post by bill van
Post by Rich Ulrich
On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 08:09:48 -0600, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by bill van
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Snidely
/dps "would a tow-head go by Blanche?"
I've heard of petrol-heads (US Motorheads?),
"Gearheads", I think.
Referring to the mechanically inclined.
Especially when the machine is a car, I think.
Post by bill van
Post by Jerry Friedman
A fan of a certain English heavy-metal band of the past would be a
Motörheadhead.
And fans of heavy metal in general are head-bangers.
Or metalheads.
From what I recall, the first "heads" among music fans
would be the Dead-heads -- the druggie reference or
implication was usually appropriate for those fans who
followed the Grateful Dead from concert to concert.
I've heard of gearheads more than once. I can't say
I'm aware of the other ones catching on, but I don't
read those music reviews.
As I recall, in the mid-1960s the early users of marijuana and other
recreational drugs referred to themselves as "heads". I don't think that
was derived from "Dead-heads", but arose independently. Both probably
When I said the druggie implication was appropriate, I was
assuming that pot-head and acid-head were terms that were
widely prevalent when Dead-head was coined.
Maybe some folks used it, but I don't remember users being called
"heads" all by itself. Hippies were mostly assumed to "do dope" -
which could be pot or the stronger hallucinogens. "Dope-head" was
common after the other terms were known; "dope fiends" was
originally a derogatory Establishment label; "dopers" may have come
about later than when "freaks" replaced hippies (early 1970s).
Post by bill van
owe something to "hop-head", from the jazz era, which meant drug user.
Google ngram confirms that "hop head+hophead" had peaks between
1924 and 1946, the jazz era. I was surprised to see that before then,
"pot head+pothead" had peak years at 1904 and 1913. "Dope fiend"
beats them both after 1915. (After getting a negative set of counts
for one search with a hyphen, I got worried about what specified
"minus" versus "hypen"; so I quit searching for pot-head.)
Post by bill van
The Jefferson Airplane lyric "Feed your head" in the 1967 song White
Rabbit is another example of that sort of usage. A little later, LSD
users came to be called acid-heads. "Head-bangers" didn't arrive until
heavy metal music did in the 1970s, and a label was required for people
who listened to it.
I think everyone agreed that pop culture of the mid-20th century resided
in one's head.
Meanwhile, it seems "drophead coupe" isn't a blow to a user of LSD liquids,
but a term for a convertible with only 2 doors.
Is this primarily a Brit term ? Is it widely used?
(I encountered it when looking up in WhiPee
the Sunbeam Alpine and its progenitors)
That's gearhead territory.
--
bill
Sam Plusnet
2017-04-22 23:38:44 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by s***@gmail.com
Post by Rich Ulrich
Post by bill van
Post by Rich Ulrich
On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 08:09:48 -0600, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by bill van
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Snidely
/dps "would a tow-head go by Blanche?"
I've heard of petrol-heads (US Motorheads?),
"Gearheads", I think.
Referring to the mechanically inclined.
Especially when the machine is a car, I think.
Post by bill van
Post by Jerry Friedman
A fan of a certain English heavy-metal band of the past would be a
Motörheadhead.
And fans of heavy metal in general are head-bangers.
Or metalheads.
From what I recall, the first "heads" among music fans
would be the Dead-heads -- the druggie reference or
implication was usually appropriate for those fans who
followed the Grateful Dead from concert to concert.
I've heard of gearheads more than once. I can't say
I'm aware of the other ones catching on, but I don't
read those music reviews.
As I recall, in the mid-1960s the early users of marijuana and other
recreational drugs referred to themselves as "heads". I don't think that
was derived from "Dead-heads", but arose independently. Both probably
When I said the druggie implication was appropriate, I was
assuming that pot-head and acid-head were terms that were
widely prevalent when Dead-head was coined.
Maybe some folks used it, but I don't remember users being called
"heads" all by itself. Hippies were mostly assumed to "do dope" -
which could be pot or the stronger hallucinogens. "Dope-head" was
common after the other terms were known; "dope fiends" was
originally a derogatory Establishment label; "dopers" may have come
about later than when "freaks" replaced hippies (early 1970s).
Post by bill van
owe something to "hop-head", from the jazz era, which meant drug user.
Google ngram confirms that "hop head+hophead" had peaks between
1924 and 1946, the jazz era. I was surprised to see that before then,
"pot head+pothead" had peak years at 1904 and 1913. "Dope fiend"
beats them both after 1915. (After getting a negative set of counts
for one search with a hyphen, I got worried about what specified
"minus" versus "hypen"; so I quit searching for pot-head.)
Post by bill van
The Jefferson Airplane lyric "Feed your head" in the 1967 song White
Rabbit is another example of that sort of usage. A little later, LSD
users came to be called acid-heads. "Head-bangers" didn't arrive until
heavy metal music did in the 1970s, and a label was required for people
who listened to it.
I think everyone agreed that pop culture of the mid-20th century resided
in one's head.
Meanwhile, it seems "drophead coupe" isn't a blow to a user of LSD liquids,
but a term for a convertible with only 2 doors.
Is this primarily a Brit term ? Is it widely used?
(I encountered it when looking up in WhiPee
the Sunbeam Alpine and its progenitors)
If I (BrE) came across the term "coupe" I would assume the author to be
Leftpondian.
I'm not familiar with "drophead" but could take a guess at its meaning.
--
Sam Plusnet
Tony Cooper
2017-04-23 00:43:22 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by s***@gmail.com
Post by Rich Ulrich
Post by bill van
Post by Rich Ulrich
On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 08:09:48 -0600, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by bill van
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Snidely
/dps "would a tow-head go by Blanche?"
I've heard of petrol-heads (US Motorheads?),
"Gearheads", I think.
Referring to the mechanically inclined.
Especially when the machine is a car, I think.
Post by bill van
Post by Jerry Friedman
A fan of a certain English heavy-metal band of the past would be a
Motörheadhead.
And fans of heavy metal in general are head-bangers.
Or metalheads.
From what I recall, the first "heads" among music fans
would be the Dead-heads -- the druggie reference or
implication was usually appropriate for those fans who
followed the Grateful Dead from concert to concert.
I've heard of gearheads more than once. I can't say
I'm aware of the other ones catching on, but I don't
read those music reviews.
As I recall, in the mid-1960s the early users of marijuana and other
recreational drugs referred to themselves as "heads". I don't think that
was derived from "Dead-heads", but arose independently. Both probably
When I said the druggie implication was appropriate, I was
assuming that pot-head and acid-head were terms that were
widely prevalent when Dead-head was coined.
Maybe some folks used it, but I don't remember users being called
"heads" all by itself. Hippies were mostly assumed to "do dope" -
which could be pot or the stronger hallucinogens. "Dope-head" was
common after the other terms were known; "dope fiends" was
originally a derogatory Establishment label; "dopers" may have come
about later than when "freaks" replaced hippies (early 1970s).
Post by bill van
owe something to "hop-head", from the jazz era, which meant drug user.
Google ngram confirms that "hop head+hophead" had peaks between
1924 and 1946, the jazz era. I was surprised to see that before then,
"pot head+pothead" had peak years at 1904 and 1913. "Dope fiend"
beats them both after 1915. (After getting a negative set of counts
for one search with a hyphen, I got worried about what specified
"minus" versus "hypen"; so I quit searching for pot-head.)
Post by bill van
The Jefferson Airplane lyric "Feed your head" in the 1967 song White
Rabbit is another example of that sort of usage. A little later, LSD
users came to be called acid-heads. "Head-bangers" didn't arrive until
heavy metal music did in the 1970s, and a label was required for people
who listened to it.
I think everyone agreed that pop culture of the mid-20th century resided
in one's head.
Meanwhile, it seems "drophead coupe" isn't a blow to a user of LSD liquids,
but a term for a convertible with only 2 doors.
Is this primarily a Brit term ? Is it widely used?
(I encountered it when looking up in WhiPee
the Sunbeam Alpine and its progenitors)
If I (BrE) came across the term "coupe" I would assume the author to be
Leftpondian.
I'm not familiar with "drophead" but could take a guess at its meaning.
A "drophead" is a convertible. The top drops down. "Coupe" is a
two-door. While "coupe" is used in AmE, I've never seen/heard
"drophead" used in AmE.

We generally pronounce "coupe" the same way we pronounce (chicken)
coop, some here say "coo-pay". Not me, though. I hear it pronounced
"coo-pay" at some of the car shows I go to photograph old cars.

We only use "coupe" to describe cars built in the pre-1950s. I had a
1941 Ford coupe and a 1948 Ford coupe. A modern 2-door car is not -
to the best of my knowledge - called a coupe.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Rich Ulrich
2017-04-23 06:26:33 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sat, 22 Apr 2017 20:43:22 -0400, Tony Cooper
A "drophead" is a convertible. The top drops down. "Coupe" is a
two-door.
Didn't know that.
While "coupe" is used in AmE, I've never seen/heard
"drophead" used in AmE.
Nor have I.
We generally pronounce "coupe" the same way we pronounce (chicken)
coop, some here say "coo-pay". Not me, though. I hear it pronounced
"coo-pay" at some of the car shows I go to photograph old cars.
I'm sure I learned "little deuce <coop>" from the Beach Boys or
Jan & Dean. 'Course, they played on each other's recordings, so
remembering the sound does not help.
We only use "coupe" to describe cars built in the pre-1950s. I had a
1941 Ford coupe and a 1948 Ford coupe. A modern 2-door car is not -
to the best of my knowledge - called a coupe.
Another abandoned word. Could a coupe have a rumple seat?
--
Rich Ulrich
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-04-23 10:02:53 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sun, 23 Apr 2017 02:26:33 -0400, Rich Ulrich
Post by Rich Ulrich
On Sat, 22 Apr 2017 20:43:22 -0400, Tony Cooper
A "drophead" is a convertible. The top drops down. "Coupe" is a
two-door.
Didn't know that.
While "coupe" is used in AmE, I've never seen/heard
"drophead" used in AmE.
Nor have I.
We generally pronounce "coupe" the same way we pronounce (chicken)
coop, some here say "coo-pay". Not me, though. I hear it pronounced
"coo-pay" at some of the car shows I go to photograph old cars.
I'm sure I learned "little deuce <coop>" from the Beach Boys or
Jan & Dean. 'Course, they played on each other's recordings, so
remembering the sound does not help.
We only use "coupe" to describe cars built in the pre-1950s. I had a
1941 Ford coupe and a 1948 Ford coupe. A modern 2-door car is not -
to the best of my knowledge - called a coupe.
Another abandoned word. Could a coupe have a rumple seat?
I've met that as *rumble* seat.

OED:

rumble seat n. now chiefly hist.

(a) a seat attached to the rear of a carriage and typically used by
servants (cf. sense 4a);
(b) (N. Amer.) an uncovered folding seat in the rear of a two-seater
motor car (cf. sense 4b) (cf. dicky n. 9c).
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Peter T. Daniels
2017-04-23 14:25:35 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sun, 23 Apr 2017 02:26:33 -0400, Rich Ulrich
Post by Rich Ulrich
On Sat, 22 Apr 2017 20:43:22 -0400, Tony Cooper
A "drophead" is a convertible. The top drops down. "Coupe" is a
two-door.
Didn't know that.
While "coupe" is used in AmE, I've never seen/heard
"drophead" used in AmE.
Nor have I.
We generally pronounce "coupe" the same way we pronounce (chicken)
coop, some here say "coo-pay". Not me, though. I hear it pronounced
"coo-pay" at some of the car shows I go to photograph old cars.
I'm sure I learned "little deuce <coop>" from the Beach Boys or
Jan & Dean. 'Course, they played on each other's recordings, so
remembering the sound does not help.
We only use "coupe" to describe cars built in the pre-1950s. I had a
1941 Ford coupe and a 1948 Ford coupe. A modern 2-door car is not -
to the best of my knowledge - called a coupe.
Another abandoned word. Could a coupe have a rumple seat?
I've met that as *rumble* seat.
rumble seat n. now chiefly hist.
(a) a seat attached to the rear of a carriage and typically used by
servants (cf. sense 4a);
(b) (N. Amer.) an uncovered folding seat in the rear of a two-seater
motor car (cf. sense 4b) (cf. dicky n. 9c).
In my yout', when NYC taxis were made by the Checker Cab Co., there was extra space
between the front bench seat for the driver (I don't know whether passengers were allowed
to ride shotgun) and the rear seat, with plenty of legroom, and two folding seats could
be drawn up from the floor to seat two more passengers (facing backward). Those were
called rumble seats.

Checkers were normally only available as taxis, but at state fairs they would have
a display where Checker cars could be purchased for private use. I don't think they
advertised in competition with GM, Ford, and Chrysler (and AMC).
Tony Cooper
2017-04-23 16:10:10 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sun, 23 Apr 2017 07:25:35 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sun, 23 Apr 2017 02:26:33 -0400, Rich Ulrich
Post by Rich Ulrich
On Sat, 22 Apr 2017 20:43:22 -0400, Tony Cooper
A "drophead" is a convertible. The top drops down. "Coupe" is a
two-door.
Didn't know that.
While "coupe" is used in AmE, I've never seen/heard
"drophead" used in AmE.
Nor have I.
We generally pronounce "coupe" the same way we pronounce (chicken)
coop, some here say "coo-pay". Not me, though. I hear it pronounced
"coo-pay" at some of the car shows I go to photograph old cars.
I'm sure I learned "little deuce <coop>" from the Beach Boys or
Jan & Dean. 'Course, they played on each other's recordings, so
remembering the sound does not help.
We only use "coupe" to describe cars built in the pre-1950s. I had a
1941 Ford coupe and a 1948 Ford coupe. A modern 2-door car is not -
to the best of my knowledge - called a coupe.
Another abandoned word. Could a coupe have a rumple seat?
I've met that as *rumble* seat.
rumble seat n. now chiefly hist.
(a) a seat attached to the rear of a carriage and typically used by
servants (cf. sense 4a);
(b) (N. Amer.) an uncovered folding seat in the rear of a two-seater
motor car (cf. sense 4b) (cf. dicky n. 9c).
In my yout', when NYC taxis were made by the Checker Cab Co., there was extra space
between the front bench seat for the driver (I don't know whether passengers were allowed
to ride shotgun) and the rear seat, with plenty of legroom, and two folding seats could
be drawn up from the floor to seat two more passengers (facing backward). Those were
called rumble seats.
You sure? They were called "jump seats" in Chicago and all webhits
use "jump seat". Checker taxis were originally made in Joliet IL, and
then production was moved to Kalamazoo, Michigan.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Tony Cooper
2017-04-23 15:04:43 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sun, 23 Apr 2017 02:26:33 -0400, Rich Ulrich
Post by Rich Ulrich
On Sat, 22 Apr 2017 20:43:22 -0400, Tony Cooper
A "drophead" is a convertible. The top drops down. "Coupe" is a
two-door.
Didn't know that.
While "coupe" is used in AmE, I've never seen/heard
"drophead" used in AmE.
Nor have I.
We generally pronounce "coupe" the same way we pronounce (chicken)
coop, some here say "coo-pay". Not me, though. I hear it pronounced
"coo-pay" at some of the car shows I go to photograph old cars.
I'm sure I learned "little deuce <coop>" from the Beach Boys or
Jan & Dean. 'Course, they played on each other's recordings, so
remembering the sound does not help.
We only use "coupe" to describe cars built in the pre-1950s. I had a
1941 Ford coupe and a 1948 Ford coupe. A modern 2-door car is not -
to the best of my knowledge - called a coupe.
Another abandoned word. Could a coupe have a rumple seat?
A rumble seat was only found on coupes as far as I know. To have a
rumble seat, the car's design had to have and extended area at the
back (where the boot would be, for some). Four-door models of the era
in which rumble seats were in vogue had squarish backs and a more
box-like shape in general.

Loading Image...

On this subject, but veering into the obAue lane, I see the term
"dickie seat" as a BrE version of "rumble seat". And, a claim that it
was called a "mother-in-law" seat.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Paul Wolff
2017-04-23 19:36:09 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sun, 23 Apr 2017 02:26:33 -0400, Rich Ulrich
Post by Rich Ulrich
On Sat, 22 Apr 2017 20:43:22 -0400, Tony Cooper
A "drophead" is a convertible. The top drops down. "Coupe" is a
two-door.
Didn't know that.
While "coupe" is used in AmE, I've never seen/heard
"drophead" used in AmE.
Nor have I.
We generally pronounce "coupe" the same way we pronounce (chicken)
coop, some here say "coo-pay". Not me, though. I hear it pronounced
"coo-pay" at some of the car shows I go to photograph old cars.
I'm sure I learned "little deuce <coop>" from the Beach Boys or
Jan & Dean. 'Course, they played on each other's recordings, so
remembering the sound does not help.
We only use "coupe" to describe cars built in the pre-1950s. I had a
1941 Ford coupe and a 1948 Ford coupe. A modern 2-door car is not -
to the best of my knowledge - called a coupe.
Another abandoned word. Could a coupe have a rumple seat?
A rumble seat was only found on coupes as far as I know. To have a
rumble seat, the car's design had to have and extended area at the
back (where the boot would be, for some). Four-door models of the era
in which rumble seats were in vogue had squarish backs and a more
box-like shape in general.
https://assets.blog.hemmings.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/10/SIA33-Rumble
seats_lede.jpg
On this subject, but veering into the obAue lane, I see the term
"dickie seat" as a BrE version of "rumble seat". And, a claim that it
was called a "mother-in-law" seat.
Oh, I see. So that, when the m-i-l was riding, she'd be well placed to
jump out and fix a mother-in-law flat?

The classic British car with a dickie seat was the Triumph Roadster:

<https://www.flickr.com/photos/***@N00/3801812732>

That had the drophead coupe body too - which I believe was indeed a term
used in this country, back in the day, though this is a modern page:

<https://www.silverstoneauctions.com/1951-sunbeam-talbot-alpine-90->
--
Paul
Jerry Friedman
2017-04-23 23:59:18 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
[coupe de grace]
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Tony Cooper
On this subject, but veering into the obAue lane, I see the term
"dickie seat" as a BrE version of "rumble seat". And, a claim that it
was called a "mother-in-law" seat.
Oh, I see. So that, when the m-i-l was riding, she'd be well placed to
jump out and fix a mother-in-law flat?
...

:-)
--
Jerry Friedman
Tony Cooper
2017-04-24 00:32:56 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sun, 23 Apr 2017 17:59:18 -0600, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
[coupe de grace]
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Tony Cooper
On this subject, but veering into the obAue lane, I see the term
"dickie seat" as a BrE version of "rumble seat". And, a claim that it
was called a "mother-in-law" seat.
Oh, I see. So that, when the m-i-l was riding, she'd be well placed to
jump out and fix a mother-in-law flat?
...
Wouldn't that depend if the m-i-l flat is on the off-side wing-side or
the near-side wing-side?
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Peter Moylan
2017-04-24 04:00:37 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Rich Ulrich
I'm sure I learned "little deuce <coop>" from the Beach Boys or
Jan & Dean. 'Course, they played on each other's recordings, so
remembering the sound does not help.
When I first heard that song I managed to work out that a "little juice
coop" (as I heard it) was some sort of vehicle, but I completely failed
to see any connection with what I knew as a coupé. No doubt I would have
worked it out if I had investigated any further, but I didn't.

Hearing the words now in my mind, the middle word doesn't sound (in
memory) at all like "juice", but I didn't think of "deuce" as a possibility.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Rich Ulrich
2017-04-24 16:53:34 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Mon, 24 Apr 2017 14:00:37 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Rich Ulrich
I'm sure I learned "little deuce <coop>" from the Beach Boys or
Jan & Dean. 'Course, they played on each other's recordings, so
remembering the sound does not help.
When I first heard that song I managed to work out that a "little juice
coop" (as I heard it) was some sort of vehicle, but I completely failed
to see any connection with what I knew as a coupé. No doubt I would have
worked it out if I had investigated any further, but I didn't.
Hearing the words now in my mind, the middle word doesn't sound (in
memory) at all like "juice", but I didn't think of "deuce" as a possibility.
I was told, way back then, that the "deuce" referred to a double-
barrel carburetor. I just now found a passing reference to that
possiblity, but the web-search consensus seems otherwise.
Wikip includes a nice photo,
Loading Image...

A 'Deuce Coupe' is a 1932 Ford Coupe (deuce being for the year).
This was considered by many to be the definitive "hot rod". The
Model B had four cylinders and the Model 18 featured the Ford
flathead V8 engine when the car was introduced. A pink slip
(mentioned in the lyrics) was the title to the car, named for the
color of the paper then used in California vehicle ownership
certificates.

I never knew the bit about the "pink slip" meaning that he won
the other guy's car.
--
Rich Ulrich
Quinn C
2017-04-24 17:34:38 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by s***@gmail.com
Meanwhile, it seems "drophead coupe" isn't a blow to a user of LSD liquids,
but a term for a convertible with only 2 doors.
Is this primarily a Brit term ? Is it widely used?
If I (BrE) came across the term "coupe" I would assume the author to be
Leftpondian.
I'm not familiar with "drophead" but could take a guess at its meaning.
A "drophead" is a convertible. The top drops down. "Coupe" is a
two-door. While "coupe" is used in AmE, I've never seen/heard
"drophead" used in AmE.
We generally pronounce "coupe" the same way we pronounce (chicken)
coop, some here say "coo-pay". Not me, though. I hear it pronounced
"coo-pay" at some of the car shows I go to photograph old cars.
We only use "coupe" to describe cars built in the pre-1950s. I had a
1941 Ford coupe and a 1948 Ford coupe. A modern 2-door car is not -
to the best of my knowledge - called a coupe.
Hm ... <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cadillac_CTS#Coupe>

Being 2-door is not a sufficient condition for a coupe, though, is
it? I think it must have a the right shape, mainly a flattened,
sloping rear.

Most VW Beetles were 2-door, but they weren't coupes.

Conversely, Mercedes-Benz calls it's CLS class "four-door coupe":

<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mercedes-Benz_CLS-Class>

| designed by the American automotive designer, Michael Fink [...]
| to combine the "strong, emotive charisma" of a coupe with the
| "comfort and practicality" of a sedan.
--
- It's the title search for the Rachel property.
Guess who owns it?
- Tell me it's not that bastard Donald Trump.
-- Gilmore Girls, S02E08 (2001)
Tony Cooper
2017-04-24 18:04:51 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Mon, 24 Apr 2017 13:34:38 -0400, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by s***@gmail.com
Meanwhile, it seems "drophead coupe" isn't a blow to a user of LSD liquids,
but a term for a convertible with only 2 doors.
Is this primarily a Brit term ? Is it widely used?
If I (BrE) came across the term "coupe" I would assume the author to be
Leftpondian.
I'm not familiar with "drophead" but could take a guess at its meaning.
A "drophead" is a convertible. The top drops down. "Coupe" is a
two-door. While "coupe" is used in AmE, I've never seen/heard
"drophead" used in AmE.
We generally pronounce "coupe" the same way we pronounce (chicken)
coop, some here say "coo-pay". Not me, though. I hear it pronounced
"coo-pay" at some of the car shows I go to photograph old cars.
We only use "coupe" to describe cars built in the pre-1950s. I had a
1941 Ford coupe and a 1948 Ford coupe. A modern 2-door car is not -
to the best of my knowledge - called a coupe.
Hm ... <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cadillac_CTS#Coupe>
Being 2-door is not a sufficient condition for a coupe, though, is
it? I think it must have a the right shape, mainly a flattened,
sloping rear.
Most VW Beetles were 2-door, but they weren't coupes.
The term "coupe" to describe an automobile in the US was used, as I
said above, for pre-1950s cars. The VW Bug was not sold in the US in
any significant number until 1955.
Automakers, and automotive writers, use terms that the general public
doesn't. In this link, 2014/2017 Beetles are called "coupes". They
also use the term "convertible", but VW called the models with a
convertible top a "cabriolet".

http://carsalesbase.com/us-car-sales-data/volkswagen/volkswagen-beetle/

My 1941 and 1948 Ford coupes did not have a flattened and sloping
rear. It had a rounded rear as in this photo of a 1948 Ford coupe.
Loading Image...
The '41 (actually made in 1940) and '48 had the same body shape, but a
different front grill design.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
s***@gmail.com
2017-04-24 21:18:54 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tony Cooper
On Mon, 24 Apr 2017 13:34:38 -0400, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by s***@gmail.com
Meanwhile, it seems "drophead coupe" isn't a blow to a user of LSD liquids,
but a term for a convertible with only 2 doors.
Is this primarily a Brit term ? Is it widely used?
If I (BrE) came across the term "coupe" I would assume the author to be
Leftpondian.
I'm not familiar with "drophead" but could take a guess at its meaning.
A "drophead" is a convertible. The top drops down. "Coupe" is a
two-door. While "coupe" is used in AmE, I've never seen/heard
"drophead" used in AmE.
We generally pronounce "coupe" the same way we pronounce (chicken)
coop, some here say "coo-pay". Not me, though. I hear it pronounced
"coo-pay" at some of the car shows I go to photograph old cars.
We only use "coupe" to describe cars built in the pre-1950s. I had a
1941 Ford coupe and a 1948 Ford coupe. A modern 2-door car is not -
to the best of my knowledge - called a coupe.
Hm ... <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cadillac_CTS#Coupe>
Being 2-door is not a sufficient condition for a coupe, though, is
it? I think it must have a the right shape, mainly a flattened,
sloping rear.
Most VW Beetles were 2-door, but they weren't coupes.
The term "coupe" to describe an automobile in the US was used, as I
said above, for pre-1950s cars. The VW Bug was not sold in the US in
any significant number until 1955.
Automakers, and automotive writers, use terms that the general public
doesn't. In this link, 2014/2017 Beetles are called "coupes". They
also use the term "convertible", but VW called the models with a
convertible top a "cabriolet".
http://carsalesbase.com/us-car-sales-data/volkswagen/volkswagen-beetle/
My 1941 and 1948 Ford coupes did not have a flattened and sloping
rear. It had a rounded rear as in this photo of a 1948 Ford coupe.
http://www.collectorcarads.com/Picture5/1947FordCoupePSideBarnFresh.jpg
The '41 (actually made in 1940) and '48 had the same body shape, but a
different front grill design.
Deuce coupes as hot rods tended to have the roof "chopped", didn't they?
It was also popular to leave the hood off and to block the rear end
or unblock the front end.

I have some pics to come through before saying more, although
a quick search turns up some ideas from the Fountain Valley Car Show (2011).

<URL:https://cone.smugmug.com/keyword/classic%20cars/i-mpvTgkd/A>
<URL:https://cone.smugmug.com/keyword/classic%20cars/i-x2c4gjM/A>

/dps
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-04-23 09:58:33 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by s***@gmail.com
Post by Rich Ulrich
Post by bill van
Post by Rich Ulrich
On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 08:09:48 -0600, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by bill van
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Snidely
/dps "would a tow-head go by Blanche?"
I've heard of petrol-heads (US Motorheads?),
"Gearheads", I think.
Referring to the mechanically inclined.
Especially when the machine is a car, I think.
Post by bill van
Post by Jerry Friedman
A fan of a certain English heavy-metal band of the past would be a
Motörheadhead.
And fans of heavy metal in general are head-bangers.
Or metalheads.
From what I recall, the first "heads" among music fans
would be the Dead-heads -- the druggie reference or
implication was usually appropriate for those fans who
followed the Grateful Dead from concert to concert.
I've heard of gearheads more than once. I can't say
I'm aware of the other ones catching on, but I don't
read those music reviews.
As I recall, in the mid-1960s the early users of marijuana and other
recreational drugs referred to themselves as "heads". I don't think that
was derived from "Dead-heads", but arose independently. Both probably
When I said the druggie implication was appropriate, I was
assuming that pot-head and acid-head were terms that were
widely prevalent when Dead-head was coined.
Maybe some folks used it, but I don't remember users being called
"heads" all by itself. Hippies were mostly assumed to "do dope" -
which could be pot or the stronger hallucinogens. "Dope-head" was
common after the other terms were known; "dope fiends" was
originally a derogatory Establishment label; "dopers" may have come
about later than when "freaks" replaced hippies (early 1970s).
Post by bill van
owe something to "hop-head", from the jazz era, which meant drug user.
Google ngram confirms that "hop head+hophead" had peaks between
1924 and 1946, the jazz era. I was surprised to see that before then,
"pot head+pothead" had peak years at 1904 and 1913. "Dope fiend"
beats them both after 1915. (After getting a negative set of counts
for one search with a hyphen, I got worried about what specified
"minus" versus "hypen"; so I quit searching for pot-head.)
Post by bill van
The Jefferson Airplane lyric "Feed your head" in the 1967 song White
Rabbit is another example of that sort of usage. A little later, LSD
users came to be called acid-heads. "Head-bangers" didn't arrive until
heavy metal music did in the 1970s, and a label was required for people
who listened to it.
I think everyone agreed that pop culture of the mid-20th century resided
in one's head.
Meanwhile, it seems "drophead coupe" isn't a blow to a user of LSD liquids,
but a term for a convertible with only 2 doors.
Is this primarily a Brit term ? Is it widely used?
(I encountered it when looking up in WhiPee
the Sunbeam Alpine and its progenitors)
If I (BrE) came across the term "coupe" I would assume the author to be
Leftpondian.
I'm not familiar with "drophead" but could take a guess at its meaning.
The word "coupé" used to be used in BrE for a type of car. It was
pronounced as two syllables, "coopay". When I first heard the AmE
pronunciation as a single syllable, "coop", I understood what it meant
but I thought it could also be used to describe a vehicle for
transporting chickens.

I have met "drophead" only in AmE. However, the OED has these quotes
from BrE sources:

1932 Autocar 28 Oct. 7 (advt.) Romney 2-seater Drop~head Coupé.
1934 Times 16 Oct. 7/3 This all-weather car has a patented
drop-head which can be folded back by one person without leaving
the car.

That is in the sense:

drop-head n. orig. U.S.
(a) a device for lowering a sewing-machine, typewriter, etc., into
its cabinet or desk so as to leave a flat surface;
(b) an adjustable canvas roof to a car; freq. attrib.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Katy Jennison
2017-04-23 11:45:27 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Sam Plusnet
If I (BrE) came across the term "coupe" I would assume the author to be
Leftpondian.
I'm not familiar with "drophead" but could take a guess at its meaning.
The word "coupé" used to be used in BrE for a type of car. It was
pronounced as two syllables, "coopay". When I first heard the AmE
pronunciation as a single syllable, "coop", I understood what it meant
but I thought it could also be used to describe a vehicle for
transporting chickens.
I have met "drophead" only in AmE. However, the OED has these quotes
1932 Autocar 28 Oct. 7 (advt.) Romney 2-seater Drop~head Coupé.
1934 Times 16 Oct. 7/3 This all-weather car has a patented
drop-head which can be folded back by one person without leaving
the car.
I'm surprised that "drophead coupé" (second word is two syllables) is
unfamiliar to Brits; maybe it's an age thing (she says, from the point
of view of someone approaching three-quarters of a century), or possibly
I became familiar with it in the days when I followed VSCC and PVT
racing (Vintage Sports Car Club; Post-Vintage Thoroughbred).

Wiktionary, for what it's worth, says:

"Noun: drophead coupé (plural drophead coupés) (Britain) a four-seated
sports car with two doors, a folding roof and a sloping rear; a soft top."

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/drophead_coup%C3%A9

It offers as an example a picture of a Riley drophead coupé, but fails
to date it; I hazard early 1950s. Lots of others obtainable via google
images.
--
Katy Jennison
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-04-23 13:04:13 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sun, 23 Apr 2017 12:45:27 +0100, Katy Jennison
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Sam Plusnet
If I (BrE) came across the term "coupe" I would assume the author to be
Leftpondian.
I'm not familiar with "drophead" but could take a guess at its meaning.
The word "coupé" used to be used in BrE for a type of car. It was
pronounced as two syllables, "coopay". When I first heard the AmE
pronunciation as a single syllable, "coop", I understood what it meant
but I thought it could also be used to describe a vehicle for
transporting chickens.
I have met "drophead" only in AmE. However, the OED has these quotes
1932 Autocar 28 Oct. 7 (advt.) Romney 2-seater Drop~head Coupé.
1934 Times 16 Oct. 7/3 This all-weather car has a patented
drop-head which can be folded back by one person without leaving
the car.
I'm surprised that "drophead coupé" (second word is two syllables) is
unfamiliar to Brits; maybe it's an age thing (she says, from the point
of view of someone approaching three-quarters of a century), or possibly
I became familiar with it in the days when I followed VSCC and PVT
racing (Vintage Sports Car Club; Post-Vintage Thoroughbred).
"Noun: drophead coupé (plural drophead coupés) (Britain) a four-seated
sports car with two doors, a folding roof and a sloping rear; a soft top."
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/drophead_coup%C3%A9
It offers as an example a picture of a Riley drophead coupé, but fails
to date it; I hazard early 1950s. Lots of others obtainable via google
images.
The terms used of today's cars seem to include "convertible", "soft top"
and "cabriolet".

In some cases a model of car is available in two versions, with or
without a folding roof: "soft top" or "hard top".

OED on "cabriolet":

A motor car with fixed sides and a folding top.

The types I've mentioned refer to the existence of a folding top. They
don't distinguish between types of body, coupé or not coupé.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Paul Wolff
2017-04-23 19:38:16 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Sam Plusnet
If I (BrE) came across the term "coupe" I would assume the author to be
Leftpondian.
I'm not familiar with "drophead" but could take a guess at its meaning.
The word "coupé" used to be used in BrE for a type of car. It was
pronounced as two syllables, "coopay". When I first heard the AmE
pronunciation as a single syllable, "coop", I understood what it meant
but I thought it could also be used to describe a vehicle for
transporting chickens.
I have met "drophead" only in AmE. However, the OED has these quotes
1932 Autocar 28 Oct. 7 (advt.) Romney 2-seater Drop~head Coupé.
1934 Times 16 Oct. 7/3 This all-weather car has a patented
drop-head which can be folded back by one person without leaving
the car.
I'm surprised that "drophead coupé" (second word is two syllables) is
unfamiliar to Brits; maybe it's an age thing (she says, from the point
of view of someone approaching three-quarters of a century), or
possibly I became familiar with it in the days when I followed VSCC and
PVT racing (Vintage Sports Car Club; Post-Vintage Thoroughbred).
"Noun: drophead coupé (plural drophead coupés) (Britain) a four-seated
sports car with two doors, a folding roof and a sloping rear; a soft top."
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/drophead_coup%C3%A9
It offers as an example a picture of a Riley drophead coupé, but fails
to date it; I hazard early 1950s. Lots of others obtainable via google
images.
Yes - I've just posted pre-agreement with your post.
--
Paul
RH Draney
2017-04-19 20:53:25 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by bill van
I think everyone agreed that pop culture of the mid-20th century resided
in one's head.
Except when it resided in one's "bag", which (according to a guest
character on "Dragnet") is where one's "thing" is located....r
bill van
2017-04-20 00:46:55 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by RH Draney
Post by bill van
I think everyone agreed that pop culture of the mid-20th century resided
in one's head.
Except when it resided in one's "bag", which (according to a guest
character on "Dragnet") is where one's "thing" is located....r
So you're saying that "Papa's got a brand new bag" meant he'd had a
transplant?
--
bill
RH Draney
2017-04-20 07:28:08 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by bill van
Post by RH Draney
Post by bill van
I think everyone agreed that pop culture of the mid-20th century resided
in one's head.
Except when it resided in one's "bag", which (according to a guest
character on "Dragnet") is where one's "thing" is located....r
So you're saying that "Papa's got a brand new bag" meant he'd had a
transplant?
I'm not sure that necessarily follows...perhaps a transcript of the
relevant scene will clear up the concept:

http://spidergrrlvstheworld.blogspot.com/2010/10/sewing-is-my-bag.html

....r
Sam Plusnet
2017-04-22 23:40:09 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by bill van
Post by RH Draney
Post by bill van
I think everyone agreed that pop culture of the mid-20th century resided
in one's head.
Except when it resided in one's "bag", which (according to a guest
character on "Dragnet") is where one's "thing" is located....r
So you're saying that "Papa's got a brand new bag" meant he'd had a
transplant?
Colostomy?
--
Sam Plusnet
Whiskers
2017-04-11 22:46:52 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Harrison Hill
I'm all for making up new words, but "xanthic"
meaning "yellowish", is a liverish new addition
to my vocabulary - or am being jaundiced?
It's from the Greek, isn't it?
--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
Will Parsons
2017-04-12 01:54:13 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Harrison Hill
I'm all for making up new words, but "xanthic"
meaning "yellowish", is a liverish new addition
to my vocabulary - or am being jaundiced?
This is not a direct response to your post, but...

As a child, I can remember rummaging through an unabridged dictionary under
the letter X, and seeing an entry for a botanical genus (?) name
"xanthoxylum". Quite some time later, I came upon the same name, now spelt
"zanthoxylum".

The latter spelling seems to be the now the accepted version, but why?

The X version is obviously the more "correct" version according to etymology,
so I surmise that whoever originally identified the genus (?), used the Z
spelling, and therefore got the right to spell the name however he saw fit.
(I would still like someone - preferably one who actually *knows* something
about Classical languages - to have some say in how new species/genera should
be assigned scientific names.)
--
Will
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-04-12 10:52:42 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Will Parsons
Post by Harrison Hill
I'm all for making up new words, but "xanthic"
meaning "yellowish", is a liverish new addition
to my vocabulary - or am being jaundiced?
This is not a direct response to your post, but...
As a child, I can remember rummaging through an unabridged dictionary under
the letter X, and seeing an entry for a botanical genus (?) name
"xanthoxylum". Quite some time later, I came upon the same name, now spelt
"zanthoxylum".
The latter spelling seems to be the now the accepted version, but why?
Possibly to match the pronunciation.
Post by Will Parsons
The X version is obviously the more "correct" version according to etymology,
so I surmise that whoever originally identified the genus (?), used the Z
spelling, and therefore got the right to spell the name however he saw fit.
(I would still like someone - preferably one who actually *knows* something
about Classical languages - to have some say in how new species/genera should
be assigned scientific names.)
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Will Parsons
2017-04-12 19:49:48 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Will Parsons
Post by Harrison Hill
I'm all for making up new words, but "xanthic"
meaning "yellowish", is a liverish new addition
to my vocabulary - or am being jaundiced?
This is not a direct response to your post, but...
As a child, I can remember rummaging through an unabridged dictionary under
the letter X, and seeing an entry for a botanical genus (?) name
"xanthoxylum". Quite some time later, I came upon the same name, now spelt
"zanthoxylum".
The latter spelling seems to be the now the accepted version, but why?
Possibly to match the pronunciation.
Quite possibly, but if so, that would be very Anglo-centric. After all,
these scientific names are supposedly (neo-)Latin and international, and
other languages typically do not pronounce an initial X the same way as an
initial Z as we do in English.
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Will Parsons
The X version is obviously the more "correct" version according to etymology,
so I surmise that whoever originally identified the genus (?), used the Z
spelling, and therefore got the right to spell the name however he saw fit.
(I would still like someone - preferably one who actually *knows* something
about Classical languages - to have some say in how new species/genera should
be assigned scientific names.)
--
Will
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-04-22 07:28:54 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Will Parsons
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Will Parsons
Post by Harrison Hill
I'm all for making up new words, but "xanthic"
meaning "yellowish", is a liverish new addition
to my vocabulary - or am being jaundiced?
This is not a direct response to your post, but...
As a child, I can remember rummaging through an unabridged dictionary under
the letter X, and seeing an entry for a botanical genus (?) name
"xanthoxylum". Quite some time later, I came upon the same name, now spelt
"zanthoxylum".
The latter spelling seems to be the now the accepted version, but why?
Possibly to match the pronunciation.
Quite possibly, but if so, that would be very Anglo-centric.
Yes, but we live in an increasingly Anglo-centric world.
Post by Will Parsons
After all,
these scientific names are supposedly (neo-)Latin and international, and
other languages typically do not pronounce an initial X the same way as an
initial Z as we do in English.
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Will Parsons
The X version is obviously the more "correct" version according to etymology,
so I surmise that whoever originally identified the genus (?), used the Z
spelling, and therefore got the right to spell the name however he saw fit.
(I would still like someone - preferably one who actually *knows* something
about Classical languages - to have some say in how new species/genera should
be assigned scientific names.)
--
athel
occam
2017-04-25 08:57:10 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Will Parsons
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Will Parsons
Post by Harrison Hill
I'm all for making up new words, but "xanthic"
meaning "yellowish", is a liverish new addition
to my vocabulary - or am being jaundiced?
This is not a direct response to your post, but...
As a child, I can remember rummaging through an unabridged dictionary under
the letter X, and seeing an entry for a botanical genus (?) name
"xanthoxylum". Quite some time later, I came upon the same name, now spelt
"zanthoxylum".
The latter spelling seems to be the now the accepted version, but why?
Possibly to match the pronunciation.
Quite possibly, but if so, that would be very Anglo-centric. After all,
these scientific names are supposedly (neo-)Latin and international, and
other languages typically do not pronounce an initial X the same way as an
initial Z as we do in English.
Check to see the spelling of 'xylophone' (also of Greek origin) in your
new dictionary. Is it spelt 'zylophone'? If so, chuck the thing into an
Anglo-centric rubbish bin, where it belongs.
Post by Will Parsons
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Will Parsons
The X version is obviously the more "correct" version according to etymology,
so I surmise that whoever originally identified the genus (?), used the Z
spelling, and therefore got the right to spell the name however he saw fit.
(I would still like someone - preferably one who actually *knows* something
about Classical languages - to have some say in how new species/genera should
be assigned scientific names.)
Jerry Friedman
2017-04-12 22:07:39 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Will Parsons
Post by Harrison Hill
I'm all for making up new words, but "xanthic"
meaning "yellowish", is a liverish new addition
to my vocabulary - or am being jaundiced?
This is not a direct response to your post, but...
As a child, I can remember rummaging through an unabridged dictionary under
the letter X, and seeing an entry for a botanical genus (?) name
"xanthoxylum". Quite some time later, I came upon the same name, now spelt
"zanthoxylum".
The latter spelling seems to be the now the accepted version, but why?
The X version is obviously the more "correct" version according to etymology,
so I surmise that whoever originally identified the genus (?),
Yes.
Post by Will Parsons
used the Z
spelling, and therefore got the right to spell the name however he saw fit.
Oddly enough, a Wikipedia article says the author, the Scotsman Philip
Miller, used the spelling with an X when he described it in 1768. I
don't know how it could have been validly changed.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zanthoxylum_americanum#Taxonomy
Post by Will Parsons
(I would still like someone - preferably one who actually *knows* something
about Classical languages - to have some say in how new species/genera should
be assigned scientific names.)
There is at least a rule that mistakes in gender concord between genus
and species get corrected, as do obvious lapsus (lapsuses?).
--
Jerry Friedman
Quinn C
2017-04-19 20:21:41 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Will Parsons
Post by Harrison Hill
I'm all for making up new words, but "xanthic"
meaning "yellowish", is a liverish new addition
to my vocabulary - or am being jaundiced?
This is not a direct response to your post, but...
As a child, I can remember rummaging through an unabridged dictionary under
the letter X, and seeing an entry for a botanical genus (?) name
"xanthoxylum". Quite some time later, I came upon the same name, now spelt
"zanthoxylum".
The latter spelling seems to be the now the accepted version, but why?
The X version is obviously the more "correct" version according to etymology,
so I surmise that whoever originally identified the genus (?),
Yes.
Post by Will Parsons
used the Z
spelling, and therefore got the right to spell the name however he saw fit.
Oddly enough, a Wikipedia article says the author, the Scotsman Philip
Miller, used the spelling with an X when he described it in 1768. I
don't know how it could have been validly changed.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zanthoxylum_americanum#Taxonomy
This page claims that the spelling with Z is the original:

| original spelling; sometimes misspelled as "Xanthoxylum"

https://npgsweb.ars-grin.gov/gringlobal/taxonomygenus.aspx?id=13017
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Will Parsons
(I would still like someone - preferably one who actually *knows* something
about Classical languages - to have some say in how new species/genera should
be assigned scientific names.)
There is at least a rule that mistakes in gender concord between genus
and species get corrected, as do obvious lapsus (lapsuses?).
What about lapsi in plural formation?
--
... their average size remains so much smaller; so that the sum
total of food converted into thought by women can never equal
[that of] men. It follows therefore, that men will always think
more than women. -- M.A. Hardaker in Popular Science (1881)
Jerry Friedman
2017-04-19 21:38:41 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Quinn C
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Will Parsons
Post by Harrison Hill
I'm all for making up new words, but "xanthic"
meaning "yellowish", is a liverish new addition
to my vocabulary - or am being jaundiced?
This is not a direct response to your post, but...
As a child, I can remember rummaging through an unabridged dictionary under
the letter X, and seeing an entry for a botanical genus (?) name
"xanthoxylum". Quite some time later, I came upon the same name, now spelt
"zanthoxylum".
The latter spelling seems to be the now the accepted version, but why?
The X version is obviously the more "correct" version according to etymology,
so I surmise that whoever originally identified the genus (?),
Yes.
Post by Will Parsons
used the Z
spelling, and therefore got the right to spell the name however he saw fit.
Oddly enough, a Wikipedia article says the author, the Scotsman Philip
Miller, used the spelling with an X when he described it in 1768. I
don't know how it could have been validly changed.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zanthoxylum_americanum#Taxonomy
| original spelling; sometimes misspelled as "Xanthoxylum"
https://npgsweb.ars-grin.gov/gringlobal/taxonomygenus.aspx?id=13017
That's more believable.
Post by Quinn C
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Will Parsons
(I would still like someone - preferably one who actually *knows* something
about Classical languages - to have some say in how new species/genera should
be assigned scientific names.)
There is at least a rule that mistakes in gender concord between genus
and species get corrected, as do obvious lapsus (lapsuses?).
What about lapsi in plural formation?
You'll have a harder time getting those into scientific names.
--
Jerry Friedman
Quinn C
2017-04-19 21:58:43 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Quinn C
Post by Jerry Friedman
There is at least a rule that mistakes in gender concord between genus
and species get corrected, as do obvious lapsus (lapsuses?).
What about lapsi in plural formation?
You'll have a harder time getting those into scientific names.
Just the lapsata, or plurals in general?
--
- It's the title search for the Rachel property.
Guess who owns it?
- Tell me it's not that bastard Donald Trump.
-- Gilmore Girls, S02E08 (2001)
Jerry Friedman
2017-04-19 22:26:09 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Quinn C
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Quinn C
Post by Jerry Friedman
There is at least a rule that mistakes in gender concord between genus
and species get corrected, as do obvious lapsus (lapsuses?).
What about lapsi in plural formation?
You'll have a harder time getting those into scientific names.
Just the lapsata, or plurals in general?
Plurals (though it can be done with genitive plurals), and
consequently lapsen.
--
Jerry Friedman
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-04-22 07:31:04 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Quinn C
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Will Parsons
Post by Harrison Hill
I'm all for making up new words, but "xanthic"
meaning "yellowish", is a liverish new addition
to my vocabulary - or am being jaundiced?
This is not a direct response to your post, but...
As a child, I can remember rummaging through an unabridged dictionary under
the letter X, and seeing an entry for a botanical genus (?) name
"xanthoxylum". Quite some time later, I came upon the same name, now spelt
"zanthoxylum".
The latter spelling seems to be the now the accepted version, but why?
The X version is obviously the more "correct" version according to etymology,
so I surmise that whoever originally identified the genus (?),
Yes.
Post by Will Parsons
used the Z
spelling, and therefore got the right to spell the name however he saw fit.
Oddly enough, a Wikipedia article says the author, the Scotsman Philip
Miller, used the spelling with an X when he described it in 1768. I
don't know how it could have been validly changed.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zanthoxylum_americanum#Taxonomy
| original spelling; sometimes misspelled as "Xanthoxylum"
https://npgsweb.ars-grin.gov/gringlobal/taxonomygenus.aspx?id=13017
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Will Parsons
(I would still like someone - preferably one who actually *knows* something
about Classical languages - to have some say in how new species/genera should
be assigned scientific names.)
There is at least a rule that mistakes in gender concord between genus
and species get corrected, as do obvious lapsus (lapsuses?).
What about lapsi in plural formation?
Is it 2nd declension? Somehow it looks more 4th to me, though I don't know why.
--
athel
Will Parsons
2017-04-22 15:12:11 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Quinn C
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Will Parsons
Post by Harrison Hill
I'm all for making up new words, but "xanthic"
meaning "yellowish", is a liverish new addition
to my vocabulary - or am being jaundiced?
This is not a direct response to your post, but...
As a child, I can remember rummaging through an unabridged dictionary under
the letter X, and seeing an entry for a botanical genus (?) name
"xanthoxylum". Quite some time later, I came upon the same name, now spelt
"zanthoxylum".
The latter spelling seems to be the now the accepted version, but why?
The X version is obviously the more "correct" version according to etymology,
so I surmise that whoever originally identified the genus (?),
Yes.
Post by Will Parsons
used the Z
spelling, and therefore got the right to spell the name however he saw fit.
Oddly enough, a Wikipedia article says the author, the Scotsman Philip
Miller, used the spelling with an X when he described it in 1768. I
don't know how it could have been validly changed.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zanthoxylum_americanum#Taxonomy
| original spelling; sometimes misspelled as "Xanthoxylum"
https://npgsweb.ars-grin.gov/gringlobal/taxonomygenus.aspx?id=13017
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Will Parsons
(I would still like someone - preferably one who actually *knows* something
about Classical languages - to have some say in how new species/genera should
be assigned scientific names.)
There is at least a rule that mistakes in gender concord between genus
and species get corrected, as do obvious lapsus (lapsuses?).
What about lapsi in plural formation?
Is it 2nd declension? Somehow it looks more 4th to me, though I don't know why.
Perhaps because it is, and you'd remembered that?

So if the Latin plural were to be used, the plural would be identical to the
singular, why is no doubt why we are accustomed to see Latin plurals of 1st,
2nd, and 3rd declension nouns in English, but not of 4th declension nouns (or
5th declension nouns, for that matter).

(In Classical Latin, the plural is readily distinguishable from the singular
in pronunciation by having a long vowel.)
--
Will
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-04-22 16:29:28 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Will Parsons
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Quinn C
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Will Parsons
Post by Harrison Hill
I'm all for making up new words, but "xanthic"
meaning "yellowish", is a liverish new addition
to my vocabulary - or am being jaundiced?
This is not a direct response to your post, but...
As a child, I can remember rummaging through an unabridged dictionary under
the letter X, and seeing an entry for a botanical genus (?) name
"xanthoxylum". Quite some time later, I came upon the same name, now spelt
"zanthoxylum".
The latter spelling seems to be the now the accepted version, but why?
The X version is obviously the more "correct" version according to etymology,
so I surmise that whoever originally identified the genus (?),
Yes.
Post by Will Parsons
used the Z
spelling, and therefore got the right to spell the name however he saw fit.
Oddly enough, a Wikipedia article says the author, the Scotsman Philip
Miller, used the spelling with an X when he described it in 1768. I
don't know how it could have been validly changed.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zanthoxylum_americanum#Taxonomy
| original spelling; sometimes misspelled as "Xanthoxylum"
https://npgsweb.ars-grin.gov/gringlobal/taxonomygenus.aspx?id=13017
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Will Parsons
(I would still like someone - preferably one who actually *knows* something
about Classical languages - to have some say in how new species/genera should
be assigned scientific names.)
There is at least a rule that mistakes in gender concord between genus
and species get corrected, as do obvious lapsus (lapsuses?).
What about lapsi in plural formation?
Is it 2nd declension? Somehow it looks more 4th to me, though I don't know why.
Perhaps because it is, and you'd remembered that?
Maybe, but I'm wondering where I would have come across it. It's not
the sort of word one expects to meet in Caesar's Gallic Wars, or the
6th book of the Aeneid, or Ovid's poems about how much he hated living
on the Black Sea. No doubt we read other things, but I don't
immediately remember what: no Cicero, no Horace.... No Ars Amatoria
either: Our Ovid book was called "Easy Ovid", but in retrospect I think
the contents were chosen not because they were easy but because little
boys were not likely to find stimulating.
Post by Will Parsons
So if the Latin plural were to be used, the plural would be identical to the
singular, why is no doubt why we are accustomed to see Latin plurals of 1st,
2nd, and 3rd declension nouns in English, but not of 4th declension nouns (or
5th declension nouns, for that matter).
(In Classical Latin, the plural is readily distinguishable from the singular
in pronunciation by having a long vowel.)
--
athel
Ross
2017-04-23 00:58:46 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Will Parsons
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Quinn C
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Will Parsons
Post by Harrison Hill
I'm all for making up new words, but "xanthic"
meaning "yellowish", is a liverish new addition
to my vocabulary - or am being jaundiced?
This is not a direct response to your post, but...
As a child, I can remember rummaging through an unabridged dictionary under
the letter X, and seeing an entry for a botanical genus (?) name
"xanthoxylum". Quite some time later, I came upon the same name, now spelt
"zanthoxylum".
The latter spelling seems to be the now the accepted version, but why?
The X version is obviously the more "correct" version according to etymology,
so I surmise that whoever originally identified the genus (?),
Yes.
Post by Will Parsons
used the Z
spelling, and therefore got the right to spell the name however he saw fit.
Oddly enough, a Wikipedia article says the author, the Scotsman Philip
Miller, used the spelling with an X when he described it in 1768. I
don't know how it could have been validly changed.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zanthoxylum_americanum#Taxonomy
| original spelling; sometimes misspelled as "Xanthoxylum"
https://npgsweb.ars-grin.gov/gringlobal/taxonomygenus.aspx?id=13017
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Will Parsons
(I would still like someone - preferably one who actually *knows* something
about Classical languages - to have some say in how new species/genera should
be assigned scientific names.)
There is at least a rule that mistakes in gender concord between genus
and species get corrected, as do obvious lapsus (lapsuses?).
What about lapsi in plural formation?
Is it 2nd declension? Somehow it looks more 4th to me, though I don't know why.
I think it's a general rule that deverbal nouns in -us are 4th.
(lapsus 'a slip or fall' < lābī 'slip, fall')
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Will Parsons
Perhaps because it is, and you'd remembered that?
Maybe, but I'm wondering where I would have come across it. It's not
the sort of word one expects to meet in Caesar's Gallic Wars, or the
6th book of the Aeneid, or Ovid's poems about how much he hated living
on the Black Sea. No doubt we read other things, but I don't
immediately remember what: no Cicero, no Horace.... No Ars Amatoria
either: Our Ovid book was called "Easy Ovid", but in retrospect I think
the contents were chosen not because they were easy but because little
boys were not likely to find stimulating.
Therefore "easy" from the teacher's point of view.
Jerry Friedman
2017-04-24 00:07:49 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Will Parsons
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Quinn C
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Will Parsons
Post by Harrison Hill
I'm all for making up new words, but "xanthic"
meaning "yellowish", is a liverish new addition
to my vocabulary - or am being jaundiced?
This is not a direct response to your post, but...
As a child, I can remember rummaging through an unabridged dictionary under
the letter X, and seeing an entry for a botanical genus (?) name
"xanthoxylum". Quite some time later, I came upon the same name, now spelt
"zanthoxylum".
The latter spelling seems to be the now the accepted version, but why?
The X version is obviously the more "correct" version according to etymology,
so I surmise that whoever originally identified the genus (?),
Yes.
Post by Will Parsons
used the Z
spelling, and therefore got the right to spell the name however he saw fit.
Oddly enough, a Wikipedia article says the author, the Scotsman Philip
Miller, used the spelling with an X when he described it in 1768. I
don't know how it could have been validly changed.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zanthoxylum_americanum#Taxonomy
| original spelling; sometimes misspelled as "Xanthoxylum"
https://npgsweb.ars-grin.gov/gringlobal/taxonomygenus.aspx?id=13017
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Will Parsons
(I would still like someone - preferably one who actually *knows* something
about Classical languages - to have some say in how new species/genera should
be assigned scientific names.)
There is at least a rule that mistakes in gender concord between genus
and species get corrected, as do obvious lapsus (lapsuses?).
What about lapsi in plural formation?
Is it 2nd declension? Somehow it looks more 4th to me, though I don't know why.
Perhaps because it is, and you'd remembered that?
So if the Latin plural were to be used, the plural would be identical to the
singular, why is no doubt why we are accustomed to see Latin plurals of 1st,
2nd, and 3rd declension nouns in English, but not of 4th declension nouns (or
5th declension nouns, for that matter).
What I found odd about "lapsus" was that M-W firmly gave the plural as
"lapsus", whereas the plural of "campus" is "campuses". For "apparatus"
it gives you your choice, and that exhausts my knowledge of Latin
fourth-declension nouns. I guess it depends on the erudition of the
people who use the word.
Post by Will Parsons
(In Classical Latin, the plural is readily distinguishable from the singular
in pronunciation by having a long vowel.)
--
Jerry Friedman
Quinn C
2017-04-24 01:58:42 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Will Parsons
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Quinn C
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Will Parsons
(I would still like someone - preferably one who actually *knows* something
about Classical languages - to have some say in how new species/genera should
be assigned scientific names.)
There is at least a rule that mistakes in gender concord between genus
and species get corrected, as do obvious lapsus (lapsuses?).
What about lapsi in plural formation?
Is it 2nd declension? Somehow it looks more 4th to me, though I don't know why.
Perhaps because it is, and you'd remembered that?
So if the Latin plural were to be used, the plural would be identical to the
singular, why is no doubt why we are accustomed to see Latin plurals of 1st,
2nd, and 3rd declension nouns in English, but not of 4th declension nouns (or
5th declension nouns, for that matter).
What I found odd about "lapsus" was that M-W firmly gave the plural as
"lapsus", whereas the plural of "campus" is "campuses".
"campus" is 2nd declension, Latin plural campi.
Post by Jerry Friedman
For "apparatus"
it gives you your choice, and that exhausts my knowledge of Latin
fourth-declension nouns. I guess it depends on the erudition of the
people who use the word.
Some more commonly used in English in full -us form: census,
coitus, fetus, sinus, status, tinnitus. Only for "status" is the
Latin plural mentioned as an option in Wiktionary, the rest is
firmly in -es territory.
--
Humans write software and while a piece of software might be
bug free humans are not. - Robert Klemme
Jerry Friedman
2017-04-24 18:45:28 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Quinn C
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Will Parsons
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Quinn C
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Will Parsons
(I would still like someone - preferably one who actually *knows* something
about Classical languages - to have some say in how new species/genera should
be assigned scientific names.)
There is at least a rule that mistakes in gender concord between genus
and species get corrected, as do obvious lapsus (lapsuses?).
What about lapsi in plural formation?
Is it 2nd declension? Somehow it looks more 4th to me, though I don't know why.
Perhaps because it is, and you'd remembered that?
So if the Latin plural were to be used, the plural would be identical to the
singular, why is no doubt why we are accustomed to see Latin plurals of 1st,
2nd, and 3rd declension nouns in English, but not of 4th declension nouns (or
5th declension nouns, for that matter).
What I found odd about "lapsus" was that M-W firmly gave the plural as
"lapsus", whereas the plural of "campus" is "campuses".
"campus" is 2nd declension, Latin plural campi.
Oops.
Post by Quinn C
Post by Jerry Friedman
For "apparatus"
it gives you your choice, and that exhausts my knowledge of Latin
fourth-declension nouns. I guess it depends on the erudition of the
people who use the word.
Some more commonly used in English in full -us form: census,
coitus, fetus, sinus, status, tinnitus. Only for "status" is the
Latin plural mentioned as an option in Wiktionary, the rest is
firmly in -es territory.
I've never heard or seen "status" as a plural. I suppose I could
imagine it in "status quo (ante)", "status epilepticus", or
other Latin phrases, especially in older writing.
--
Jerry Friedman
Quinn C
2017-04-24 02:23:23 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Quinn C
Post by Jerry Friedman
There is at least a rule that mistakes in gender concord between genus
and species get corrected, as do obvious lapsus (lapsuses?).
What about lapsi in plural formation?
Is it 2nd declension? Somehow it looks more 4th to me, though I don't know why.
"Lapsi" was meant to be autological, exemplifying itself: this
plural formation is a lapsus in itself.
--
The bee must not pass judgment on the hive. (Voxish proverb)
-- Robert C. Wilson, Vortex (novel), p.125
Snidely
2017-04-25 08:20:44 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wednesday, Jerry Friedman pointed out that ...
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Will Parsons
Post by Harrison Hill
I'm all for making up new words, but "xanthic"
meaning "yellowish", is a liverish new addition
to my vocabulary - or am being jaundiced?
This is not a direct response to your post, but...
As a child, I can remember rummaging through an unabridged dictionary under
the letter X, and seeing an entry for a botanical genus (?) name
"xanthoxylum". Quite some time later, I came upon the same name, now spelt
"zanthoxylum".
The latter spelling seems to be the now the accepted version, but why?
The X version is obviously the more "correct" version according to
etymology, so I surmise that whoever originally identified the genus (?),
Yes.
Post by Will Parsons
used the Z
spelling, and therefore got the right to spell the name however he saw fit.
Oddly enough, a Wikipedia article says the author, the Scotsman Philip
Miller, used the spelling with an X when he described it in 1768. I
don't know how it could have been validly changed.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zanthoxylum_americanum#Taxonomy
Post by Will Parsons
(I would still like someone - preferably one who actually *knows* something
about Classical languages - to have some say in how new species/genera
should be assigned scientific names.)
There is at least a rule that mistakes in gender concord between genus
and species get corrected, as do obvious lapsus (lapsuses?).
I realize that leopard optics isn't your primary hobby, but perhaps
this would entertain you:

<URL:https://www.flickr.com/photos/tootsuite/33448080553>

If the mourning cloak butterfly might be found farther west than
Cincinatti, I think this is a "bingo!"

/dps
--
I have always been glad we weren't killed that night. I do not know
any particular reason, but I have always been glad.
_Roughing It_, Mark Twain
RH Draney
2017-04-12 06:57:10 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Harrison Hill
I'm all for making up new words, but "xanthic"
meaning "yellowish", is a liverish new addition
to my vocabulary - or am being jaundiced?
You could ask Pier Xanthony where he got the name for his signature
punworld....r
Loading...