Discussion:
legitimately
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a***@gmail.com
2018-01-12 07:14:25 UTC
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1) They legitimately doubted his account of the events at first, but whatever he
said was later verified.

2) They rightly doubted his account of the events at first, but whatever he
said was later verified.

3) They rightfully doubted his account of the events at first, but whatever he
said was later verified.

Which are grammatical?
Which are idiomatic?
Which make sense?

The doubt itself was legitimate, although he was telling the truth. Anybody in
their right mind would have doubted his account.

Gratefully,
Navi
Tony Cooper
2018-01-12 07:22:12 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
1) They legitimately doubted his account of the events at first, but whatever he
said was later verified.
2) They rightly doubted his account of the events at first, but whatever he
said was later verified.
3) They rightfully doubted his account of the events at first, but whatever he
said was later verified.
Which are grammatical?
Which are idiomatic?
Which make sense?
The doubt itself was legitimate, although he was telling the truth. Anybody in
their right mind would have doubted his account.
Gratefully,
Navi
I'll skip your three questions and say "They had a legitimate reason
to doubt his account of events...." is what I'd write.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Harrison Hill
2018-01-12 08:35:22 UTC
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1) They legitimately doubted his account of the events at first, but whatever he
said was later verified.
2) They rightly doubted his account of the events at first, but whatever he
said was later verified.
3) They rightfully doubted his account of the events at first, but whatever he
said was later verified.
Which are grammatical?
Which are idiomatic?
Which make sense?
The doubt itself was legitimate, although he was telling the truth. Anybody in
their right mind would have doubted his account.
"Legitimate" is the wrong word, as is "rightly" and "rightfully".

4) They HONESTLY doubted his account of the events at first, but
EVERYTHING HE HAD said was later verified.
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-01-12 12:48:13 UTC
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Post by Harrison Hill
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) They legitimately doubted his account of the events at first, but whatever he
said was later verified.
2) They rightly doubted his account of the events at first, but whatever he
said was later verified.
3) They rightfully doubted his account of the events at first, but whatever he
said was later verified.
Which are grammatical?
Which are idiomatic?
Which make sense?
The doubt itself was legitimate, although he was telling the truth. Anybody in
their right mind would have doubted his account.
"Legitimate" is the wrong word, as is "rightly" and "rightfully".
4) They HONESTLY doubted his account of the events at first, but
EVERYTHING HE HAD said was later verified.
I disagree. The sentences are all clearly meant to indicate that there
existed good reasons for doubt. It's not about the state of mind of
the 'accusers' at all. 'Honestly' conveys only that the 'accusers' could
truthfully say that they doubted the account. It says nothing about
the legitimacy of those doubts. "We believe you are lying", is an
entirely different thing to, "We have good reason to believe you're
lying."
Peter T. Daniels
2018-01-12 13:27:21 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
1) They legitimately doubted his account of the events at first, but whatever he
said was later verified.
2) They rightly doubted his account of the events at first, but whatever he
said was later verified.
3) They rightfully doubted his account of the events at first, but whatever he
said was later verified.
Which are grammatical?
Which are idiomatic?
Which make sense?
The doubt itself was legitimate, although he was telling the truth. Anybody in
their right mind would have doubted his account.
You might mean "everything" rather than "whatever." But who can tell?
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