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planned
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a***@gmail.com
2018-06-11 00:35:40 UTC
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1) I can't come to your party tomorrow. I have things planned.
Meaning: I have plans.

2) I am seriously in love with her and I have things planned, but I don't think
her father will let her.
Meaning: I have serious plans for all relationship (presumably marriage) but
her father won't allow her to make my plans come true.

3) I want to open a bakery. I have things planned.
4) I want to open a bakery. I have everything planned.
Meaning: I have planned how I am going to do it.

Are '1', '2', '3' and '4' grammatically correct with the given meanings?
Are they idiomatic?

Gratefully,
Navi
Richard Yates
2018-06-11 01:17:04 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
1) I can't come to your party tomorrow. I have things planned.
Meaning: I have plans.
2) I am seriously in love with her and I have things planned, but I don't think
her father will let her.
Meaning: I have serious plans for all relationship (presumably marriage) but
her father won't allow her to make my plans come true.
3) I want to open a bakery. I have things planned.
4) I want to open a bakery. I have everything planned.
Meaning: I have planned how I am going to do it.
Are '1', '2', '3' and '4' grammatically correct with the given meanings?
Are they idiomatic?
Yes.
Yes.
a***@gmail.com
2018-06-11 02:02:47 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
1) I can't come to your party tomorrow. I have things planned.
Meaning: I have plans.
2) I am seriously in love with her and I have things planned, but I don't think
her father will let her.
Meaning: I have serious plans for all relationship (presumably marriage) but
her father won't allow her to make my plans come true.
3) I want to open a bakery. I have things planned.
4) I want to open a bakery. I have everything planned.
Meaning: I have planned how I am going to do it.
Are '1', '2', '3' and '4' grammatically correct with the given meanings?
Are they idiomatic?
Yes.
Yes.
Thank you very much, Richard,

I made a typo in my post. I just noticed it.

It should be:
Meaning: I have serious plans for OUR relationship (presumably marriage) but
her father won't allow her to make my plans come true.

I had written 'all' instead of 'our'.

My apologies.

Respectfully,
Navi
Snidely
2018-06-13 08:20:40 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) I can't come to your party tomorrow. I have things planned.
Meaning: I have plans.
2) I am seriously in love with her and I have things planned, but I don't
think her father will let her.
Meaning: I have serious plans for all relationship (presumably marriage)
but her father won't allow her to make my plans come true.
3) I want to open a bakery. I have things planned.
4) I want to open a bakery. I have everything planned.
Meaning: I have planned how I am going to do it.
Are '1', '2', '3' and '4' grammatically correct with the given meanings?
Are they idiomatic?
Yes.
Sure.
Post by a***@gmail.com
Yes.
Maybe. I don't think 3) is idiomatic for the intended meaning. I wold
couple it instead with something like, "I want to do A. It's one of my
plans." Or maybe, "I want to do A. It helps me with my plans [for B],
e.g. World Conquest]." Or even "Right now I want to do A. I keep
coming up with plans, and right now that's it."
Post by a***@gmail.com
Thank you very much, Richard,
I made a typo in my post. I just noticed it.
Meaning: I have serious plans for OUR relationship (presumably marriage) but
her father won't allow her to make my plans come true.
I had written 'all' instead of 'our'.
I suspect most of us didn't notice until you pointed it out.
Post by a***@gmail.com
My apologies.
Respectfully,
Navi
Every once in a while, could you slip in a message that wasn't
exploring the dark corners of the language cupboard?

/dps
--
Ieri, oggi, domani
a***@gmail.com
2018-06-13 17:20:40 UTC
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Post by Snidely
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) I can't come to your party tomorrow. I have things planned.
Meaning: I have plans.
2) I am seriously in love with her and I have things planned, but I don't
think her father will let her.
Meaning: I have serious plans for all relationship (presumably marriage)
but her father won't allow her to make my plans come true.
3) I want to open a bakery. I have things planned.
4) I want to open a bakery. I have everything planned.
Meaning: I have planned how I am going to do it.
Are '1', '2', '3' and '4' grammatically correct with the given meanings?
Are they idiomatic?
Yes.
Sure.
Post by a***@gmail.com
Yes.
Maybe. I don't think 3) is idiomatic for the intended meaning. I wold
couple it instead with something like, "I want to do A. It's one of my
plans." Or maybe, "I want to do A. It helps me with my plans [for B],
e.g. World Conquest]." Or even "Right now I want to do A. I keep
coming up with plans, and right now that's it."
Post by a***@gmail.com
Thank you very much, Richard,
I made a typo in my post. I just noticed it.
Meaning: I have serious plans for OUR relationship (presumably marriage) but
her father won't allow her to make my plans come true.
I had written 'all' instead of 'our'.
I suspect most of us didn't notice until you pointed it out.
Post by a***@gmail.com
My apologies.
Respectfully,
Navi
Every once in a while, could you slip in a message that wasn't
exploring the dark corners of the language cupboard?
/dps
--
Ieri, oggi, domani
Thank you very much, Snidely,

Every time I ask a question, I think that it would be extremely simple to
answer for a native speaker. I am sort of blind. I don't know which corners
are dark.

Gratefully,
Navi
a***@gmail.com
2018-06-13 17:24:53 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by Snidely
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) I can't come to your party tomorrow. I have things planned.
Meaning: I have plans.
2) I am seriously in love with her and I have things planned, but I don't
think her father will let her.
Meaning: I have serious plans for all relationship (presumably marriage)
but her father won't allow her to make my plans come true.
3) I want to open a bakery. I have things planned.
4) I want to open a bakery. I have everything planned.
Meaning: I have planned how I am going to do it.
Are '1', '2', '3' and '4' grammatically correct with the given meanings?
Are they idiomatic?
Yes.
Sure.
Post by a***@gmail.com
Yes.
Maybe. I don't think 3) is idiomatic for the intended meaning. I wold
couple it instead with something like, "I want to do A. It's one of my
plans." Or maybe, "I want to do A. It helps me with my plans [for B],
e.g. World Conquest]." Or even "Right now I want to do A. I keep
coming up with plans, and right now that's it."
Post by a***@gmail.com
Thank you very much, Richard,
I made a typo in my post. I just noticed it.
Meaning: I have serious plans for OUR relationship (presumably marriage) but
her father won't allow her to make my plans come true.
I had written 'all' instead of 'our'.
I suspect most of us didn't notice until you pointed it out.
Post by a***@gmail.com
My apologies.
Respectfully,
Navi
Every once in a while, could you slip in a message that wasn't
exploring the dark corners of the language cupboard?
/dps
--
Ieri, oggi, domani
Thank you very much, Snidely,
Every time I ask a question, I think that it would be extremely simple to
answer for a native speaker. I am sort of blind. I don't know which corners
are dark.
Gratefully,
Navi
PS.

To me,


3) I want to open a bakery. I have things planned.

was supposed to mean:

I have planned things for opening a bakery. I know how I am going to go about
opening a bakery. I will take a loan from the bank, hire a baker....

Gratefully,
Navi

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