Discussion:
turn it around
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a***@gmail.com
2018-01-10 06:00:06 UTC
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1) We can produce quality work and turn it around very quickly.

Source:
https://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/american/turn-around

The dictionary says the definition of turn around is:

to complete a piece of work, process, or activity within a particular time

My problem with '1' is that the 'turning around' seems to take place after
the production is over.

Is '1' grammatical and does it make sense (as far as the temporal order of
things is considered)?

I think the meaning is we can design something really good and then produce
whatever has been designed at a rapid rate.

---------

Another related question:

Does 'turned around' mean 'disoriented' in all varieties of English?

Gratefully,
Navi
b***@aol.com
2018-01-10 06:21:31 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
1) We can produce quality work and turn it around very quickly.
https://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/american/turn-around
to complete a piece of work, process, or activity within a particular time
My problem with '1' is that the 'turning around' seems to take place after
the production is over.
i understand "and" as indicating simultaneous, not consecutive actions, so that the sentence actually means "We can produce quality work with a short
turnaround time".
Post by a***@gmail.com
Is '1' grammatical and does it make sense (as far as the temporal order of
things is considered)?
I think the meaning is we can design something really good and then produce
whatever has been designed at a rapid rate.
---------
Does 'turned around' mean 'disoriented' in all varieties of English?
Gratefully,
Navi
Tony Cooper
2018-01-10 07:18:52 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
1) We can produce quality work and turn it around very quickly.
https://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/american/turn-around
to complete a piece of work, process, or activity within a particular time
My problem with '1' is that the 'turning around' seems to take place after
the production is over.
Is '1' grammatical and does it make sense (as far as the temporal order of
things is considered)?
I think the meaning is we can design something really good and then produce
whatever has been designed at a rapid rate.
I don't think you have a handle on it.

In the work context, the "turn-around" is the amount of time it takes
to complete the process. The "turn-around" can be specific (Our
turn-around for processing orders is 3 days") or it can be general
(Our turn-around for completing orders is the fastest in the industry)

It's an error above in using "turning around" in this context. Just
"turn-around".

Neither quality of the work or process nor speed of completing the
process is inherent in the use. "Our turn-around in completing orders
is the slowest in the industry and our products are shoddy." can be a
correct statement.

The "process" above is from the time the order is received until the
time the order is shipped or ready for pick-up. The total time
involved is the "turn-around". This includes whatever is done
in-house to create the order, whatever is done to prepare the product
(manufacturing it or pulling it from inventory) for delivery, and
packaging it for shipment or pick-up.

To put it in a real world example, if you call a company and order a
custom screenprinted tee shirt, you may be told their turn-around is
two weeks. That means they expect your shirt to be shipped from their
office or ready for you to pick up two weeks from the day you place
the order.
Post by a***@gmail.com
Does 'turned around' mean 'disoriented' in all varieties of English?
No, one meaning is things have been reversed or had opposite results
from something previous. The University of Central Florida won 0
football games in 2015 and lost 12 games under coach George O'Leary.
The University of Central Florida won 13 football games in 2017 and
lost 0 games under coach Scott Frost. Frost turned around the team's
fortunes. No disorientation was involved.

Something that has "turned around" can go from very good to very bad
or from very bad to very good.

Another meaning is the disoriented definition when a person says they
were all turned around.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
a***@gmail.com
2018-01-10 07:53:36 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) We can produce quality work and turn it around very quickly.
https://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/american/turn-around
to complete a piece of work, process, or activity within a particular time
My problem with '1' is that the 'turning around' seems to take place after
the production is over.
Is '1' grammatical and does it make sense (as far as the temporal order of
things is considered)?
I think the meaning is we can design something really good and then produce
whatever has been designed at a rapid rate.
I don't think you have a handle on it.
In the work context, the "turn-around" is the amount of time it takes
to complete the process. The "turn-around" can be specific (Our
turn-around for processing orders is 3 days") or it can be general
(Our turn-around for completing orders is the fastest in the industry)
It's an error above in using "turning around" in this context. Just
"turn-around".
Neither quality of the work or process nor speed of completing the
process is inherent in the use. "Our turn-around in completing orders
is the slowest in the industry and our products are shoddy." can be a
correct statement.
The "process" above is from the time the order is received until the
time the order is shipped or ready for pick-up. The total time
involved is the "turn-around". This includes whatever is done
in-house to create the order, whatever is done to prepare the product
(manufacturing it or pulling it from inventory) for delivery, and
packaging it for shipment or pick-up.
To put it in a real world example, if you call a company and order a
custom screenprinted tee shirt, you may be told their turn-around is
two weeks. That means they expect your shirt to be shipped from their
office or ready for you to pick up two weeks from the day you place
the order.
Post by a***@gmail.com
Does 'turned around' mean 'disoriented' in all varieties of English?
No, one meaning is things have been reversed or had opposite results
from something previous. The University of Central Florida won 0
football games in 2015 and lost 12 games under coach George O'Leary.
The University of Central Florida won 13 football games in 2017 and
lost 0 games under coach Scott Frost. Frost turned around the team's
fortunes. No disorientation was involved.
Something that has "turned around" can go from very good to very bad
or from very bad to very good.
Another meaning is the disoriented definition when a person says they
were all turned around.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Thank you both very much,

Tony, that was a wonderful explanation. I guess the two processes happen at the
same time and the 'and' is indeed simultaneous, as Bebe... says.

I have to admit I was wide off the mark.


I think heard 'I am turned around.' Would that work? And do you know if
it is used in British English? It is not that important to me, but I am just
curious.

Gratefully,
Navi.
Harrison Hill
2018-01-10 08:37:45 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) We can produce quality work and turn it around very quickly.
https://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/american/turn-around
to complete a piece of work, process, or activity within a particular time
My problem with '1' is that the 'turning around' seems to take place after
the production is over.
Is '1' grammatical and does it make sense (as far as the temporal order of
things is considered)?
I think the meaning is we can design something really good and then produce
whatever has been designed at a rapid rate.
I don't think you have a handle on it.
In the work context, the "turn-around" is the amount of time it takes
to complete the process. The "turn-around" can be specific (Our
turn-around for processing orders is 3 days") or it can be general
(Our turn-around for completing orders is the fastest in the industry)
It's an error above in using "turning around" in this context. Just
"turn-around".
Neither quality of the work or process nor speed of completing the
process is inherent in the use. "Our turn-around in completing orders
is the slowest in the industry and our products are shoddy." can be a
correct statement.
The "process" above is from the time the order is received until the
time the order is shipped or ready for pick-up. The total time
involved is the "turn-around". This includes whatever is done
in-house to create the order, whatever is done to prepare the product
(manufacturing it or pulling it from inventory) for delivery, and
packaging it for shipment or pick-up.
To put it in a real world example, if you call a company and order a
custom screenprinted tee shirt, you may be told their turn-around is
two weeks. That means they expect your shirt to be shipped from their
office or ready for you to pick up two weeks from the day you place
the order.
Post by a***@gmail.com
Does 'turned around' mean 'disoriented' in all varieties of English?
No, one meaning is things have been reversed or had opposite results
from something previous. The University of Central Florida won 0
football games in 2015 and lost 12 games under coach George O'Leary.
The University of Central Florida won 13 football games in 2017 and
lost 0 games under coach Scott Frost. Frost turned around the team's
fortunes. No disorientation was involved.
Something that has "turned around" can go from very good to very bad
or from very bad to very good.
Another meaning is the disoriented definition when a person says they
were all turned around.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Thank you both very much,
Tony, that was a wonderful explanation. I guess the two processes happen at the
same time and the 'and' is indeed simultaneous, as Bebe... says.
I have to admit I was wide off the mark.
I think heard 'I am turned around.' Would that work? And do you know if
it is used in British English? It is not that important to me, but I am just
curious.
Gratefully,
Navi.
Tony's "all turned around" - meaning "disoriented" - is not a BrE
expression that I have ever heard; and we prefer "disorientated".

Nor have I ever heard "I am turned around" except in an improbable
sense of: "I have my back to you", "I am facing the other way".
Tony Cooper
2018-01-10 14:17:31 UTC
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On Wed, 10 Jan 2018 00:37:45 -0800 (PST), Harrison Hill
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) We can produce quality work and turn it around very quickly.
https://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/american/turn-around
to complete a piece of work, process, or activity within a particular time
My problem with '1' is that the 'turning around' seems to take place after
the production is over.
Is '1' grammatical and does it make sense (as far as the temporal order of
things is considered)?
I think the meaning is we can design something really good and then produce
whatever has been designed at a rapid rate.
I don't think you have a handle on it.
In the work context, the "turn-around" is the amount of time it takes
to complete the process. The "turn-around" can be specific (Our
turn-around for processing orders is 3 days") or it can be general
(Our turn-around for completing orders is the fastest in the industry)
It's an error above in using "turning around" in this context. Just
"turn-around".
Neither quality of the work or process nor speed of completing the
process is inherent in the use. "Our turn-around in completing orders
is the slowest in the industry and our products are shoddy." can be a
correct statement.
The "process" above is from the time the order is received until the
time the order is shipped or ready for pick-up. The total time
involved is the "turn-around". This includes whatever is done
in-house to create the order, whatever is done to prepare the product
(manufacturing it or pulling it from inventory) for delivery, and
packaging it for shipment or pick-up.
To put it in a real world example, if you call a company and order a
custom screenprinted tee shirt, you may be told their turn-around is
two weeks. That means they expect your shirt to be shipped from their
office or ready for you to pick up two weeks from the day you place
the order.
Post by a***@gmail.com
Does 'turned around' mean 'disoriented' in all varieties of English?
No, one meaning is things have been reversed or had opposite results
from something previous. The University of Central Florida won 0
football games in 2015 and lost 12 games under coach George O'Leary.
The University of Central Florida won 13 football games in 2017 and
lost 0 games under coach Scott Frost. Frost turned around the team's
fortunes. No disorientation was involved.
Something that has "turned around" can go from very good to very bad
or from very bad to very good.
Another meaning is the disoriented definition when a person says they
were all turned around.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Thank you both very much,
Tony, that was a wonderful explanation. I guess the two processes happen at the
same time and the 'and' is indeed simultaneous, as Bebe... says.
I have to admit I was wide off the mark.
I think heard 'I am turned around.' Would that work? And do you know if
it is used in British English? It is not that important to me, but I am just
curious.
Gratefully,
Navi.
Tony's "all turned around" - meaning "disoriented" - is not a BrE
expression that I have ever heard; and we prefer "disorientated".
Nor have I ever heard "I am turned around" except in an improbable
sense of: "I have my back to you", "I am facing the other way".
The phrase "I'm all turned around" is like saying "I'm all mixed up".
(Note the "all" in my version)
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Rich Ulrich
2018-01-10 17:46:24 UTC
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On Wed, 10 Jan 2018 09:17:31 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
On Wed, 10 Jan 2018 00:37:45 -0800 (PST), Harrison Hill
Post by Harrison Hill
Tony's "all turned around" - meaning "disoriented" - is not a BrE
expression that I have ever heard; and we prefer "disorientated".
Nor have I ever heard "I am turned around" except in an improbable
sense of: "I have my back to you", "I am facing the other way".
The phrase "I'm all turned around" is like saying "I'm all mixed up".
(Note the "all" in my version)
I agree that "I'm all turned around" means "all mixed up" but
"I'm turned around" is possible, too, when followed by further
explication. It would translate as a lesser difficulty, like, "I
think I've been facing south when I thought I was facing east,
but I believe I'm about to get properly oriented."
--
Rich Ulrich
Peter Moylan
2018-01-11 00:41:51 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
On Wed, 10 Jan 2018 00:37:45 -0800 (PST), Harrison Hill
Post by Harrison Hill
Tony's "all turned around" - meaning "disoriented" - is not a BrE
expression that I have ever heard; and we prefer "disorientated".
Nor have I ever heard "I am turned around" except in an improbable
sense of: "I have my back to you", "I am facing the other way".
The phrase "I'm all turned around" is like saying "I'm all mixed up".
(Note the "all" in my version)
The only times I've heard "turned around" to mean "disorient(at)ed" were
in the context of becoming lost in the geographical sense. There was a
case in the paper just last week. A bushwalker went off the trail to
look at something, and the side trip turned him around so that he
couldn't re-find the trail. They found him five days later, still alive.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Peter T. Daniels
2018-01-10 15:17:37 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
1) We can produce quality work and turn it around very quickly.
https://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/american/turn-around
to complete a piece of work, process, or activity within a particular time
My problem with '1' is that the 'turning around' seems to take place after
the production is over.
Is '1' grammatical and does it make sense (as far as the temporal order of
things is considered)?
How would grammaticality come into it at all?
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