Discussion:
Athelney
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Mallocy
2018-01-08 13:01:15 UTC
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I always believed that the place-name Athelney (Somerset, England)
was pronounced with the stress on the first syllable. Am I mistaken?

The BBC always have the stress on the second syllable of Athelney Jones,
the Scotland Yard detective who is 'helped' by Sherlock Holmes.

Perhaps it's different when used as a christian name: I have never
come across anyone so named in real life.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-01-09 13:01:21 UTC
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Post by Mallocy
I always believed that the place-name Athelney (Somerset, England)
was pronounced with the stress on the first syllable. Am I mistaken?
I've always pronounced with first-syllable stress (on the rare
occasions that I pronounce it at all), but I don't know if that is how
the locals say it.

John Wells's blog (generally very reliable: he knew what he was talking
about) has a discussion about this at
http://phonetic-blog.blogspot.fr/2013/03/atherton.html, mainly
concerned with Atherton (near Manchester), but mentioning Athelney and
similar names. Most of the discussion was about whether the th is [θ]
or [ð], but all of his phonetic representations show first-syllable
stress.

My own name is ['æθl̩stən], or ['æθl̩] for short, and as far I know
it's always pronounced with stress on the first syllable. It also has
[θ], but I think historically, for example in the time of King
Athelstan, it had [ð].
Post by Mallocy
The BBC always have the stress on the second syllable of Athelney Jones,
the Scotland Yard detective who is 'helped' by Sherlock Holmes.
Perhaps it's different when used as a christian name: I have never
come across anyone so named in real life.
--
athel
Will Parsons
2018-01-09 21:00:55 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Mallocy
I always believed that the place-name Athelney (Somerset, England)
was pronounced with the stress on the first syllable. Am I mistaken?
I've always pronounced with first-syllable stress (on the rare
occasions that I pronounce it at all), but I don't know if that is how
the locals say it.
John Wells's blog (generally very reliable: he knew what he was talking
about) has a discussion about this at
http://phonetic-blog.blogspot.fr/2013/03/atherton.html, mainly
concerned with Atherton (near Manchester), but mentioning Athelney and
similar names. Most of the discussion was about whether the th is [θ]
or [ð], but all of his phonetic representations show first-syllable
stress.
My own name is ['æθl̩stən], or ['æθl̩] for short, and as far I know
it's always pronounced with stress on the first syllable. It also has
[θ], but I think historically, for example in the time of King
Athelstan, it had [ð].
Yes, that's true.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Mallocy
The BBC always have the stress on the second syllable of Athelney Jones,
the Scotland Yard detective who is 'helped' by Sherlock Holmes.
Perhaps it's different when used as a christian name: I have never
come across anyone so named in real life.
The accent on the second syllable is certainly not historical. An
interesting parallel lies in the name "Sigourney", the surname of a
19th century poetess (nowadays one would say "female poet") active in
Hartford, Connecticut. (There's still a street named after her in
Hartford.) The name (of both the poet and the street) is pronounced
on the first syllable, [ˈsɪɡə(ɹ)ni]. Most people now, though,
associate the name with the actress, Sigourney Weaver, whose first
name is accented on the second syllable.
--
Will
RH Draney
2018-01-09 21:45:17 UTC
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Post by Will Parsons
The accent on the second syllable is certainly not historical. An
interesting parallel lies in the name "Sigourney", the surname of a
19th century poetess (nowadays one would say "female poet") active in
Hartford, Connecticut. (There's still a street named after her in
Hartford.) The name (of both the poet and the street) is pronounced
on the first syllable, [ˈsɪɡə(ɹ)ni]. Most people now, though,
associate the name with the actress, Sigourney Weaver, whose first
name is accented on the second syllable.
And whose real name is Susan, following a family tradition (her father,
late president of the National Broadcasting Company, was Sylvester but
known to one and all as "Pat", and her uncle Winstead used the name
"Doodles" professionally)....r
Lewis
2018-01-10 03:46:33 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by Will Parsons
The accent on the second syllable is certainly not historical. An
interesting parallel lies in the name "Sigourney", the surname of a
19th century poetess (nowadays one would say "female poet") active in
Hartford, Connecticut. (There's still a street named after her in
Hartford.) The name (of both the poet and the street) is pronounced
on the first syllable, [ˈsɪɡə(ɹ)ni]. Most people now, though,
associate the name with the actress, Sigourney Weaver, whose first
name is accented on the second syllable.
And whose real name is Susan, following a family tradition (her father,
late president of the National Broadcasting Company, was Sylvester but
known to one and all as "Pat",
That sounds oddly like a Beatles song...
Post by RH Draney
and her uncle Winstead used the name
"Doodles" professionally)....r
Was he a mobster or a cartoonist?
--
It's Tchaikovsky's 'Another One Bites the Dust'," said Crowley, closing
his eyes as they went through Slough.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-01-10 04:24:12 UTC
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Post by Will Parsons
The accent on the second syllable is certainly not historical. An
interesting parallel lies in the name "Sigourney", the surname of a
19th century poetess (nowadays one would say "female poet") active in
Nowadays one would say "poet." Her sex or gender is not relevant to the question.
Reinhold {Rey} Aman
2018-01-10 18:30:13 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
An interesting parallel lies in the name "Sigourney", the surname
of a 19th century poetess (nowadays one would say "female poet")
Nowadays one would say "poet."
^^^
If "one" is a "sensitive" p.c. asshole,
as the actress said to the waitress.

See the "sensitive" p.c. asshole:
Loading Image...
--
~~~ Reinhold {Rey} Aman ~~~
Harrison Hill
2018-01-10 19:46:36 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Mallocy
I always believed that the place-name Athelney (Somerset, England)
was pronounced with the stress on the first syllable. Am I mistaken?
I've always pronounced with first-syllable stress (on the rare
occasions that I pronounce it at all), but I don't know if that is how
the locals say it.
John Wells's blog (generally very reliable: he knew what he was talking
about) has a discussion about this at
http://phonetic-blog.blogspot.fr/2013/03/atherton.html, mainly
concerned with Atherton (near Manchester), but mentioning Athelney and
similar names. Most of the discussion was about whether the th is [θ]
or [ð], but all of his phonetic representations show first-syllable
stress.
My own name is ['æθl̩stən], or ['æθl̩] for short, and as far I know
it's always pronounced with stress on the first syllable. It also has
[θ], but I think historically, for example in the time of King
Athelstan, it had [ð].
Post by Mallocy
The BBC always have the stress on the second syllable of Athelney Jones,
the Scotland Yard detective who is 'helped' by Sherlock Holmes.
Perhaps it's different when used as a christian name: I have never
come across anyone so named in real life.
Athelstan aka Aethelstan? The first King of England? The king who
united Wessex and Mercia?

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