Discussion:
How do you in find?
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Paul Carmichael
2017-10-09 15:07:13 UTC
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Just saw this on Duolingo (where I'm attempting to learn German and French)

"In American english one can say "How do you in find this design?" . It would mean, What
do you think of this design? Too busy, too dull, too big etc."

Is this person correct in asserting that?

I've never seen any such construct. But then I don't speak to Americans much.
--
Paul.

https://paulc.es/
https://asetrad.org
Lanarcam
2017-10-09 15:10:53 UTC
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Post by Paul Carmichael
Just saw this on Duolingo (where I'm attempting to learn German and French)
Gute idée !
Richard Tobin
2017-10-09 15:17:26 UTC
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Post by Paul Carmichael
"In American english one can say "How do you in find this design?" . It
would mean, What do you think of this design? Too busy, too dull, too
big etc."
I think the "in" is just a typo. It should be "how do you find this
design".

-- Richard
Jerry Friedman
2017-10-09 17:06:16 UTC
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Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Paul Carmichael
"In American english one can say "How do you in find this design?" . It
would mean, What do you think of this design? Too busy, too dull, too
big etc."
I think the "in" is just a typo. It should be "how do you find this
design".
This is an American endorsement of your suggestion.
--
Jerry Friedman
Peter T. Daniels
2017-10-09 21:17:07 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Paul Carmichael
"In American english one can say "How do you in find this design?" . It
would mean, What do you think of this design? Too busy, too dull, too
big etc."
I think the "in" is just a typo. It should be "how do you find this
design".
This is an American endorsement of your suggestion.
+ another

(Is the corrected version unusual in BrE?)
Richard Tobin
2017-10-09 22:34:07 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Paul Carmichael
"In American english one can say "How do you in find this design?" . It
would mean, What do you think of this design? Too busy, too dull, too
big etc."
I think the "in" is just a typo. It should be "how do you find this
design".
This is an American endorsement of your suggestion.
+ another
(Is the corrected version unusual in BrE?)
No, it's perfectly normal British English.

-- Richard
Paul Carmichael
2017-10-10 07:39:09 UTC
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Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Paul Carmichael
"In American english one can say "How do you in find this design?" . It
would mean, What do you think of this design? Too busy, too dull, too
big etc."
I think the "in" is just a typo. It should be "how do you find this
design".
This is an American endorsement of your suggestion.
+ another
(Is the corrected version unusual in BrE?)
No, it's perfectly normal British English.
I've never heard it. "What do you think of this design?" would be normal.
--
Paul.

https://paulc.es/
https://asetrad.org
musika
2017-10-10 08:42:13 UTC
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Re: "how do you find"
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Richard Tobin
No, it's perfectly normal British English.
I've never heard it. "What do you think of this design?" would be normal.
Have you never heard the old joke?

Waiter: "How did you find your steak, sir?
Diner: "I just lifted a chip and there it was."
--
Ray
UK
Paul Carmichael
2017-10-10 11:04:01 UTC
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Post by musika
Re: "how do you find"
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Richard Tobin
No, it's perfectly normal British English.
I've never heard it. "What do you think of this design?" would be normal.
Have you never heard the old joke?
Waiter: "How did you find your steak, sir?
Diner: "I just lifted a chip and there it was."
Context, I suppose. I'm pretty sure I've never heard it in the context "how do you find?".
--
Paul.

https://paulc.es/
https://asetrad.org
s***@gmail.com
2017-10-10 01:42:08 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Paul Carmichael
"In American english one can say "How do you in find this design?" . It
would mean, What do you think of this design? Too busy, too dull, too
big etc."
I think the "in" is just a typo. It should be "how do you find this
design".
This is an American endorsement of your suggestion.
+ another
+0.5. I would understand it, but I wouldn't use it much.
I'd stick with "what do you think of".
I might use "how did you find Tim [to be]?",
in asking about somebody's well-being or behavior.
("How did you find Tim's lecture style?", maybe.)
Post by Peter T. Daniels
(Is the corrected version unusual in BrE?)
/dps
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