Discussion:
Using "in" with "experience"
Add Reply
Robert Green
2018-05-01 12:05:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
I frequently see people write on their resumes for a teaching job that
they have "a great deal of experience in teaching people" one thing or
another.

It seems to me, however, that the proper way for a person to describe
his or her experience is to omit "in," so that the sentence reads, " I
have a great deal of experience teaching people" this or that thing.

Alternatively, I often wonder whether it would not be even better to
use the present perfect tense by writing, "I have had a great deal of
experience teaching people. . ., " as doing that indicates that the
experience was gained and still exists.

I was therefore wondering which of those sentences people here prefer.

Thanks very much in advance for your opinions.

---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-01 13:23:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Green
I frequently see people write on their resumes for a teaching job that
they have "a great deal of experience in teaching people" one thing or
another.
It seems to me, however, that the proper way for a person to describe
his or her experience is to omit "in," so that the sentence reads, " I
have a great deal of experience teaching people" this or that thing.
Alternatively, I often wonder whether it would not be even better to
use the present perfect tense by writing, "I have had a great deal of
experience teaching people. . ., " as doing that indicates that the
experience was gained and still exists.
I was therefore wondering which of those sentences people here prefer.
Thanks very much in advance for your opinions.
You will be welcome.

None are incorrect, but your original version (the one you don't like)
seems most natural because of its rhythm. The third version isn't ideal
on a résumé because it's a bit wordy.
Robert Green
2018-05-01 14:02:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Tue, 1 May 2018 06:23:00 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
You will be welcome.
When would that be?

---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-01 14:19:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Green
On Tue, 1 May 2018 06:23:00 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
You will be welcome.
When would that be?
Presumably after your advance thanks become operative.
CDB
2018-05-01 14:24:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Green
Post by Peter T. Daniels
You will be welcome.
When would that be?
Nicely fielded.
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-05-01 13:24:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Green
I frequently see people write on their resumes for a teaching job that
they have "a great deal of experience in teaching people" one thing or
another.
It seems to me, however, that the proper way for a person to describe
his or her experience is to omit "in," so that the sentence reads, " I
have a great deal of experience teaching people" this or that thing.
Alternatively, I often wonder whether it would not be even better to
use the present perfect tense by writing, "I have had a great deal of
experience teaching people. . ., " as doing that indicates that the
experience was gained and still exists.
I was therefore wondering which of those sentences people here prefer.
Thanks very much in advance for your opinions.
I have a great deal of experience in youth club management.

There you go. Can't remove the 'in' in that one so there's no
obvious reason to do so in the others. As for the past tense,
that would actually appear to work against what you intend.
If I say I have had experience that tends to suggest that such
experience is not recent and up to date.
Robert Green
2018-05-01 13:56:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Tue, 1 May 2018 06:24:14 -0700 (PDT), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
<***@googlemail.com> wrote:

Thanks for the opinion, but the sentence below, which you wrote, does
not have a gerund following "in."
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
I have a great deal of experience in youth club management.
A sentence comparable to the one I was questioning would be "I have a
great deal of experience in managing youth clubs" -- which, imo, would
be better as "I have a great deal of experience managing youth clubs."
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
As for the past tense, that would actually appear to work against what you intend.
If I say I have had experience that tends to suggest that such
experience is not recent and up to date.
On the contrary, if I'm not mistaken, "have had" is not the past
tense; it is the present perfect tense, which implies that a past
action or its results are ongoing.






---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-01 14:22:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Green
On Tue, 1 May 2018 06:24:14 -0700 (PDT), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Thanks for the opinion, but the sentence below, which you wrote, does
not have a gerund following "in."
That's the point. Why should a sentence with a gerund in that position
be treated differently from a sentence with another sort of nominal in
that position?
Post by Robert Green
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
I have a great deal of experience in youth club management.
A sentence comparable to the one I was questioning would be "I have a
great deal of experience in managing youth clubs" -- which, imo, would
be better as "I have a great deal of experience managing youth clubs."
The "management" and "managing" sentences are not synonymous.
Post by Robert Green
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
As for the past tense, that would actually appear to work against what you intend.
If I say I have had experience that tends to suggest that such
experience is not recent and up to date.
On the contrary, if I'm not mistaken, "have had" is not the past
tense; it is the present perfect tense, which implies that a past
action or its results are ongoing.
Sometimes it does, sometimes it doesn't. Here, because it is not the
usual way of saying it, a question arises as to why you are saying it
in an unusual way -- what are you trying to conceal?
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-05-01 14:22:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Green
On Tue, 1 May 2018 06:24:14 -0700 (PDT), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Thanks for the opinion, but the sentence below, which you wrote, does
not have a gerund following "in."
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
I have a great deal of experience in youth club management.
A sentence comparable to the one I was questioning would be "I have a
great deal of experience in managing youth clubs" -- which, imo, would
be better as "I have a great deal of experience managing youth clubs."
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
As for the past tense, that would actually appear to work against what you intend.
If I say I have had experience that tends to suggest that such
experience is not recent and up to date.
On the contrary, if I'm not mistaken, "have had" is not the past
tense; it is the present perfect tense, which implies that a past
action or its results are ongoing.
This is what happens when you get bogged down in technical
distinctions. There are two tense 'families' in English, past and
present. The present perfect is in the former!

I have had my tea = I completed the meal some time ago
I have had experience = I completed my experience some time ago
Robert Green
2018-05-01 15:12:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Tue, 1 May 2018 07:22:28 -0700 (PDT), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
This is what happens when you get bogged down in technical
distinctions. There are two tense 'families' in English, past and
present. The present perfect is in the former!
Why then does every grammar guide differentiate the two?
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
I have had my tea = I completed the meal some time ago.
I have had experience = I completed my experience some time ago.
The reason is, imo, that a distinction exists between the past perfect
"I have had my tea" and the simple past "I had my tea," as the
following thread on stackexchange.com explained a few years ago:

"I have had lunch" emphasises that my need for food is currently still
satisfied. . . "I had lunch" literally means that in the implied
period of the past I did happen to eat something for lunch, but it
doesn't have any particular implications on the present.

The difference betweed those two sentences is the same difference that
exists between saying " I had experience teaching" and "I have had
experience teaching;" namely, the latter implies that the experience
still exists, whereas the former does not.




---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-05-01 21:43:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Green
On Tue, 1 May 2018 07:22:28 -0700 (PDT), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
This is what happens when you get bogged down in technical
distinctions. There are two tense 'families' in English, past and
present. The present perfect is in the former!
Why then does every grammar guide differentiate the two?
Every grammar guide? You've read them all have you?
Post by Robert Green
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
I have had my tea = I completed the meal some time ago.
I have had experience = I completed my experience some time ago.
The reason is, imo, that a distinction exists between the past perfect
"I have had my tea" and the simple past "I had my tea," as the
"I have had lunch" emphasises that my need for food is currently still
satisfied. . . "I had lunch" literally means that in the implied
period of the past I did happen to eat something for lunch, but it
doesn't have any particular implications on the present.
Piffle! There is no obvious distinction between these two answers to the
question, "Are you hungry?"

1) No, I've had lunch, thank-you
2) No, I had lunch, thank-you

Both say, I'm not hungry now because I ate lunch. Both report past
action with present consequence.
Post by Robert Green
The difference betweed those two sentences is the same difference that
exists between saying " I had experience teaching" and "I have had
experience teaching;" namely, the latter implies that the experience
still exists, whereas the former does not.
Fascinating and all but that's not the sentences we're comparing!
Janet
2018-05-01 19:47:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Green
I frequently see people write on their resumes for a teaching job that
they have "a great deal of experience in teaching people" one thing or
another.
A teacher's trade is clear communication. If I was the prospective
employer I'd mark that down as flanneling and a sloppy effort.

Don't all teachers teach people?

His CV surely lists the number and duration of teaching posts; they
alone show whether he has a "great deal" of experience (or not).
Post by Robert Green
It seems to me, however, that the proper way for a person to describe
his or her experience is to omit "in," so that the sentence reads, " I
have a great deal of experience teaching people" this or that thing.
Alternatively, I often wonder whether it would not be even better to
use the present perfect tense by writing, "I have had a great deal of
experience teaching people. . ., " as doing that indicates that the
experience was gained and still exists.
I was therefore wondering which of those sentences people here prefer.
None. I would expect every sentence to give useful information.

" I have 20 years experience teaching Adult Literacy (or

Chemistry in boarding schools/ English as a second language/ Infants/How
to write successful job applications)

Janet.



---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-05-01 21:46:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Janet
Post by Robert Green
I frequently see people write on their resumes for a teaching job that
they have "a great deal of experience in teaching people" one thing or
another.
A teacher's trade is clear communication. If I was the prospective
employer I'd mark that down as flanneling and a sloppy effort.
Don't all teachers teach people?
Well, that's what they're supposed to do but ....
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-05-10 09:27:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Janet
[ … ]
" I have 20 years experience teaching Adult Literacy (or
Chemistry in boarding schools
I was taught chemistry at a boarding school, but now you have me
wondering: do they teach a different sort of chemistry at day schools?
Post by Janet
/ English as a second language/ Infants/How
to write successful job applications)
Janet.
---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com
--
athel
the Omrud
2018-05-10 09:45:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
[ … ]
 " I have 20 years experience teaching Adult Literacy (or
Chemistry in boarding schools
I was taught chemistry at a boarding school, but now you have me
wondering: do they teach a different sort of chemistry at day schools?
I was taught Chemistry in a non-boarding Grammar School. Is that different?
--
David
Peter Moylan
2018-05-10 11:24:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by the Omrud
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Janet
[ … ]
" I have 20 years experience teaching Adult Literacy (or
Chemistry in boarding schools
I was taught chemistry at a boarding school, but now you have me
wondering: do they teach a different sort of chemistry at day schools?
I was taught Chemistry in a non-boarding Grammar School. Is that different?
They suppressed the news for many years, but now it's leaking out:
chemistry is different in different parts of the world. That's why you
always feel a little queasy when travelling abroad.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
the Omrud
2018-05-10 11:44:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
[ … ]
 " I have 20 years experience teaching Adult Literacy (or
Chemistry in boarding schools
I was taught chemistry at a boarding school, but now you have me
wondering: do they teach a different sort of chemistry at day schools?
I was taught Chemistry in a non-boarding Grammar School.  Is that
different?
chemistry is different in different parts of the world. That's why you
always feel a little queasy when travelling abroad.
I think I've become tolerant to the differences across Europe - these
days, I don't feel at all queasy until I leave our own continent.
--
David
J. J. Lodder
2018-05-11 20:19:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by the Omrud
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by the Omrud
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Janet
[ - ]
" I have 20 years experience teaching Adult Literacy (or
Chemistry in boarding schools
I was taught chemistry at a boarding school, but now you have me
wondering: do they teach a different sort of chemistry at day schools?
I was taught Chemistry in a non-boarding Grammar School. Is that different?
chemistry is different in different parts of the world. That's why you
always feel a little queasy when travelling abroad.
I think I've become tolerant to the differences across Europe - these
days, I don't feel at all queasy until I leave our own continent.
That's because of a super-secret Euro-plan from long ago
to pollute all drinking water with standardised Eu-Coli,

Jan
micky
2018-05-12 01:33:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
In alt.usage.english, on Fri, 11 May 2018 22:19:15 +0200,
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by the Omrud
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by the Omrud
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Janet
[ - ]
" I have 20 years experience teaching Adult Literacy (or
Chemistry in boarding schools
I was taught chemistry at a boarding school, but now you have me
wondering: do they teach a different sort of chemistry at day schools?
I was taught Chemistry in a non-boarding Grammar School. Is that different?
chemistry is different in different parts of the world. That's why you
always feel a little queasy when travelling abroad.
I think I've become tolerant to the differences across Europe - these
That's because of the ECC, the European Chemical Community. Their rules
don't apply elsewhere, so you have electrons, ions, free radicals,
militant radicals, and all sort of things flying around.
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by the Omrud
days, I don't feel at all queasy until I leave our own continent.
That's because of a super-secret Euro-plan from long ago
to pollute all drinking water with standardised Eu-Coli,
Jan
--
Please say where you live, or what
area's English you are asking about.
So your question or answer makes sense.
. .
I have lived all my life in the USA,
Western Pa. Indianapolis, Chicago,
Brooklyn, Baltimore.
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-05-10 11:39:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Janet
[ … ]
" I have 20 years experience teaching Adult Literacy (or
Chemistry in boarding schools
I was taught chemistry at a boarding school, but now you have me
wondering: do they teach a different sort of chemistry at day schools?
Of course they teach different chemistry at day schools. They just can't
get the night right!
the Omrud
2018-05-10 11:45:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Janet
[ … ]
" I have 20 years experience teaching Adult Literacy (or
Chemistry in boarding schools
I was taught chemistry at a boarding school, but now you have me
wondering: do they teach a different sort of chemistry at day schools?
Of course they teach different chemistry at day schools. They just can't
get the night right!
I've got some salami in the fridge.
--
David
Janet
2018-05-10 16:45:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
In article <***@mid.individual.net>, ***@imm.cnrs.fr
says...
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Janet
[ ? ]
" I have 20 years experience teaching Adult Literacy (or
Chemistry in boarding schools
I was taught chemistry at a boarding school, but now you have me
wondering: do they teach a different sort of chemistry at day schools?
istr the discussion was about how best to describe one's teaching
experience in a CV. I gave examples.

In my example, the advertised post is in the Chemistry dept of a
boarding school

Janet.
Whiskers
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Green
I frequently see people write on their resumes for a teaching job that
they have "a great deal of experience in teaching people" one thing or
another.
It seems to me, however, that the proper way for a person to describe
his or her experience is to omit "in," so that the sentence reads, " I
have a great deal of experience teaching people" this or that thing.
Alternatively, I often wonder whether it would not be even better to
use the present perfect tense by writing, "I have had a great deal of
experience teaching people. . ., " as doing that indicates that the
experience was gained and still exists.
I was therefore wondering which of those sentences people here prefer.
Thanks very much in advance for your opinions.
Omit the 'in' to seem more educated and literate.
--
^^^^^^^^^^
Whiskers
~~~~~~~~~~


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://usenet.sinaapp.com/
Robert Green
2018-05-01 14:04:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Tue, 1 May 2018 14:35:36 +0100 (GMT+01:00), Whiskers
Post by Whiskers
Omit the 'in' to seem more educated and literate.
Thank you.


---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com
Peter Moylan
2018-05-02 05:45:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Whiskers
Post by Robert Green
I frequently see people write on their resumes for a teaching job that
they have "a great deal of experience in teaching people" one thing or
another.
It seems to me, however, that the proper way for a person to describe
his or her experience is to omit "in," so that the sentence reads, " I
have a great deal of experience teaching people" this or that thing.
Alternatively, I often wonder whether it would not be even better to
use the present perfect tense by writing, "I have had a great deal of
experience teaching people. . ., " as doing that indicates that the
experience was gained and still exists.
I was therefore wondering which of those sentences people here prefer.
Thanks very much in advance for your opinions.
Omit the 'in' to seem more educated and literate.
Either way, I incline to Janet's opinion. Does the sentence say anything
that's not obvious from the list of positions held? Is it, perhaps,
fluff to distract the reader from the fact that the list is not all that
impressive?

When I see "I have had much experience in teaching people" I expect a
follow-on like "... and even more experience in teaching animals".
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Stefan Ram
2018-05-10 11:53:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Green
It seems to me, however, that the proper way for a person to describe
his or her experience is to omit "in," so that the sentence reads, " I
have a great deal of experience teaching people" this or that thing.
»The patient should be encouraged to see a single
physician with an understanding of and, preferably,
experience in treating somatization disorder.«

»However, experience treating patients with
schizophrenia and cocaine dependence do not
support this hypothesis.«

Essentials of Psychiatry - Jerald Kay (2006)

The two quotes show some variance in the usage within
a single book (actually written by two authors).
I'm inclined to see "experience treating" as a "weak form"
of "experience in treating" that gives less weight or
emphasis to the phrase.

»This was my first experience in finding out what the
colour of my skin meant.«

»I have spoken of my own experience in entering the
Hampton Institute.«

(+ 3 more "experience in ...ing" in this work)

Up from Slavery - Booker Taliaferro Washington

Washington always uses "experience in ...ing".

»The group from UCLA recently published their experience
using dynamic half Fourier acquisition«

»In this initial report, they described their experience
treating 60 women with both anterior«

»a 16-year experience performing sacrospinous ligament
suspension procedures at our center«

»Our experience using this colpocleisis procedure in 44
patients«

»Sullivan et al. (62) reported their experience using
what they describe as a«

»Wang reviewed a 3-year experience comparing VCUG and
PPUG to evaluate«

Female Urology, Urogynecology, and Voiding Dysfunction
- Sandip P. Vasavada (editor) (2005)

In the above book, »in« is never used. The comparison of
these two books might hint that certain authors or editors
might make a choice to always use or always omit "in",
which might hint that the usage depends on the region
or time or sociotope or type of work.
Stefan Ram
2018-05-10 12:00:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Stefan Ram
The two quotes show some variance in the usage within
a single book (actually written by two authors).
I'm inclined to see "experience treating" as a "weak form"
of "experience in treating" that gives less weight or
emphasis to the phrase.
»In« also might clarify the meaning:

»He reported his experience using a satellite phone.«.

Did he use a satellite phone to report his experience
of did he report what he had experienced when he was
using a satellite phone?

»He reported his experience in using a satellite phone.«

Now it's more clear: He reported what he had experienced
when he was using a satellite phone.
Kerr-Mudd,John
2018-05-10 15:16:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Stefan Ram
The two quotes show some variance in the usage within
a single book (actually written by two authors).
I'm inclined to see "experience treating" as a "weak form"
of "experience in treating" that gives less weight or
emphasis to the phrase.
»He reported his experience using a satellite phone.«.
Did he use a satellite phone to report his experience
of did he report what he had experienced when he was
using a satellite phone?
»He reported his experience in using a satellite phone.«
Now it's more clear: He reported what he had experienced
when he was using a satellite phone.
Whatever happened to ASCII 0x22? - "text here"
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Loading...