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baby names
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Peter T. Daniels
2017-05-14 13:35:55 UTC
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The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --

Noah and Emma.
Paul Carmichael
2017-05-14 13:45:59 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
Actually, I think 张伟 and 王芳 did a bit better.
--
Paul.

https://paulc.es/
https://asetrad.org
Peter Moylan
2017-05-14 13:57:12 UTC
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Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
Actually, I think 张伟 and 王芳 did a bit better.
When you're the biggest country in the world, you tend to outvote
everyone else.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Peter T. Daniels
2017-05-14 17:30:13 UTC
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Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
Actually, I think 张伟 and 王芳 did a bit better.
--
Paul.
https://paulc.es/
https://asetrad.org
Those would be the Spanish data?
occam
2017-05-15 12:40:18 UTC
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Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
Actually, I think 张伟 and 王芳 did a bit better.
'Mohammad' in The Netherlands (at least in the cities)

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/netherlands/6022588/Mohammed-is-most-popular-boys-name-in-four-biggest-Dutch-cities.html

(sorry, Tinyurl site is not working right now.)
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-05-14 14:35:57 UTC
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On Sun, 14 May 2017 06:35:55 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
In the USA?
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-05-14 14:48:46 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sun, 14 May 2017 06:35:55 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
In the USA?
Of course. Where else is there?
--
athel
Peter T. Daniels
2017-05-14 17:31:12 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sun, 14 May 2017 06:35:55 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
In the USA?
Of course. Where else is there?
I don't see you providing the English or French data.
Sam Plusnet
2017-05-14 19:29:13 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sun, 14 May 2017 06:35:55 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
In the USA?
Of course. Where else is there?
I don't see you providing the English or French data.
No, but if he had supplied that data he would have qualified it.
--
Sam Plusnet
Peter T. Daniels
2017-05-14 19:36:26 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sun, 14 May 2017 06:35:55 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
In the USA?
Of course. Where else is there?
I don't see you providing the English or French data.
No, but if he had supplied that data he would have qualified it.
Of course, because he, notoriously, is associated with both Britain and France.
(And Chile.)
Peter Moylan
2017-05-15 00:53:38 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sun, 14 May 2017 06:35:55 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
In the USA?
Of course. Where else is there?
I think both Noah and Emma would qualify as rare old-fashioned names
around here. I've never met anyone with either name.

On the other hand, the name Emma did have a bit of influence on me when
I was a child. I suppose many of us must still remember the song about
Emma See and Kay Ewi.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Peter T. Daniels
2017-05-15 03:47:05 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sun, 14 May 2017 06:35:55 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
In the USA?
Of course. Where else is there?
I think both Noah and Emma would qualify as rare old-fashioned names
around here. I've never met anyone with either name.
On the other hand, the name Emma did have a bit of influence on me when
I was a child. I suppose many of us must still remember the song about
Emma See and Kay Ewi.
Nope.

Emma Stone, Emma Watson.

NPR's Noah Adams probably doesn't count as a role model.
RH Draney
2017-05-15 08:44:57 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Moylan
I think both Noah and Emma would qualify as rare old-fashioned names
around here. I've never met anyone with either name.
Nope.
Emma Stone, Emma Watson.
And Emma Thompson, who unlike those two is only *slightly* younger than
I....
Post by Peter T. Daniels
NPR's Noah Adams probably doesn't count as a role model.
Noah Wylie might, if you're a librarian....r
Peter T. Daniels
2017-05-15 11:36:44 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Moylan
I think both Noah and Emma would qualify as rare old-fashioned names
around here. I've never met anyone with either name.
Nope.
Emma Stone, Emma Watson.
And Emma Thompson, who unlike those two is only *slightly* younger than
I....
But would she figure in 2016's US naming boom?
Post by RH Draney
Post by Peter T. Daniels
NPR's Noah Adams probably doesn't count as a role model.
Noah Wylie might, if you're a librarian....r
Probably better known from *E.R.* ...
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-05-15 10:19:12 UTC
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On Mon, 15 May 2017 10:53:38 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sun, 14 May 2017 06:35:55 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
In the USA?
Of course. Where else is there?
I think both Noah and Emma would qualify as rare old-fashioned names
around here. I've never met anyone with either name.
I don't think I've ever come across a British Noah.

Emma is an unremarkable name in the UK.

Two in the public eye that come to mind are the TV presenter Emma
Willis:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emma_Willis

and the actress Emma Thompson:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emma_Thompson
Post by Peter Moylan
On the other hand, the name Emma did have a bit of influence on me when
I was a child. I suppose many of us must still remember the song about
Emma See and Kay Ewi.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Jack Campin
2017-05-15 11:08:29 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
In the USA?
Of course. Where else is there?
I think both Noah and Emma would qualify as rare old-fashioned names
around here. I've never met anyone with either name.
I don't think I've ever come across a British Noah.
Emma is an unremarkable name in the UK.
You haven't been keeping up.

https://www.mumsnet.com/baby-names/most-popular-scottish-baby-names

I've never met a Noah either but it can only get more popular
with global warming. Deucalion, Pyrrha and Utnapishtim can't
be far behind.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
e m a i l : j a c k @ c a m p i n . m e . u k
Jack Campin, 11 Third Street, Newtongrange, Midlothian EH22 4PU, Scotland
mobile 07895 860 060 <http://www.campin.me.uk> Twitter: JackCampin
Peter Young
2017-05-15 14:43:12 UTC
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Post by Jack Campin
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
In the USA?
Of course. Where else is there?
I think both Noah and Emma would qualify as rare old-fashioned names
around here. I've never met anyone with either name.
I don't think I've ever come across a British Noah.
Emma is an unremarkable name in the UK.
You haven't been keeping up.
https://www.mumsnet.com/baby-names/most-popular-scottish-baby-names
I've never met a Noah either but it can only get more popular
with global warming. Deucalion, Pyrrha and Utnapishtim can't
be far behind.
And Gilgamesh?

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Ir)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Peter T. Daniels
2017-05-15 15:41:58 UTC
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Post by Peter Young
Post by Jack Campin
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
In the USA?
Of course. Where else is there?
I think both Noah and Emma would qualify as rare old-fashioned names
around here. I've never met anyone with either name.
I don't think I've ever come across a British Noah.
Emma is an unremarkable name in the UK.
You haven't been keeping up.
https://www.mumsnet.com/baby-names/most-popular-scottish-baby-names
I've never met a Noah either but it can only get more popular
with global warming. Deucalion, Pyrrha and Utnapishtim can't
be far behind.
And Gilgamesh?
The story of the "Babylonian Noah" Utnapishtim got stuck into the Gilgamesh Epic.
David Kleinecke
2017-05-15 16:55:45 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Young
Post by Jack Campin
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
In the USA?
Of course. Where else is there?
I think both Noah and Emma would qualify as rare old-fashioned names
around here. I've never met anyone with either name.
I don't think I've ever come across a British Noah.
Emma is an unremarkable name in the UK.
You haven't been keeping up.
https://www.mumsnet.com/baby-names/most-popular-scottish-baby-names
I've never met a Noah either but it can only get more popular
with global warming. Deucalion, Pyrrha and Utnapishtim can't
be far behind.
And Gilgamesh?
The story of the "Babylonian Noah" Utnapishtim got stuck into the Gilgamesh Epic.
The first name "Justice" runs in my mother's family. It seemed
odd to me but the old records show it also spelled "Justus" and,
aha, of Biblical origin.
Richard Tobin
2017-05-15 11:42:17 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
I don't think I've ever come across a British Noah.
It's become quite common in the last 15 years.

-- Richard
Peter Moylan
2017-05-15 17:26:25 UTC
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Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
I don't think I've ever come across a British Noah.
It's become quite common in the last 15 years.
Because of sea level rise?
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Katy Jennison
2017-05-15 12:37:46 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
I don't think I've ever come across a British Noah.
Emma is an unremarkable name in the UK.
I have a great-nephew Noah.

His mother is Emma.
--
Katy Jennison
GordonD
2017-05-14 21:30:57 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
I used to think it was just Bible-thumping Americans who would burden
their child with a name like 'Noah' but it's catching on here as well.
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
Ross
2017-05-14 21:38:57 UTC
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Post by GordonD
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
I used to think it was just Bible-thumping Americans who would burden
their child with a name like 'Noah' but it's catching on here as well.
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
Or maybe dictionary-thumpers?
Tony Cooper
2017-05-14 22:55:42 UTC
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Post by GordonD
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
I used to think it was just Bible-thumping Americans who would burden
their child with a name like 'Noah' but it's catching on here as well.
I doubt if the baby Noahs in the US are named because the parents
picked a Biblical name. It's much more likely that the name was
chosen because some celebrity or celebrity's child has the name.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Cheryl
2017-05-15 01:27:18 UTC
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Post by GordonD
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
I used to think it was just Bible-thumping Americans who would burden
their child with a name like 'Noah' but it's catching on here as well.
Biblical names have been getting more popular here, particularly for
boys, for some time, and most of the parents probably have no religious
affiliation at all. I think it started some 20-30 years back with
"Zachary".
--
Cheryl
Tony Cooper
2017-05-15 01:32:08 UTC
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Post by Cheryl
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
I used to think it was just Bible-thumping Americans who would burden
their child with a name like 'Noah' but it's catching on here as well.
Biblical names have been getting more popular here, particularly for
boys, for some time, and most of the parents probably have no religious
affiliation at all. I think it started some 20-30 years back with
"Zachary".
Not Adam or Eve?
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Cheryl
2017-05-15 10:35:33 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Cheryl
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
I used to think it was just Bible-thumping Americans who would burden
their child with a name like 'Noah' but it's catching on here as well.
Biblical names have been getting more popular here, particularly for
boys, for some time, and most of the parents probably have no religious
affiliation at all. I think it started some 20-30 years back with
"Zachary".
Not Adam or Eve?
Ha! No, modern parents don't seem to be choosing names in Biblical
order. There do seem to be more Adams around than there were when I was
a child, but that wouldn't be hard. I don't think the name Eve has
become very popular recently, although I met a 20-something Marie-Eve,
but she's Quebec French, and I suppose they have different naming
patterns. I did read recently that modern Quebecois parents are more
likely than their parents were to give their children English names. At
one point, the writer said, it was very unpopular to give francophone
children in Quebec English names for political reasons.

For a long time locally, I swear the most popular source of children's
names was the names of daytime soap opera stars.
--
Cheryl
GordonD
2017-05-15 10:46:54 UTC
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Post by Cheryl
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Cheryl
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
I used to think it was just Bible-thumping Americans who would burden
their child with a name like 'Noah' but it's catching on here as well.
Biblical names have been getting more popular here, particularly for
boys, for some time, and most of the parents probably have no religious
affiliation at all. I think it started some 20-30 years back with
"Zachary".
Not Adam or Eve?
Ha! No, modern parents don't seem to be choosing names in Biblical
order. There do seem to be more Adams around than there were when I was
a child, but that wouldn't be hard. I don't think the name Eve has
become very popular recently, although I met a 20-something Marie-Eve,
but she's Quebec French, and I suppose they have different naming
patterns. I did read recently that modern Quebecois parents are more
likely than their parents were to give their children English names. At
one point, the writer said, it was very unpopular to give francophone
children in Quebec English names for political reasons.
For a long time locally, I swear the most popular source of children's
names was the names of daytime soap opera stars.
Hence many ladies in their twenties are called Kylie.
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
Janet
2017-05-15 12:26:55 UTC
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In article <***@mid.individual.net>, ***@med.mun.ca
says...
Post by Cheryl
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Cheryl
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
I used to think it was just Bible-thumping Americans who would burden
their child with a name like 'Noah' but it's catching on here as well.
Biblical names have been getting more popular here, particularly for
boys, for some time, and most of the parents probably have no religious
affiliation at all. I think it started some 20-30 years back with
"Zachary".
Not Adam or Eve?
Ha! No, modern parents don't seem to be choosing names in Biblical
order.
No Matthew, Mark, Luke, John, Daniel, James, Andrew, Aaron, Ben, Jake
< Josh? You do surprise me.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/01/28/biblical-baby-boy-names_n_
4661559.html

Janet.
Cheryl
2017-05-15 12:52:03 UTC
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Post by Janet
says...
Post by Cheryl
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Cheryl
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
I used to think it was just Bible-thumping Americans who would burden
their child with a name like 'Noah' but it's catching on here as well.
Biblical names have been getting more popular here, particularly for
boys, for some time, and most of the parents probably have no religious
affiliation at all. I think it started some 20-30 years back with
"Zachary".
Not Adam or Eve?
Ha! No, modern parents don't seem to be choosing names in Biblical
order.
No Matthew, Mark, Luke, John, Daniel, James, Andrew, Aaron, Ben, Jake
< Josh? You do surprise me.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/01/28/biblical-baby-boy-names_n_
4661559.html
That's jumping clear to the New Testament (well, not including Aaron,
Jacob and Joshua). There do seem to be lots of Aarons and Joshuas
around, but if people are going to start with Adam and Eve, you'd think
they'd pick a lot more of the Old Testament names. I haven't heard of
any Methuselahs, for example, or Cains (people have named babies
Jezebel; why not Cain?) or some of the more obscure ones like Tereh. I
remember Terah because I was in a Bible study group led by a Salvation
Army officer who couldn't believe none of us knew who Terah was. He was
the father of Abraham.

You don't encounter many children named Abraham these days, either, at
least not in English. Ibrahim is pretty common, I think. At one time
locally "Abram" used to be fairly common, although I suspected it was a
mis-spelling for Abraham since I found it in rural areas with
notoriously poor records. But that was back in the 19th century.
--
Cheryl
Peter T. Daniels
2017-05-15 15:15:42 UTC
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Post by Cheryl
Post by Janet
says...
Post by Cheryl
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Cheryl
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
I used to think it was just Bible-thumping Americans who would burden
their child with a name like 'Noah' but it's catching on here as well.
Biblical names have been getting more popular here, particularly for
boys, for some time, and most of the parents probably have no religious
affiliation at all. I think it started some 20-30 years back with
"Zachary".
Not Adam or Eve?
Ha! No, modern parents don't seem to be choosing names in Biblical
order.
No Matthew, Mark, Luke, John, Daniel, James, Andrew, Aaron, Ben, Jake
< Josh? You do surprise me.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/01/28/biblical-baby-boy-names_n_
4661559.html
That's jumping clear to the New Testament (well, not including Aaron,
Jacob and Joshua). There do seem to be lots of Aarons and Joshuas
around, but if people are going to start with Adam and Eve, you'd think
they'd pick a lot more of the Old Testament names. I haven't heard of
any Methuselahs, for example, or Cains (people have named babies
Jezebel; why not Cain?) or some of the more obscure ones like Tereh. I
remember Terah because I was in a Bible study group led by a Salvation
Army officer who couldn't believe none of us knew who Terah was. He was
the father of Abraham.
I've met an oboist named Cain-something (hyphenated first name) and asked him about
it -- he said it was a family name. I didn't pursue it, but I suppose it might be
yet another avatar of "Cohen" (I knew a Bruce Cain in Chicago, and that's what it
was in that case.)
Post by Cheryl
You don't encounter many children named Abraham these days, either, at
least not in English. Ibrahim is pretty common, I think. At one time
locally "Abram" used to be fairly common, although I suspected it was a
mis-spelling for Abraham since I found it in rural areas with
notoriously poor records. But that was back in the 19th century.
But very good Bible skills. "Abraham" was originally "Abram" (and Sarah was originally Sarai).
President Garfield was James Abram Garfield, as is well known to crossword-doers.
Cheryl
2017-05-15 15:33:42 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Cheryl
Post by Janet
says...
Post by Cheryl
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Cheryl
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
I used to think it was just Bible-thumping Americans who would burden
their child with a name like 'Noah' but it's catching on here as well.
Biblical names have been getting more popular here, particularly for
boys, for some time, and most of the parents probably have no religious
affiliation at all. I think it started some 20-30 years back with
"Zachary".
Not Adam or Eve?
Ha! No, modern parents don't seem to be choosing names in Biblical
order.
No Matthew, Mark, Luke, John, Daniel, James, Andrew, Aaron, Ben, Jake
< Josh? You do surprise me.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/01/28/biblical-baby-boy-names_n_
4661559.html
That's jumping clear to the New Testament (well, not including Aaron,
Jacob and Joshua). There do seem to be lots of Aarons and Joshuas
around, but if people are going to start with Adam and Eve, you'd think
they'd pick a lot more of the Old Testament names. I haven't heard of
any Methuselahs, for example, or Cains (people have named babies
Jezebel; why not Cain?) or some of the more obscure ones like Tereh. I
remember Terah because I was in a Bible study group led by a Salvation
Army officer who couldn't believe none of us knew who Terah was. He was
the father of Abraham.
I've met an oboist named Cain-something (hyphenated first name) and asked him about
it -- he said it was a family name. I didn't pursue it, but I suppose it might be
yet another avatar of "Cohen" (I knew a Bruce Cain in Chicago, and that's what it
was in that case.)
Post by Cheryl
You don't encounter many children named Abraham these days, either, at
least not in English. Ibrahim is pretty common, I think. At one time
locally "Abram" used to be fairly common, although I suspected it was a
mis-spelling for Abraham since I found it in rural areas with
notoriously poor records. But that was back in the 19th century.
But very good Bible skills. "Abraham" was originally "Abram" (and Sarah was originally Sarai).
President Garfield was James Abram Garfield, as is well known to crossword-doers.
Yes, but if you were a devout Christian wanting to name a child after
Abraham, wouldn't you use his name in the form it had after it was
changed? Clearly some people didn't think this way in the past, though.
And a lot of children with Biblical names are named after, say, their
Grandfather Moses, not the Biblical Moses.

I don't think many of the modern Noahs and Joshuas are named after
either the Biblical personage or a relative. I think it's just fashion,
like all those Kristas (with all the variations in spellings) that
suddenly appeared some years back.
--
Cheryl
Peter Young
2017-05-15 14:43:54 UTC
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Post by Cheryl
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Cheryl
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
I used to think it was just Bible-thumping Americans who would burden
their child with a name like 'Noah' but it's catching on here as well.
Biblical names have been getting more popular here, particularly for
boys, for some time, and most of the parents probably have no religious
affiliation at all. I think it started some 20-30 years back with
"Zachary".
Not Adam or Eve?
Ha! No, modern parents don't seem to be choosing names in Biblical
order. There do seem to be more Adams around than there were when I was
a child, but that wouldn't be hard. I don't think the name Eve has
become very popular recently, although I met a 20-something Marie-Eve,
but she's Quebec French, and I suppose they have different naming
patterns. I did read recently that modern Quebecois parents are more
likely than their parents were to give their children English names. At
one point, the writer said, it was very unpopular to give francophone
children in Quebec English names for political reasons.
For a long time locally, I swear the most popular source of children's
names was the names of daytime soap opera stars.
I'm not sure I Adam and Eve that.

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Ir)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Quinn C
2017-05-15 18:16:43 UTC
Reply
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Post by Cheryl
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Cheryl
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
I used to think it was just Bible-thumping Americans who would burden
their child with a name like 'Noah' but it's catching on here as well.
Biblical names have been getting more popular here, particularly for
boys, for some time, and most of the parents probably have no religious
affiliation at all. I think it started some 20-30 years back with
"Zachary".
Not Adam or Eve?
Ha! No, modern parents don't seem to be choosing names in Biblical
order. There do seem to be more Adams around than there were when I was
a child, but that wouldn't be hard. I don't think the name Eve has
become very popular recently, although I met a 20-something Marie-Eve,
but she's Quebec French, and I suppose they have different naming
patterns.
Certainly. E.g., I've met three Marie-Eve (various spellings), if
I don't forget any.

Still, a lot of popular names are shared between the US and
Canada, and between the provinces. It's more that Quebec has a few
names that hardly fly elsewhere, like Felix and Florence.

<https://www.todaysparent.com/pregnancy/baby-names/top-baby-names-by-province-2016/>

I'd prefer the statistics to ignore spelling differences, like
French Léa vs. English Leah, or French Zoë vs. English Zoey (and
others.)

Newfoundland has its quirks, too, like very high ranks for Jackson
(m.) and Avery (f.)
--
In the old days, the complaints about the passing of the
golden age were much more sophisticated.
-- James Hogg in alt.usage.english
Cheryl
2017-05-15 18:34:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Quinn C
Post by Cheryl
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Cheryl
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
I used to think it was just Bible-thumping Americans who would burden
their child with a name like 'Noah' but it's catching on here as well.
Biblical names have been getting more popular here, particularly for
boys, for some time, and most of the parents probably have no religious
affiliation at all. I think it started some 20-30 years back with
"Zachary".
Not Adam or Eve?
Ha! No, modern parents don't seem to be choosing names in Biblical
order. There do seem to be more Adams around than there were when I was
a child, but that wouldn't be hard. I don't think the name Eve has
become very popular recently, although I met a 20-something Marie-Eve,
but she's Quebec French, and I suppose they have different naming
patterns.
Certainly. E.g., I've met three Marie-Eve (various spellings), if
I don't forget any.
Still, a lot of popular names are shared between the US and
Canada, and between the provinces. It's more that Quebec has a few
names that hardly fly elsewhere, like Felix and Florence.
My mother was a Florence, but the name is generally considered very
old-fashioned these days. I think I've met one Florence who wasn't of my
mother's generation. She'd probably be in her 40s now.
Post by Quinn C
<https://www.todaysparent.com/pregnancy/baby-names/top-baby-names-by-province-2016/>
I'd prefer the statistics to ignore spelling differences, like
French Léa vs. English Leah, or French Zoë vs. English Zoey (and
others.)
Newfoundland has its quirks, too, like very high ranks for Jackson
(m.) and Avery (f.)
Some of those unfortunate Newfoundland children are going to spend a
large part of their lives spelling their names every time they meet a
new person. I wonder why the other provinces don't seem to have quite so
much variation? I notice Noah is pretty popular everywhere, and so is
Liam. Liam is not unknown here, but we have a lot of people of Irish
ancestry, so I expect it to be common here, but maybe not elsewhere. I
don't think I've actually met either a Jackson (much less a Jaxxon) or
an Avery, although of course a Jack could be Jaxon in formal
circumstances. And Jackson as a surname isn't uncommon.
--
Cheryl
Tony Cooper
2017-05-15 18:40:14 UTC
Reply
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Post by Cheryl
Post by Quinn C
Post by Cheryl
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Cheryl
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
I used to think it was just Bible-thumping Americans who would burden
their child with a name like 'Noah' but it's catching on here as well.
Biblical names have been getting more popular here, particularly for
boys, for some time, and most of the parents probably have no religious
affiliation at all. I think it started some 20-30 years back with
"Zachary".
Not Adam or Eve?
Ha! No, modern parents don't seem to be choosing names in Biblical
order. There do seem to be more Adams around than there were when I was
a child, but that wouldn't be hard. I don't think the name Eve has
become very popular recently, although I met a 20-something Marie-Eve,
but she's Quebec French, and I suppose they have different naming
patterns.
Certainly. E.g., I've met three Marie-Eve (various spellings), if
I don't forget any.
Still, a lot of popular names are shared between the US and
Canada, and between the provinces. It's more that Quebec has a few
names that hardly fly elsewhere, like Felix and Florence.
My mother was a Florence, but the name is generally considered very
old-fashioned these days. I think I've met one Florence who wasn't of my
mother's generation. She'd probably be in her 40s now.
Post by Quinn C
<https://www.todaysparent.com/pregnancy/baby-names/top-baby-names-by-province-2016/>
I'd prefer the statistics to ignore spelling differences, like
French Léa vs. English Leah, or French Zoë vs. English Zoey (and
others.)
Newfoundland has its quirks, too, like very high ranks for Jackson
(m.) and Avery (f.)
Some of those unfortunate Newfoundland children are going to spend a
large part of their lives spelling their names every time they meet a
new person. I wonder why the other provinces don't seem to have quite so
much variation? I notice Noah is pretty popular everywhere, and so is
Liam. Liam is not unknown here, but we have a lot of people of Irish
ancestry, so I expect it to be common here, but maybe not elsewhere. I
don't think I've actually met either a Jackson (much less a Jaxxon) or
an Avery, although of course a Jack could be Jaxon in formal
circumstances. And Jackson as a surname isn't uncommon.
Between my grandson's two baseball teams, they have a Jackson (first
name), an Avery, and a Noah. Not mentioned, but two with the first
name of Aiden. No Jack, but a Jake.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Quinn C
2017-05-15 18:59:44 UTC
Reply
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Post by Cheryl
Post by Quinn C
Newfoundland has its quirks, too, like very high ranks for Jackson
(m.) and Avery (f.)
Some of those unfortunate Newfoundland children are going to spend a
large part of their lives spelling their names every time they meet a
new person. I wonder why the other provinces don't seem to have quite so
much variation? I notice Noah is pretty popular everywhere, and so is
Liam. Liam is not unknown here, but we have a lot of people of Irish
ancestry, so I expect it to be common here, but maybe not elsewhere. I
don't think I've actually met either a Jackson (much less a Jaxxon) or
an Avery, although of course a Jack could be Jaxon in formal
circumstances. And Jackson as a surname isn't uncommon.
My Chinese-Canadian neighbor has Avery as middle name, and
sometimes uses that instead of her first (which is a lot more
conventional in her generation).
--
WinErr 008: Erroneous error. Nothing is wrong.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-05-15 21:28:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Cheryl
Post by Quinn C
Post by Cheryl
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Cheryl
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
I used to think it was just Bible-thumping Americans who would burden
their child with a name like 'Noah' but it's catching on here as well.
Biblical names have been getting more popular here, particularly for
boys, for some time, and most of the parents probably have no religious
affiliation at all. I think it started some 20-30 years back with
"Zachary".
Not Adam or Eve?
Ha! No, modern parents don't seem to be choosing names in Biblical
order. There do seem to be more Adams around than there were when I was
a child, but that wouldn't be hard. I don't think the name Eve has
become very popular recently, although I met a 20-something Marie-Eve,
but she's Quebec French, and I suppose they have different naming
patterns.
Certainly. E.g., I've met three Marie-Eve (various spellings), if
I don't forget any.
Still, a lot of popular names are shared between the US and
Canada, and between the provinces. It's more that Quebec has a few
names that hardly fly elsewhere, like Felix and Florence.
My mother was a Florence, but the name is generally considered very
old-fashioned these days. I think I've met one Florence who wasn't of my
mother's generation. She'd probably be in her 40s now.
There's a younger Florence, aged 30, Florence Welch "English musician,
singer and songwriter, best known as the vocalist of indie rock band
Florence and the Machine".
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Florence_Welch
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Cheryl
2017-05-15 22:27:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Cheryl
Post by Quinn C
Post by Cheryl
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Cheryl
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
I used to think it was just Bible-thumping Americans who would burden
their child with a name like 'Noah' but it's catching on here as well.
Biblical names have been getting more popular here, particularly for
boys, for some time, and most of the parents probably have no religious
affiliation at all. I think it started some 20-30 years back with
"Zachary".
Not Adam or Eve?
Ha! No, modern parents don't seem to be choosing names in Biblical
order. There do seem to be more Adams around than there were when I was
a child, but that wouldn't be hard. I don't think the name Eve has
become very popular recently, although I met a 20-something Marie-Eve,
but she's Quebec French, and I suppose they have different naming
patterns.
Certainly. E.g., I've met three Marie-Eve (various spellings), if
I don't forget any.
Still, a lot of popular names are shared between the US and
Canada, and between the provinces. It's more that Quebec has a few
names that hardly fly elsewhere, like Felix and Florence.
My mother was a Florence, but the name is generally considered very
old-fashioned these days. I think I've met one Florence who wasn't of my
mother's generation. She'd probably be in her 40s now.
There's a younger Florence, aged 30, Florence Welch "English musician,
singer and songwriter, best known as the vocalist of indie rock band
Florence and the Machine".
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Florence_Welch
I had never heard of her.
--
Cheryl
HVS
2017-05-15 22:51:01 UTC
Reply
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Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
There's a younger Florence, aged 30, Florence Welch "English
musician,
Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
singer and songwriter, best known as the vocalist of indie rock band
Florence and the Machine".
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Florence_Welch
I had never heard of her.
Switching from frequency of names, Florence and the Machine are worth
checking out. - really quite good stuff.
--
Cheers, Harvey
CanE (30 years) & BrE (34 years),
indiscriminately mixed
Peter T. Daniels
2017-05-15 03:49:00 UTC
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Post by Cheryl
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
I used to think it was just Bible-thumping Americans who would burden
their child with a name like 'Noah' but it's catching on here as well.
Biblical names have been getting more popular here, particularly for
boys, for some time, and most of the parents probably have no religious
affiliation at all. I think it started some 20-30 years back with
"Zachary".
My cousin's son is Zeke. My mother was exercised that they didn't at least make it "Ezekiel."

His last name starts with W, so he gets to be last whether they use first or last names.
RH Draney
2017-05-15 08:48:03 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
My cousin's son is Zeke. My mother was exercised that they didn't at least make it "Ezekiel."
My official name is "Ronald", but because it was also my father's name,
I was known as "Zebedee" ("Zeb" for short) for the first ten years of my
life....
Post by Peter T. Daniels
His last name starts with W, so he gets to be last whether they use first or last names.
For pub trivia: what 1966 #1 hit song fails to alphabetize by either
title or artist?...(secondary hint: no two lines of the lyrics rhyme)....r
GordonD
2017-05-15 10:43:52 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by Peter T. Daniels
My cousin's son is Zeke. My mother was exercised that they didn't at
least make it "Ezekiel."
My official name is "Ronald", but because it was also my father's name,
I was known as "Zebedee" ("Zeb" for short) for the first ten years of my
life....
Post by Peter T. Daniels
His last name starts with W, so he gets to be last whether they use first or last names.
For pub trivia: what 1966 #1 hit song fails to alphabetize by either
title or artist?...(secondary hint: no two lines of the lyrics rhyme)....r
"96 Tears" by ? and the Mysterians

(though there are many song titles that begin with a number, so maybe not)
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
Peter Moylan
2017-05-16 05:26:23 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by GordonD
Post by RH Draney
For pub trivia: what 1966 #1 hit song fails to alphabetize by either
title or artist?...(secondary hint: no two lines of the lyrics rhyme)....r
"96 Tears" by ? and the Mysterians
(though there are many song titles that begin with a number, so maybe not)
I think "99 Luftballons" was a hit at about that time. Then there was a
Japanese song called something like "Ue o mui aruko", but at least in
Australia that was listed in the romanised form.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Ross
2017-05-16 05:53:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by GordonD
Post by RH Draney
For pub trivia: what 1966 #1 hit song fails to alphabetize by either
title or artist?...(secondary hint: no two lines of the lyrics rhyme)....r
"96 Tears" by ? and the Mysterians
(though there are many song titles that begin with a number, so maybe not)
I think "99 Luftballons" was a hit at about that time. Then there was a
Japanese song called something like "Ue o mui aruko", but at least in
Australia that was listed in the romanised form.
Pretty good recollection: Ue o muite aruko: (Let's walk along looking up),
marketed in my part of the world, absurdly, as "Sukiyaki" -- presumably
some record company's idea of the only Japanese word people would recognize
and be able to pronounce. I seem to recall that, either there was a
misprint on the label, or the radio jocks weren't even smart enough to
pronounce that, and I heard "Sukiyaka" more than once.
Charles Bishop
2017-05-16 18:50:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ross
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by GordonD
Post by RH Draney
For pub trivia: what 1966 #1 hit song fails to alphabetize by either
title or artist?...(secondary hint: no two lines of the lyrics rhyme)....r
"96 Tears" by ? and the Mysterians
(though there are many song titles that begin with a number, so maybe not)
I think "99 Luftballons" was a hit at about that time. Then there was a
Japanese song called something like "Ue o mui aruko", but at least in
Australia that was listed in the romanised form.
Pretty good recollection: Ue o muite aruko: (Let's walk along looking up),
marketed in my part of the world, absurdly, as "Sukiyaki" -- presumably
some record company's idea of the only Japanese word people would recognize
and be able to pronounce. I seem to recall that, either there was a
misprint on the label, or the radio jocks weren't even smart enough to
pronounce that, and I heard "Sukiyaka" more than once.
I was told the Japanese pronunciation of "Sukiyaki" was (very
approximate) - Skee ya ke rather than Soo kee ya ke.

My Japanese is very limited, but I'm mostly understood when I use the
very little I have. Though they could just be polite.
--
charles
Quinn C
2017-05-16 23:47:47 UTC
Reply
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Post by Charles Bishop
Post by Ross
Post by Peter Moylan
I think "99 Luftballons" was a hit at about that time. Then there was a
Japanese song called something like "Ue o mui aruko", but at least in
Australia that was listed in the romanised form.
Pretty good recollection: Ue o muite aruko: (Let's walk along looking up),
marketed in my part of the world, absurdly, as "Sukiyaki" -- presumably
some record company's idea of the only Japanese word people would recognize
and be able to pronounce. I seem to recall that, either there was a
misprint on the label, or the radio jocks weren't even smart enough to
pronounce that, and I heard "Sukiyaka" more than once.
I was told the Japanese pronunciation of "Sukiyaki" was (very
approximate) - Skee ya ke rather than Soo kee ya ke.
Yes, especially in standard/Tokyo pronunciation. As in "a skosh"
(< sukoshi).

Stomu Yamashta wrote his name in a way that produced a result
closer to the original pronunciation than the standard
transkription, Sutomu Yamashita. Hm, I see he was actually
Tsutomu, but I guess he just gave up on getting a ts from English
speakers. Germans would have no problems with Ts- as such, but
Tst- might take a little practise, too.
--
In the old days, the complaints about the passing of the
golden age were much more sophisticated.
-- James Hogg in alt.usage.english
Peter T. Daniels
2017-05-17 03:14:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Quinn C
Post by Charles Bishop
Post by Ross
Post by Peter Moylan
I think "99 Luftballons" was a hit at about that time. Then there was a
Japanese song called something like "Ue o mui aruko", but at least in
Australia that was listed in the romanised form.
Pretty good recollection: Ue o muite aruko: (Let's walk along looking up),
marketed in my part of the world, absurdly, as "Sukiyaki" -- presumably
some record company's idea of the only Japanese word people would recognize
and be able to pronounce. I seem to recall that, either there was a
misprint on the label, or the radio jocks weren't even smart enough to
pronounce that, and I heard "Sukiyaka" more than once.
I was told the Japanese pronunciation of "Sukiyaki" was (very
approximate) - Skee ya ke rather than Soo kee ya ke.
Yes, especially in standard/Tokyo pronunciation. As in "a skosh"
(< sukoshi).
Stomu Yamashta wrote his name in a way that produced a result
closer to the original pronunciation than the standard
transkription, Sutomu Yamashita. Hm, I see he was actually
Tsutomu, but I guess he just gave up on getting a ts from English
speakers. Germans would have no problems with Ts- as such, but
Tst- might take a little practise, too.
A phonetic study of the voiceless vowels in Japanese showed that they really
_aren't_ there; but they _are_ psychologically real. Is it the effect of the
writing system? Is it the effect of morphophonemics?
David Kleinecke
2017-05-17 15:21:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
Post by Charles Bishop
Post by Ross
Post by Peter Moylan
I think "99 Luftballons" was a hit at about that time. Then there was a
Japanese song called something like "Ue o mui aruko", but at least in
Australia that was listed in the romanised form.
Pretty good recollection: Ue o muite aruko: (Let's walk along looking up),
marketed in my part of the world, absurdly, as "Sukiyaki" -- presumably
some record company's idea of the only Japanese word people would recognize
and be able to pronounce. I seem to recall that, either there was a
misprint on the label, or the radio jocks weren't even smart enough to
pronounce that, and I heard "Sukiyaka" more than once.
I was told the Japanese pronunciation of "Sukiyaki" was (very
approximate) - Skee ya ke rather than Soo kee ya ke.
Yes, especially in standard/Tokyo pronunciation. As in "a skosh"
(< sukoshi).
Stomu Yamashta wrote his name in a way that produced a result
closer to the original pronunciation than the standard
transkription, Sutomu Yamashita. Hm, I see he was actually
Tsutomu, but I guess he just gave up on getting a ts from English
speakers. Germans would have no problems with Ts- as such, but
Tst- might take a little practise, too.
A phonetic study of the voiceless vowels in Japanese showed that they really
_aren't_ there; but they _are_ psychologically real. Is it the effect of the
writing system? Is it the effect of morphophonemics?
That's an important enough result to merit a reference. I
hope one is possible.
Peter T. Daniels
2017-05-17 17:33:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
Post by Charles Bishop
Post by Ross
Post by Peter Moylan
I think "99 Luftballons" was a hit at about that time. Then there was a
Japanese song called something like "Ue o mui aruko", but at least in
Australia that was listed in the romanised form.
Pretty good recollection: Ue o muite aruko: (Let's walk along looking up),
marketed in my part of the world, absurdly, as "Sukiyaki" -- presumably
some record company's idea of the only Japanese word people would recognize
and be able to pronounce. I seem to recall that, either there was a
misprint on the label, or the radio jocks weren't even smart enough to
pronounce that, and I heard "Sukiyaka" more than once.
I was told the Japanese pronunciation of "Sukiyaki" was (very
approximate) - Skee ya ke rather than Soo kee ya ke.
Yes, especially in standard/Tokyo pronunciation. As in "a skosh"
(< sukoshi).
Stomu Yamashta wrote his name in a way that produced a result
closer to the original pronunciation than the standard
transkription, Sutomu Yamashita. Hm, I see he was actually
Tsutomu, but I guess he just gave up on getting a ts from English
speakers. Germans would have no problems with Ts- as such, but
Tst- might take a little practise, too.
A phonetic study of the voiceless vowels in Japanese showed that they really
_aren't_ there; but they _are_ psychologically real. Is it the effect of the
writing system? Is it the effect of morphophonemics?
That's an important enough result to merit a reference. I
hope one is possible.
Beckman, M. E. 1982. “Segmental Duration and the ‘Mora’ in Japanese.” Phonetica
39:113–35.

Otake, Takashi, Giyoo Hatano, Anne Cutler, and Jacques Mehler. 1993. “Mora or
Syllable? Speech Segmentation in Japanese.” Journal of Memory and Language
32:258–78.

These are from my article in the Gedenkschrift for Michael Patrick O'Connor,
which will be published any decade now by Eisenbrauns.
David Kleinecke
2017-05-17 19:04:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
Post by Charles Bishop
Post by Ross
Post by Peter Moylan
I think "99 Luftballons" was a hit at about that time. Then there was a
Japanese song called something like "Ue o mui aruko", but at least in
Australia that was listed in the romanised form.
Pretty good recollection: Ue o muite aruko: (Let's walk along looking up),
marketed in my part of the world, absurdly, as "Sukiyaki" -- presumably
some record company's idea of the only Japanese word people would recognize
and be able to pronounce. I seem to recall that, either there was a
misprint on the label, or the radio jocks weren't even smart enough to
pronounce that, and I heard "Sukiyaka" more than once.
I was told the Japanese pronunciation of "Sukiyaki" was (very
approximate) - Skee ya ke rather than Soo kee ya ke.
Yes, especially in standard/Tokyo pronunciation. As in "a skosh"
(< sukoshi).
Stomu Yamashta wrote his name in a way that produced a result
closer to the original pronunciation than the standard
transkription, Sutomu Yamashita. Hm, I see he was actually
Tsutomu, but I guess he just gave up on getting a ts from English
speakers. Germans would have no problems with Ts- as such, but
Tst- might take a little practise, too.
A phonetic study of the voiceless vowels in Japanese showed that they really
_aren't_ there; but they _are_ psychologically real. Is it the effect of the
writing system? Is it the effect of morphophonemics?
That's an important enough result to merit a reference. I
hope one is possible.
Beckman, M. E. 1982. “Segmental Duration and the ‘Mora’ in Japanese.” Phonetica
39:113–35.
Otake, Takashi, Giyoo Hatano, Anne Cutler, and Jacques Mehler. 1993. “Mora or
Syllable? Speech Segmentation in Japanese.” Journal of Memory and Language
32:258–78.
These are from my article in the Gedenkschrift for Michael Patrick O'Connor,
which will be published any decade now by Eisenbrauns.
Thank You. I observe that is not a new idea. But then I do
not really pay attention the phonetics literature.
Richard Tobin
2017-05-16 09:03:48 UTC
Reply
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by GordonD
Post by RH Draney
For pub trivia: what 1966 #1 hit song fails to alphabetize by either
title or artist?...(secondary hint: no two lines of the lyrics rhyme)....r
"96 Tears" by ? and the Mysterians
I think "99 Luftballons" was a hit at about that time.
Only if 1983 is about 1966. I suppose it depends on your perspective.

-- Richard
Quinn C
2017-05-16 16:24:35 UTC
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Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by GordonD
Post by RH Draney
For pub trivia: what 1966 #1 hit song fails to alphabetize by either
title or artist?...(secondary hint: no two lines of the lyrics rhyme)....r
"96 Tears" by ? and the Mysterians
I think "99 Luftballons" was a hit at about that time.
Only if 1983 is about 1966. I suppose it depends on your perspective.
Indeed. Nena is of my generation, and I was barely walking in
1966, so to me it was quite obviously off.
--
Democracy means government by the uneducated,
while aristocracy means government by the badly educated.
-- G. K. Chesterton
Peter Moylan
2017-05-16 17:13:10 UTC
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Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by GordonD
Post by RH Draney
For pub trivia: what 1966 #1 hit song fails to alphabetize by either
title or artist?...(secondary hint: no two lines of the lyrics rhyme)....r
"96 Tears" by ? and the Mysterians
I think "99 Luftballons" was a hit at about that time.
Only if 1983 is about 1966. I suppose it depends on your perspective.
Well, they're both "last century", which is how accurately I can
estimate dates.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Mark Brader
2017-05-16 20:57:39 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Richard Tobin
Only if 1983 is about 1966. I suppose it depends on your perspective.
Well, they're both "last century", which is how accurately I can
estimate dates.
They are? Oh, goodness, so they are. I must update my century.
--
Mark Brader | "What a strange field. Studying beings instead of mathematics.
Toronto | Could lead to recursive problems in logic."
***@vex.net | -- Robert L. Forward (The Flight of the Dragonfly)
Peter T. Daniels
2017-05-15 11:37:44 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by Peter T. Daniels
My cousin's son is Zeke. My mother was exercised that they didn't at least make it "Ezekiel."
My official name is "Ronald", but because it was also my father's name,
I was known as "Zebedee" ("Zeb" for short) for the first ten years of my
life....
An obvious choice?
Post by RH Draney
Post by Peter T. Daniels
His last name starts with W, so he gets to be last whether they use first or last names.
For pub trivia: what 1966 #1 hit song fails to alphabetize by either
title or artist?...(secondary hint: no two lines of the lyrics rhyme)....r
Robert Bannister
2017-05-15 02:12:07 UTC
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Post by GordonD
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
I used to think it was just Bible-thumping Americans who would burden
their child with a name like 'Noah' but it's catching on here as well.
It was popular in France a couple of decades ago.
--
Robert B. born England a long time ago;
Western Australia since 1972
Rich Ulrich
2017-05-15 07:16:30 UTC
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On Mon, 15 May 2017 10:12:07 +0800, Robert Bannister
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
I used to think it was just Bible-thumping Americans who would burden
their child with a name like 'Noah' but it's catching on here as well.
It was popular in France a couple of decades ago.
Yannik Noah was a Frenchman and tennis player who won
the French Open in 1983. And he was an outgoing and
popular guy. That looks to me like the right combination to
lead to babies being named after him.

He has a son who plays pro basketball in the U.S. -
Joakim Noah of the NBA New York Knicks.
--
Rich Ulrich
Ross
2017-05-15 07:43:46 UTC
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Post by Rich Ulrich
On Mon, 15 May 2017 10:12:07 +0800, Robert Bannister
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
I used to think it was just Bible-thumping Americans who would burden
their child with a name like 'Noah' but it's catching on here as well.
It was popular in France a couple of decades ago.
Yannik Noah was a Frenchman and tennis player who won
the French Open in 1983. And he was an outgoing and
popular guy. That looks to me like the right combination to
lead to babies being named after him.
He has a son who plays pro basketball in the U.S. -
Joakim Noah of the NBA New York Knicks.
--
Rich Ulrich
Well, in French-speaking tennis-playing circles, perhaps. But
really, it's all over the place. IMDb will give you lists of
actors and movie/tv characters named "Noah" -- most of them
in the last two decades. This probably reflects an existing
naming-trend that quite a bit earlier than the OP seemed to
assume. Exactly who was the original, I wouldn't venture to
guess, but that would be a place to start if you thought
it was some screen celebrity.

(Note: Not exclusively American -- there are "Noah" characters
in "East Enders", "Home and Away", and ...."Dr. Who" (though
I suppose that might be the Biblical one).
Rich Ulrich
2017-05-16 04:42:44 UTC
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Post by Ross
Post by Rich Ulrich
On Mon, 15 May 2017 10:12:07 +0800, Robert Bannister
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
I used to think it was just Bible-thumping Americans who would burden
their child with a name like 'Noah' but it's catching on here as well.
It was popular in France a couple of decades ago.
Yannik Noah was a Frenchman and tennis player who won
the French Open in 1983. And he was an outgoing and
popular guy. That looks to me like the right combination to
lead to babies being named after him.
He has a son who plays pro basketball in the U.S. -
Joakim Noah of the NBA New York Knicks.
--
Rich Ulrich
Well, in French-speaking tennis-playing circles, perhaps. But
really, it's all over the place.
I think you are under-rating the recognition and influence that
popular athletes have, far beyond their own sports, when their
country decides to be proud of them for their international
achievements.

And they do product endorsements. A few years ago, one of
the highest paid (overall) professional athletes in the world was
the sole Japanese tennis player ever to reach the pro top ten.
Post by Ross
IMDb will give you lists of
actors and movie/tv characters named "Noah" -- most of them
in the last two decades. This probably reflects an existing
naming-trend that quite a bit earlier than the OP seemed to
assume. Exactly who was the original, I wouldn't venture to
guess, but that would be a place to start if you thought
it was some screen celebrity.
(Note: Not exclusively American -- there are "Noah" characters
in "East Enders", "Home and Away", and ...."Dr. Who" (though
I suppose that might be the Biblical one).
--
Rich Ulrich
Quinn C
2017-05-15 18:24:43 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
Quiz: in which country are the most popular names for baby girls
Angel and Princess (2014)?
--
It gets hot in Raleigh, but Texas! I don't know why anybody
lives here, honestly.
-- Robert C. Wilson, Vortex (novel), p.220
Tony Cooper
2017-05-15 18:42:04 UTC
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On Mon, 15 May 2017 14:24:43 -0400, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
Quiz: in which country are the most popular names for baby girls
Angel and Princess (2014)?
"Princess" is not a rare first name for African American girls, but
the Angels in my grandson's class are all male Hispanics.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Paul Carmichael
2017-05-18 09:51:21 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
On Mon, 15 May 2017 14:24:43 -0400, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
Quiz: in which country are the most popular names for baby girls
Angel and Princess (2014)?
"Princess" is not a rare first name for African American girls, but
the Angels in my grandson's class are all male Hispanics.
Here in Very North Africa (south of the Pyrenees) the boy's name is singular and the
female version is the same but plural (Ángel vs Ángeles).
--
Paul.

https://paulc.es/
https://asetrad.org
Quinn C
2017-05-18 12:56:19 UTC
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Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Tony Cooper
On Mon, 15 May 2017 14:24:43 -0400, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
Quiz: in which country are the most popular names for baby girls
Angel and Princess (2014)?
"Princess" is not a rare first name for African American girls, but
the Angels in my grandson's class are all male Hispanics.
Here in Very North Africa (south of the Pyrenees) the boy's name is singular and the
female version is the same but plural (Ángel vs Ángeles).
Looks like a crazy way to differentiate genders, but I'm sure the
latter is short for "Maria de los Angeles".

Just like "Carmen" stems from "Maria del Carmen" (which should
probably really be "del Carmel".) My friend of that name went by
"Maria", though.
--
Bug:
An elusive creature living in a program that makes it incorrect.
The activity of "debugging," or removing bugs from a program, ends
when people get tired of doing it, not when the bugs are removed.
Ross
2017-05-18 21:53:16 UTC
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Post by Quinn C
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Tony Cooper
On Mon, 15 May 2017 14:24:43 -0400, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
Quiz: in which country are the most popular names for baby girls
Angel and Princess (2014)?
"Princess" is not a rare first name for African American girls, but
the Angels in my grandson's class are all male Hispanics.
Here in Very North Africa (south of the Pyrenees) the boy's name is singular and the
female version is the same but plural (Ángel vs Ángeles).
Looks like a crazy way to differentiate genders, but I'm sure the
latter is short for "Maria de los Angeles".
Just like "Carmen" stems from "Maria del Carmen" (which should
probably really be "del Carmel".) My friend of that name went by
"Maria", though.
Or, more closely, "Mercedes".
Ross
2017-05-18 21:55:24 UTC
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Post by Ross
Post by Quinn C
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Tony Cooper
On Mon, 15 May 2017 14:24:43 -0400, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
Quiz: in which country are the most popular names for baby girls
Angel and Princess (2014)?
"Princess" is not a rare first name for African American girls, but
the Angels in my grandson's class are all male Hispanics.
Here in Very North Africa (south of the Pyrenees) the boy's name is singular and the
female version is the same but plural (Ángel vs Ángeles).
Looks like a crazy way to differentiate genders, but I'm sure the
latter is short for "Maria de los Angeles".
Just like "Carmen" stems from "Maria del Carmen" (which should
probably really be "del Carmel".) My friend of that name went by
"Maria", though.
Or, more closely, "Mercedes".
Oh, and "Dolores", too!
Paul Carmichael
2017-05-25 13:06:40 UTC
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Post by Ross
Oh, and "Dolores", too!
Lola.
--
Paul.

https://paulc.es/
https://asetrad.org
RH Draney
2017-05-25 13:17:43 UTC
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Post by Ross
Oh, and "Dolores", too!
Lola.
But since the subject line says "baby names" you need the diminutive:

"Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul. Lo-lee-ta:
the tip of the tongue taking a trip of three steps down the palate to
tap, at three, on the teeth. Lo. Lee. Ta. She was Lo, plain Lo, in the
morning, standing four feet ten in one sock. She was Lola in slacks. She
was Dolly at school. She was Dolores on the dotted line. But in my arms
she was always Lolita."

....r
Peter Moylan
2017-05-26 15:42:17 UTC
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Post by Ross
Oh, and "Dolores", too!
Lola.
A friend of mine has a granddaughter named Lola. When she's mentioned, I
have to struggle not to burst into song.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
GordonD
2017-05-30 08:31:49 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Ross
Oh, and "Dolores", too!
Lola.
A friend of mine has a granddaughter named Lola. When she's mentioned, I
have to struggle not to burst into song.
As a Laurel and Hardy fan the name makes me think of the baying crowd
in the opening scene of 'Way Out West'.
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
Paul Carmichael
2017-05-25 13:05:54 UTC
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Post by Quinn C
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Tony Cooper
On Mon, 15 May 2017 14:24:43 -0400, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
Quiz: in which country are the most popular names for baby girls
Angel and Princess (2014)?
"Princess" is not a rare first name for African American girls, but
the Angels in my grandson's class are all male Hispanics.
Here in Very North Africa (south of the Pyrenees) the boy's name is singular and the
female version is the same but plural (Ángel vs Ángeles).
Looks like a crazy way to differentiate genders, but I'm sure the
latter is short for "Maria de los Angeles".
Not an abbreviation, but based on, maybe:

https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%81ngeles_(nombre)

As for Carmen:

https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carmen_(nombre)
--
Paul.

https://paulc.es/
https://asetrad.org
Mack A. Damia
2017-05-15 21:40:30 UTC
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On Mon, 15 May 2017 14:24:43 -0400, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
Quiz: in which country are the most popular names for baby girls
Angel and Princess (2014)?
South Africa

http://www.timeslive.co.za/sundaytimes/lifestyle/2016/10/27/My-Precious-Angel-is-a-little-Princess-%E2%88%92-SAs-top-10-baby-girl-names
Quinn C
2017-05-15 23:08:32 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
On Mon, 15 May 2017 14:24:43 -0400, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
Quiz: in which country are the most popular names for baby girls
Angel and Princess (2014)?
South Africa
http://www.timeslive.co.za/sundaytimes/lifestyle/2016/10/27/My-Precious-Angel-is-a-little-Princess-%E2%88%92-SAs-top-10-baby-girl-names
Interesting parallel!

The list I picked it up from is for the Philippines:

<http://www.babynamewizard.com/name-list/filipino-girls-names-most-popular-names-for-girls-in-phillipines>

(And I didn't need a spellchecker to write that country name
correctly, as opposed to the page ...)
--
If you kill one person, you go to jail; if you kill 20, you go
to an institution for the insane; if you kill 20,000, you get
political asylum. -- Reed Brody, special counsel
for prosecutions at Human Rights Watch
Ross
2017-05-15 23:51:30 UTC
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Post by Quinn C
Post by Tony Cooper
On Mon, 15 May 2017 14:24:43 -0400, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
Quiz: in which country are the most popular names for baby girls
Angel and Princess (2014)?
South Africa
http://www.timeslive.co.za/sundaytimes/lifestyle/2016/10/27/My-Precious-Angel-is-a-little-Princess-%E2%88%92-SAs-top-10-baby-girl-names
Interesting parallel!
<http://www.babynamewizard.com/name-list/filipino-girls-names-most-popular-names-for-girls-in-phillipines>
(And I didn't need a spellchecker to write that country name
correctly, as opposed to the page ...)
--
If you kill one person, you go to jail; if you kill 20, you go
to an institution for the insane; if you kill 20,000, you get
political asylum. -- Reed Brody, special counsel
for prosecutions at Human Rights Watch
Damn! Philippines is what I was going to guess. (They seem to have
a weakness for the cutesy-kitschy-twee. They're also big on beauty
contests.) What would I have won?
Rich Ulrich
2017-05-16 04:35:19 UTC
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Post by Ross
Post by Quinn C
Post by Tony Cooper
On Mon, 15 May 2017 14:24:43 -0400, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
Quiz: in which country are the most popular names for baby girls
Angel and Princess (2014)?
South Africa
http://www.timeslive.co.za/sundaytimes/lifestyle/2016/10/27/My-Precious-Angel-is-a-little-Princess-%E2%88%92-SAs-top-10-baby-girl-names
Interesting parallel!
<http://www.babynamewizard.com/name-list/filipino-girls-names-most-popular-names-for-girls-in-phillipines>
(And I didn't need a spellchecker to write that country name
correctly, as opposed to the page ...)
--
If you kill one person, you go to jail; if you kill 20, you go
to an institution for the insane; if you kill 20,000, you get
political asylum. -- Reed Brody, special counsel
for prosecutions at Human Rights Watch
Damn! Philippines is what I was going to guess. (They seem to have
a weakness for the cutesy-kitschy-twee. They're also big on beauty
contests.) What would I have won?
Odd Philippines: A couple of months ago, I read a news feature
which happened to claim, among other observations, that
most households had their own karaoke machine.

I also recall reading that, historically, the Philippines had a very
high murder rate, as a side effect of a huge amount of violence
in settling disputes. As I attempt to fact-check that: I see that
in the Philippines, (Wikip)
Article 248 of the Revised Penal Code defines murder as killing
someone other than a family member[1] with any of the following six
circumstances:

Other than a family member? - It does not say more about that.
The listed "six circumstances" generally rule out common disputes; and
Murder is punishable by reclusión perpetua (20 to 40 years'
incarceration).[2] Without any of these six aggravating
circumstances, a killing is instead homicide punishable by
reclusión temporal....


So, I'm guessing that they do have a high rate for murder+
homicide + offing-a-family-member.
--
Rich Ulrich
Tony Cooper
2017-05-16 05:18:20 UTC
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On Tue, 16 May 2017 00:35:19 -0400, Rich Ulrich
Post by Rich Ulrich
Post by Ross
Post by Quinn C
Post by Tony Cooper
On Mon, 15 May 2017 14:24:43 -0400, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
Quiz: in which country are the most popular names for baby girls
Angel and Princess (2014)?
South Africa
http://www.timeslive.co.za/sundaytimes/lifestyle/2016/10/27/My-Precious-Angel-is-a-little-Princess-%E2%88%92-SAs-top-10-baby-girl-names
Interesting parallel!
<http://www.babynamewizard.com/name-list/filipino-girls-names-most-popular-names-for-girls-in-phillipines>
(And I didn't need a spellchecker to write that country name
correctly, as opposed to the page ...)
--
If you kill one person, you go to jail; if you kill 20, you go
to an institution for the insane; if you kill 20,000, you get
political asylum. -- Reed Brody, special counsel
for prosecutions at Human Rights Watch
Damn! Philippines is what I was going to guess. (They seem to have
a weakness for the cutesy-kitschy-twee. They're also big on beauty
contests.) What would I have won?
Odd Philippines: A couple of months ago, I read a news feature
which happened to claim, among other observations, that
most households had their own karaoke machine.
I also recall reading that, historically, the Philippines had a very
high murder rate, as a side effect of a huge amount of violence
in settling disputes. As I attempt to fact-check that: I see that
in the Philippines, (Wikip)
Article 248 of the Revised Penal Code defines murder as killing
someone other than a family member[1] with any of the following six
Other than a family member? - It does not say more about that.
The listed "six circumstances" generally rule out common disputes; and
Murder is punishable by reclusión perpetua (20 to 40 years'
incarceration).[2] Without any of these six aggravating
circumstances, a killing is instead homicide punishable by
reclusión temporal....
So, I'm guessing that they do have a high rate for murder+
homicide + offing-a-family-member.
If you are just guessing, you must not follow the news. There's a
high rate of murder by, all right, just on the order of President
Duterte.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/apr/02/philippines-president-duterte-drugs-war-death-squads

And, guess who's a bigly fan of Duterte?
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-05-16 11:43:12 UTC
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On Tue, 16 May 2017 01:18:20 -0400, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
On Tue, 16 May 2017 00:35:19 -0400, Rich Ulrich
Post by Rich Ulrich
Post by Ross
Post by Quinn C
Post by Tony Cooper
On Mon, 15 May 2017 14:24:43 -0400, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
Quiz: in which country are the most popular names for baby girls
Angel and Princess (2014)?
South Africa
http://www.timeslive.co.za/sundaytimes/lifestyle/2016/10/27/My-Precious-Angel-is-a-little-Princess-%E2%88%92-SAs-top-10-baby-girl-names
Interesting parallel!
<http://www.babynamewizard.com/name-list/filipino-girls-names-most-popular-names-for-girls-in-phillipines>
(And I didn't need a spellchecker to write that country name
correctly, as opposed to the page ...)
--
If you kill one person, you go to jail; if you kill 20, you go
to an institution for the insane; if you kill 20,000, you get
political asylum. -- Reed Brody, special counsel
for prosecutions at Human Rights Watch
Damn! Philippines is what I was going to guess. (They seem to have
a weakness for the cutesy-kitschy-twee. They're also big on beauty
contests.) What would I have won?
Odd Philippines: A couple of months ago, I read a news feature
which happened to claim, among other observations, that
most households had their own karaoke machine.
I also recall reading that, historically, the Philippines had a very
high murder rate, as a side effect of a huge amount of violence
in settling disputes. As I attempt to fact-check that: I see that
in the Philippines, (Wikip)
Article 248 of the Revised Penal Code defines murder as killing
someone other than a family member[1] with any of the following six
Other than a family member? - It does not say more about that.
The listed "six circumstances" generally rule out common disputes; and
Murder is punishable by reclusión perpetua (20 to 40 years'
incarceration).[2] Without any of these six aggravating
circumstances, a killing is instead homicide punishable by
reclusión temporal....
So, I'm guessing that they do have a high rate for murder+
homicide + offing-a-family-member.
If you are just guessing, you must not follow the news. There's a
high rate of murder by, all right, just on the order of President
Duterte.
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/apr/02/philippines-president-duterte-drugs-war-death-squads
And, guess who's a bigly fan of Duterte?
I wonder whether he is a potential recipient of the Trump Award "Pretty
Smart Cookie". That was recently awarded to the Supreme Leader of North
Korea in recognition of his holding on to power by killing potential
opponents.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Peter T. Daniels
2017-05-16 14:05:37 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Tue, 16 May 2017 01:18:20 -0400, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
On Tue, 16 May 2017 00:35:19 -0400, Rich Ulrich
Post by Rich Ulrich
So, I'm guessing that they do have a high rate for murder+
homicide + offing-a-family-member.
If you are just guessing, you must not follow the news. There's a
high rate of murder by, all right, just on the order of President
Duterte.
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/apr/02/philippines-president-duterte-drugs-war-death-squads
And, guess who's a bigly fan of Duterte?
I wonder whether he is a potential recipient of the Trump Award "Pretty
Smart Cookie". That was recently awarded to the Supreme Leader of North
Korea in recognition of his holding on to power by killing potential
opponents.
(including relatives)

Maybe Jared Kushner will be a Smart Cookie.
Peter T. Daniels
2017-05-16 13:37:45 UTC
Reply
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Post by Tony Cooper
On Tue, 16 May 2017 00:35:19 -0400, Rich Ulrich
Post by Rich Ulrich
Odd Philippines: A couple of months ago, I read a news feature
which happened to claim, among other observations, that
most households had their own karaoke machine.
I also recall reading that, historically, the Philippines had a very
high murder rate, as a side effect of a huge amount of violence
in settling disputes. As I attempt to fact-check that: I see that
in the Philippines, (Wikip)
Article 248 of the Revised Penal Code defines murder as killing
someone other than a family member[1] with any of the following six
Other than a family member? - It does not say more about that.
The listed "six circumstances" generally rule out common disputes; and
Murder is punishable by reclusión perpetua (20 to 40 years'
incarceration).[2] Without any of these six aggravating
circumstances, a killing is instead homicide punishable by
reclusión temporal....
So, I'm guessing that they do have a high rate for murder+
homicide + offing-a-family-member.
If you are just guessing, you must not follow the news. There's a
high rate of murder by, all right, just on the order of President
Duterte.
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/apr/02/philippines-president-duterte-drugs-war-death-squads
And, guess who's a bigly fan of Duterte?
Don't forget Erdoğan. Guess who's likely to be extradited in the next few weeks.

ObAUE: Lookit that, extradite and indict have different etyma -- tradire, to
hand over, and dictare, to accuse, frequentative of dicere to say. (The c is
one of those Renaissance hypercorrections like the b in debt and the s in island.)
Charles Bishop
2017-05-16 18:52:43 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
On Tue, 16 May 2017 00:35:19 -0400, Rich Ulrich
Post by Rich Ulrich
Post by Ross
Post by Quinn C
Post by Tony Cooper
On Mon, 15 May 2017 14:24:43 -0400, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
Quiz: in which country are the most popular names for baby girls
Angel and Princess (2014)?
South Africa
http://www.timeslive.co.za/sundaytimes/lifestyle/2016/10/27/My-Precious-
Angel-is-a-little-Princess-%E2%88%92-SAs-top-10-baby-girl-names
Interesting parallel!
<http://www.babynamewizard.com/name-list/filipino-girls-names-most-popular
-names-for-girls-in-phillipines>
(And I didn't need a spellchecker to write that country name
correctly, as opposed to the page ...)
--
If you kill one person, you go to jail; if you kill 20, you go
to an institution for the insane; if you kill 20,000, you get
political asylum. -- Reed Brody, special counsel
for prosecutions at Human Rights Watch
Damn! Philippines is what I was going to guess. (They seem to have
a weakness for the cutesy-kitschy-twee. They're also big on beauty
contests.) What would I have won?
Odd Philippines: A couple of months ago, I read a news feature
which happened to claim, among other observations, that
most households had their own karaoke machine.
I also recall reading that, historically, the Philippines had a very
high murder rate, as a side effect of a huge amount of violence
in settling disputes. As I attempt to fact-check that: I see that
in the Philippines, (Wikip)
Article 248 of the Revised Penal Code defines murder as killing
someone other than a family member[1] with any of the following six
Other than a family member? - It does not say more about that.
The listed "six circumstances" generally rule out common disputes; and
Murder is punishable by reclusión perpetua (20 to 40 years'
incarceration).[2] Without any of these six aggravating
circumstances, a killing is instead homicide punishable by
reclusión temporal....
So, I'm guessing that they do have a high rate for murder+
homicide + offing-a-family-member.
If you are just guessing, you must not follow the news. There's a
high rate of murder by, all right, just on the order of President
Duterte.
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/apr/02/philippines-president-duterte-dr
ugs-war-death-squads
I think Duterte has rescinded his "order", but I'm unsure.
Post by Tony Cooper
And, guess who's a bigly fan of Duterte?
Wasn't Duterte going to visit the White House, and the invitation was
withdrawn, or Duterte said he was much too busy to make the trip?
--
charles
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-05-17 06:13:02 UTC
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Post by Charles Bishop
[ ... ]
I think Duterte has rescinded his "order", but I'm unsure.
And, guess who's a bigly fan of Duterte?
Wasn't Duterte going to visit the White House, and the invitation was
withdrawn, or Duterte said he was much too busy to make the trip?
Maybe he's worried that Trump will do to him what his predecessor did
to Pinochet (who was already half-way across the Pacific when his
official visit was cancelled):

"Marcos' explanation then was that he suddenly had 'urgent' business
outside Manila and therefore could not receive Pinochet" (Washington
Post).

After all, the leader of the free world often has urgent business to
transact in Mar-a-Lago.

On the other hand, maybe Duterte is remembering the number of dictators
who found suddenly that they were no longer dictators when they went
abroad.
--
athel
Richard Bollard
2017-05-18 05:40:15 UTC
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On Tue, 16 May 2017 00:35:19 -0400, Rich Ulrich
Post by Rich Ulrich
Post by Ross
Post by Quinn C
Post by Tony Cooper
On Mon, 15 May 2017 14:24:43 -0400, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
Quiz: in which country are the most popular names for baby girls
Angel and Princess (2014)?
South Africa
http://www.timeslive.co.za/sundaytimes/lifestyle/2016/10/27/My-Precious-Angel-is-a-little-Princess-%E2%88%92-SAs-top-10-baby-girl-names
Interesting parallel!
<http://www.babynamewizard.com/name-list/filipino-girls-names-most-popular-names-for-girls-in-phillipines>
(And I didn't need a spellchecker to write that country name
correctly, as opposed to the page ...)
--
If you kill one person, you go to jail; if you kill 20, you go
to an institution for the insane; if you kill 20,000, you get
political asylum. -- Reed Brody, special counsel
for prosecutions at Human Rights Watch
Damn! Philippines is what I was going to guess. (They seem to have
a weakness for the cutesy-kitschy-twee. They're also big on beauty
contests.) What would I have won?
Odd Philippines: A couple of months ago, I read a news feature
which happened to claim, among other observations, that
most households had their own karaoke machine.
That does not surprise me. I have known a few Filipinos who love the
empty orchestra.
--
Richard Bollard
Canberra Australia

To email, I'm at AMT not spAMT.
Quinn C
2017-05-16 16:24:35 UTC
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Post by Ross
Post by Quinn C
Post by Tony Cooper
On Mon, 15 May 2017 14:24:43 -0400, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
Quiz: in which country are the most popular names for baby girls
Angel and Princess (2014)?
South Africa
http://www.timeslive.co.za/sundaytimes/lifestyle/2016/10/27/My-Precious-Angel-is-a-little-Princess-%E2%88%92-SAs-top-10-baby-girl-names
Interesting parallel!
<http://www.babynamewizard.com/name-list/filipino-girls-names-most-popular-names-for-girls-in-phillipines>
(And I didn't need a spellchecker to write that country name
correctly, as opposed to the page ...)
--
If you kill one person, you go to jail; if you kill 20, you go
to an institution for the insane; if you kill 20,000, you get
political asylum. -- Reed Brody, special counsel
for prosecutions at Human Rights Watch
Damn! Philippines is what I was going to guess. (They seem to have
a weakness for the cutesy-kitschy-twee. They're also big on beauty
contests.) What would I have won?
A packet of tamarind soup base, to balance out all the sweetness.
<Loading Image...>
--
If you kill one person, you go to jail; if you kill 20, you go
to an institution for the insane; if you kill 20,000, you get
political asylum. -- Reed Brody, special counsel
for prosecutions at Human Rights Watch
Ross
2017-05-16 23:30:35 UTC
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Post by Quinn C
Post by Ross
Post by Quinn C
Post by Tony Cooper
On Mon, 15 May 2017 14:24:43 -0400, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
Quiz: in which country are the most popular names for baby girls
Angel and Princess (2014)?
South Africa
http://www.timeslive.co.za/sundaytimes/lifestyle/2016/10/27/My-Precious-Angel-is-a-little-Princess-%E2%88%92-SAs-top-10-baby-girl-names
Interesting parallel!
<http://www.babynamewizard.com/name-list/filipino-girls-names-most-popular-names-for-girls-in-phillipines>
(And I didn't need a spellchecker to write that country name
correctly, as opposed to the page ...)
--
If you kill one person, you go to jail; if you kill 20, you go
to an institution for the insane; if you kill 20,000, you get
political asylum. -- Reed Brody, special counsel
for prosecutions at Human Rights Watch
Damn! Philippines is what I was going to guess. (They seem to have
a weakness for the cutesy-kitschy-twee. They're also big on beauty
contests.) What would I have won?
A packet of tamarind soup base, to balance out all the sweetness.
<http://afodltd.com/images/afodpic/40-034.gif>
Thanks! That's actually quite nice. I used to buy it now and then
when I discovered a Filipino shop in our local downmarket shopping
area.
Quinn C
2017-05-15 19:50:31 UTC
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[this seems to have failed to go out earlier]
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
Not much change in the last few years.

<https://www.ssa.gov/oact/babynames/decades/names2010s.html>

Emma is #1 already, Noah will probably be #1 once 2017 is
included. Emma was #3 in the 2000s.

This is an interesting curve:
<http://nametrends.net/name.php?name=Emma>

The one for Sarah looks similar, just that the second peak is
already over. Noah, OTOH, had never been particularly popular
before in the time covered (since 1880).
--
Manche Dinge sind vorgeschrieben, weil man sie braucht, andere
braucht man nur, weil sie vorgeschrieben sind.
-- Helmut Richter in de.etc.sprache.deutsch
Peter T. Daniels
2017-05-15 20:30:58 UTC
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Post by Quinn C
[this seems to have failed to go out earlier]
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
Not much change in the last few years.
<https://www.ssa.gov/oact/babynames/decades/names2010s.html>
Emma is #1 already, Noah will probably be #1 once 2017 is
included. Emma was #3 in the 2000s.
<http://nametrends.net/name.php?name=Emma>
The one for Sarah looks similar, just that the second peak is
already over. Noah, OTOH, had never been particularly popular
before in the time covered (since 1880).
I just remembered -- Lt. Olivia Benson's adopted son on *L&O: SVU* is Noah. He
seems to be about 3 now -- he occasionally has a line (but he's in far from
every episode).
m***@att.net
2017-05-17 00:07:47 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
From AUE in 1998, and James Follett, on 'Emma', paraphrasing from 'Let's
Speak Strine':

One of the many anecdotes in the book was one about a well-known
British author who visited a Sydney bookshop for a signing session
of his latest work.
`Emma Sidget,' said a woman customer, handing a copy of the book to
the author. He wrote on the end paper: `For Emma...' broke off and asked
her how she spelt Sidget.
`Emma Sidget!' said the woman.
`Yes -- but how do you spell it?'
`EMMA SIDGET!'
At this point another customer explained that the woman was actually
saying: `How much is it?'
--
James Follett -- novelist

I agree with him.
m***@att.net
2017-05-17 00:13:15 UTC
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Post by m***@att.net
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
From AUE in 1998, and James Follett, on 'Emma', paraphrasing from 'Let's
One of the many anecdotes in the book was one about a well-known
British author who visited a Sydney bookshop for a signing session
of his latest work.
`Emma Sidget,' said a woman customer, handing a copy of the book to
the author. He wrote on the end paper: `For Emma...' broke off and asked
her how she spelt Sidget.
`Emma Sidget!' said the woman.
`Yes -- but how do you spell it?'
`EMMA SIDGET!'
At this point another customer explained that the woman was actually
saying: `How much is it?'
--
James Follett -- novelist
I agree with him.
(sorry, I neglected to reference the part where James said it was a favorite of his, from the book)
Ross
2017-05-17 00:19:01 UTC
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Post by m***@att.net
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
From AUE in 1998, and James Follett, on 'Emma', paraphrasing from 'Let's
One of the many anecdotes in the book was one about a well-known
British author who visited a Sydney bookshop for a signing session
of his latest work.
`Emma Sidget,' said a woman customer, handing a copy of the book to
the author. He wrote on the end paper: `For Emma...' broke off and asked
her how she spelt Sidget.
`Emma Sidget!' said the woman.
`Yes -- but how do you spell it?'
`EMMA SIDGET!'
At this point another customer explained that the woman was actually
saying: `How much is it?'
--
James Follett -- novelist
Emma CHISIT, you idiot! How could he possibly have got that so wrong?
Post by m***@att.net
I agree with him.
About what?
m***@att.net
2017-05-17 00:33:25 UTC
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Post by Ross
Post by m***@att.net
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
From AUE in 1998, and James Follett, on 'Emma', paraphrasing from 'Let's
One of the many anecdotes in the book was one about a well-known
British author who visited a Sydney bookshop for a signing session
of his latest work.
`Emma Sidget,' said a woman customer, handing a copy of the book to
the author. He wrote on the end paper: `For Emma...' broke off and asked
her how she spelt Sidget.
`Emma Sidget!' said the woman.
`Yes -- but how do you spell it?'
`EMMA SIDGET!'
At this point another customer explained that the woman was actually
saying: `How much is it?'
--
James Follett -- novelist
Emma CHISIT, you idiot! How could he possibly have got that so wrong?
Post by m***@att.net
I agree with him.
About what?
What I said, following up. If you were signing, there would no
clarification needed, I suppose. Is that the real quote, or are you
calling me an idiot on behalf of Follett??
Ross
2017-05-17 01:29:19 UTC
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Post by m***@att.net
Post by Ross
Post by m***@att.net
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
From AUE in 1998, and James Follett, on 'Emma', paraphrasing from 'Let's
One of the many anecdotes in the book was one about a well-known
British author who visited a Sydney bookshop for a signing session
of his latest work.
`Emma Sidget,' said a woman customer, handing a copy of the book to
the author. He wrote on the end paper: `For Emma...' broke off and asked
her how she spelt Sidget.
`Emma Sidget!' said the woman.
`Yes -- but how do you spell it?'
`EMMA SIDGET!'
At this point another customer explained that the woman was actually
saying: `How much is it?'
--
James Follett -- novelist
Emma CHISIT, you idiot! How could he possibly have got that so wrong?
Post by m***@att.net
I agree with him.
About what?
What I said, following up. If you were signing, there would no
clarification needed, I suppose. Is that the real quote, or are you
calling me an idiot on behalf of Follett??
The original story was apparently published in the Sydney Morning
Herald, 30 November 1964. It is repeated in Afferbeck Lauder, _Let
Stalk Strine_ (Sydney, Ure Smith, 1965, p.9). The British author
was Monica Dickens. With "Chisit", the name is a reasonable
approximation of a broad Australian pronunciation of "How much is it?".
With "Sidget", it is not. The idiot is whoever replaced "Chisit" with
"Sidget", since they apparently failed to get the point of the story, or
have completely loony ideas about Australian pronunciation.

And I still don't get what Follett said that you are agreeing with.
Ross
2017-05-17 01:34:03 UTC
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Post by Ross
Post by m***@att.net
Post by Ross
Post by m***@att.net
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The most popular names for newborns in 2016 were just announced --
Noah and Emma.
From AUE in 1998, and James Follett, on 'Emma', paraphrasing from 'Let's
One of the many anecdotes in the book was one about a well-known
British author who visited a Sydney bookshop for a signing session
of his latest work.
`Emma Sidget,' said a woman customer, handing a copy of the book to
the author. He wrote on the end paper: `For Emma...' broke off and asked
her how she spelt Sidget.
`Emma Sidget!' said the woman.
`Yes -- but how do you spell it?'
`EMMA SIDGET!'
At this point another customer explained that the woman was actually
saying: `How much is it?'
--
James Follett -- novelist
Emma CHISIT, you idiot! How could he possibly have got that so wrong?
Post by m***@att.net
I agree with him.
About what?
What I said, following up. If you were signing, there would no
clarification needed, I suppose. Is that the real quote, or are you
calling me an idiot on behalf of Follett??
The original story was apparently published in the Sydney Morning
Herald, 30 November 1964. It is repeated in Afferbeck Lauder, _Let
Stalk Strine_ (Sydney, Ure Smith, 1965, p.9). The British author
was Monica Dickens. With "Chisit", the name is a reasonable
approximation of a broad Australian pronunciation of "How much is it?".
With "Sidget", it is not. The idiot is whoever replaced "Chisit" with
"Sidget", since they apparently failed to get the point of the story, or
have completely loony ideas about Australian pronunciation.
Checked up the original 1998 thread. Yep, it was Follett. Two or three
people corrected him at the time.
Post by Ross
And I still don't get what Follett said that you are agreeing with.
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